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Lord Malakite
11-07-2003, 03:05 PM
I've been a little bored recently, so I figured we could play a little game. As you know most of us are big Star Wars buffs, able to tell people every single line of dialogue from the movies and point out the names of even the most obscure charactors among other useless information. So I figure we could try to expand on this idea with a video game thread devoted entirely to useless video game info. Who knows, we might acually learn something new. ;)


Berzerk is the only game known to have directly caused a fatality involuntarily ("Marathon Gaming" and suicide are voluntary). In the early 1980s a person died of a heart attack while playing the game.

Gun Fight, a Midway game produced in 1975 was the first game to use a microprocessor. The microprocessor's speed? A whopping 2 mhz.

During their peak popularity arcade games were everywhere: pizza shops, restaurants, retail stores, even car dealerships.

Computer Space, the first arcade game ever made was released in four colors: green, red, yellow, and blue.

Flynn's is the name of the arcade in Tron.

Centipede was the first arcade game designed by a woman.

Pong was not the first video game, but it was the first successful video game.

To date, no home console system (handhelds aren't considered home console systems) has matched the success of the Atari 2600 (a.k.a. the VCS). It was in production for an amazing 14 years.

Video game violence existed prior to the Mortal Kombat era. In Exidy's Death Race (released in 1976) the player's goal was to drive over Gremlins (which appeared as real people to many). In Chiller, a later release by the company from 1986, the object was to shoot human targets and was quite gory for the time.

Dragon's Lair II production as put on hold because of the decline in popularity of arcade games. It was finally released in 1991.

Williams arcade games such as Defender, Stargate, Robotron and Sinistar are among the most challenging and difficult games to play.

Many classic arcade games were converted to newer games (by replacing the controls, marquee and game board) since they no longer made money in arcades. In retrospect, this wasn't such a good idea, since classics are the most popular games today.

Steve Russell, an MIT student, created Spacewar in 1961. This was the basis for the first video arcade game.

Atari was commissioned by the U.S. military to develop a training simulator version of Battlezone. Two cabinets were made with a modified version of original Battlezone.

Mario, Nintendo’s star character of Donkey Kong fame was originally called "jumpman".

Budweiser Tapper, a Bally Midway game where you play a bartender who serves beer to customers was also released in another form: Rootbeer Tapper (a non-alcoholic form) to appease child-oriented arcades.

Proper arcade etiquette to let someone know you want to play the next game was (is) to put your quarter above the control panel or marquee bracket.

Tron was a box-office flop, but an arcade sensation.

Three arcade games have been created based on music stars. Bally Midway released Journey in 1983, based on the rock group of the same name, Midway released Revolution-X in 1994, based on the rock group Aerosmith, and Sega released Michael Jackson's Moonwalker in 1990.

Red Donkey Kong cabinets are very rare. They are from the very first few made off the production line: Radarscope factory conversions. These games are VERY collectible.

Bally released a trivia game known as Professor Pac-Man. The game was a huge bomb, only 400 were made (by comparison over 100,000 Pac-Man games were made).

It was only recently that someone was able to achieve the perfect score on Pac-Man. In 1999, Billy Mitchell reached a score of 3,333,360 points, the highest score possible on the game.

The actual names of the ghosts in Pac-Man are: Shadow, Speedy, Bashful and Pokey. The ghosts' nicknames are Blinky, Pinky, Inky and Clyde, respectively.

There are 240 dots to be devoured in each Pac-Man maze.

Pac-Man was originally released in Japan as Puck Man. When the game was brought over to the US, the name was changed due to fears of people using the name in a more vulgar sense. Hint: What rhymes with puck?

The first arcade game (Computer Space) was a flop. It was too hard to understand.

There have been over 3000 different arcade games made since they first appeared in the 1970s.

Baby Pac-Man was the first and only one of three video game/pinball hybrid games ever made popular. The other two games: Granny and the Gators (also released by Bally) and Caveman (released by Gottlieb) were not very successful.

Most full size arcade games weigh 250 – 350 pounds.

Many games with black and white monitors used color overlays to simulate a color screen.

Pac-Man's creator came up with the Pac-Man character after looking at a pizza missing one slice.

There is an organization that records, tracks and verifies high scores for all video games: Twin Galaxies.

Galaga was one of the first games to feature a bonus stage.

Space Invaders caused a coin shortage when originally released in Japan.

Warrior, a vector game by Cinematronics was the first one-on-one fighting game. The game was released in 1979, predating Street Fighter by 8 years.

The first successful arcade game was tested at Andy Capp's tavern. A few hours to weeks (varies on accounts) after being on location, it broke down. The reason? It was jammed with quarters.

Space Invaders earned three times as much money as the original Star Wars movie grossed at the box office.

Crystal Castles is one of the few classic arcade games to actually have an ending.

Eugene Jarvis designed Defender in 1980.

Atari developed a very unique pinball game named Hercules. It was so large that it used a wooden ball nearly the size of a billard cue ball for a pinball.

Top arcade players can play some games for over 20 hours on the same quarter.

Nolan Bushnell originally developed games under the name "Syzygy." After his first creation, he started the company known as Atari. Later on he went to found Chuckie Cheese.

Pinball was banned in New York until 1976.

Steve Juraszek was a 15 year-old prodigy who was able to score over 15 million in Defender.

mrmiller
11-07-2003, 03:15 PM
Best post ever :D :cool: :kiss:

=MATT=

Dr Zoltar
11-07-2003, 05:11 PM
Damn fine post! Ah, the memories...

James Boba Fettfield
11-07-2003, 06:31 PM
In Chiller, a later release by the company from 1986, the object was to shoot human targets and was quite gory for the time.

I played the rom of that. It was one of those misfit unlicensed NES games, and you got points for shooting out the windows of a church! It got old fast, but it was fun for a bit.

JediTricks
11-07-2003, 07:50 PM
Two arcade games have been created based on music stars. Bally Midway released Journey in 1983, based on the rock group of the same name and Sega released Michael Jackson's Moonwalker in 1990.Wasn't the game titled "Journey Escape"? Also, doesn't Aerosmith have some shooter now?


Bally released a trivia game known as Professor Pac-Man. The game was a huge bomb, only 400 were made (by comparison over 100,000 Pac-Man games were made).I saw this when I was a kid, very boring.


Baby Pac-Man was the first and only one of three video game/pinball hybrid games ever made popular. I played this when I was a kid, pretty fun but not entirely challenging. I used to get it confused with Pac-Man Jr. because of similar titles. Super Pac-Man is still my favorite of the Pac arcade series.


The first successful arcade game was tested at Andy Capp's tavern. A few weeks after being on location, it broke down. The reason? It was jammed with quarters. I'm pretty sure it was the next day that it broke down due to being full of quarters.


Atari developed a very unique pinball game named Hercules. It was so large that it used a billard cue ball for a pinball.This is not accurate, the Hercules pinball machine used a wooden ball slightly smaller than a billiard cue. The Redondo Beach pier arcade had a bank of these when I was a kid, boring game due to a very spartan board and flippers that simply weren't up to the task of hitting that mammoth pinball. Great arcade though at the time, had the old Raster graphics Star Trek game and a ton of great lesser-knowns like that, all in good condition.

Lord Malakite
11-07-2003, 08:27 PM
This is not accurate, the Hercules pinball machine used a wooden ball slightly smaller than a billiard cue.
That is why you're the Super Mod JT, because you've been around longer than I. :D ;)

Feel free to add additional useless facts if you have them guys.

Lord Malakite
11-07-2003, 08:36 PM
E.T. was the biggest movie of 1982, so it was big news when Warner Communications nabbed the video-game rights from Steven Spielberg and promised that the game would be done for the 1982 Christmas buying season. That gave Atari programmer Howard Scott Warshaw six weeks to design, program, and bug test the game. That he succeeded was a major surprise; that the game sucked should have surprised no one. That didn't stop Atari. Learning no lessons from their Pac-Man debacle (Atari produced 12 million Pac-Man cartridges, only ten million Atari 2600's had been sold). Atari produced five million E.T. cartridges. Nearly all of them came back. Faced with tons of unusable merchandise, Atari ended up sending 14 truckloads of cartridges to a landfill in Alamagordo, New Mexico. Don't bother taking the trip, though. Everything was crushed by a steamroller before being dumped and then was covered in cement.

Exhaust Port
11-07-2003, 08:37 PM
Also, doesn't Aerosmith have some shooter now?
Aerosmiths game came out about 5 years ago if my memory is correct. I can't remember the games name but you were suppose to save each member of the band. It sucked and I never played again.

James Boba Fettfield
11-07-2003, 09:42 PM
I thought Malakite was meaning just arcade for the music thing. Did Aerosmith's come out in arcades?

If you're meaning all video games, then you have Iron Maiden, Metallica, and Kiss games. Then there's the Britney Spears game and other music star games I don't remember right now.

Does that count as useless knowledge?

Exhaust Port
11-07-2003, 09:43 PM
Yes, the Aerosmith shooter game was an arcade only machine.

James Boba Fettfield
11-07-2003, 09:44 PM
I wonder if Caesar owns it.

Exhaust Port
11-07-2003, 09:45 PM
It was called Revolution X.

http://www.joystixamusements.com/vidgame.asp?IDA=43

You shot CD's instead of bullets. LAME. :D

James Boba Fettfield
11-07-2003, 09:48 PM
Dang, it's a lot older than I thought.

EDIT-I think I found out why I thought it was not an arcade game. It was released for Saturn, as well. I learn something new everyday.

plasticfetish
11-08-2003, 03:17 AM
"Useless Video game knowledge"
I object to the title of this thread ... this is all great and very important stuff!

Computer Space, the first arcade game ever made was released in three colors: green, red and blue.
I would add yellow to that. (See pic below.)

Great arcade though at the time, had the old Raster graphics Star Trek game...
You can play that game at my house on Atari 800 (or 400) also. :) (I love that game.)

JediTricks
11-08-2003, 05:37 AM
Star Trek... You can play that game at my house on Atari 800 (or 400) also. :) (I love that game.)You can play that game online, I've seen it in a free Java emulation somewhere. I wasn't as good at it as I wanted to be, I guess being a Trekkie doesn't make you automatically good at the video game. ;) My dad has an Atari 400 computer with working modem, not even as cool as my old TRS-80 though IMO. :D


Trivia:
I believe SNK Neo Geo is still the only home video game system that was 100% compatible with its arcade counterparts, to the point where you could actually rent the arcade machine's catrdridge to play at home. Both the home console and the arcade machines were able to use the Neo Geo memory card.

(and I still have mine :D)

The NEC Turbografx-16 is not a true 16-bit system despite it's name. Although the Sega Genesis, and later the Super NES, are 16-bit systems, the T-16 is actually an souped-up 8-bit system not unlike the NES.

CooLJoE
11-08-2003, 09:33 AM
Berzerk is the only game known to have directly caused a fatality. In the early 1980s a person died of a heart attack while playing the game.

Not true. There was a kid a year ago or so that killed himself because of EverQuest. And I'm not sure if he was the only one or not.


To date, no home system has matched the success of the Atari 2600 (a.k.a. The VCS). It was in production for an amazing 14 years.

If you count the Gameboy, it would beat that record or atleast match it. And its still going.

Exhaust Port
11-08-2003, 09:59 AM
The NEC Turbografx-16 is not a true 16-bit system despite it's name. Although the Sega Genesis, and later the Super NES, are 16-bit systems, the T-16 is actually an souped-up 8-bit system not unlike the NES.
Ugh, that Turbografx system blew too. The Genesis was the best of the lot by far but for quite a while the game support for it was very poor as Sega had only started to allow outside vendors to produce games for their system. I still have mine and love it!!!



CooLJoE[/b]]Not true. There was a kid a year ago or so that killed himself because of EverQuest. And I'm not sure if he was the only one or not.
True, but I think that fact was geared towards arcade systems not home or PC games.

jjreason
11-08-2003, 11:09 AM
I resent the "Turbografx blew" quote - where else could I have played keepers like "Legendary Axe" and "Bonk's Revenge"? Granted, it was no Genesis but there were some really fun and playable games on that system (including also the best R-Type game I've ever played). Some other notables from the Turbo days.......

TV Sports Football
Bonk 2
Bloody Wolf (!!!!)
Ninja Something (awesome as well)
World Class Baseball (addictive gameplay, a friend and I would fight during games)

and you could do it all in the palm of your hand as well, with the "game boy on roids" portable - which bragged a full colour screen.

Let's hear it for Turbografx!!!!!!!! :D

James Boba Fettfield
11-08-2003, 11:35 AM
Not true. There was a kid a year ago or so that killed himself because of EverQuest. And I'm not sure if he was the only one or not.

Bezerk killed the guy while playing it, it wasn't like he got depressed because of the game and committed suicide, as in the case of the EverQuest loser, uh I mean person. EverQuest didn't kill the guy, the guy killed himself.


If you count the Gameboy, it would beat that record or atleast match it. And its still going.

Wasn't it 1989 when GameBoy was introduced? To match that record of 14 years it would still have to be in production in year 2003. I don't remember any pea colored screen GameBoys still being manufactured today or even in the last few years. GameBoy Color and Pocket put an end to the GameBoy era.

scruffziller
11-08-2003, 02:23 PM
Berzerk is the only game known to have directly caused a fatality. In the early 1980s a person died of a heart attack while playing the game.

There was a report of a guy in Hong Kong who died of dehydration, exhaustion, etc. from playing EverQuest at an internet cafe for 3 days straight. No food, water, or sleep.




Steve Russell, an MIT student, created Spacewar in 1961. This was the basis for the first video arcade game.

The computer machine it was on cost $50,000.


Mario, Nintendo’s star character of Donkey Kong fame was originally called "jumpman".

The reason it is called DONKEY Kong, was because when it was being produced for America there was a mistranslation of the words from Japanese. It was suppose to be MONKEY Kong.

Lord Malakite
11-08-2003, 03:00 PM
Man, you guys like disproving me more than putting up more useless facts. :D


There was a report of a guy in Hong Kong who died of dehydration, exhaustion, etc. from playing EverQuest at an internet cafe for 3 days straight. No food, water, or sleep.
That dosen't technically count as the game directly killing him. Something within the game itself had to cause the result of death in order to count. In the case you mentioned it was just from plain stupidity of not taking a break. Which by the way is known as "Marathon Gaming Syndrom". ;)


Wasn't it 1989 when GameBoy was introduced? To match that record of 14 years it would still have to be in production in year 2003. I don't remember any pea colored screen GameBoys still being manufactured today or even in the last few years. GameBoy Color and Pocket put an end to the GameBoy era.
Correct. Plus, I was aiming for home systems (a.k.a. consoles you hook to a T.V.). The Game Boy is a handheld. :p

Lord Malakite
11-08-2003, 03:14 PM
What most gamers may not know is that Easter eggs are the last bit of fallout of one of the most significant decisions in the history of the industry, Atari's decision to deny credit to its programmers. The roots of the decision lie in the business practices of the mainframe computing world. In the world before the PC revolution, computing giant IBM viewed programmers as jobbers, interchangeable cogs working on a digital assembly line. The concept of giving programmers credit for developing a VAX or DEC application was laughable. Atari and many early computer companies, looking for a business model, imitated IBM's, meaning no credits, low salaries, and no royalties for game developers. Besides, to Atari's way of thinking, putting credits on video games for the 2600 would just invite headhunters to poach its most talented employees. That decision eventually came back to bite Atari in the butt. Warren Robinett, who programmed the original Adventure for the 2600, rebelled against his bosses by placing a secret room within the game that could only be found by getting a hidden dot from the blue maze. If you managed to make it to the secret room, you could see "Created by Warren Robinnett" running vertically down your screen -- the very first Easter egg. Others, even more disenchanted with Atari management, left the company altogether to develop their own games for the Atari 2600. These were the first third-party developers, Activision and Imagic.

As you may know, Donkey Kong was the early hit that cemented Nintendo's position in the video-game business, and the cash cow that sustained the fledgling Nintendo of America. The game became an outright phenomenon, and Nintendo signed deals for everything from board games to lunch boxes to a cartoon show. More importantly, it sold the rights to make various console and computer ports. With over 60,000 Donkey Kong machines produced, and all of the income from the various licensing deals, Nintendo was flying high. What you may not know is that Nintendo's Japanese office received a telex from MCA Universal stating that the company had 48 hours to hand all profits earned from Donkey Kong over to MCA and destroy all unsold Donkey Kong inventory. The reason? MCA alleged that Donkey Kong infringed on Universal Studios' "King Kong" copyright. Never fond of being threatened, NoA met with MCA lawyers, seemingly with the intent of settling. MCA could see no other outcome, but Nintendo was suspicious, and asked for a short delay. It was granted, and the Nintendo legal team went to work digging up everything it could on the "King Kong" property. A month later, the two sides reconvened. After a civil dinner, Nintendo counsel Howard Lincoln dropped the bomb: They weren't settling. MCA honcho Sid Sheinberg reportedly went ballistic, and the lawsuit was on. Unfortunately for MCA, Nintendo had a very good reason for refraining from a settlement: It had discovered that MCA did not own the "King Kong" copyright! Even more shockingly, in a previous lawsuit MCA Universal had actually gone to pains to prove that the "King Kong" property was public domain! The writing was on the wall. With such strong evidence on its side, Nintendo pushed for a dismissal, which the judge quickly granted. MCA was ordered to pay $1.8 million in damages to Nintendo and to return the money it had bullied out of other Donkey Kong-affiliated licensees it had drawn into the dispute. Later on Nintendo honored their head lawyer by naming their latest character/game franchise, with his permission of course, after him. And what was the game you might ask? It was Kirby.

scruffziller
11-08-2003, 04:05 PM
Something within the game itself had to cause the result of death in order to count.
So what was the scientific basis of the cause of his heart attack? Was it caused by some form of brain seizure they always warn about in those instruction books?:D

You could comment more on my actual facts.:(

Berzerk was also a board game. As did alot of vidjo games.

Lord Malakite
11-08-2003, 04:21 PM
So what was the scientific basis of the cause of his heart attack? Was it caused by some form of brain seizure they always warn about in those instruction books?:D

You could comment more on my actual facts.:(
I would guess the over excitement took too much of a strain on the guy's heart, much like some rollercoaster deaths you have probably heard about on occasion.

I did comment on your comments. I gave the term used for that particular condition where someone plays themself to death. :crazed: The second one about the price sounds believable and I never even heard about the Monkey Kong one till now. :p

Kidhuman
11-08-2003, 07:19 PM
Very interesting thread. Most of these games I can remember. I can agree that E.T. sucked eggs. I think I finished that game in a matter of ten minutes.

jjreason
11-08-2003, 07:42 PM
Ha! I played the bejeezus out of ET myself, but didn't want to admit to it for fear of being ridiculed!!!! :D

How great were Activision games for the 2600? I have a disc for Playstation with quite a few of those old games all in one, and I've played hours of "Pitfall" on my PC. The game is still fun after all these years.

plasticfetish
11-08-2003, 09:01 PM
I can agree that E.T. sucked eggs. I think I finished that game in a matter of ten minutes.
I still have a copy of it floating around ... I don't think I've ever been able to stay interested for more than 5 minutes in that game. (Which, considering that I've played Asteroids for days at a time, means something.) A significantly bad game.

I remember seeing/reading (?) that it's creator also created the great Yar's Revenge.

CooLJoE
11-09-2003, 02:25 AM
Well, if handheld CONSOLES don't count, then you need to fix the title of this thread or that specific fact. No making rules for a fact after its been stated.

The original gameboy may not be in production, but the old games still work on the current games as the architecture is still very much there. So in my eyes, its still in production. And there doesn't seem to be an end for that architecture for atleast another couple of years. Unless Nintendo decides to make the next gameboy still be backward compatible.


Also, how did berzerk give the guy a heartattack? Unless it purposely electrocuted him or jumped out of the screen at him, its no more direct that the guy dying of dehydration or the guy committing suicide. I mean, the guy who committed suicide was SOO involved with EQ that when something happened to his character he felt no reason to live. Thats pretty damn directly related if you ask me. And yes, he was a moron for getting that involved and caring that much. I don't blame the game for it.....its the user that was at fault. But its still a direct result. Addictive game + moron who can't distinguish reality from fantasy = dead moron.

James Boba Fettfield
11-09-2003, 02:53 AM
So because it is backwards compatible means GameBoys are still in production? :crazed: That's like saying PS1 is still being produced because you can play its games on PS2. (PS1's might still be in production, I don't know, just using the example for a point) When GameBoy turned into GameBoy color, it became a new system. It's not like they redesigned the console's appearance, like what was done with Nintendo in its later years of production.

JediTricks
11-09-2003, 04:23 AM
and you could do it all in the palm of your hand as well, with the "game boy on roids" portable - which bragged a full colour screen. Ah, the TurboExpress, I still have mine, sitting next to my Atari Lynx... in a box in my closet somewhere. ;) Great system since it was the only color handheld at the time that could actually show TV (with the optional TV Tuner).


That "Monkey Kong" thing is a rumor, I've never seen evidence that it's true except that it "makes sense". I've heard that it was named "Donkey Kong" because the donkey represents a stubborn character, but I can't confirm that either.



The original gameboy may not be in production, but the old games still work on the current games as the architecture is still very much there. So in my eyes, its still in production. And there doesn't seem to be an end for that architecture for atleast another couple of years. Unless Nintendo decides to make the next gameboy still be backward compatible. Sorry, I'm not buying it. Just because the Atari 5200 could play 2600 games doesn't mean it was a 2600.


Also, how did berzerk give the guy a heartattack? Unless it purposely electrocuted him or jumped out of the screen at him, its no more direct that the guy dying of dehydration or the guy committing suicide.Yeah, I gotta agree with you on that, Berzerk didn't give the guy seizures which caused him to die or anything, it was his involvement with the game that led to a heart attack, no different from the reports of the yutz in Asia who died playing video games because he wouldn't leave the machine. It's not the game's fault they were so involved that they died, nothing in the game directly caused their deaths, their deaths were caused by intense stimulation which they chose to undertake.


TRIVIA:

In Donkey Kong, the reason Jumpman (aka Mario) is wearing a hat is because the original design of the character called for his hair to fly up during the downward part of a jump, but that level of sprite animation design was too detailed for Nintendo to achieve at the time.

-

Shigeru Miyamoto, designer of Donkey Kong, The Legend of Zelda, and other Nintendo classics and is considered the top video game designer ever, has no computer training whatsoever - he was chosen to design Donkey Kong because of his imagination and artistic qualities. He wrote the music to Super Mario Brothers and Legend of Zelda on his acoustic guitar.

-

Tetris was originally created to test Artificial Intelligence. It was based on a real-world game popular in Russia where the different-shaped pieces are made up of 5 squares which are supposed to be fit together to make one large rectangle - Tetris only uses 4 squares. Because it was invented in the USSR, it was the property of the country rather than its creator, the KGB were largely involved with its licensing for computer and later as the premiere Game Boy game. Eventually, the creator of the game defected to the US and reclaimed ownership and licensing rights once the Russian government's initial ownership period was up.

James Boba Fettfield
11-09-2003, 04:35 AM
April 28, 1982, Wednesday

Officials are investigating whether an 18-year-old boy suffered a heart attack because of the stress of playing a video game, Deputy Lake County Coroner Mark Allen says. The youth died earlier this month while playing a video game in Calumet City, Ill. A University of Nebraska researcher, Dr. Robert Eliot, has released a study saying video games can be hazardous to people who may be susceptible to heart disease. Allen said Tuesday Peter Bukowski, 18, of South Holland, Ill., suffered a heart attack caused "by myocardial inflamation."

"We don't want to say yes or no whether the video game represents enough exertion to have brought on the attack," Allen said, but he added the possibility was under investigation.

I think the reason Malakite's information is incorrect on the matter is because that death there was one of the only reported cases for close to twenty years, if not longer.

plasticfetish
11-09-2003, 05:33 AM
I've heard that it was named "Donkey Kong" because the donkey represents a stubborn character
That's my understanding. There's more about that here (http://www.gamespot.com/gamespot/features/video/dk_history/p02-01.html).

Lord Malakite
11-09-2003, 02:17 PM
Yeah, I gotta agree with you on that, Berzerk didn't give the guy seizures which caused him to die or anything, it was his involvement with the game that led to a heart attack, no different from the reports of the yutz in Asia who died playing video games because he wouldn't leave the machine. It's not the game's fault they were so involved that they died, nothing in the game directly caused their deaths, their deaths were caused by intense stimulation which they chose to undertake.
Thats just it JT, the difference is the intense stimulation. The idiot who died in Asia didn't die from an involuntary reaction caused by being over stimulated by the game from playing it one time like in the Beserk incident, he died because he voluntarily decided that playing a game was more important than doing basic things like eating, drinking, going to the can, etc. for days on end without taking a break. Same with the suicide case, he voluntarily ended his life because he lost at the game.

Lord Malakite
11-09-2003, 02:53 PM
Shigeru Miyamoto, designer of Donkey Kong, The Legend of Zelda, and other Nintendo classics and is considered the top video game designer ever, has no computer training whatsoever - he was chosen to design Donkey Kong because of his imagination and artistic qualities. He wrote the music to Super Mario Brothers and Legend of Zelda on his acoustic guitar.
This goes along with what you said JT.

In 1977, Shigeru Miyamoto's father, worried about his "dreamer" of a son, and placed a call to an old friend who was the president of a successful toy company. That friend was Hiroshi Yamauchi, and that "toy company" was Nintendo. As a favor to his friend, the young man was brought on board despite there not being any specific position that needed filling. Miyamoto floated around the company for three years, working a variety of jobs ranging from designing arcade cabinets, to creating new toys and just being a general art director. It wasn't until 1980, though, that Yamauchi asked Miyamoto to start working on video games. The imaginative young man was eager to work on such a new and exciting field. After a few stumbling blocks -- like losing a key license -- his game was finally made (Donkey Kong).

Lord Malakite
11-09-2003, 03:28 PM
Wasn't the game titled "Journey Escape"? Also, doesn't Aerosmith have some shooter now?

Nope, its just Journey (http://www.klov.com/game_detail.php?game_id=8242).

odb
11-09-2003, 05:48 PM
Three arcade games have been created based on music stars. Bally Midway released Journey in 1983, based on the rock group of the same name, Midway released Revolution-X in 1994, based on the rock group Aerosmith, and Sega released Michael Jackson's Moonwalker in 1990.


The Wu-Tang Clan had a beat 'em up created after them for the PS1, I think it was called Taste the Pain. Being most noteable for allowing 4 players to be in the ring at once and having no aerial moves of any kind.

Thrill Kill for the PS1 was banned in the UK.

That's all I can think of at the moment.

JediTricks
11-09-2003, 09:01 PM
Thats just it JT, the difference is the intense stimulation. The idiot who died in Asia didn't die from an involuntary reaction caused by being over stimulated by the game from playing it one time like in the Beserk incident, he died because he voluntarily decided that playing a game was more important than doing basic things like eating, drinking, going to the can, etc. for days on end without taking a break. I've played Berzerk, "intense stimulation" is not exactly how I would describe it. Both guys chose to play these games until their bodies could not take it, you claim that the heart attack guy died from the stimulation of the game, but the other guy was so stimulated by the game that he couldn't pull himself away to save his life (literally).


Nope, its just Journey (http://www.klov.com/game_detail.php?game_id=8242).I must have gotten it confused with Journey's Atari 2600 game "Journey Escape".


TRIVIA:

I worked for Nintendo twice, I was a sales rep during a holiday season, and another year I ran a Starfox competition (still have a boatload of those Starfox pins somewhere).

(ok, not trivia anybody would ever care about, but still :D)

Lord Malakite
11-09-2003, 10:04 PM
I've played Berzerk, "intense stimulation" is not exactly how I would describe it. Both guys chose to play these games until their bodies could not take it, you claim that the heart attack guy died from the stimulation of the game, but the other guy was so stimulated by the game that he couldn't pull himself away to save his life (literally).

Think of it like a gun JT. In one scenario a guy holds a gun to his head and shoots himself, then he dies. In another scenario a guy accidently bumps a table with the gun lying on it unknown to him. The gun hits the ground and fires, hitting the guy in the head. He then dies. What would you do? Would you rule both cases suicide. Most people would say no, that in one of the cases it was a complete accident. Only the one who did it on purpose would be considered suicide. Thats the way way this game thing is. The guy who died from the heart attack is like the guy who had the gun accidently go off. The one who decided to play non-stop is like the guy who commitied suicide.

The difference is that a rational person couldn't have ever forseen dieing a likely outcome from playing just one game (unless they seen a doctor who just happened to catch the problem and forwarned the person in advance). If that was the case fewer people would play games. In the other case the guy made a choice that any rational person would have known to be harmful. That is why most people know when it is time to take a break. Most people know that going for days on end without sleep, eating, or getting rid of bodily waste as being harmful.


TRIVIA:

I worked for Nintendo twice, I was a sales rep during a holiday season, and another year I ran a Starfox competition (still have a boatload of those Starfox pins somewhere).

(ok, not trivia anybody would ever care about, but still :D)


Cool, I never knew that. Which Star Fox was this for, the SNES or the N64 game?

jjreason
11-10-2003, 05:16 PM
I have a little trouble with the whole Monkey/Donkey Kong idea. The Japanese characters for those two animals wouldn't look anything alike, I wouldn't think. The only way it's plausible is if it happened in spoken conversation, but you'd think the english speaking Genius would have been able to pick up on the mistake.

David Crane, the guy who made Pitfall and many other Activision titles for 2600 was at one point (I believe) responsible for more cartridges sold than anyone else by some margin. Can't remember where I read this (maybe the booklet included in that PSone collection?). His games kick ***. Did he continue on with Activision?

CooLJoE
11-11-2003, 04:59 AM
Malakite - Every method that you've used to invalidate the asian guy only made the EQ suicide guy more valid. So its still wrong. Berzerk isn't the only game to directly cause a death.

The EQ kid played a game that was so intense that he got way too involved to the point of killing himself because of what happened to his character in the game. Sure he had a choice, but bundle the game's level of intense with his (obviously) weak mind = his rational thoughts kinda went out the window. So his death was caused by the game. And much like Berzerk, there was a part of the person that attributed to the death. Berzerk alone didn't cause the heart attack, the kid's health helped that. Same as the EQ kid's mental health.

scruffziller
11-11-2003, 07:19 AM
Think of it like a gun JT. In one scenario a guy holds a gun to his head and shoots himself, then he dies. In another scenario a guy accidently bumps a table with the gun lying on it unknown to him. The gun hits the ground and fires, hitting the guy in the head. He then dies. What would you do? Would you rule both cases suicide. Most people would say no, that in one of the cases it was a complete accident. Only the one who did it on purpose would be considered suicide. Thats the way way this game thing is. The guy who died from the heart attack is like the guy who had the gun accidently go off. The one who decided to play non-stop is like the guy who commitied suicide.

The difference is that a rational person couldn't have ever forseen dieing a likely outcome from playing just one game (unless they seen a doctor who just happened to catch the problem and forwarned the person in advance). If that was the case fewer people would play games. In the other case the guy made a choice that any rational person would have known to be harmful. That is why most people know when it is time to take a break. Most people know that going for days on end without sleep, eating, or getting rid of bodily waste as being harmful.
I do understand what Malakite is saying and I agree and see the difference.




TRIVIA:

I worked for Nintendo twice, I was a sales rep during a holiday season, and another year I ran a Starfox competition (still have a boatload of those Starfox pins somewhere).

(ok, not trivia anybody would ever care about, but still :D)
The Dell Guy???!!!!:D

Lord Malakite
11-11-2003, 12:32 PM
I do understand what Malakite is saying and I agree and see the difference.
Thank you! At least someone does.

JediTricks
11-11-2003, 07:20 PM
The first Starfox, for SNES. We had a special cartridge in the SNES display unit that played the game according to the contest rules. I think the idea was to get as far as you could on level one in 2 minutes or something.


Dude, you're getting a... Starfox T-shirt! :D


Malakite, we have no evidence that says the Asian guy was playing this game to kill himself. When you put a loaded gun to your head and pull the trigger, that's a specific intent; this Asian guy played till he died, but we have no reason to think he played TO DIE.

Lord Malakite
11-11-2003, 09:48 PM
Malakite, we have no evidence that says the Asian guy was playing this game to kill himself. When you put a loaded gun to your head and pull the trigger, that's a specific intent; this Asian guy played till he died, but we have no reason to think he played TO DIE.

I never said the Asian guy was playing the game to kill himself. I said the guy made a choice to do something that any rational person would have known to be dangerous, similar to the guy sticking a gun to his own head. The guy who stuck the gun to his own head could have been screwed up and thought that shooting himself would make him capable of flying. LOOK AT IT FROM A 3RD. PERSON PERSPECTIVE OF A RATIONAL, SANE, PERSON.

Perhaps what one of my friends here at the college said can convey what I mean: "Hmm ... I can see how both could have attributed... but a heart attack is a more direct and immediate cause... it's like epilespy.. outside stimuli can directly affect one's health... the other game scenarios are more like a lack of moral judgement or a result of a mental problem.. the problem with the EQ guy was he probably was mentally disturbed before he started playing the game... and it just added to it... but it couldn't be the direct cause."

Arguing that a video game directly kills people the way you are doing it, you could include just about anything. Someone gets crushed to death and it just happens to be an arcade machine that fell on him, so the game is responsible for killing him. A guy goes to a store to buy a video game only and gets killed in a car accident on the way there, so the game is responsible for killing him. A guy trips on a video game left on the stairs and breaks his neck, so the game is responsible for killing him. A guy gets electricuted from a frayed cord on a arcade machine, so the video game killed him. Some guy decides to eat a video game for the heck of it and chokes on it, therefore the game is responsible for killing him. :frus:

I honestly don't think there is anything else I can say to get my point across. You either get it or you don't, so I don't think I'll be commenting on it any more. Sorry if my post offends anyone in advance, but it gets frustrating when it feels like you are talking to a brick wall. I feel a lot better now. :crazed:

JediTricks
11-12-2003, 07:01 PM
In both instances, the game did not physically cause death, it did not reach out and strangle or electrocute or poison, but in both instances, the playing of the game caused some sort of reaction in the brains of the people playing them that led to their deaths: one supposedly caused a man to have increased strain on his circulatory system which caused a heart attack, and another became so involved by his game that he found himself unable to stop playing for such a long period that his body eventually shut down. Both deaths resulted from the players receiving powerful stimuli from the games, and both may or may not have resulted from prior disease (heart disease for one and mental disease for the other).


TRIVIA

The name "Atari" is a term from the Japanese game go, similar to saying "check" in chess.

Hasbro Interactive, the video game division of Hasbro, is no longer owned by Hasbro themselves. It was sold off for quick cash a few years ago to keep Hasbro from going bankrupt.

plasticfetish
11-12-2003, 07:24 PM
I don't know about being killed by a game ... but I do know that for a number of years, I did suffer from Pac Man fever.

But "seriously", that thing about the Atari name is interesting (didn't know that) ... I just looked it up and read that the term (from the game "Go") means roughly ... "Look out, this move I am making is dangerous to you."

ATARI!

So it's Infogrames that ended up buying the Atari name now I see?

JediTricks
11-12-2003, 08:21 PM
I think they only bought the Atari name, which had been recently retired by its previous owner. I could be wrong about that, it was within the past year and a half, IIRC.

Lord Malakite
11-13-2003, 01:25 AM
In both instances, the game did not physically cause death, it did not reach out and strangle or electrocute or poison, but in both instances, the playing of the game caused some sort of reaction in the brains of the people playing them that led to their deaths: one supposedly caused a man to have increased strain on his circulatory system which caused a heart attack, and another became so involved by his game that he found himself unable to stop playing for such a long period that his body eventually shut down. Both deaths resulted from the players receiving powerful stimuli from the games, and both may or may not have resulted from prior disease (heart disease for one and mental disease for the other).
Thought of one other possible way to put it that may make it clear what I'm going at, involuntary vs. voluntary.

Video Game Stimuli+EQ Guy=Suicide+Unable to deal with Reality=Voluntary Choice+Death

Video Game Stimuli+Asian Guy=Marathon Gaming+Unwilling to deal with Reality's Basic Needs=Voluntary Choice+Death

Video Game Stimuli+Beserk Guy=Heart Attack caused by Stimuli+Willing to deal with Reality=Involuntary Choice+Death

All three made the choice to play the video games. All three died as a result. But only the Beserk guy died involuntary. He didn't just get up and decide to have a heart attack for the heck of it, the same true for any body else who has a heart attack. The suicide guy and the Asain guy did have a voluntary choice. The suicide guy put the gun to his head and pulled the trigger (most likely knowing what would happen), the same for anyone else commiting suicide. The Asian guy made the choice to play without taking care of bodily needs and died (regardless if he didn't mean to kill himself), similar to someone who overdoses on drugs or drinks way too much to feel good and accidently kills themself in the process.

The game is responsible for killing the Beserk guy because it was an involuntary reaction to the game itself, like epilepsy. The game isn't responsible for killing the EQ guy or the Asian though, because their deaths were voluntary actions (intentionional or unintentional) that used the game only as an excuse to justify what they decided to do (though mental illness would be a justifiable excuse, especially for the EQ guy).

plasticfetish
11-13-2003, 02:36 AM
So what you're saying is ... Berserk killed the guy?

(Just yankin' your chain. You know, I got the idea. The game was so exciting that it killed the guy. Not ... the guy played it until he died. Honestly ... it's a pretty exciting game. I can dig it. I think Tempest is pretty exciting also ... that one gets the heart pumping pretty good.)

For you time and effort, I award you with this ... berserkatar.

EDIT: Here's a better version!

CooLJoE
11-13-2003, 12:53 PM
I still say that EQ caused the death the same as Berzerk. If the Berzerk kid had know he had heart problems (prior to the heart attack) or if he didn't have the problem at all....it would have been prevented. Therefore, Berzerk didn't really cause the heartattack, his body was already on the way to giving him one.

James Boba Fettfield
11-13-2003, 09:31 PM
I think we should also mention in here the curse of John Madden games as some useless knowledge!

I read an article about this in Sports Illustrated back when Madden 2003 was released, and the cover man was Marshall Faulk. Those who follow the NFL will know last season wasn't the greatest for the St. Louis Rams, or Faulk.

Here's some numbers courtesy of CNN:


2004 cover: Michael Vick -- Quarterback, Atlanta Falcons
Before cover: 24 touchdowns, almost 3,000 yards passing, more than 700 yards rushing
After cover: Broke leg in preseason, yet to play this season

2003 cover: Marshall Faulk -- Running Back, St. Louis Rams
Before cover: 21 touchdowns, more than 2,000 total yards
After cover: 10 touchdowns, fewer than 1,500 total yards

2002 cover: Daunte Culpepper -- Quarterback, Minnesota Vikings
Before cover: 16 games, 40 touchdowns
After cover: 11 games, 19 touchdowns

2001 cover: Eddie George -- Running Back, Tennessee Titans
The star of John Madden 2001 was no different. George registered a dramatic decline in rushing and receiving yards a year after putting his mug on EA's popular football franchise.

I hope Donovan McNabb is put on Madden 2005's cover.

Exhaust Port
11-13-2003, 10:33 PM
I wonder if that will hold true for the EA NCAA Football series. USC's quarterback is on that 2004 edition. Hopefully that will mean that they'll choke here soon. :D

mrmiller
11-14-2003, 01:29 PM
Being a big Atari collector and fan (duh.. look at my avatar) I had a lot I wanted to contribute to this thread, but it got crazy on the "did the game kill him or not" topic. I'll start posting a few now that we are getting back on track.

One interesting note has been touched on before with ET. It has actually been shown that ET was the Death of Atari. Now that is one bad video game. Maybe one game killed a person or not, but with ET we have a game that killed a multi-million dollar company!

=MATT=

Lord Malakite
11-14-2003, 08:51 PM
One of the oddest things about the rise of PC gaming is that it was never supposed to happen. Unlike consoles, which are essentially single-function computers designed specifically to play games, PCs were (and are) general purpose machines created to perform a variety of functions from reading your e-mail to surfing the Web to doing your taxes to writing the Great American Novel in a word processor. The basic design and architecture of the PC wasn't even designed for graphics, never mind the processor-intensive games we play on PCs today. So what happened? The answer, of course, is that (to paraphrase J.C. Herz), "The lure of turning these expensive collections of hardware into intellectual jungle gyms was just too great." The problem was, prior to 1995, all of the intense graphic and data processing required by games had to be built on the infrastructure of DOS and an architecture that wasn't designed for it. On top of that, unlike a console, PCs were built by different manufacturers and were loaded with different sound and graphics cards, none of which processed a program in the same way. That meant that developers had to decide which hardware to support and which to ignore. Heaven help the gamer whose hardware wasn’t supported by the game. At best, it simply wouldn’t run. At worst, it could cause a massive system crash. This actually happened to Microsoft in 1994 when it shipped a million copies of The Lion King with Compaq who had changed some of its hardware at the last minute and neglected to inform Microsoft. As a result, Bill Gates awoke on December 25, 1994 to the sound of a million children crying because their new PCs didn’t work. Enter Alex St. John, who, along with team members Eric Engstrom and Craig Eisler, were known inside Microsoft as the "Beastie Boys." At the time, Microsoft was pushing Windows 95 as a “multimedia” solution -- meaning movies, CD-ROM encyclopedias, and similar exciting products. St. John, though, had a revelation. He knew that the future of multimedia wasn’t Encarta, it was DOOM, a hot new game that had just been released by a scruffy group of nerds in Texas. If Windows 95 could be made an easy-to-use universal gaming platform, it would not only insure the success of the product, it would also kill DOS -- which was quickly becoming an albatross around Gates’ neck. That was the genesis of DirectX, a suite of multimedia Application Programming Interfaces (APIs) that provide a standard development platform for all Windows-based PCs. Game developers no longer have to write directly to hardware, they could now just use DirectX API calls and Windows would handle most of the sound and graphic processing for you. For end-users this meant that gamers no longer had to open their case and muck around with DIP switches on cards, load up memory managers, learn how to modify a config.sys file, or keep a box full of boot disks to get their games to run. Although there were plenty of problems along the way, eventually DirectX was spectacularly successful. It succeeded in killing DOS gaming and ending the nightmare of compatibility issues. In effect, DirectX opened up gaming to large mass of people who had neither the desire nor the ability to muck around with guts of their machine. As gaming becomes ever more mainstream, DirectX continues to make it easier to create and run games on a PC.

JediTricks
11-14-2003, 10:28 PM
... in theory. ;)

scruffziller
12-04-2003, 08:54 AM
... in theory. ;)
.....Mr. Anderson..............:D

Lord Malakite
01-23-2004, 09:36 PM
JBF and I have a combined amount of games ranging about 200 in total, give or take a few. Can't get more useless than that. :p

scruffziller
01-27-2004, 04:48 AM
I never said the Asian guy was playing the game to kill himself. I said the guy made a choice to do something that any rational person would have known to be dangerous, similar to the guy sticking a gun to his own head. The guy who stuck the gun to his own head could have been screwed up and thought that shooting himself would make him capable of flying. LOOK AT IT FROM A 3RD. PERSON PERSPECTIVE OF A RATIONAL, SANE, PERSON.

Perhaps what one of my friends here at the college said can convey what I mean: "Hmm ... I can see how both could have attributed... but a heart attack is a more direct and immediate cause... it's like epilespy.. outside stimuli can directly affect one's health... the other game scenarios are more like a lack of moral judgement or a result of a mental problem.. the problem with the EQ guy was he probably was mentally disturbed before he started playing the game... and it just added to it... but it couldn't be the direct cause."

Arguing that a video game directly kills people the way you are doing it, you could include just about anything. Someone gets crushed to death and it just happens to be an arcade machine that fell on him, so the game is responsible for killing him. A guy goes to a store to buy a video game only and gets killed in a car accident on the way there, so the game is responsible for killing him. A guy trips on a video game left on the stairs and breaks his neck, so the game is responsible for killing him. A guy gets electricuted from a frayed cord on a arcade machine, so the video game killed him. Some guy decides to eat a video game for the heck of it and chokes on it, therefore the game is responsible for killing him. :frus:

I honestly don't think there is anything else I can say to get my point across. You either get it or you don't, so I don't think I'll be commenting on it any more. Sorry if my post offends anyone in advance, but it gets frustrating when it feels like you are talking to a brick wall. I feel a lot better now. :crazed:
Actually I see the death of the guy in Asia playing EQ as being similar to a race car driver who gets killled in an accident while racing.

mabudonicus
01-27-2004, 12:11 PM
This thread is great, fellows!!!

My Mabupinion(like ya care:D)

Imagine I went into a store and found a huge display of Super Articulated Clonetroopers and Ephant mon's (MEN??) for like 15 cents a piece, and I couldn't even process the information and I died on the spot... what killed me???
Whereas if I spent all my money on SW and had to stop eating for a few months and died, THEN what killed me???

I dunno, I think it's pretty hilarious thinking about some guy all freaking out and yelling and stuff, desperate to get away from evil otto (real tragedy if the bouncing smiley face was the "last straw"... think the guy had the "de-rezzing" image on his tombstone) and then actually just fallinbg down dead.... I mean, it's dark humour, but it is pretty funny in an odd way....

I agree with whoever it was saying Tempest was that kind of exciting... I still get a bit crazy when I play that game.....

Anyways, I'll stop now, no reason to argue.. that landfill story about ET is priceless (all it does is make his neck stretch??? that's odd, wonder what it's supposed to MEAN??)

El Chuxter
01-27-2004, 01:14 PM
I remember the ET game. It was kinda. . . well. . . it had nothing to do with the stupid movie! :D I used to love to kill off ET, because you could toggle the joystick and flip his corpse back and forth. :Pirate:

Mortal Kombat was erroneously listed as being produced by Sega in an older Genus Edition of Trivial Pursuit.

Nintendo wanted an American sequel to Super Mario Bros faster than the programmers in Japan could produce one, so they changed the characters in a previously unrelated game ("Adventures in Dreamworld"?) to Mario, Luigi, Toad, and Princess Toadstool for what we know as Super Mario Bros 2. What we call Super Mario Bros 3 is, in Japan, Super Mario Bros 2.

I'm not sure, but I think Bionic Commando was the first major home console game to use profanity. (In the end, Hitler says, "You damn fool!")

When Mario dumped her to pursue Princess Toadstool, Pauline hooked up with the nameless exterminator from Donkey Kong II. She got hooked on bug spray, which led to her eventual death in the Zero World of Super Mario Bros. :)

The coolest quote of all time is "All your base are belong to us!"

plasticfetish
01-27-2004, 04:48 PM
I agree with whoever it was saying Tempest was that kind of exciting... I still get a bit crazy when I play that game.....
I think it was me. That game used to give me the shakes. Probably had more to do with chugging a cola Slurpie and eating 100 Now-and-Laters while playing at 7-11 though.

Atari Jaguar had a cool Tempest game, Tempest 2000 I think? (Wish I could Get my Jaguar to work.)

JediTricks
01-27-2004, 05:27 PM
Tempest was an awesome game, I'm not especially good at video games in general, but I used to be not so bad on that one. That was one game where I usually felt like I got a good value for my quarter, that one and Centipede.



Nintendo wanted an American sequel to Super Mario Bros faster than the programmers in Japan could produce one, so they changed the characters in a previously unrelated game ("Adventures in Dreamworld"?) to Mario, Luigi, Toad, and Princess Toadstool for what we know as Super Mario Bros 2. What we call Super Mario Bros 3 is, in Japan, Super Mario Bros 2.Nope, close but no cigar. You are right about US version of SMB2 being that unrelated Japanese title "Doki Doki No Panic", but the actual Japanese Super Mario Bros 2 was only released in the US on a special SNES Mario Bros bundle cart called "Super Mario All-Stars" (great cart BTW!), with the Japanese SMB2 being called "The Lost Levels". The Japanese and US share the same SMB3.

The Japanese SMB2 (and the aforementioned version on SNES) has a key gameplay difference from SMB1, you have to choose which character you want to play as, Mario or Luigi, because Luigi jumps higher and further than Mario, but skids longer upon landing as well. Choosing the right character is key to certain levels.

James Boba Fettfield
01-27-2004, 05:36 PM
Nintendo wanted an American sequel to Super Mario Bros faster than the programmers in Japan could produce one, so they changed the characters in a previously unrelated game ("Adventures in Dreamworld"?) to Mario, Luigi, Toad, and Princess Toadstool for what we know as Super Mario Bros 2. What we call Super Mario Bros 3 is, in Japan, Super Mario Bros 2.[/b]

There was a game for the SNES called Super Mario All-Stars. It included versions of Mario Bros. 1, 2, and 3. That is, the Mario Bros. 1, 2, and 3 of America. It also included a game entitled The Lost Levels. Those Lost Levels are what the Japanese version of Mario Bros. 2 consisted of. I think the reason for American gamers getting a different Mario Bros. 2 was because of the higher level of difficulty of the Lost Levels, so we got a different sequel than Japan.

With that being said, Mario Bros. 3 here and in Japan are the same game . . .

I think . . .

EDIT-And JT gets to it before I did.

Lord Malakite
01-27-2004, 11:14 PM
Nintendo wanted an American sequel to Super Mario Bros faster than the programmers in Japan could produce one, so they changed the characters in a previously unrelated game ("Adventures in Dreamworld"?) to Mario, Luigi, Toad, and Princess Toadstool for what we know as Super Mario Bros 2. What we call Super Mario Bros 3 is, in Japan, Super Mario Bros 2.

If I remember correctly, they made our Super Mario Bros. 2 from Doki Doki No Panic not because Nintendo wanted an American sequel to Super Mario Bros. faster than the programmers in Japan could produce one. It was because they thought that the Japanese version of Super Mario Bros. 2 (now known here as The Lost Levels as everyone already stated) was too difficult for Americans. Ironically, Japan got our version of Super Mario Bros. 2 about the same time as we got their version. Over there it is known as Super Mario Bros. America.

James Boba Fettfield
01-28-2004, 08:12 AM
The hardest part of that game for me was 9-3. I got the pic of it this morning when I was recalling just how difficult the game could be. How I loathe running under Bowser in a situation like that.

JediTricks
01-29-2004, 04:28 AM
I don't remember how I did it, but my cart has several TLL games saved on the D levels, so I guess either I found a warpzone or actually completed it at one point. That game is hard, and the more I play it, the more I suuuuuuuuuck at it! So I threw in the towel and have split my time between the other games on the cart and Lost Vikings. Damn I love the SNES!