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View Full Version : Does anyone read anymore? or What is your favorite book?



darthvyn
07-05-2002, 07:21 PM
For my 300th post, i thought i would start a new thread, and being a (sort of) bibliophile, i wanted to know what my fellow star wars freaks like to read...

i love anything by kurt vonnegut, except i couldn't get through "player piano" for some reason. everyone should read Slaughterhouse 5, and Sirens of Titan. i think when i rule the world, everyone will have to. Sirens actually answers the meaning of life...

i love anything by chuck palhaniuk, the author of Fight Club, Choke, Invisible Monsters, and Survivor, although i have yet to read Survivor. i have it... somewhere...

so? anyone else? give me some titles that i should read... give everyone else some titles they should read!

LTBasker
07-05-2002, 07:27 PM
Nope, don't read anymore! Err... then why am I here? :D

I don't read alot unless I have to. I've read the whole Young Jedi Knight series, but that's about all I've read at will... :o

stormie
07-05-2002, 07:30 PM
Book-a-week-Bob...my nickname down at the library. Not really, but I, on average, read a book a week...almost like an addiction. ;)

As for good authors, I'd recommend John Irving (I've read and enjoyed all the fiction he's written), Ray Bradbury (another classic author of horror, sci-fi, and just plain old fiction), Arthur C. Clarke and Gregory Benford for sci-fi stuff, and I've just recently read all three of the Civil War suspense offerings by Owen Parry (very enjoyable). So many others to name, but those are just a few. :D

Jonna
07-05-2002, 11:33 PM
Thank God there is someone else that actually reads out there. For those that don't, here are some brilliant books:

God and the New Physics
The tao of Physics
A Brief history of Time
Figments of Reality
The search for Super strings, Symmetry and the Theory of Everything
Schodinger's Kittens and the Search for Reality
Engines of creation
Realms of the human Unconscious
The White Hotel
The Stranger
The Fall
A Happy Death
Zarathustra
Adventures in the skin Trade.....


I'm getting tired of writing so:
Anything by Goethe, Camus, Einstein, Rimbaud, Nietzsche, Jung, Sartre, Spinoza, Kierkegaard, Artaud, etc.

I wish that I had my bookcases in this room; this post would be several pages long.

Jonna
07-05-2002, 11:42 PM
Alright these are the best pieces of literature ever written.

A Happy Death by Albert Camus
Thus Spoke Zarathustra by Nietzsche
A Season In Hell by Arthur Rimbaud

Honorable mention off the top of my head:
The White Hotel by Dylan Thomas
Faust by Goethe
The Sorrows of Young Werther by Goethe

Dark Knight
07-05-2002, 11:50 PM
Anything by

Marget Weis and Tracy Hickman
(Death Gate series, Dragon Lance) .

R.A. Salvatore
(Icewind Dale trilogy)

I'm in the middle of reading of Alice Borchardt Trilogy

Oh yea, any Star Wars books:crazed:

Nebulaz
07-06-2002, 12:02 AM
Right now i'm tackling the New Jedi Order series. but anything starwars.

Eternal Padawan
07-06-2002, 12:56 AM
I'm reading Orson Scott Card's trilogy right now. Speaker For the Dead, Xenocide, and Children of the Mind. I just started Xenocide.

Everybody should read Tolkein once. I've read the trilogy twice now. It was even better the second time. I'm a big fan of Larry McMurtry. Lonesome Dove is the best western book I've read in years. I like Tom Clancy too, but after awhile all his characters start sounding the same.

Chelsea Quinn Yarbro's St. Germaine chronicles.
Piers Anthony (particularly Xanth and Incarnations of Immortality)
Crichton is good for quick reads.
Mike Nelson's Mind over Matters is a funny humorist book.
Stephen Ambrose's WWII books (D-Day, Citizen Soldier, Band Of Brothers, Wild Blue, etc) are amazing historical roadmaps.

Like Jonna said, there's so much out there, just pick up a book and start reading. I was telling madubon the other day to pick historical military geniuses and read biographies about them. Fascinating chaps, military guys.

Sometimes I get depressed because there's so much out there, you could spend 24-7-365 reading, reading, reading, and not even scratch the surface of what's good out there...think of all the great literature you will miss out on in your lifetime. :sad: :(

jjreason
07-06-2002, 01:29 AM
I enjoy reading as well. Im currently plodding through Vector Prime, and wish I hadn't bothered starting. It's always that way for me and SW books. I did like the Thrawn trilogy by Zahn for the most part. I read the novelization of Star Wars when I was in Grade 1!
I like Stephen King (the mastermind of modern cursing) and am just past halfway in Insomnia. Probably the best one of his I've read in the past 5 or 6.
I like Tom Clancy, but I went on a 4 book stint of his and had to take a break. Ill go back and pick up after Sum of all Fears one day. His non fiction book about the Marine Expeditionary Unit was pretty cool.
I like Tolkien, although I've only been through the Hobbit and LOTR. I agree, everyone should get through them. The size is daunting, but I did see a boxed set of 5 smaller volumes instead of the usual 3. Probably more accessible for kids.
I've enjoyed all 4 Harry Potter books by JK Rowling.
I've enjoyed most of what I've read by Michael Crichton and John Grisham. Im going to try Ludlum's Bourne trilogy again soon, I got stuck the first time. I need copies with larger print than the last ones. Nothing like reading one page for 20 min. (I got sick of that in University!).
I also like to read a military book here and there, most recently "The One that got away" and "Bravo 2 zero" by two British SAS soldiers that got compromised in Iraq. Great, great reading. I can't find a copy of Black Hawk Down anywhere, but when I do I will read it straight away.
I like to read biographies of sports figures, although my latest, Joe Dimaggio by Ben Cramer, has me bogged down and stuck. Quite dry, but Im working at it.
I read many, many, many comic books by various publishers but highly recommend Warren Ellis' work in any facet, old trade paperbacks of Preacher by Garth Ennis and Sandman by Neil Gaiman, anything by Frank Miller, and classic Marvel stories by Stan Lee.
I pretty much have something on the go in terms of reading all the time.

Hasbro'sBountyHunter
07-06-2002, 02:16 AM
All 4 Harry Potter books!

Jargo
07-06-2002, 03:22 AM
Never read any non movie star wars books but I read and re-read the movie novellisations of the original trilogy quite regularly.

Mostly I read Terry Pratchetts books, thought provoking comedy fantasy stuff. Laced with pathos and stunning observations about the world we live in while retaining the best kind of fantasy romp. At over 26 books in the series it's become something of a ritual to go and find the latest every year. Can honestly say I've never read anything better.

Also read harry Harrisons Stainles steel rat series. Historical books, books on archeology and books that explore the history of myth and religion and ancient cultures. Read the dictionary quite a bit, books on slang and the origins of words, I'm quite partial to books on cartography (maps) throughout the ages, As an actor I've read thousands of playscripts and delved into Shakespeares works more times than i care to mention. Winnie the Pooh is a favourite, Charlottes web, Asterix the Gaul, Charles Dickens works are a heavy read but worthwhile to enrich ones language.
Poetry is something I've been interested in for a long time and I read many books of poetry from ancient to modern.

Quite honestly, if there's a book on the table I'll pick it up and delve into it but if it doesn't grip me by the end of the first chapter I'm prone to put it down and not pick it up again for many a moon. I plan on saving many books until I reach my autumn years and then sit forever reading.

plasticfetish
07-06-2002, 04:14 AM
This is a good one. Hmmm ...

I read obsessively up until college ... when I was FORCED to read Obsessively. After that it all dried up. Early on it was anything to do with science fiction ... someone said Vonnegut and Bradbury. I read anything from Asimov's "I, Robot" to the Larry Niven "Ringworld" trilogy. (I suppose the 60's and 70's Sci-fi books had a big influence on my taste in movies). Even before those ... yeah the Tolken books and at one point the original Grail stories (I'm not sure which Jr. High librarian I was trying to impress with that.) Later and much later ... I would just pick an author and read as many books as I could find. Anthony Burgess ... I think I lived through most. W. Somerset Maugham ... I read a quite a few. Once I was in college I read as much as I could "pound down" in 5 years ... I think I managed to sneak in all of the James Bond books plus a travel book Ian Fleming wrote just to avoid reading my assigned books though.

Now, it's pretty much "informative" type art books or books with lots of bright colorful pictures.
Instructional books and manuals are about all I can squeeze in (yawn). I think somebody mentioned squirreling books away for their old age ... I suppose that's what we all should do.

I do have a four/five year old son though ... and I have to admit, I've read the "I Am a Jedi Apprentice" kids book (what seems like) a million times. Proving ... that the Star Wars kids books are a total nightmare. I've been forced to just make stuff up so I wont doze off. Hah ... I should just start reading him "Brave New World" (which more and more seems like the most important book I ever read) at night to freak out his kindergarten teachers.

Lman316
07-06-2002, 08:18 AM
Love to read. To me, it's better than television, and I would gladly give the "idiot box" up some day for reading. I have in the past, but it's hard to escape it when your house has 5 of 'em.
But as far as what I like: Stephen King, Michael Crichton, Jeffery Deaver, and a few other fiction writers...right now, I'm stuck on the names of the authors who wrote Hannibal (and The Silence of the Lambs, Red Dragon) and the guy who wrote Along Came A Spider (and his series with Alex Cross). I think the latter is named Patterson, but for the life of me I can't remember his first.
I'm heavy on the fiction because, in all truth, I can get enough non-fiction in life. Some non-fiction is okay, like right now I'm going back and forth between Stephen King's Carrie and a book called: Basic Teachings of the Great Philosophers. And I know I can do two at the same time, as long as I read the fiction more, because I find it easier to get back into non-fiction than it is to get back into fiction. Facts are sometimes easier to remember than a good story.
I'm definitely getting started on another of my "reading kicks", and in a little while I'll probably be craving any good fiction story that looks interesting. I'm mostly into horror and the sci-fi stuff, but if it looks good, I'll usually give it a chance. Ah, gotta love those blurbs.

End...

darthvyn
07-06-2002, 12:06 PM
Originally posted by plasticfetish
I should just start reading him "Brave New World" (which more and more seems like the most important book I ever read) at night to freak out his kindergarten teachers.

holy crap, how could i forget this one??? a book written in the 30's that couldn't be more poigniant today... cloning, dissolution of family, government sactioned drug use, rampant promiscuity...

Brave New World, by Aldous Huxley

in that same vein, 1984 is also really great, although suffers from the title as timeline... perhaps a special edition re-named 2084???

also, if anyone is an artist, writer, mechanic, wanderer, free-thinker, or madman, then they should read

Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance, An Inquiry into Values

by Robert M. Pirsig... this book will change your life, and if everyone read it, would change the world, but alas, very few people read anymore...

which is why i'm so delighted to see so many posts in this thread! i thought it was a good idea to start this thread, but then i figured it would get buried because no one reads anymore... keep the suggestions coming... i'm getting that hunger that only abstract symbols on flattened and bleached tree flesh can sate!

Exhaust Port
07-06-2002, 12:26 PM
Originally posted by Jonna
Thank God there is someone else that actually reads out there. For those that don't, here are some brilliant books:

God and the New Physics
The tao of Physics
A Brief history of Time
Figments of Reality
The search for Super strings, Symmetry and the Theory of Everything
Schodinger's Kittens and the Search for Reality
Engines of creation
Realms of the human Unconscious
The White Hotel
The Stranger
The Fall
A Happy Death
Zarathustra
Adventures in the skin Trade.....


I'm getting tired of writing so:
Anything by Goethe, Camus, Einstein, Rimbaud, Nietzsche, Jung, Sartre, Spinoza, Kierkegaard, Artaud, etc.

I wish that I had my bookcases in this room; this post would be several pages long.

Jonna, I love non-fiction science books especially those dealing with physics and astrophysics. On your "anything by" list I would like to add: Carl Sagan, Steven Hawking and Kip Thorn (provided the tech. support for Carl Sagan when writing "Contact"). Great stuff. Nothing makes me more in awe of our existance than reading this kind of stuff.

Obi-Don
07-06-2002, 02:10 PM
I believe my favorite is Ender's War. I have read all of the Star Wars except a few and waiting on the next one in the New Jedi Order to come out. I also love the Dragonriders of Pern books.

conli olper
07-06-2002, 02:23 PM
theres this book, 'the magus' by john fowles. you should check it out.

Mandalorian Candidat
07-06-2002, 07:39 PM
We've done this in a similar thread about a month or two ago so I won't go specifically into my choices but I started reading Grisham's The Summons. I got half-way through it about two weeks ago. I wasn't able to finish it because it was my sis-in-law's and she had to return it to the library. So I'm just waiting on the hold list at the library for my turn.

I really like Grisham's style. He, like Crichton, make even the mundane details seem interesting.

QLD
07-06-2002, 08:45 PM
I don't read non-SW books as often as I like, but occasionally I do.

I love Farenheit 451 though.

InsaneJediGirl
07-06-2002, 09:01 PM
Bradbury books are always good.They have a nice blend of SciFi and Horror(Sometimes).

"TheHot Zone" is a great book if your into Science/Medical Stuff.Its a true story,about the Goverment and what tests they
do on deadly diseases.

I cant remember the title,but a good book is something to do with the Real Men In Black.Dating back to the early 1900s or some where in that time period.

All 4 Harry Potter books were great.

Of course..Starwars books are good too.Visions of the Future/Specter of the Past are 2 of my favs.:D :D :D

darthvyn
07-06-2002, 09:42 PM
Originally posted by InsaneJediGirl
I cant remember the title,but a good book is something to do with the Real Men In Black.Dating back to the early 1900s or some where in that time period.

are you referring to the book "behold a pale horse"? that book was written by an ex-CIA guy, and any place that sells it has to take your social security #...

InsaneJediGirl
07-06-2002, 10:05 PM
Originally posted by darthvyn
are you referring to the book "behold a pale horse"? that book was written by an ex-CIA guy, and any place that sells it has to take your social security #...

No.I found the title..its called "The Ufo Silencers: Mystery of the Men in Black"No SS Number needed,just order it off of Amazon.

Lowly Bantha Cleaner
07-06-2002, 10:31 PM
I am currently reading a book that came out a few years ago, written by David Halberstam (one of the many names of authors that has surfaced over the past few months accused of plagarizing) titled The Children. The book is about the early days of the Civil Rights Movement, focusing on Nashville Tennessee and the start of SNCC (Student Non-Violent Coordinating Committee) a Civil Rights group made up of young college students under the direction of the minister Jim Lawson.

This book gives great insight to what life was like for African-Americans in America. It is hard to believe that as little as 40 years ago, that blacks were often denied basic rights such as using the same public facilities as whites and voting (among others). It took years of legal rulings to finally strike down the Jim Crow laws that various localities had that denied blacks these rights. Enforcing it was another matter. It took direct action from blacks in order for these rulings to be heeded. And as the title of the book implies, it was the younger generation of blacks, the "children" that were driving force, often at the forefront of the marches, boycotts, and sit-ins whether they were in Nashville, Birmingham, Selma or Mississippi. It is a great read and one that I recommend strongly for it tells of a dark chapter in American history and how just a handful of it's young citizens strived for change using only nonviolent tactics and civil disobedience. If you want proof that simply turning the other cheek when you are directly under fire can work, then read this book.

anarky
07-08-2002, 02:03 PM
thomas jefferson said something about books--but i don't remember it--so i won't quote it

i'm currently reading the adventures of kavalier and clay by michael chabon--about a couple of guys who make a comic book in the golden age of comics--it won the pulitzer prize last year, i think--excellent read so far

Jedi Knightrider
07-08-2002, 07:05 PM
I read a lot of technical manuals - stuff like how those TV's in the dashboard could actually work and stuff.

I also have a couple of scripts from Knightrider that i read every week. I pick one, not all of them each week.

Forhekset
07-09-2002, 07:51 AM
I read a lot, as much as I can fit into my spare time. Some of my favorite authors are Frank Herbert, William Faulkner, Ray Bradbury, H.G. Wells, Henry James, Franz Kafka, Friedrich Nietzsche, Cormack McCarthy, Tolkien...that's all I can really think of off the top of my head. One of the best books I've ever read is "Blood Meridian" by McCarthy. I also like "The Stranger" by Albert Camus quite a bit.

gibbspaulus
07-09-2002, 10:33 AM
Wow - some heavy works in there from you guys.

I'm in a dull mood so here's a list

War Of The Worlds - H G Wells (Always re-reading it and finding new things)
When Worlds Collide - Wylie and Baumer (Can't spell - and I want the sequel)
DAy Of The Triffids - John Wyndham

(can you spot the post apocolyptic thing going on here)

Harry Potter Series - JK Rowling
Tales Of The City Series - Armistead Maupin
Virgin / BBC Doctor Who New Adventures
Maureen Lipman (comedienne / actress) writes some good anecdotal stuff, as does Ellen Degeneres.


That's it (for now)

lunchymeatball
07-09-2002, 10:53 AM
I read every day to and from work.
Favorite Author; Neil Gaiman
If I had to chose five books to recommend;

American Gods- Neil Gaiman
An excellent book, I love the way Gaiman tells stories within stories within stories.
1984 - George Orwell
One of the best books I have read. Bleak.
Trainspotting - Irvine Welsh
So much better than the film. Not for the easily shocked (if you are looking for sickness try "Filth" SICK but good.
Dune Heretics - Frank Herbert
A big fan of the Dune series. Heretics IMO is the best.
Stardust - Neil Gaiman
An excellent fairytale. I never get bored with this book.

I am currently re-reading "The Mallorean" series by David Eddings.

:)

robman71
07-09-2002, 11:31 AM
My all time favorite "book" is the LOTR series. I have read all of Tolkeins works and continue to reread them about every three years. I have also been reading the Wheel of Time series by Robert Jordan and a lot of H. P. Lovecraft as of late.

Jonna
07-09-2002, 11:53 AM
As far as horrror writers go, I have to agree with robman71. Lovecraft was quite innovative. A million times better than King.

billfremore
07-09-2002, 11:56 AM
Originally posted by Jonna
Thank God there is someone else that actually reads out there. For those that don't, here are some brilliant books:

God and the New Physics
The tao of Physics
A Brief history of Time
Figments of Reality
The search for Super strings, Symmetry and the Theory of Everything
Schodinger's Kittens and the Search for Reality
Engines of creation
Realms of the human Unconscious

I'm getting tired of writing so:
Anything by Goethe, Camus, Einstein, Rimbaud, Nietzsche, Jung, Sartre, Spinoza, Kierkegaard, Artaud, etc.

I wish that I had my bookcases in this room; this post would be several pages long.

You will let me know when you've finished building your time machine, won't you?

I am currently enjoying the Fletch series of books by Gregory McDonald.

Forhekset
07-09-2002, 11:59 AM
Lovecraft was great. I think Stephen King sucks bad. The guy just isn't a good writer.

MikeAndTheBots
07-09-2002, 11:59 AM
I'm suprised no one else mentioned the Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy and its various sequals (written by Douglas Adams). Those book were great.

Jonna
07-09-2002, 12:06 PM
Originally posted by billfremore


You will let me know when you've finished building your time machine, won't you?

Ya, you laugh now, but just wait till I build a teleporter and you start getting smacked with a wet fish out of thin air.



I am currently enjoying the Fletch series of books by Gregory McDonald.

Are you joking!?! You don't really mean that they wrote books for the movie, do you? That movie was so bad it was good.:D

DarthBrandon
07-09-2002, 12:28 PM
No One Here Gets Out Alive, the biography of Jim Morrison.

billfremore
07-09-2002, 12:45 PM
Originally posted by Jonna

Ya, you laugh now, but just wait till I build a teleporter and you start getting smacked with a wet fish out of thin air.


I was wondering what that noise was.


Are you joking!?! You don't really mean that they wrote books for the movie, do you? That movie was so bad it was good.:D

Actually the books came first before the movie.
Did you know there will be a new Fletch movie coming next year directed by Kevin Smith and starring Jason Lee?

warren
07-09-2002, 11:07 PM
I personally is more towards sci fi and fantasy books ....

LOTR is the best yet,:D
also Raymond E. Feist Riftwar Saga. You should try reading it ... very imaginative and interesting book .... ;)
David Gemmel Legend
David Eddings The Mallorean and The Belgariad
R A Salvatore The Dark Elf Trilogy is superb:p
Dragon Lance is also very entertaining

Michael Crichton The Eaters of the Dead is good
Red Storm Rising was not bad ....
Star Wars of course .....

well ..... the list is very long if I continue to write ......:crazed:

master jedi
07-10-2002, 07:14 PM
I like The Hobbit and Lord of the Rings books. I also like books on cryptozoology, books on UFS/things from space, and books on the paranormal.

Darth Nitwit
07-10-2002, 10:40 PM
I liked almost all of the Star wars Books, as I have read all of them.

darthvyn
08-17-2002, 04:20 PM
for my 500th post, i wanted to revive this thread... right now i'm reading chuck palhaniuk's novel survivor

he wrote fight club, invisible monsters, and choke. this is the only work by him so far that i've not read.

i also started to read confederacy of dunces, but i actually forgot that i'd been reading it, and started survivor (duh!)

bigbarada
08-17-2002, 07:35 PM
Well, I recommend Tolkien to everyone: The Hobbit, LOTR, The Silmarillon, Book of Lost Tales, etc.

Any other fans of Tolkien checked out The War of the Ring series by Christopher Tolkien? From what I understand, it is merely a compilation of some of Tolkien's old notes and not a cohesive story.

I also recommend C.S. Lewis' The Chronicles of Narnia. Awesome books.

I feel kind of silly listing comic books with all these heavy titles being tossed around, but:

The Watchmen by Alan Moore and Dave Gibbons
The Dark Knight Returns by Frank Miller
Marvels by Kurt Busiek and Alex Ross
Kingdom Come by Busiek and Ross
Bone by Jeff Smith
Maus I & II by Art Spiegelman

Anybody who claims that comic books aren't true literature should check out those titles.