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James Boba Fettfield
05-21-2003, 03:22 PM
After mining cornfields for thrills in last year's "Signs", M. Night Shyamalan will turn his attention to "The Woods" for his next feature, with Ashton Kutcher, Kirsten Dunst and Joaquin Phoenix in talks to star, according to The Hollywood Reporter

"Woods" marks the first film of a two-picture deal Shyamalan has with the Walt Disney Co. and is being eyed as a summer 2004 release with an October production start planned. Details about the second film in the deal were not made public.

Set in 1897, Shyamalan's "Woods" script revolves around a close-knit community that lives with the frightening knowledge that a mythical race of creatures resides in the woods around them.

Source Story (http://www.empiremovies.com/cgi-bin/newspro/fullnews.cgi?newsid1053516083,94330,)

Sounds like Lovecraft. Maybe he'll keep batting 1.000 with me and this one turns out to be a good movie. Eternal Darkness did a cool mythical race/evil thing and made a good story. Hopefully Night can do the same.

El Chuxter
05-21-2003, 03:32 PM
I've liked all Shyamalan's films so far, so I'm hoping this will be another great movie. But Ashton Kutcher? Ugh. He should play a gender-bending Boom-Boom in X3 and get killed off immediately by some joke villain like Mandarin.

Jedi_Master_Guyute
05-21-2003, 05:14 PM
Uh, i agree with everything you said Chuxter up till the Boom Boom reference. I can't stand Ashton Kutcher, so hopefully he gets killed off, quickly. I did love Phoenix in "Signs" though. His reaction to the vide of the incident in Brazil is something i would've done.
"Move children! Vaminos!" hehehehehe Is he not merciful?!??!? :D

RooJay
05-22-2003, 06:17 PM
Night can do no wrong in my eyes, but this has left me wondering exactly what kind of "mythical creatures" will this be about? Unicorns and fairies? Vampires and werewolves? Bigfootses?

Jedi_Master_Guyute
05-23-2003, 03:34 AM
Roojay, don't even put M. night and the idea of Bigfoot in the same sentence. The glory he could rightfully install into that creature as well as damned downright spooky it would be makes me salivate at the mouth. Knowing luck though, it'll be like Leprechauns or something. Maybe mr. Warwick Davis could make a cameo. :D

James Boba Fettfield
05-23-2003, 01:56 PM
I hope it's not some Leprechauns or Bigfoot things. How about Cthulhu. Yes, a Cthulhu inspired creature would dominate over a hairy man or a little man.

JediCole
05-23-2003, 05:40 PM
I must concur with my fellow SSG posters in regard to Shyamalan and his films. Each one is a wonderful slant on a theme (The Sixth Sense - ghosts, Unbreakable - super heroes, Signs - UFOs). I think the underlying theme offered up for Woods is an intriguing one. Given its period setting, I should expect the beings in question to be more along the lines of the deeply rooted traditional supernatural nasties - like ghouls, rather than any of a myriad other possibilities offered up. That or something gleaned from Native American lore (assuming the town in question is in America of that period). Nothing outside of traditional European or Native American critters would make sense, especially given that it is a period piece set that far back in history. Though welcome, a Cthulhu-esque creature (or creatures) could play in even contemporary small towns, no need for a period film.

Kidhuman
05-23-2003, 09:04 PM
Sounds interesting. He has made good movies and why should this be any different. Kutcher maybe, but we will have to see. He looks to goofy to play a serious part.

RooJay
05-24-2003, 04:26 PM
Originally posted by JediCole
I must concur with my fellow SSG posters in regard to Shyamalan and his films. Each one is a wonderful slant on a theme (The Sixth Sense - ghosts, Unbreakable - super heroes, Signs - UFOs). I think the underlying theme offered up for Woods is an intriguing one. Given its period setting, I should expect the beings in question to be more along the lines of the deeply rooted traditional supernatural nasties - like ghouls, rather than any of a myriad other possibilities offered up. That or something gleaned from Native American lore (assuming the town in question is in America of that period). Nothing outside of traditional European or Native American critters would make sense, especially given that it is a period piece set that far back in history. Though welcome, a Cthulhu-esque creature (or creatures) could play in even contemporary small towns, no need for a period film.

DUHHH...:stupid: :crazed:
When I originally read that news at cinescape.com I inexplicably read that the story was to take place in 1987! I was reading your post and thinking to myself...PERIOD PIECE?! Why would 1987 make it a PERIOD PIECE?!!:stupid:
Shows how closely I pay attention sometimes!;) :crazed: :D

The 'Xir
05-24-2003, 07:15 PM
Well seeing as it takes place in 1897 Pennsylvania, you guys might want to start researching any Quaker or Amish myths that might exist! ;) Just a thought!
I heard this might be a romance story also. Hhmmmm... sounds aweful familiar. Hey maybe Ashton's character will fall in love with Big Foot!!! OK maybe not! :D

James Boba Fettfield
05-29-2003, 11:12 AM
Casting news on this today:


Bryce Dallas Howard, daughter of Oscar-winning director Ron Howard, has signed on to make her feature film debut with a starring role in director M. Night Shyamalan's The Woods for Disney.

mylow thehutt
06-09-2003, 08:07 PM
I can just see this movie,
a group of teens in the woods,just then they hear a noise and race back to there car but it isn't THERE!!! "DUDE WHERS MY CAR!!".

RooJay
09-09-2003, 12:10 AM
FilmJerk.com script review (Possible Spoilers)
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“M. Night Shyamalan is back to his old tricks with his latest, “The Woods,” which he wrote and is set to direct. There is the slow plodding for three-quarters of the film to build towards the endgame, the use of colors to emphasize themes and the patented twist ending. Although I liked the script, knowing the pedigree of the film makes the reader more attuned to what is to come— I was able to guess the twist within the first 40 pages.

The film begins with Edward Walker, the leader of the small town of 60 people, intoning ominous words at a dinner: “We came here to start anew. We are grateful for the time we have been given.” As hands begin to pass various platters and baskets of food, screams carry through the village from a distant place. It emanates from the woods found on the town’s outskirts and soon dies away. Later that same day, a bell tolls from the town’s watchtower, which overlooks the woods, reverbrating throughout the area. Each family huddles to their basements and waits for the all-clear signal is given. Once it is sounded, the townspeople resume their lives. But they soon find a smaller piece of livestock brutally killed, its head twisted back and fur fully removed. We soon learn it was killed by what the townfolk call Those We Don’t Speak Of, creatures from Covington Woods that have been plaguing the town since the beginning.

We then meet some of the peripheral characters, such as: Lucius Hunt, the young man who questions the town’s way; Alice, his mother, a leader of the town and a member of its secretive council of elders; Ivy and Kitty, two sisters both enamored with Lucius, with the former blind but able to see the auras of people and items; and Noah Percy, the mentally handicapped young man who is drawn to the woods and contiunally tempts it.

After asking her father’s permission, Kitty proposes to Lucius, telling him that she loves him. “I love you more than the sun and moon together,” she says. “And if you feel the same way, we should not hide it any longer. It’s a gift, love is. We should be thankful. We should bellow it with all the breath in our lungs, “Thank you! Thank you! Thank you!”” Lucius turns her down, as he is seemingly more in love with her sister. As Kitty becomes engaged to Noah, Lucius secretly becomes engaged to Ivy.

Lucius becomes increasingly enamored with the woods and what lies beyond, coming to believe that the innocent people of the village can pass through it. Sitting him down, Alice explains that there is something in those towns that lie beyond the forest, contentment. “There is something in the very nature of the cities and towns that rejects it. Society survives on greed, and desire. Its heart is fed by wants.” She tells him to not desire to leave the town, even as some of the younger townspeople increasingly begin to step over the forbidden line into Covington Woods.

Wearing yellow cloaks, there they discover large clawed footprints, and they soon see “the dark form of a humped creature, standing upright,” which soon strides away from them. Soon after, the creatures enter the town, sending the townspeople flurrying. On each door is found a red crimson “X.” Kitty and Noah are soon married, although after the ceremony the creatures again visit, this time butchering all the livestock taken and skinned. The next day the town begins an inquisition to find out why the creatures visited…what was done to anger them? Did a member of the small town enter the woods?

And then an act by Noah sets in motion the third act: He stabs Lucius as they try to work out the quasi-romantic triangle that exists with Kitty.

I’m going to end Reddy’s review at that, although there is a great deal more to tell. What I can reveal is this: After this point, the story focuses on Ivy as she is granted permission to go beyond the town’s walls in order to save Lucius. The creatures in the forest mentioned in the well-written speculative article found at IGN FilmForce are not the creatures of the forest plaguing the town—There is no Bigfoot, or albatwitches, ghosts, Cheenos, gnomes, faeries, goblins or anything else that has been mentioned. And the big reveal at the end is not even centered on this aspect.

But one thing struck me from what Reddy wrote me in a subsequent exchange:“When one goes to see a Shyamalan film, they expect a big twist at the end of the film. Unfortunately, as a big reader of the mystery genre, I was able to guess the ending of the film relatively early…It’s gotten to the point, that – like certain detective novels – we come knowing that there will be a twist at the end, and it’s gotten to the point where we are on the look-out for such a thing. And this can be a bad thing, especially when it is as easy to guess from the clues found here early on, based on the dialogue and main theme that runs through the entire film. Shyamalan needs to a way to satiate this fixation, because now it is getting tired— although I really liked the film and look forward to seeing it realized once it hits the screen next summer. I would love to see Shyamalan move beyond this, so as not to become a one-trick pony. He is a better storyteller than that and deserves a longer career.

The ensemble cast for the film includes (as of this writing) Adrien Brody, Joaquin Phoenix, Bryce Dallas Howard, Sigourney Weaver, Judy Greer and Jayne Atkinson. Shyamalan will also produce, along with Scott Rudin and Sam Mercer. Production is scheduled to start in Pennsylvania October 14.

dr_evazan22
09-09-2003, 12:19 AM
Has anyone stopped to consider that this could be about the mythical life of actor James Woods?

Jedi_Master_Guyute
10-06-2003, 01:02 PM
I can't believe i beat JBFF to this!! He must be slipping in his OSU surroundings.

Dark Horizons reports that M. Night Shymalan's new flick will change the title from "The Woods" to The Village, letting Lucky McKee keep the name The Woods. The films which hits theaters August 6th stars Joaquin Phoenix, Judy Greer and Sigourney Weaver.

(thanks to Bloody Disgusting for the news)

dr_evazan22
10-06-2003, 03:25 PM
Last week I got in touch witha girl from high school. She's now married and all. Well, they supposedly do some artsy-craftsy things with iron and metal to sell at flea markets and such. She said that someone from the production had been by and purchased a lot of stuff from them for the movie. I forget where she said she lives, but it was a little north and west of Phoenixville PA.

James Boba Fettfield
10-06-2003, 05:15 PM
I edited the thread title in response to the news Guyute has posted.

Jedi_Master_Guyute
12-20-2003, 02:04 PM
The teaser trailer is FINALLY up!!

http://movie-list.com/trailers.php?id=village

I think this movie looks pretty interesting, from what we see at least. I trust M. night and think he'll once again deliver a fantastic film. cheers! :D

Jedi_Master_Guyute
04-26-2004, 03:34 PM
"The Village Trailer & Footage to Premiere on ABC Source: Touchstone Pictures Tuesday, April 20, 2004



On April 26 (8:00 – 11:00 p.m., ET) M. Night Shyamalan will host an ABC Network telecast of The Sixth Sense, during which he will present an exclusive, world premiere trailer of his next film, The Village – in theaters nationwide on July 30, 2004.

One week later, on May 3 (8:00-11:00 p.m., ET), Shyamalan hosts the ABC network television debut of Unbreakable. During the telecast Shyamalan will showcase never before seen material for The Village, including a groundbreaking 15 minutes of unique programming including a first look at scenes from the film, interviews, and behind-the-scenes access.

M. Night Shyamalan's The Village, starring Joaquin Phoenix, Sigourney Weaver, Adrien Brody, and William Hurt, tells the chilling tale of a close-knit community that lives with the frightening knowledge that creatures reside in the woods around them and the courage of one young man who challenges them."

I don't know if this is just the teaser from December or whatnot, but it's still worth checking out. Thanks to my Mommy for calling me and letting me know. Thanks mum! :D and a small thanks to comingsoon.net hehehehe :D

James Boba Fettfield
04-26-2004, 04:29 PM
I'll be watching for that.

Kidhuman
04-26-2004, 08:22 PM
The movie looks pretty good. I will see it.

Jedi_Master_Guyute
04-26-2004, 10:34 PM
I thought the trailer was rather awesome. I can't wait to see this flick!! :D

EDIT: Here is a link to the site where you can find the new trailer!!!
http://thevillage.movies.go.com/main.html

Jedi_Master_Guyute
05-24-2004, 03:21 PM
Saw this at BD and thought i'd post it. Very interesting.

"The Philadelphia Daily News reports that M. Night Shyamalan and crew quietly set up shop in Chadds Ford, Chester County, this week to shoot additional footage for The Village.

Sigourney Weaver, William Hurt, Joaquin Phoenix, and Bryce Howard were present for a three-day shoot, which, several crewmembers say, was the filming of a new ending.

The Gladwyne-based director's sixth film is scheduled for a July 30 release and had filmed in Chadds Ford last year, from October through December.

A studio spokesperson said the shooting did not involve a new ending, but since the ending has been leaked online already there's always a possibility that this is indeed the case."

My friends read the original ending and had mixed thoughts on it. Hopefully he tweaked it, but we'll see! :D

dr_evazan22
05-24-2004, 08:48 PM
That's right around the corner from me! I wish I had geard about it.

derek
07-30-2004, 05:54 PM
SPOILERS FOLLOW!!!
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Just got back from seeing "the village", and am happy to report i very much enjoyed it. this movie is probably not going to be as well received as his previous films, but i found it very entertaining and thought provoking. but those expecting a monster movie are going to be very disapointed.......unless you're like me, and see the monsters for what they really are.......man's made up stories and myths used by those in power to keep the folks in line.
;)

Rocketboy
07-30-2004, 11:28 PM
I saw it also and really liked it. I agree that it won't be as well recieved as Signs or the 6th Sense.

I figured out the end about 1/2 way through.

2-1B
08-01-2004, 11:35 AM
I loved it.

No big shocking ending or anything but I don't think it mattered. Cool story, good acting, great visual look to the film. I loved it.

Turbowars
08-01-2004, 09:51 PM
Yeah I like it as well. It was put together nicely and it wasn't what I was expecting. Adrian Brody really gives me the creeps now.:p

Oh and don't bother to see Without a Paddle, because it's CRAP. I saw it at a studio screening last night and I was very happy I didn't pay to see it.

[DSS]Pedr0
08-01-2004, 11:14 PM
I loved it.

No big shocking ending or anything but I don't think it mattered. Cool story, good acting, great visual look to the film. I loved it.
Agreed. It was more than I went in expecting.

Jedi_Master_Guyute
08-02-2004, 02:20 AM
I got back this flick a bit ago and i absolutely LOVED it. I agree that i don't think it'll get as much praise, attention and profit as 6th sense, but nuts to that, i loved it. It was shot very well, the score was excellent and the performances were top notch. I had an idea what the "twist" could be and i was somewhat right. I loved how M. Night said so much at the end and only hinted at it in a few lines. The ending also poses other questions: like Noah, was he really handicapped or was it a ploy to get people riled up about the creatures?! i mean, he was able to hunt down Ivy and why would he go after her!?!? granted, he didn't really attack her as she just kinda fell, but was he tryin' to scare her or what?!! Or one could say that he tried to kill Luscious because Luscious had spoke of leaving the village and that wasn't allowed!! So many questions.

I'll definately snatch this up on DVD, the score too. Cheers!! :D

Hellboy
08-02-2004, 09:36 PM
I really didn't care for it.

I wasn't expecting much but based on the trailers I at least thought it might be a decent suspense film with maybe a touch of horror if I was lucky. Instead I got a film devoid of any legitimately creepy moments or good sense of tension. It was no fault of the actors though, they were fine, and the cinematography was excellent, my problem is with the story. It drags you along feeding you breadcrumbs of information regarding "the village" and its inhabitants until its great secret is revealed and once it was I found it laughable.

I couldn't help but feel deceived when leaving this movie, and not in the way where you feel outsmarted, more like cheated. This might have been decent as an episode of the Twilight Zone but as a movie I can't recommend it.

RooJay
08-04-2004, 08:57 PM
When this project was first announced, I was pretty sure I had figured out the "twist" right away - just didn't seem like the typical setting for an M. Night movie. This was even before the movie had started filming. Of course, I turned out to be right about that (not that I'm trying to make any kind of statement about intelligence ;) ). The whole thing of it is this: ultimately, it's not about the so-called twist - it's about the characters and their journey. This is what, in my honest opinion, makes Shyamalan a great director as well as what sets him apart from most every other filmmaker out there.
His films are not for everyone, however. This is certain. It would seem that the vast majority of today's filmgoing audience tends to be very plot-oriented. That's certainly not a bad thing, but for as for myself, I much prefer character driven films. M. Night seems to me to excel at this better than just about anyone else out there that I can think of right now.
Ask anyone whose opinion you trust what the Sixth Sense was about. If they're someone who pays attention they won't tell you that it was about how Bruce Willis was a ghost. Ask them what Unbreakable was about - they shouldn't be telling you that it was about how Sam Jackson is a supervillain. I certainly hope that no one here would find anyone of much regard that thinks Signs was supposed to be about how the aliens where vulnerable to water. These where all movies about character and about human interaction and the responses of people to the world around them.
I should point out that I'm the type of person who really doesn't mind having the ending spoiled for me. When I start a new book that I'm really interested in I will sometimes read the last chapter first. When I pick up my comics for the week, I always flip through them first before reading them. I sometimes just can't wait to see how things are gonna play out! None of it really matters to me because for me it's all in the journey. It's about understanding the characters, seeing how they react to the events unfolding, and watching how they are changed and grow. I may have figured out what the deal was with the Village before the cameras even started rolling, but that was never the point for me anyway. I knew I was going to be in for a good yarn and Night has yet to disappoint me!
Some people will love this movie. Others will not care so much for it. Everyone has their own tastes and opinions and each is valid in it's own right. I for one say that these kinds of movies are what we definitely need more of - even if anyone out there didn't care for this particular story. Even if you don't care for this particular style of storytelling. I think we as an audience can only be benefitted by this type of narrative where the characters drive the plot rather than being driven by it. I absolutely loved this movie as much as I've loved each of M. Night Shyamalan's other mvoies (meaning a lot) and I can't wait to see what he does next.

Oh yeah...and Adrien Brody rules! ;)

Rocketboy
08-04-2004, 09:15 PM
Great way to sums things up! I agree with you for the most part...but I still hate the Sixth Sense.

2-1B
08-05-2004, 04:56 AM
Great post Roojay. :)

Hellboy, sorry you didn't like it but I have to respect what you said about the production vs. the story. :)

Guyote, those are some great questions so let me just touch on them a bit:

I think Noah was a total basket case.
I think his point to the story is that "we" can NOT completely shield ourselves from the harsh realities of life.
Yes, it was a controlled environment and that did help but there is no way to completely stop the corrosion of the human heart. Noah was jealous of Lucious and his love, so he tried to kill him. The unthinkable has come to the Village, the very past horror they tried to avoid.
I think Noah is also there to show the danger of brainwashing. He got so wrapped up in the story of the creatures and so fascinated with it that he became obsessed. I loved how he had Lucious blood on him and said something about the bad color attracted them. As for taking the suit, well he was so wrapped up in it that when he found it, he just had to become a creature. :D

Meh, for all I know I could be way off track. Noah might have known all along that it was a hoax. Maybe he really did go in the woods on his own and found out for himself that he would not be harmed because there was nothing to harm him. Maybe that's why he was laughin like that in the beginning. Maybe he knew of the farce and he was giddy because he knew what the others didn't.

What do you think ? :D

ThomasLane
08-10-2004, 03:15 PM
I thought it was a pretty good story, but it was unsatisfying. There were a bunch of little questions that seem like they should be important, but they go unanswered.

- Why won't the blind girl tell Lucius his color?
- Why can't the Sigourney Weaver character and the Wiliam Hurt character get together?
- Who was skinning the livestock, and why?
- And why didn't one of the council members just make the trek through the forest and save themselves a huge headache? (the "oath" thing is pretty weak)

One of the things that I liked about "Signs" was that all the little character flaws and strange events were revealed to be important to the outcome of the story. But in this movie, they all just go nowhere.

Rocketboy
08-10-2004, 04:04 PM
Did M Night steal the story for "The Village?"
May contain SPOILERS for "The Village."


Author Contemplating Lawsuit Over 'The Village'
Mon Aug 9, 8:40 PM ET

LOS ANGELES (Reuters) - Simon & Schuster Inc. is reviewing its legal options against The Walt Disney Co. and writer-director M. Night Shyamalan over what the author of a children's book says are similarities between its plot and the film "The Village," a spokeswoman for the publisher said on Monday.

The film, which slipped to second place last weekend, has grossed $85.6 million. Last week reports circulated that its plot and surprise ending parallel Margaret Peterson Haddix's first book "Running Out of Time," published in 1995.

Haddix told Reuters that she heard about the similarities last week when fans -- and then journalists -- began calling and e-mailing her and her publisher to ask if she had sold the book to Shyamalan. She said she has never spoken to "The Sixth Sense" director or to Disney.

"It's certainly an interesting situation," Haddix said. "I'm just examining what my options are."

In a statement, Disney and Shyamalan's Blinding Edge Pictures said they "believe these claims to be meritless."

Shyamalan has battled a copyright lawsuit brought by a Pennsylvania screenwriter who claimed the plot from the 2002 film "Signs" mirrored his unproduced script "Lord of the Barrens."

In "Running Out of Time" and "The Village," adults in a bucolic 19th century town keep the same secret from their children, and a plucky tomboy journeys through dangerous woods to get medicine.

Haddix said she optioned the book twice -- once to Viacom Inc.-owned Nickelodeon, which allowed the option to expire in May 2003 without making a film.

She saw "The Village" last week but declined to discuss her opinion of the film. "Let's just say that I saw the same similarities that other people have pointed out," she said.

Lawyers for Simon & Schuster also were reviewing their legal options, spokeswoman Tracy van Straaten said.

"This is a children's book...that sold more than half a million copies and won prizes, so it's not an obscure book for us," van Straaten said. The book was nominated for an Edgar Award, the nation's top prize for mystery stories.

Here is a description of the book:

When a diphtheria epidemic hits her 1840 village, thirteen-year-old Jessie discovers it is actually a 1995 tourist site under unseen observation by heartless scientists, and it's up to Jessie to escape the village and save the lives of the dying children.

http://story.news.yahoo.com/news?tmpl=story&cid=598&ncid=790&e=10&u=/nm/20040810/film_nm/leisure_thevillage_dc

Beast
08-10-2004, 05:53 PM
I thought it was a pretty good story, but it was unsatisfying. There were a bunch of little questions that seem like they should be important, but they go unanswered.

- Why won't the blind girl tell Lucius his color?
- Why can't the Sigourney Weaver character and the Wiliam Hurt character get together?
- Who was skinning the livestock, and why?
- And why didn't one of the council members just make the trek through the forest and save themselves a huge headache? (the "oath" thing is pretty weak)

One of the things that I liked about "Signs" was that all the little character flaws and strange events were revealed to be important to the outcome of the story. But in this movie, they all just go nowhere.
- I don't think she told Lucius his color, because it was red. He was the 'bad color' but that's what attracted her to him. He was the firey and dangerous person. In regards to the color red, I do have to wonder what they do to a child that is born with red hair. ;)

- I don't think they can't get together. Unless I missed a plot point. I think there's some attraction there clearly, but maybe they just don't feel it's right. Or maybe that's there own little private sin, that they're struggling with. I'll have to watch it again.

- This one is easier to answer. Noah was doing it. He was using the skins and the feathers to make his monster suit more scary. That's why it looks different then the other suits. You can even see some bones and parts he didn't use in the 'Quiet Room' when they find him missing.

- Well, I assume during the first few years after setting up the Village there were a lot of desires of missing the outside world. That's why the oath was taken, so noone would leave and possibly destroy the peaceful utopia that they'd created. The same oath bites them on the arse due to what happens. :)

MTFBWY and HH!!

Jar Jar Binks

Jedi_Master_Guyute
08-11-2004, 01:58 AM
Great post Roojay. :)

Hellboy, sorry you didn't like it but I have to respect what you said about the production vs. the story. :)

Guyote, those are some great questions so let me just touch on them a bit:

I think Noah was a total basket case.
I think his point to the story is that "we" can NOT completely shield ourselves from the harsh realities of life.
Yes, it was a controlled environment and that did help but there is no way to completely stop the corrosion of the human heart. Noah was jealous of Lucious and his love, so he tried to kill him. The unthinkable has come to the Village, the very past horror they tried to avoid.
I think Noah is also there to show the danger of brainwashing. He got so wrapped up in the story of the creatures and so fascinated with it that he became obsessed. I loved how he had Lucious blood on him and said something about the bad color attracted them. As for taking the suit, well he was so wrapped up in it that when he found it, he just had to become a creature. :D

Meh, for all I know I could be way off track. Noah might have known all along that it was a hoax. Maybe he really did go in the woods on his own and found out for himself that he would not be harmed because there was nothing to harm him. Maybe that's why he was laughin like that in the beginning. Maybe he knew of the farce and he was giddy because he knew what the others didn't.

What do you think ? :D

Caesar- "wake up, sucker...." :crazed: i couldn't help but toss in a DOTD reference. :D

I saw this flick again last week with a good friend of mine (who loved it) and more things stuck out to me, a few of which you mentioned, but allow me to elaborate. When Noah is sitting on the chair and is covered in blood and talks about the bad color, a thought came to me about the idea of "red" being the bad color. now, red is the color of "blood" and red is the bad color. hence, it's just another way of discussing that the spilling of blood (red) just attracts more of these "creature" or another way of saying it is, "violence breeds violence." Think about it: Noah stabs Luscious and in any normal day society, Noah would've taken some sort of punishment for his crime, more than likely in sort of physical treatment, have it be death or some sort of beating, but there still would've been violence as a result of violence. It's a cycle and the idea of red being the bad color, so you should avoid is it just an underlying away of stating the negativity towards violence and its results. Hope that made sense.

As for Noah, i am still torn on this one. I thank Binks for pointing out to me that his creature suit had feathers and whatnot on it, so it was more than obvious that he had some sort of knowledge of the creatures, whether he knew it was a hoax or he just saw one and tried to build a suit of his own, i don't know, but it's safe to say that his thoughts on the creatures took him over which is why he in fact became one at the end. I still can't grasp why would he would go after Ivy, but my only thought is that it was to scare her back to the village and not let her get out. It is this thought that makes me think that he was in fact sane and the whole handicapped thing was just for show/inicite thoughts into peoples heads. It also shows a deep love for Ivy that he would do what he could in order to save her from the towns and any sort of harm. If you notice, he didn't really touch her in the woods, he just ran by her, barely touching her. I just want to sit down with M. Night and discuss this with him!!

on a side note, i picked up the score for the film and it's been on repeat for the 36 hours i've had it. The violin work is just breathtaking and I keep listening to the track where Luscious first grabs Ivy's hand they run into the basement. Very awesome score and it ranks in my top few, ever.

any thoughts/theories on my thoughts/theories are welcome/appreciated! Cheers! :D

2-1B
08-11-2004, 02:55 AM
Caesar- "wake up, sucker...." :crazed: i couldn't help but toss in a DOTD reference. :D

Bless your heart. Seriously, all it takes is a Dawn quote like that to put a smile on my face and in my post. :)



I saw this flick again last week with a good friend of mine (who loved it) and more things stuck out to me, a few of which you mentioned, but allow me to elaborate. When Noah is sitting on the chair and is covered in blood and talks about the bad color, a thought came to me about the idea of "red" being the bad color. now, red is the color of "blood" and red is the bad color. hence, it's just another way of discussing that the spilling of blood (red) just attracts more of these "creature" or another way of saying it is, "violence breeds violence." Think about it: Noah stabs Luscious and in any normal day society, Noah would've taken some sort of punishment for his crime, more than likely in sort of physical treatment, have it be death or some sort of beating, but there still would've been violence as a result of violence. It's a cycle and the idea of red being the bad color, so you should avoid is it just an underlying away of stating the negativity towards violence and its results. Hope that made sense.

As for Noah, i am still torn on this one. I thank Binks for pointing out to me that his creature suit had feathers and whatnot on it, so it was more than obvious that he had some sort of knowledge of the creatures, whether he knew it was a hoax or he just saw one and tried to build a suit of his own, i don't know, but it's safe to say that his thoughts on the creatures took him over which is why he in fact became one at the end. I still can't grasp why would he would go after Ivy, but my only thought is that it was to scare her back to the village and not let her get out. It is this thought that makes me think that he was in fact sane and the whole handicapped thing was just for show/inicite thoughts into peoples heads. It also shows a deep love for Ivy that he would do what he could in order to save her from the towns and any sort of harm. If you notice, he didn't really touch her in the woods, he just ran by her, barely touching her. I just want to sit down with M. Night and discuss this with him!!

on a side note, i picked up the score for the film and it's been on repeat for the 36 hours i've had it. The violin work is just breathtaking and I keep listening to the track where Luscious first grabs Ivy's hand they run into the basement. Very awesome score and it ranks in my top few, ever.

any thoughts/theories on my thoughts/theories are welcome/appreciated! Cheers! :D

Yeah, I like your points on Noah, I can't say I'm totally sold either way as to his sanity. I'm still leaning toward COO-COO COO-COO but who knows, I'll watch it again.

Excellent post Binks, very well stated and I applaud you for the Noah/skins observation.

Ehhhh, about the theft of the story idea, I don't know . . . come on, it's not a completely original idea in the first place so I think what matters is the details. The simple connection of a modern society hidden as 19th century is NOT sufficient IMO. Duh, of course medicine is the common reason to leave - why else would they ? :rolleyes:

SithDroid
08-14-2004, 08:56 PM
I thought this movie was great. A lot of people and critics are giving it a hard time saying it was predictable and they guessed the ending 1/2 way through. Well, I for one loved it. It kept me guessing like when you find out that the creatures are fake, then you see one chasing her, it makes you think that they are indeed real, then you find out they are fake again. The new girl Howard was amazing. I sometimes had a hard time believeing she would run like that being blind and all, but this movie was quite entertaining.

Rocketboy
08-14-2004, 10:36 PM
The new girl Howard was amazing.She's related to Ron Howard. His daughter if I'm not mistaken.

2-1B
08-15-2004, 02:55 AM
. . . thus making her Clint Howard's niece.

Creepy. :crazed: