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View Full Version : I hate Eminem...



Yar Cydoh
07-09-2002, 10:27 PM
...but his new song has a good beat to it. What do you think?
I really hate rap but this song just gets to me. :)

LTBasker
07-09-2002, 10:33 PM
Eminem sucks IMO. Only reason why the beat is good is cause it's rap and they don't actually make it. ;)

Dar' Argol
07-09-2002, 10:45 PM
I actually like Eminem:rolleyes:. Its refreshing that all of his albums have a different sound to them. One of the other things I really like is the fact that he hasn't forgotton that he is WHITE!! He's not trying to be another Vanilla Ice or the reverse, a Wacko Jacko:D.

I really like the new CD too! Where I had to spik 1 song on the last CD b/c I really didn't care for it, and I did the same to the one before that as well, I haven't had to skip on yet. And the song he does for his daughter "Hailey's Song" is really touching. It helps that MY daughters name is the same. Of course the one he does WITH his daughter, "My Dad's Gone Crazy", is just funny!!! You can tell by his voice he had a lot of fun doing that song:D

I wonder if Hailey calls Dr. Dre, "Uncle Dre"?????:D

DeadEye
07-09-2002, 11:26 PM
I don't care for rap at all.

MikeAndTheBots
07-09-2002, 11:39 PM
Originally posted by DeadEye
I don't care for rap at all.
Ditto. Eminem himself seems pretty funny but most of his music just seems to be an attention getter. I've seen better rappers and I don't even like rap.

DeadEye
07-09-2002, 11:45 PM
Rap, and most music for that matter, is a repetitive jumble of guitar stringing and profanity. :frus:

Hasbro'sBountyHunter
07-10-2002, 12:01 AM
I don't mind Eminem.

DeadEye
07-10-2002, 12:17 AM
Different strokes for different folks, I always say. :D

Jedi Juice
07-10-2002, 12:37 AM
Well, I enjoy rap music, but I don't care for Eminem. I just don't like his style of rap and, well, I don't like his music. But that's just me. I guess I prefer southern rap, like Cash Money or No Limit.

DeadEye
07-10-2002, 09:03 AM
N-O-L-I-M-I-T, that's the way it ought to be. :D

Not really.

lunchymeatball
07-10-2002, 10:20 AM
I don't hate him.
I don't like him either.
I just don't think about him then it doesn't bother me.

Jonna
07-10-2002, 10:27 AM
I'm with lunchymeatball!

billfremore
07-10-2002, 10:51 AM
I enjoy some of his music but then again I also enjoy Tennessee Ernie Ford.

morecow299
07-10-2002, 12:40 PM
i hate rap and i don't care for eminem

Capitan_Moroni
07-10-2002, 01:00 PM
I dont like him. Any guy thats gonna sing about killing his girlfriend or rapeing his mom has serious issues.

jeddah
07-10-2002, 01:53 PM
Whiny wigger

DarthBrandon
07-10-2002, 02:01 PM
I don't mind Eminem. I like some of his tunes ( rap songs ) while others are just crap. I also like Gordon Lightfoot if that tells you anything.

billfremore
07-10-2002, 02:33 PM
Well I'm glad people are quantifying why they don't like Eminem. :rolleyes:

I resolve to do the same from now on. :p

Dar' Argol
07-10-2002, 03:33 PM
Originally posted by Capitan_Moroni
I dont like him. Any guy thats gonna sing about killing his girlfriend or rapeing his mom has serious issues.

See, this is why he does that, to get a reaction out of you. Like he stated in the opening minute of his "Criminal" song off the "Marshall Mathers LP":


A lot of people ask me.. stupid [EDITED] questions
A lot of people think that.. what I say on records
or what I talk about on a record, that I actually do in real life
or that I believe in it
Or if I say that, I wanna kill somebody, that..
I'm actually gonna do it
or that I believe in it
Well, [EDITED].. if you believe that
then I'll kill you

He then goes on to say in "The Eminem Show" on the song "Sing for the Moment" he says:

If I'm such a [EDITED] menace, this [EDITED] doesn't make sense B
It's all political, if my music is literal, and I'm a criminal how the [EDITED] can I raise a little girl?
I couldn't. I wouldn't be fit to

I also love how everyone just says, "I hate eminem" but really gives no reason as to why:rolleyes:

Yar Cydoh
07-10-2002, 04:16 PM
I don't like Eminem because any rapper has no talent. Rap is just talking to computerized music. This reminds me of a little thing that was on Family Guy once, The dog was listening to the scanner and says "Is it me or has rap gotten lazy?"

Dar' Argol
07-10-2002, 04:50 PM
Originally posted by Yar Cydoh
I don't like Eminem because any rapper has no talent. Rap is just talking to computerized music. This reminds me of a little thing that was on Family Guy once, The dog was listening to the scanner and says "Is it me or has rap gotten lazy?"

Rap is not just "talking to computerized music". When I first go into rap back in the 80's, it was far more then that. I listiened to the likes of Kool Moe Dee, Jazzy Jeff and the Fresh Price, NWA, Slick Rick, 2 Live Crew, Run DMC, Rob Base and DJ Eazy Rock and the like. There was no "Computierized Music" there. And even some of todays rappers still scratch. A few really steal their beats from older songs (I.E. Puff Daddy), but most, and I say most, of Eminem's beats are original. They may have been downloaded into a computer and then mixed there, but is that not the point of computers, to make very complicated tasks simpler???

I did a little searching and found this. It explains the history of Rap and how it is more then just "talking to computerized music:

The history of rap music


Every so often a new style of music emerges that takes America by storm and comes to represent the generation that grows up with it. In the 50's it was rock'n'roll, followed by the Mowtown sound of the 60's. The 1970's brought folk music and disco. But in the 80's it was rap. Perhaps no other form of music has crossed as many boundaries and become a bridge between America's many cultures as rap has.

Rap evolved from African people in general and black people born in the U.S. in particular. Its origins can be traced to West Africa where tribesmen held "men of words" in high regard. Later when slaves were brought to the New World, the captives mixed American music with the beats they remembered from Africa. Another origin of rap is a form of Jamaican folk stories called "toasts." These are narrative poems that tell stories in rhyme.

Over a hundred years later, rapping was a street art. Just as doo-wop in the 1950's, rap began in inner-city schoolyards and street corners in the 1970's. Early raps were boastful tales, and put-downs directed at other rappers. This music style was slowly growing in popularity among black teens in New York City, Washington, D.C., and Philadelphia. As early as 1974 neighborhood block parties in New York featured early forms of rapping.

But it wasn't until the commercial success of "Rapper's Delight" by the Sugar Hill Gang in 1979 that major record labels took notice of this explosive new sound. Rap's audience started to grow tremendously and gain notoriety with acts like Public Enemy, N.W.A., and Ice-T. More than 20 years have now passed and rap still has a huge following among people of all ages and socio-economic backgrounds.

But the musical style is not without its critics. In the 80's many raps were commentaries on the hardships of ghetto life, warnings about drugs and about teenage love or lust. Those topics led some parents to fear that rap encouraged youths to turn to violence, and illegal substance use. Organizations such as the Parents' Music Resource Center had fits over lyrics in rap and hip-hop which contained explicit references to sex, drugs and racism. The performers don't deny that rap music speaks openly about harsh topics. But they argue that audiences should be able distinguish between fantasy and reality, right and wrong.

Presently, rap and its close relative hip-hop are enjoying its largest popularity ever as a result of its mainstream acceptance. And thanks to artists like Kid Rock and Eminem, African-Americans are not the only ones listening anymore. Also, the female audience has grown steadily with the emergence of ladies behind the microphone like Salt-n-Pepa, Queen Latifah, and Li'l Kim.



Author's name omitted by request

Lowly Bantha Cleaner
07-10-2002, 10:57 PM
Like someone said before, I don't hate Eminem. He probably likes it when you hate him, it riles it up and inspires him. I don't like him either. I think he works best on ignore.

Now Sha Na Na. . . that was music.

Jargo
07-11-2002, 06:26 AM
I just find him boring. Little big man with his tough posturing and 'wannabe black' white trash attitudes. I feel the same way about any white guy who gets into the rap scene and starts talkin' the talk and walkin' the walk. We have a DJ over here in the UK called Tim Westwood who does his show and gives this spiel like he's black and then he's interviewed where there's no 'homies' around and he's from Croydon or something with a normal accent and a pathetic need to impress. White guys rapping is pathetic. get your own musical style and leave the rap to those who can and do it better. Although rap has just got so boring these days. It used to be stimulating and interesting tolisten to but now it's just a drone. Droning boring voices talking about droning boring issues that aren't issues. I don't really want to hear some emotionally insecure and immature dude carp on about how good he is in the sack and what he's gonna do to his b*tch when he gets home. Please, I've heard 11 year olds with more brains make a better dialogue.
And the most annoying thing about rap is that there's so much churned out. You can't turn round for six million new releases that sound exactly alike every week. Give it a break or change the tune.
To quote Monty Python - "I vill not buy thees record, it is scratched"

Somebody creative please save rap before it disappears completely up its own bum.

jeddah
07-11-2002, 08:28 AM
Originally posted by EMPEROR JARGO
I just find him boring. Little big man with his tough posturing and 'wannabe black' white trash attitudes. I feel the same way about any white guy who gets into the rap scene and starts talkin' the talk and walkin' the walk.

Me too, but have you heard of Bubba Sparxx? He's a refreshingly original white rapper/lyricist and his choon Ugly is inspirational. I think the success behind Eminem is Dre, whilst Bubba has the expertise of Timbaland behind his own good lyrics.


Originally posted by EMPEROR JARGO
We have a DJ over here in the UK called Tim Westwood who does his show and gives this spiel like he's black and then he's interviewed where there's no 'homies' around and he's from Croydon or something with a normal accent and a pathetic need to impress. [/B]

Right there! He is soooooo embarrasing to hear, isn't he? Have you seen him since he was shot (probably set up)? He looks like Tom Bell now! Good call on Tim Westwood, he is a class A Tosser. :D

jeddah

bigbarada
07-12-2002, 01:49 AM
I don't really care much for rap in general and I see Eminem as a passing fad in the grand scheme of things. Nobody will remember him in 20 years.

I have no really good reasons for not liking rap other than I just don't like it. Different tastes and I don't feel that I need to explain or justify my opinions to anybody since they are my opinions. For any of you wondering, I have listened to rap extensively. When you share a tent with black men for 8 months in Bosnia, you have no choice in the matter since they have absolutely no consideration for other people. Not a racist jibe just an observation that rings true for 99% of the black soldiers I knew in the Army.

odb
07-12-2002, 04:51 PM
Originally posted by EMPEROR JARGO
We have a DJ over here in the UK called Tim Westwood who does his show and gives this spiel like he's black and then he's interviewed where there's no 'homies' around and he's from Croydon or something with a normal accent and a pathetic need to impress

I'm so glad someone else hates Tim Westwood. Whenever I hear him on the radio I think its someone taking the p***, similiar to something from the Fast Show. I don't know anyone that can take him seriously and everytime they hear him he ends up being the centre for hours of entertainment. The biggest joke is that he is taken deadly seriously on Radio 1 and put across as a real innovator.:confused:

On Eminem I prefer him to the waves of boy and girl bands that are now swamping music. In comparason he's probably a musical genius to the Likes of Westlife, Hearsay, Nsync and the rest. Saying it is talking over someone else's beat is a little narrow minded. If you think like that then Moby's Play album is surely the personification of someone ripping the blues and jazz songs. His lyrics are orginal and quite often pretty funny, I think it also requires amount of skill/talent to string together a series of samples and make a coherrent tune to fit your lyrics. Yes they do have a certain amount of shock value but then if your rock/rap stars can't be outrageous who can :confused:

stormie
07-12-2002, 06:36 PM
Personally, I don't care for his voice or his songs. I also don't care for Eminem the person, just because he seems like a whiny punk. However, if I let my feelings of the artists themselves occlude my feelings for the music they produce, I probably wouldn't care for 99% of the music out there today. Most musicians today seem like whiny punks.

But the thing that really gets me is the way his music is classified. I believe it's essentially rap; yet, one of the local radio stations here that plays mostly popular rock/new rock (whatever you want to call it), also sometimes plays Eminem. What? Why would they play Eminem, when they don't play other rap? Really pretty weird when you are listening to a nice, mellow ColdPlay song, and the next thing you know, "Two trailerpark girls..." is whining through your speakers. ;) A simple press of the preset button takes care of that. Though, given the choice between a new Eminem song and another freakin' Nirvana rewind, I might just take the Eminem. Might. ;)

scruffziller
07-14-2002, 12:25 PM
EMINEM IS A RAP GOD!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

JON9000
07-14-2002, 05:12 PM
Eminem is funny, funny, funny. The video where he's spoofing the Batman show is too much!

Lt Kettch
07-14-2002, 07:12 PM
i do not hate rap, however i do hate eminem bc he is just so negative, there is no excuse for all the bs that is in his songs, i don't care if it actually happened to him, or if he thinks its funny, or if it sells records or whatever. eminem is pretty much filth, and i really hoped he was gone after that second album, but alas. a new single :(

KingOfSting
07-15-2002, 12:32 AM
i dont really mind rap, too much of it i cant really stand (much like techno...im more of a rock/punk/metal person) but some of its actually pretty good. i do enjoy listening to eminem and plan to pick up his new cd sometime.

187-Maul
07-15-2002, 12:15 PM
IMO eminem and his music is cool and I really like all his albums ecpecially the new one (eminem show), but he definetly isn't the best rapper or something like that

Tupac is still THE rap god !!!

jeddah
07-15-2002, 06:29 PM
Originally posted by 187-Maul

Tupac is still THE rap god !!!


And what makes you feel that? The fact that he was murdered, or his lyrical prowess? The machine conveyor-belt of 'new releases' that have been peddled almost endlessly since his death? Or how about the anti-hero self loathing persona he cultivated?

I don't know if he is the Rap God, but he was certainly more accomplished an entertainern (in my criteria ;) ) than Eminem :D

Don't get me wrong, I like some of his tracks or joints :rolleyes:, but am often flabbergasted to find that the ones that are most popular are the ones heavily punctuated by four letter words (invariably used conversationally) and the 'n' word. These same cool-criers are also usually middle England or America white teens who have not gone through life without, or suffered any kind of prejudice but like the idea of being angry about something they don't understand.

jeddah

mylow thehutt
07-15-2002, 07:29 PM
Can't spell crap without rap.:p

Deoxyribonucleic
07-15-2002, 09:12 PM
Originally posted by Dar' Argol


See, this is why he does that, to get a reaction out of you. Like he stated in the opening minute of his "Criminal" song off the "Marshall Mathers LP":




Yup just like Howard Stern (whom I love) and Rush Limbah(sp?) who's show was actually pretty funny too! They just get all jiggy with it to spice up life and pss people off...get reactions out of all of us mundanes who drive to work, drive to toyville, drive home, post on SSG, go to bed, wake up, drive to work, drive to toyville, drive home, post on SSG, go to bed, etc.

:p

but who says there's anything wrong with mundane I ask you?!

hehe :p :crazed:

PEACE OUT! :)

Jonna
07-15-2002, 09:40 PM
Sorry, but I can't help to insert the "Who Cares?" here.

Darth Nitwit
07-15-2002, 09:58 PM
I don't like him, so I don't listen to him. It is just that simple. No hassle

187-Maul
07-16-2002, 06:27 PM
well jeddah I think Tupac is THE Rap god because 1. his music is just soo good, 2. he was a big rolemodel (musicwise) for other rappers to have a career and get out of the ghetto

jeddah
07-17-2002, 01:35 PM
O....IC ;)

jeddah

DarthQuack
07-02-2009, 05:32 AM
Deadeye had a sweet 'tar.

Darth Cruel
07-02-2009, 09:19 AM
Rap is not just "talking to computerized music". When I first go into rap back in the 80's, it was far more then that. I listiened to the likes of Kool Moe Dee, Jazzy Jeff and the Fresh Price, NWA, Slick Rick, 2 Live Crew, Run DMC, Rob Base and DJ Eazy Rock and the like. There was no "Computierized Music" there. And even some of todays rappers still scratch. A few really steal their beats from older songs (I.E. Puff Daddy), but most, and I say most, of Eminem's beats are original. They may have been downloaded into a computer and then mixed there, but is that not the point of computers, to make very complicated tasks simpler???

I did a little searching and found this. It explains the history of Rap and how it is more then just "talking to computerized music:

The history of rap music


Every so often a new style of music emerges that takes America by storm and comes to represent the generation that grows up with it. In the 50's it was rock'n'roll, followed by the Mowtown sound of the 60's. The 1970's brought folk music and disco. But in the 80's it was rap. Perhaps no other form of music has crossed as many boundaries and become a bridge between America's many cultures as rap has.

Rap evolved from African people in general and black people born in the U.S. in particular. Its origins can be traced to West Africa where tribesmen held "men of words" in high regard. Later when slaves were brought to the New World, the captives mixed American music with the beats they remembered from Africa. Another origin of rap is a form of Jamaican folk stories called "toasts." These are narrative poems that tell stories in rhyme.

Over a hundred years later, rapping was a street art. Just as doo-wop in the 1950's, rap began in inner-city schoolyards and street corners in the 1970's. Early raps were boastful tales, and put-downs directed at other rappers. This music style was slowly growing in popularity among black teens in New York City, Washington, D.C., and Philadelphia. As early as 1974 neighborhood block parties in New York featured early forms of rapping.

But it wasn't until the commercial success of "Rapper's Delight" by the Sugar Hill Gang in 1979 that major record labels took notice of this explosive new sound. Rap's audience started to grow tremendously and gain notoriety with acts like Public Enemy, N.W.A., and Ice-T. More than 20 years have now passed and rap still has a huge following among people of all ages and socio-economic backgrounds.

But the musical style is not without its critics. In the 80's many raps were commentaries on the hardships of ghetto life, warnings about drugs and about teenage love or lust. Those topics led some parents to fear that rap encouraged youths to turn to violence, and illegal substance use. Organizations such as the Parents' Music Resource Center had fits over lyrics in rap and hip-hop which contained explicit references to sex, drugs and racism. The performers don't deny that rap music speaks openly about harsh topics. But they argue that audiences should be able distinguish between fantasy and reality, right and wrong.

Presently, rap and its close relative hip-hop are enjoying its largest popularity ever as a result of its mainstream acceptance. And thanks to artists like Kid Rock and Eminem, African-Americans are not the only ones listening anymore. Also, the female audience has grown steadily with the emergence of ladies behind the microphone like Salt-n-Pepa, Queen Latifah, and Li'l Kim.



Author's name omitted by request

This article has the ring of a desparate attempt to legitimize rap. Pretty weak. It is kind of insulting to rap, in my own opinion.

I don't mind rap. There is some that I can listen to all day. Will Smith comes to mind.

It's the ignorant c-rap that I dislike. And, along with Ice-T, N.W.A., and all of the other fine, upstanding citizens who sing about shooting cops in the face, feeding women crack, having sex with them, and then beating them, selling dope, hitting your mother in the head with a shovel, and a thousand other really positive (read that with extreme sarcasm) messages that get sent through some forms of rap (and yes I realize that other forms of music do it as well, but I key on on rap as that is Eminem's preferred style), eminem is nearly at the top of the list in that area.

And as for Eminem singing about not doing the stuff he sings about, well, he also sang about not doing the stuff, so maybe that's not true either (again with sarcasm). Just the same, the posibility that he does not act as his songs say most assuredly does not make the messages he sends any cleaner.

I look at it like this: The world has lots of cruelty. We experience it every single day without any help from the media, be that music, movies, books, news, or any other information source as well as simply by interacting with other humans. The more we are subjected to it, the more we (in general) are desensitized to it. Personally, I do not think it is a good thing to be desensitized to cruelty. And in that line of reasoning, I am not a fan of the cruelty being glorified in the media.

I do not mind the message of cruelty being offered in the media. But when it is offered as if it is the right thing to do, I can not support that. I can be OK with it if it is tempered with a showing of the consequences of the cruelty. But, like so many other rappers, Eminem sends the message that it is OK to be cruel. And I am not down with that.

El Chuxter
07-02-2009, 09:52 AM
I could buy the argument that guys like Ice-T or NWA were "street reporters" in a sense. Eazy-E started NWA with money he made dealing coke, and Ice Cube was a bona fide gangsta, for cryin' out loud.

But by the time you get to a talentless douchenozzle whiteboy from Detroit (and I'm not referring to Kid Rock this time), there's no legitimacy to it anymore.

As much as Ice Cube's later work doesn't hold a candle to his early stuff (really, Are We There Yet 2 vs Death Certificate, no contest), at least he's not like Ice-T and still pretending to be a 20-ish thug on the mean streets.

pbarnard
07-02-2009, 10:33 AM
But by the time you get to a talentless douchenozzle whiteboy from Detroit (and I'm not referring to Kid Rock this time), there's no legitimacy to it anymore.

And he's not really even from Detroit or even one of the rougher burbs. He's from Warren, not even in Wayne county.

On a side note, he did convince Sasha Baron Cohen to see the GI Joe movie at the MTV Movie Awards. Yep, that's what it took. :thumbsup:

Darth Cruel
07-02-2009, 11:32 AM
I could buy the argument that guys like Ice-T or NWA were "street reporters" in a sense. Eazy-E started NWA with money he made dealing coke, and Ice Cube was a bona fide gangsta, for cryin' out loud.

But by the time you get to a talentless douchenozzle whiteboy from Detroit (and I'm not referring to Kid Rock this time), there's no legitimacy to it anymore.

As much as Ice Cube's later work doesn't hold a candle to his early stuff (really, Are We There Yet 2 vs Death Certificate, no contest), at least he's not like Ice-T and still pretending to be a 20-ish thug on the mean streets.

I might be mis-inturpreting your response. But I did not mean to make Eminem out to be a thug. Far from it (but no better). I find him to present himself as something as bad, but I will refrain from using the title I would like to use for the sake of this being a family friendly forum. And he may not be advocating shooting a cop in the face, but messages like hitting your mother in the head with a shovel are every bit as bad.

And another thing that strikes me as odd...is that he seems to be intentionally presenting this terrible image to the public as if it is an OK thing to do. And worse yet...there seem to be members of the public that embrace the image.

My own opinion is that the whole Eminem phenomenon is a sad testimonial to a great many of the negative aspects of life.

On the other hand, it is working for him. His money-o-meter is clicking non-stop.