PDA

View Full Version : Lott to step down from Senate Leadership Post



Lowly Bantha Cleaner
12-20-2002, 10:08 AM
It was just announced on TV that Senator Trent Lott of Mississippi, will resign his post as the Senate Majority Leader, the most powerful position a Senator can hold. He was pressured by many, including several within his own party, to step down from his post because of the remarks he made at Strom Thurmond's 100th Birthday party in which he suggested a Strom, running on a segregationist State's Rights platform, would have been better suited to run the country, if he had won the presidency back when he ran in 1948. Those marks compounded with similar marks he made in 1980, the fact that he voted against the MLK holiday, and many pieces of legislation that dealt with civil-rights plus the fact that his college fraternity was intent on breaking up peaceful civil-rights demonstrations, paint a questionable picture about this man (He was also one of the staunchest Nixon defenders but we'll leave that out of the discussion). :D

No word yet on who will replace him. It looks like two names pop up, and those are Don Nickels of Oklahoma and Bill Frist of Tennessee.

EricRG
12-20-2002, 10:52 AM
Who cares. One Republican is just like another. He just happened to make the mistake of making his true feelings public.

QLD
12-20-2002, 11:40 AM
Becuase there are no biggoted democrats either. *cough*Byrd*cough*.

While I think Lott should have stepped down, I do find it ironic that the person who started the lynch-mob, was Jesse Jackson, who once called New York City "Hymie-town".

But what Lott said was just plain stupid and wrong. However, I do not feel he meant any malice with his statement either. He should have resigned his post a few weeks ago when this first came about.

But also, better his true feelings are out, because I would much rather KNOW someone is biggoted, rather than have them keep their feelings to themselves, and use their influence or power to cause problems. That is much more dangerous.

Dar Basra
12-20-2002, 12:23 PM
Hmmm .. and I thought this thread was going to be about Senator Lott Dod.

Lman316
12-20-2002, 12:39 PM
Originally posted by Dar Basra
Hmmm .. and I thought this thread was going to be about Senator Lott Dod.

At least that would have been a little more interesting. And probably less partisan politics would be involved too...:rolleyes:

End...

BanthaPoodoo
12-20-2002, 01:09 PM
Originally posted by Quite-Long Dong
I do find it ironic that the person who started the lunch-mob, was Jesse Jackson


Hmmm wonder where they all went to eat??? :D

Fulit
12-20-2002, 01:53 PM
Originally posted by Dar Basra
Hmmm .. and I thought this thread was going to be about Senator Lott Dod.

That reminds me of a hilarious picture I saw somewhere, I saved it for just this very moment. I think it came from a site called Gammorrean Jedi or something. So I want to give proper credit to whoever did this picture, cause it wasn't me.

QLD
12-20-2002, 02:16 PM
BanthaPoodoo.....your quote seems to have a typo in it, I wonder how that happened....hmmmm..

;)

JediTricks
12-20-2002, 02:47 PM
Fulit, that's a funny pic, especially the ToyFare-esque big eyes on the Luke and his rebel friends. :D

Personally, I don't think anybody who believes in segragation should be in a place of authority, but it's not like Lott's comments are the first of such. Look at Attorney General John Ashcroft, the guy is against mixed marriages, says he wants them to be illegal, but there was no major outcry to have him removed. Strange system indeed.

Jedi Clint
12-20-2002, 02:51 PM
Originally posted by Lowly Bantha Cleaner
It was just announced on TV that Senator Trent Lott of Mississippi, will resign his post as the Senate Majority Leader, the most powerful position a Senator can hold. He was pressured by many, including several within his own party, to step down from his post because of the remarks he made at Strom Thurmond's 100th Birthday party in which he suggested a Strom, running on a segregationist State's Rights platform, would have been better suited to run the country, if he had won the presidency back when he ran in 1948. Those marks compounded with similar marks he made in 1980, the fact that he voted against the MLK holiday, and many pieces of legislation that dealt with civil-rights plus the fact that his college fraternity was intent on breaking up peaceful civil-rights demonstrations, paint a questionable picture about this man (He was also one of the staunchest Nixon defenders but we'll leave that out of the discussion). :D

No word yet on who will replace him. It looks like two names pop up, and those are Don Nickels of Oklahoma and Bill Frist of Tennessee.


I have a minor correction, but well worth pointing out. Lott did not mention anything about Thumond's Dixie-crat affiliation, or imply that any of the "mess" that we are in today was due to the segregationists losing that Presidential election. I believe he spoke without thinking. He was saying nice things about Strom (things he had said in the past without being "corrected"), and didn't think about his prior associations. That being said, I was never that impressed with Lott. I seriously doubt that he is a racist though. Strom (R) and Byrd (D) I wonder about. I don't remember seeing anywhere near the fuss raised by Lott's critics when Byrd recently used the "n" word to describe an imaginary group of "white" people that didn't impress him. I guess it just depends what party your in. If your a Democrat then you can count on support from movie stars, rock stars, and TV personalities. But if your a Republican those same people have you in their cross-hairs. Being a fan of most things "80's", I thought I'd watch the "I love the 80's" series on VH1. Anything political in nature was joined with liberal diatribe from a myriad of guests.

Lowly Bantha Cleaner
12-20-2002, 03:10 PM
Byrd and Jackson have made some overtly racist statements in the past, but you have to look at this from the perspective of the Republican party.

Do we want the incoming leader of the new Senate Republican majority to be embroiled with this controversy when we have to defend a House, Senate, and a Presidency plus a majority of governorships in 2004? A lot of these are held by a razor thin majority.

Do we want to keep him in his post despite the fact that we are trying to recruit more and more African-Americans into the GOP? I am convinced that if turnout for the last election in Novermber was 2% higher, the GOP would not have had the slam dunk they had. 2004 is a presidential year and presidential elections can draw turnout as high as 50% where as I believe the last election got something just below 40%. GOPers seem to vote more passionatley then Dems, but 2004 will see a major referundum on the GOP and their authority, and I believe that this will draw more Dems to the poll.

And while I am not defending these gentlemen's remarks, Byrd is a senile dinosaur and Jackson has little leadership and credibility within the Democratic party. The difference is Lott is a man who holds great power and the GOPers decided that he should leave the position because they don't want their leadership to be perceived as backwards when it comes to race.

Fulit
12-20-2002, 03:12 PM
Originally posted by JediTricks
Look at Attorney General John Ashcroft, the guy is against mixed marriages, says he wants them to be illegal, but there was no major outcry to have him removed. Strange system indeed.

The major difference would be that Lott was elected to his position, and Ashcroft was appointed. The appointment was on Senate approval, but he was appointed all the same. What is almost scarier to me about Ashcroft is the reported fact that he traditionally has (fact) had himself anointed in oil upon every election to public office, (office of Attorney General the exception? NO!), and I thought it was quite stuffy of him to have the bare breasts of a 100+ year old Justice Department statue covered because they "made him uncomfortable."

Call me a Democrat, a liberal, or what you will, but I have a huge problem with government officials who have a problem with the human body.

Not to get off on a tangent about Ashcroft, who I obviously dislike, so here's a comment on what I think of Lott.....

I do not agree with his stance, BUTTTTTT...........

"Segregationist" is vastly different from "Racist"

A segregationist believes that all races are equal, but should LIVE APART.

A racist holds himself ABOVE all other races, unconditionally.

I am staunchly anti-Republican, anti-racism, and anti-2 party system. That's why I find this thing so ridiculous. For crying out loud, even Clinton said they were being hypocritical, (the Repubs)!

BanthaPoodoo
12-20-2002, 04:07 PM
Originally posted by Quite-Long Dong
BanthaPoodoo.....your quote seems to have a typo in it, I wonder how that happened....hmmmm..

;)


Hmmm, I dont know.......:p

stillakid
12-20-2002, 05:34 PM
The guy is a Republican from the South. Is anyone really surprised that he thinks this way?:rolleyes:

derek
12-20-2002, 06:53 PM
Originally posted by stillakid
The guy is a Republican from the South. Is anyone really surprised that he thinks this way?:rolleyes:

come on guys. i live in the south, and i'm a former republican(they weren't radical enough for me) and i'm not even close to being a racist. let's have honest disagreement and passionate discussions, but please don't label everyone who is for low taxes, small government and lives in the south a racist.:)

JON9000
12-20-2002, 09:50 PM
Senator Lott did the smart thing. If there is one thing the Republican party doesn't need, it's a boogey man democrats can hold up to swing voters and say "Look!- This is what you are voting for when you vote Republican!!"

The racial history of this country is an uncomfortable subject for many Americans, and I truly believe most of us are not (or at least no longer) racist. It is just a shame to me that Republicans running for national office do not believe Georgia and South Carolina ought to join the modern world and drop the confederate symbol from their state flags. Or if they believe they should, cannot say it due to the political consequences.

I firmly believe that you cannot cozy up to all those old demons of the south and still claim to be reconstructed. Sorry Trent, maybe David Duke can come out and play.

At least the republicans got their chance to really repudiate some of the scarier elements of their constituency. I just hope it wasn't all a nice little show.:eek:

Old Fossil
12-21-2002, 02:04 AM
I live in south Mississippi, and I can tell you that I know of NOBODY who is sorry to see Lott go as Senate Majority Leader. He's got all the charm of a largemouth bass, though apparently much less fight in him...

I would like to see him resign, and somebody with a bit firmer moral ground replace him -- Democrat or Republican, doesn't matter to me as long as they have even a little principle. I never voted for the guy in the first place.

sith_killer_99
12-21-2002, 12:42 PM
You know, it's kinda strange.

I live in Kentucky right now, and there are a lot of "indications" that the Klan has stong support here.

Yet, almost everyone I talk to around here is a registered Democrat. I even know a Republican who is a registered Democrat. He told me that if he didn't register as a Democrat "people would know" and he would have a hard time finding a job, getting a loan, etc.

Racism is not a party issue.

QLD
12-21-2002, 12:58 PM
Definately! There are just as many biggoted Democrats as Republicans.

sith_killer_99
12-21-2002, 01:14 PM
Not to mention that it plays both ways.

In other words, just because a person is not white, dosen't mean that they can't be racist.

I personally have my suspicions about some individuals.

I grew-up in a strongly Hispanic neighborhood. One day, back in high school and Hispanic buddy of mine got pulled asdie by one of the Deans, who was also Hispanic.

He told by buddy, "White people have no respect for Hispanics, and Stoners are even worse."

Me being a Stoner and a White guy, I was pretty offended. Who was this guy to tell my friend I had no respect for him?

Needless to say, I lost all respect for that particular Dean.

Old Fossil
12-21-2002, 02:19 PM
What's a Stoner?

QLD
12-21-2002, 02:28 PM
A stoner is usually a nickname for the people who smoke pot, and like to play hackey sack, and.....well, smoke pot.

sith_killer_99
12-21-2002, 02:45 PM
Hacky Sack is the great American past time.

Stoners are/were easily identified by their long hair, denim jackets, rock t-shirts (usually black), and cloud of smoke (marlboro;) )

We dominated during the 80's into the early 90's and were replced by baggy pants wearing, hip hop listening, Fubu wearing kids.:frus:

In any event Stoners pretty much died when Heavy Metal, Thrash, Hard Core, and the rest went the way of the dinosaur. Only to be replaced by the Seattle sound, Brittany Spears, The Back Street Boys, and Kid Rock.:cry: :cry: :cry: :cry: :cry:

Oh how I long for the days of AC/DC, Iron Maiden, Metallica, Slayer and Pantera, but I digress.

JON9000
12-21-2002, 03:36 PM
Put themmmmm- in the Irrrron Maiden.

Iron Maiden? Excellent!!

Speaking of stoners.

Anyway, the racist boogeyman I grew up with was Jesse Helms, the Senator from NC. He was a democrat in his youth, but switched to The GOP when it appeared segregation was no longer au courant with the Dems, thanks to LBJ.

My big problem is those that "play the race card" because they are not getting their way. I worked in an athletic apparel store in high school. We only carried Div. I schools and a customer was upset we did not have Winston-Salem State University gear. She said the store was racist for not carrying the local black college. I thought this was pretty silly, and rather degrading to anyone who had been subjected to real racism, such as profiling, intimidation, or God forbid- lynching. She was just mad we didn't have what she wanted.:stupid:

EricRG
12-21-2002, 09:40 PM
Long live the Stoners!!!:crazed: :crazed: :crazed: :crazed: :crazed:

Eddie lives.

Lowly Bantha Cleaner
12-21-2002, 11:29 PM
Originally posted by stillakid
The guy is a Republican from the South. Is anyone really surprised that he thinks this way?:rolleyes:


Originally posted by derek
come on guys. i live in the south, and i'm a former republican(they weren't radical enough for me) and i'm not even close to being a racist. let's have honest disagreement and passionate discussions, but please don't label everyone who is for low taxes, small government and lives in the south a racist.

Yes, let us not make the mistake of labeling how all Northerners are this and all Hispanics feel this, when we know there are vast differences of opinions in almost every ethnic/racial group. It just isn't fair. Besides. not every Southerner is a racist, (but they do drink moonshine, marry their cousins, and beat their wives.) :D

Old Fossil
12-22-2002, 01:42 AM
Originally posted by sith_killer_99
Hacky Sack is the great American past time.

Stoners are/were easily identified by their long hair, denim jackets, rock t-shirts (usually black), and cloud of smoke (marlboro;) )

We dominated during the 80's into the early 90's and were replced by baggy pants wearing, hip hop listening, Fubu wearing kids.:frus:

In any event Stoners pretty much died when Heavy Metal, Thrash, Hard Core, and the rest went the way of the dinosaur. Only to be replaced by the Seattle sound, Brittany Spears, The Back Street Boys, and Kid Rock.:cry: :cry: :cry: :cry: :cry:

Oh how I long for the days of AC/DC, Iron Maiden, Metallica, Slayer and Pantera, but I digress.


Ahhh, unnuh-stan, sithkiller-san.

Emperor Howdy
12-22-2002, 02:56 AM
Originally posted by JON9000
The racial history of this country is an uncomfortable subject for many Americans

Not for me. I'm not a racist, and never have been. I wasn't even born when slavery existed....and neither were any black people I know. I have several black friends and the subject never comes up. Why would it? Truthfully, we could care a less about that crap. With the exception of ignorant hate groups, some nazi-wannabes, and a few 'baccy-chewin' hillbillies, racism is kept alive by minorities (and not just African Americans) who use it as an ace up the sleeve. Hey, more power to them. If I could get a better job based solely on my race...why not? My own television networks, radio stations, and colleges? Sure! Grants? Scholarships? Government assistance programs? Thanks! The sad truth is, the longer rednecks like Lott hold high positions, the more ammo people have to cry racial injustice.

JON9000
12-22-2002, 04:50 PM
Originally posted by Emperor Howdy
Not for me. I'm not a racist, and never have been. I wasn't even born when slavery existed....and neither were any black people I know. I have several black friends and the subject never comes up. Why would it? Truthfully, we could care a less about that crap. With the exception of ignorant hate groups, some nazi-wannabes, and a few 'baccy-chewin' hillbillies, racism is kept alive by minorities (and not just African Americans) who use it as an ace up the sleeve. Hey, more power to them. If I could get a better job based solely on my race...why not? My own television networks, radio stations, and colleges? Sure! Grants? Scholarships? Government assistance programs? Thanks! The sad truth is, the longer rednecks like Lott hold high positions, the more ammo people have to cry racial injustice.

What can I say Howdy? I am glad it no longer exists where you live except when used in reverse by minorities or couple of fringe groups.

Affirmative Action programs based solely on race no longer exist, BTW. They have been declared unconstitutional. You can still design a program that considers race a "plus" factor, but good luck getting to pass muster. It won't. :zzz: