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View Full Version : How does Dooku stop all the Droids?



Battle Droid
09-17-2002, 08:53 PM
With the Force? He just waves his finger and they all stop, they couldn't of all seen him.

They aren't the same as they were in Ep1, with all of them joined together by the Droid Control Ship Computer. They're independent.

Lord Tenebrous
09-18-2002, 12:22 AM
It's kind of like a Force Calm, only with mechanicals. He essentially neutralized the circuitry into a rest mode.

But that's not official. What's official is that Lucas needed to stop the plot, have some tension, then wow us with the Gunships so we don't realize that the sheer amount of droids should have already killed all the remaining Jedi, and destroyed the ships soon after.

It's a Lucas thing. Your enemies can't shoot straight if you're supposed to live. :rolleyes:

LTBasker
09-18-2002, 12:35 AM
I always thought he had a control device on the balcony that would deactivate all the droids (like if any of the victims ever dealt with the droids and made a plea with something he wanted) so that could be it but I dunno. It was just there so that they could polute with more unneeded CGI shots to show it off. ;)

Master Goeweins
09-18-2002, 12:53 AM
Force users have some control over the mechanical, i.e. Qui Gon telling the droid they are going to Coruscant. Except that one had a primary order that flagged Qui Gon's command. Dooku probably had a code installed in the droids to recognize his force command, or he is just so powerful that he could manipulate them however he felt. Well...... maybe. Anyways, just my thought.

The Overlord Returns
09-18-2002, 01:10 PM
I'd suggest he most likely had a "hold" device, as saying he used the force just begs the question as to why Yoda or Mace, jedi just as powerful/ more powerful than Dooku, wouldn't simply do the exact same thing.

Jargo
09-18-2002, 06:47 PM
Well he's on the balcony with Poggle and his lieutenent Sun Rit, Dooku raises his hand and either Poggle of his lieutenent then deactivates the droids - which are of their making - so it's understandable that with their sophisticated war control room, they would have sophisticated monitoring of all aspects of the droid army.
It's a safe bet that it was the Geonosians who deactivated them for Dooku and on Dooku's ever so subtle command.
Considering how close to the transmitters the droids are, the signal would be strong enough that it would reach all the droids almost instantaneously. Thus the speed with which Dooku seemed to halt them. :)

That's my contribution for the day, thank you.

Beast
09-18-2002, 06:52 PM
Exactly as Jargo said. Dooku raises his hand, signaling someone to halt the droids for a minute so he can deliver his ultimatium to Mace Windu and the other Jedi's. As well as so that Ki-Adi-Mundi, Plo Koon, Aayla Secura, and I think one other can be moved into the circle. As soon as Mace turned down the offer, Dooku called for the Droids to go back into combat mode. :)

MTFBWY and HH!!

Jar Jar Binks

stillakid
09-19-2002, 12:16 AM
See, what's silly about that sequence is that while we are led to believe that all of those droids are once again controlled by a master processor somewhere, GL, in his infinite wisdom, included a shot of one of the Super Battle Droids arrogantly pushing one of the plain ol' Battle Droids out of the way. Arrogance? This implies some kind of individuality which runs counter to the whole Droid Control ship thing. It's not new. He set the precedent in TPM by having a couple of them be smartasses.

While I'm generally not a fan of having the Force be used so freely as an explanation for why everything in the Star Wars films happens, this is one instance where it would actually help the story if Dooku used that magical power to halt their advance. That would leave room for that individuality of personality that some of those mechanical robots seem to possess.

The Overlord Returns
09-19-2002, 09:42 AM
actually I'm pretty sure that SBD was pushing the plain one out of the way because it had just been crippled by laser fire.

I would imagine there is a command for them not to be impeded by each other.....

stillakid
09-19-2002, 11:29 AM
Originally posted by The Overlord Returns
actually I'm pretty sure that SBD was pushing the plain one out of the way because it had just been crippled by laser fire.

I would imagine there is a command for them not to be impeded by each other.....

I'd have to watch it again to look for that...however, even if that was the case technically, it's too subtle a point to consider as a reason. That brief action bespeaks of the larger improved droid shoving the older model out of the way for reasons of superiority.

I think that has been George's biggest problem with the Prequels thus far. His exuberance to "explain" things or layer in subtleties, as you suggest with that example, fall apart because a) they are useless points to make, and b) their meaning is lost anyway because the action/explanation is poorly done and is "mistaken" for something else. When you're writing a novel, that stuff is fine because you have the luxury of expanding on an idea, but in a movie, the image or dialogue that you see or hear is all you get. A great Writer/Director can manage it, but a poor one will fail as GL did.:)

The Overlord Returns
09-19-2002, 11:40 AM
the thing about that scene is, it's a throw away bit of humour.

It's not actually supposed to "mean" anything. It's eye candy. There's moments like this strewn throughout the OT as well yet we seem much more forgiving of things like this that appear in the old films.

The Overlord Returns
09-19-2002, 11:42 AM
Also, we only know for sure that the droid control ship acts as a giant "on/ off" switch. There's no evidence that the Bd's are all connected to a hive mind type thingie....

umm...yeah,.

stillakid
09-19-2002, 12:00 PM
Originally posted by The Overlord Returns
the thing about that scene is, it's a throw away bit of humour.

It's not actually supposed to "mean" anything. It's eye candy. There's moments like this strewn throughout the OT as well yet we seem much more forgiving of things like this that appear in the old films.

Perhaps, but none of the "eye-candy" in the OT ever really created conflicts within the story or plot the way they do in the Prequels. In GL's rush to impress us with what the technology can do onscreen, he fails to completely consider just how he's "subtley" affecting the story.

There are a lot of people on these boards who don't mind...who say "just forget it and enjoy the movie." Whatever. That kind of attitude is fine for video games because it's all about the imagery and "play" value, but in a movie, we're supposed to expect a cohesive story that makes sense, where even the throw-away moments...heck, especially the throw-away moments, add to the overall story, not detract from it and inspire questions of conflict.

Besides, since I've been posting on these boards, I've heard time and time again from GL's defenders about the overwhelming hordes of bad dialogue, story conflicts, and "throw-away" moments in the OT that some of us "don't mind ignoring" as if we are just targeting the Prequels for sport. However, I have yet to see one list of all of these "problems" with the OT that we are all "ignoring" because of some kind of imagined "OT Worship.":rolleyes: The OT was popular and successful because GL came up with a great idea, had great writers come in and help him smooth out the problems, and had great production designers to present the story in a unique way. The Prequels are falling flat with practically everyone except diehard fans because he failed to bring in qualified writers and is now more interested in showcasing his high-tech toys than telling a good story.

stillakid
09-19-2002, 12:06 PM
Originally posted by The Overlord Returns
Also, we only know for sure that the droid control ship acts as a giant "on/ off" switch. There's no evidence that the Bd's are all connected to a hive mind type thingie....

umm...yeah,.

True, but with all the rest of the "explanations" that we're getting, I'd be surprised if that wasn't explained as well somewhere. I'll have to defer to anyone else who has read all the books and stuff.

But with GL's propensity to outright plagiarize concepts from other films and books, it wouldn't surprise me one iota if he didn't lift the "mind hive" thingie out of Trek.

The Overlord Returns
09-19-2002, 12:12 PM
I'm not exactly sure what these explanation things you're reffering to are.

There's been no concrete explanation for many things we've seen in the films. I don't care if a book about star wars decides to say what dooku did to halt the droids (point: he did NOT turn them off. It was a hold your fire type thing). That's not GL's explanation, it's random star wars book author guy.

As for the OT and the little mistakes in the stories, well...the first that comes to mind is the Imperials getting to cloud city BEFORE the Falcon, considering the falcon has to be tracked by fett before they could determine where they went. Made no sense whatsoever, and thats the best film in the series.

stillakid
09-19-2002, 12:29 PM
Originally posted by The Overlord Returns
I'm not exactly sure what these explanation things you're reffering to are.

There's been no concrete explanation for many things we've seen in the films. I don't care if a book about star wars decides to say what dooku did to halt the droids (point: he did NOT turn them off. It was a hold your fire type thing). That's not GL's explanation, it's random star wars book author guy.

I'm with you, the books are meaningless to me, but inevitably, when I bring up a question, someone here pipes in with an explanation from the novel or some other source. My point is always that if GL intends to convey a point (especially a storypoint), it has to be included in the film itself to make sense. For instance, the whole idea of a "trial" and the "execution" sequence on Geonesis is ridiculous. What is the point of a trial, I once asked. Well, apparently, in the novel there is a detailed explanation for it. In the movie, however, the entire sequence just comes off as one of those James-Bond type affairs where the heroes are given a chance to escape (and they of course do). I think that Rune Haako (sp?) even says what I was thinking during the sequence: "Somebody do something, shoot her!" or something like that. Yeah! Why not? But no.


Originally posted by The Overlord Returns
As for the OT and the little mistakes in the stories, well...the first that comes to mind is the Imperials getting to cloud city BEFORE the Falcon, considering the falcon has to be tracked by fett before they could determine where they went. Made no sense whatsoever, and thats the best film in the series.

The Falcon had no hyperdrive. Now, we have no way to know exactly how fast it can go without hyperdrive, but we do know how far away planets are from one another. Assuming that the Falcon made a beeline right for Bespin, Fett could have figured that out pretty easily, radioed back to the Imperials, and the lot of them could have easily hyperdrived to Bespin with plenty of time to catch dinner and a movie as the Falcon crawled through interstellar space. If there's anything that doesn't make sense in that sequence, it's that Han and Leia weren't 80 years old or more by the time they reached Bespin, but hey, who's counting? :rolleyes:

The Overlord Returns
09-19-2002, 12:34 PM
Originally posted by stillakid


I'm with you, the books are meaningless to me, but inevitably, when I bring up a question, someone here pipes in with an explanation from the novel or some other source. My point is always that if GL intends to convey a point (especially a storypoint), it has to be included in the film itself to make sense. For instance, the whole idea of a "trial" and the "execution" sequence on Geonesis is ridiculous. What is the point of a trial, I once asked. Well, apparently, in the novel there is a detailed explanation for it. In the movie, however, the entire sequence just comes off as one of those James-Bond type affairs where the heroes are given a chance to escape (and they of course do). I think that Rune Haako (sp?) even says what I was thinking during the sequence: "Somebody do something, shoot her!" or something like that. Yeah! Why not? But no.



The Falcon had no hyperdrive. Now, we have no way to know exactly how fast it can go without hyperdrive, but we do know how far away planets are from one another. Assuming that the Falcon made a beeline right for Bespin, Fett could have figured that out pretty easily, radioed back to the Imperials, and the lot of them could have easily hyperdrived to Bespin with plenty of time to catch dinner and a movie as the Falcon crawled through interstellar space. If there's anything that doesn't make sense in that sequence, it's that Han and Leia weren't 80 years old or more by the time they reached Bespin, but hey, who's counting? :rolleyes:

BUT, the onus is on you to assume that Fett decide they must be going to bespin. It's still a continuity error, or atleast a story error. There's no reason for fett to know they are going to bespin until they're minutes away from landing......

stillakid
09-19-2002, 01:03 PM
Originally posted by The Overlord Returns


BUT, the onus is on you to assume that Fett decide they must be going to bespin. It's still a continuity error, or atleast a story error. There's no reason for fett to know they are going to bespin until they're minutes away from landing......

Since I wasn't in the cockpit with him, I suppose you're right. But with Fett being the cunning bounty hunter that we are led to believe he is, he probably figured out quickly that the Falcon had no hyperdrive. That is most likely why he guessed (correctly) that the Falcon was still in the vicinity even when it disappeared off the scopes. His suspicions would have been confirmed when the Falcon trundled off into space. Given the vast distances between things, Fett then could have pulled out his own Thomas Guide and put two and two together pretty easily as to where Solo was headed and how long it would take them to get there. So, no, it's not a continuity error in the least, at least that part of it. The only problem in the sequence is the actual timeline of events, given that with sublight speed velocity, the odds of reaching Bespin within their own lifetimes was pretty remote at best.

The Overlord Returns
09-19-2002, 01:15 PM
Originally posted by stillakid


Since I wasn't in the cockpit with him, I suppose you're right. But with Fett being the cunning bounty hunter that we are led to believe he is, he probably figured out quickly that the Falcon had no hyperdrive. That is most likely why he guessed (correctly) that the Falcon was still in the vicinity even when it disappeared off the scopes. His suspicions would have been confirmed when the Falcon trundled off into space. Given the vast distances between things, Fett then could have pulled out his own Thomas Guide and put two and two together pretty easily as to where Solo was headed and how long it would take them to get there. So, no, it's not a continuity error in the least, at least that part of it. The only problem in the sequence is the actual timeline of events, given that with sublight speed velocity, the odds of reaching Bespin within their own lifetimes was pretty remote at best.

Something tells me that fett wasn't going to "make a guess" when working for Vader. Besides, you're still projecting. It is a continuity error, simply because it makes no sense, and it was played out that way simply to move the story along. Besides, how cunning can I guy be when he ends up buying it at the hands of a blind man?

RooJay
09-19-2002, 04:41 PM
Originally posted by Lord Tenebrous
It's a Lucas thing. Your enemies can't shoot straight if you're supposed to live. :rolleyes:

Actually, it's an every director thing. What purpose would it serve for the hero to be shot dead center between the eyes if he's supposed to live? Except, of course, to turn any film into essentially a living dead movie.;) Knowing that the heroes in that scene are supposed to, and did survive, the most obvious explanation for Dooku being able to stop all of the droids at once is that he obviously had some means, whatever it may be, of doing so that we are not shown because it is completely inconsequential and does nothing to serve the story. Whatever the means was by which he accomplished this, we are left to make up an excuse for ourselves if needed; maybe he used the force, maybe the droids did all hear his command, maybe he had a magic button, etc..

The Overlord Returns
09-19-2002, 04:47 PM
Originally posted by RooJay


Actually, it's an every director thing. What purpose would it serve for the hero to be shot dead center between the eyes if he's supposed to live? Except, of course, to turn any film into essentially a living dead movie.;) Knowing that the heroes in that scene are supposed to, and did survive, the most obvious explanation for Dooku being able to stop all of the droids at once is that he obviously had some means, whatever it may be, of doing so that we are not shown because it is completely inconsequential and does nothing to serve the story. Whatever the means was by which he accomplished this, we are left to make up an excuse for ourselves if needed; maybe he used the force, maybe the droids did all hear his command, maybe he had a magic button, etc..

I could not agree more.

Lord Tenebrous
09-19-2002, 06:06 PM
I rechecked the scene, and Dooku points into the Arena, so the Force is a probable explanation. At the end of Dooku's little plea bargain, the droids reactivate without another signal, meaning that Dooku could be mentally releasing them. He does it again with the Geonosian fighters, waving his hand to have them break and regroup behind the Gunship.


As far as the SBD knocking down the BD, Obi-Wan had already shocked the battle droid, so the SBD knocked it out of the way to get some good shots in.

Dark Lord Kakorotto
09-29-2002, 10:45 PM
he knows how they are made...there is probably an internal switch that only one who is aware of it could turn it off

bigbarada
09-30-2002, 04:30 PM
The force explanation is fairly simple and obvious. It only presents a problem if you are just looking for faults in the movie.

Let's face it, no movie is perfect. Anyone can nitpick any film apart if they have a mind to. It takes much more intelligence and maturity to focus on the positive aspects of the movie, not just the negative. If you think the convenient plot device is exclusive to the prequels, then you haven't really watched many movies.

I'm sure Battle Droid started this thread wanting to get an explanation that fits within the context of the story. I don't really think he intended to open the door for even more criticism of AOTC.