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View Full Version : Baking instructions for high altitude??



scruffziller
05-31-2003, 12:24 PM
On my DiGiorno deep dish pizza box it says,
"For High Altitude(Over 3,500 ft.) bake as directed for 70 to 75 minutes."

What is up with that?:D

Exhaust Port
05-31-2003, 12:54 PM
Thinner air causes poor heat transfer and lower BTU's for a given flame. I've done some camping above 10,000' in the lower Rocky's and it can take a while to boil water.

scruffziller
05-31-2003, 02:10 PM
That is some cool science.

Exhaust Port
05-31-2003, 02:34 PM
But it brings up another quesiton, how many people would even know the altitiude that they are at to know if they should adjust cooking times?

James Boba Fettfield
05-31-2003, 02:42 PM
Now let's give it up to our atmosphere for making this all possible! You rock, atmosphere!

Exhaust Port
05-31-2003, 02:56 PM
No way man, the atmosphere has been keeping us down too long. Down with the atmosphere!! :D

Mr. JabbaJohnL
05-31-2003, 03:54 PM
Dang, I live in Colorado (mile high and all that) and it doen't take that long.

Bel-Cam Jos
05-31-2003, 05:02 PM
I have a hard time remembering my latitude and longitude, but I need to know, because just about all the recipes I've seen tell you what degrees and minutes are necessary. I think my lat & long is about 34 degrees, 9 minutes, plus 117 degrees and 40 minutes. :p Most of my food comes out cold; must be a problem with my oven. :rolleyes:

Exhaust Port
05-31-2003, 05:56 PM
That's funny Bel-Cam Jos! :D I'll have to use that one.

Lord Malakite
05-31-2003, 06:45 PM
Good reasoning Exhaust Port.

It has to do with the pressure. Boiling points are related to the amount of pressure and heat being added. Lower one, the other has to rise to acheive boiling.

Darth Jax
05-31-2003, 07:18 PM
originally posted by exhaust port
No way man, the atmosphere has been keeping us down too long. Down with the atmosphere!!


that's gravity keeping you down

CloneTrooperMace
05-31-2003, 07:41 PM
I guess if you are on a plane and you want pizza.Maybe you can?

Exhaust Port
05-31-2003, 09:24 PM
Originally posted by Lord_Malakite
It has to do with the pressure. Boiling points are related to the amount of pressure and heat being added. Lower one, the other has to rise to acheive boiling.

Oh yeah, that's it. I don't know what I was referring to.

Kidhuman
05-31-2003, 09:36 PM
Do you think they cook it on the ground and just warm it up in a microwave since it takes so long?

Lord Malakite
06-01-2003, 02:31 PM
I assume you are talking about food on commercial airplanes kidhuman. I don't know exactly how they do that since I've never flown in a commercial plane, but I would assume cooking times for food shouldn't matter that much since the plane would be pressurized. If they did heat things up later on instead of cooking them right there, I'm certain it would have to be due to the fact that there are so many passengers to begin with.

Exhaust Port
06-01-2003, 03:18 PM
For all I know all food is of the reheated variety for the very reason Lord_Malakite said, too many passengers. In addition the requirements of uncooked items, mainly refrigeration, make it uneconomical to bring items that require cooking.

Just FYI, the highest cabin altitude (the relative altitude pressure inside a pressurized aircraft) you'll experience is 8000'. A story that was relayed to me was a passenger upon exiting the aircraft took a moment to complain to the flight crew that they flew too low the whole flight. They assured him that they were at quite a high altitude at cruise. He called their bluff by showing him his fancy watch that would show the altitude. Sadly he wouldn't except the answer that the watch calculated altitude by pressure and only would register the cabin pressure of 8000' at cruise. :)

JediTricks
06-02-2003, 02:13 AM
Originally posted by Exhaust Port
Thinner air causes poor heat transfer and lower BTU's for a given flame. I've done some camping above 10,000' in the lower Rocky's and it can take a while to boil water. Same here, except it was the Sierra Nevadas for me during Boy Scouts. It got so bad at the last camp before the summit of Mt Whitney that our troop simply didn't bother cooking the food... oh what a mistake that was (sad thing was, we had already learned this mistake on Mt Badden-Powell... never eat freeze-dried spaghetti without following the directions).


Originally posted by Darth Jax
that's gravity keeping you down No, you're thinking of "The Man".

Bel-Cam Jos
06-03-2003, 07:42 PM
Originally posted by Darth Jax
that's gravity keeping you down

Originally posted by JediTricks
No, you're thinking of "The Man".
You know, even though I'm just hangin' around with nothin' to do but frown, rainy days and Mondays always get me down. :( :rolleyes:
JT, did you build the 1 foot high rock tower to make Mt. Baden Powell exactly 9400 ft in elevation? (my exact numbers may be off on the height, but I know it's one foot below an even 100 number).

Darth Jax
06-03-2003, 08:56 PM
originally posted by JediTricks
No, you're thinking of "The Man".

"step up sucker, understand, don't you know
I'm the Man"

elegantly put by anthrax long before it became fashionable to fuse rap and metal.


originally posted by JediTricks
It got so bad at the last camp before the summit of Mt Whitney that our troop simply didn't bother cooking the food... oh what a mistake that was (sad thing was, we had already learned this mistake on Mt Badden-Powell... never eat freeze-dried spaghetti without following the directions).


guess it is true that those that don't learn from the mistakes of the past are destined to repeat them.

JediTricks
06-04-2003, 02:36 AM
Originally posted by Bel-Cam Jos
JT, did you build the 1 foot high rock tower to make Mt. Baden Powell exactly 9400 ft in elevation? (my exact numbers may be off on the height, but I know it's one foot below an even 100 number). Nope, we signed the book and left. We weren't in the "fun" mood, nothing to do up there - even on Whitney (tallest mountain in continental US) there was stuff to do at each camp (well, not like a camp counsellor or anything, but stuff to explore and room to try stuff out and things to see), but BP didn't feel that way at all.


Originally posted by Darth Jax
guess it is true that those that don't learn from the mistakes of the past are destined to repeat them. Or have them repeat on them. ;) Baden-Powell was our final training hike before Whitney too... I blame the altitude for the mistakes (I got wicked altitude sickness near the top of Whitney).

Bel-Cam Jos
06-04-2003, 07:37 PM
Originally posted by JediTricks
No, you're thinking of "The Man".
Last night, CBS had the Top 100 Heroes/Villains, and Man was the #20 villain. The Man from Bambi, that is.

Stemp Fester
06-23-2003, 11:16 AM
Just remember to attach the parachute to the oven....