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View Full Version : tipping........at Quizno's???



derek
12-09-2003, 11:33 PM
i had lunch today at quizno's, the sub sandwich store. i paid with my check card and noticed when i went to sign the receipt, there was a place for me to write in a tip.

now, i'm all for tipping my waitor or waitress when i sit down in a restaurant for a meal, and especially if i get excellent service, but there is no way i'm giving a tip to some guy who makes me a sandwich and gives me an empty cup so i can fill up my own drink at the self serve fountain drink dispencer.

well, guess what? i get home today and check my account balance online and those idiots gave themselves a tip anyway, even after i wrote a line thru the tip area and wrote the total at the bottom of the receipt.

what's wrong with the world when not only does a fast food establishment think they should be getting tips, but when you don't give them one, they "take" it anyway? what's next, tipping the drive thru guy at burger king?

your thoughts?

James Boba Fettfield
12-09-2003, 11:37 PM
Is the tip an automatic thing on all bills there?


So let me get this right, as I've never been inside a Quiznos. I'm going to assume it's like a Subway, right? If so, then I would wonder about the tip thing as well. I mean, if you're having to tip this guy, does that mean you'll need to be tipping everyone responsible for your order at a Burger King.

I don't understand things sometimes.

derek
12-09-2003, 11:43 PM
Is the tip an automatic thing on all bills there?


So let me get this right, as I've never been inside a Quiznos. I'm going to assume it's like a Subway, right? If so, then I would wonder about the tip thing as well. I mean, if you're having to tip this guy, does that mean you'll need to be tipping everyone responsible for your order at a Burger King.

I don't understand things sometimes.

yea, it's just like subway, except they "heat" the sandwich up.

you know how when you pay with a credit card in a restaurant and it has the amount of your bill, then under that it has a blank space for you to write in a tip amount and then total it up at the bottom?

well, i wrote a line thru the tip area and carried the food total down to the "total" line, which any half way intelligent person who makes sandwiches would see they didn't get a tip.

at the bottom of the receipt there is a print out that says what your tip would be for 10%, 15% and 20%........i gave them 0%, but they apparently overruled me and gave themselves a 20% tip, which came out to $2.91. there is no way they will get that money. i'll contest this charge to the supreme court! :crazed:

Beast
12-09-2003, 11:44 PM
It's like Subways, if they were a high class joint. The sandwiches are over-priced if you ask me, and they're really not much better. I like them, but when a sub costs you like $7-8 bucks, then it's a bit much. And now they actually expect you to tip? That's outragous, it's not like your getting a 'meal meal'. It's a artsy fartsy sandwich shop. I'm utterly appauled that they have a tip section on the reciept, and they actually took a tip, even though you put a line thru it. If you have the reciept anywhere, I'd complain. That's nuts. :(

MTFBWY and HH!!

Jar Jar Binks

James Boba Fettfield
12-09-2003, 11:47 PM
Yeah, what's the legal thing on someone doing that? Giving yourself a tip.

I mean, you gave them back the receipt with the no tip on it, then they charge you for it, but you don't have the credit to cover it when they charge your card? I mean, it probably would never happen, but what if it did in your case. I'd be mighty mad.

Giving yourself a tip! Ha ha!

derek
12-09-2003, 11:49 PM
Yeah, what's the legal thing on someone doing that? Giving yourself a tip.

I mean, you gave them back the receipt with the no tip on it, then they charge you for it, but you don't have the credit to cover it when they charge your card? I mean, it probably would never happen, but what if it did in your case. I'd be mighty mad.

Giving yourself a tip! Ha ha!

yea, why stop at 20%???? if they are just giving themselves tips, why not 100%???

i'll call them tomorrow, and if necessary contact my bank to contest this.

Exhaust Port
12-09-2003, 11:58 PM
I've seen this at a couple of non-tipping locations but I always assumed it was the software that came with the equipment that was generating the TIP option. Like you Derek, I wrote a line through the TIP section and carried down the TOTAL. I haven't had someone do something like this to me yet.

Obviously what happened to you is wrong if not illegal. Even if you were at a location that would normally having tipping they can't just write there own in. It's your right as a customer to tip what you think is appropriate. If the service really sucks then you have the right to tip a big fat ZERO. The only exception to that is when a resturant automatically includes a tip but I've only seen those for groups of people.

Give'em hell and let us know what they say.

JediTricks
12-10-2003, 12:22 AM
That's crap, gives the food service industry a bad image, the culprits here should be made an example of. Not only is this totally immoral what they did, but it's also illegal, but surprisingly commonplace. This is why I try to avoid using a credit card at restaurants that are cheapo like Sizzler, and why when I do I hang onto the receipt I sign where it shows exactly how much I tipped (generally $0 since if you use the card to tip, the servers have to claim it in their taxes while cash is up to them to declare or not :p). I suggest you contact the DA if you want to pursue legal measures and if the DA has no objections, also contact the district supervisor and get whomever did up the receipt fired. Finally, contact your credit card company and explain to them that this was abused, I know Visa and Mastercard have changed a lot of policies lately due to fraud, I'd love to see this one fixed as well.

Jedi_Master_Guyute
12-10-2003, 12:30 AM
Ah, geez, c'mon Derek, unanalize your wallet and give the guy a couple bucks!! Seriously, is it so hard to give a guy a few extra bucks for sweating in front of a hot bun warmer and tossing ingridients onto your sub. Does this man not work? does he not bleed? Do you somehow feel like you're better than him just because he's chosen his path in the field of sub making. Just give the guy a tip you cheapskate! :stupid:



J/K J/K J/K :crazed: hehehehehehehehe
Man, i can't wait to see how many feathers i've ruffled!!! actually, this is complete crap in my opinion. I can't believe that a place like Quiznos is asking for a tip now. What's next, will the guy who runs the drive thru at my local McDonalds ask for a tip or some sort of window service fee?!?!! What's this world coming to?!?! This is just another reason I used to buy my food in bulk at sams and just cook for myself......and by "cooking" i mean, like mac and cheese, spaghettios, noodles and soup....real cooking?!?! lol hell no!!

I'd definately contact the store Manager, their home office reps and your credit card company. Maybe they'll offer you some sort of compensation if you don't press charges. Maybe you'll get a lifetime supply of Quizno's for free!!! best of luck to you, my friend!!! :D

derek
12-10-2003, 12:35 AM
Maybe you'll get a lifetime supply of Quizno's for free!!!

i'm gonna contact "jackie childs" ASAP!!! he did wonders for kramer. got him a marlboro billboard and free coffee for life! :D

LTBasker
12-10-2003, 12:54 AM
That's deeply screwed up man. If you ever eat there again you should write "Tipping is an EARNED PRIVLEDGE NOT A RIGHT"

bobafrett
12-10-2003, 01:21 PM
Yeah Derek, what they did sounds illegal. I work part time delivering pizza's. If the customer doesn't want to leave a tip, there's not a damn thing I can do about it, cash or credit. I would do like JT says, and take this up with the DA. If they won't give you satisfaction, since the amount is rather small, then take it up with the police department in that town. Call the Quizno's corporate office and find out what there policy is on this. If you still have your copy of the receipt, take that with your CC statement as evidence, but don't just let them get away with it. We had a driver who gave himself a $5.00 tip on a customers CC, and guess what, he no longer works for the place anymore.

I went into a Jimmy Johns sandwich place once, and the guy ringing up my order had the cash drawer open, totaled my purchase on a calculator, and also my friend who was with me. I went home and the next day I called the Manager for the store. He fired the employee that day. I went to a drive through at Burger King, and as I pulled up too the window, I see a cashier take a ten dollar bill from the drawer and slide it on into his pocket. Anyway, just take action before other star systems suffer the same fate as Alderan!

El Chuxter
12-10-2003, 01:23 PM
You'll probably have to wait until your statement comes. That's how credit card transactions usually work. :(

I'd call up the restaurant, not tell them anything, and get the phone number for the district manager, then let him (or her) know what's going on. That's fraud, and it can get the company in serious trouble, so I doubt the person or persons responsible won't get canned. If they did it to you, it's probably been going on before and will keep going.

stillakid
12-10-2003, 03:53 PM
Conveniently enough, this was a topic of discussion on Tom Leykis the other day.

My personal feeling is that the idea behind tipping has been lost. Look, if giving somebody a couple extra bucks is compulsory, then add it to the bill automatically. But in our society, you're made to feel like a pariah if you don't give at least 15%. That's bs. I do my job everyday and don't have my hand out expecting "a little extra." Why should anyone else expect the same?

Oh, right. Waiters and such don't make that much money. Well, who's fault is that? Why should I be expected to make up for a cheapskate boss who fails to pay his employees a fair wage? It's my understanding that restaurants get away with paying less because it is assumed that tips will bring the employee income back up to something resembling minimum wage. Bollocks to that!

We should all give tips only if:
A) you want to get better service than all the other shmucks standing around you. Fair? No, but bribery happens all the time and you can either wait the 30 minutes for a lousy table or fork over a 20 to get faster and better service.

B) the service you were given was exemplary. Like I said, I go to work everyday and don't expect anything beyond a paycheck for what I do. Compliments are welcome but hardly expected and "tipping" isn't part of the equation for most career people.

I was having lunch with out of town friends at a restaurant last year when we inadvertently left a small tip. Quite by accident, one of the guys just did the math wrong. In any case, there was more than enough for the bill and "some" extra for the tip. Unbelievably, we were ready to cross the street down the block, when the waiter comes running after us with his hand out. :eek: "Was there something wrong with my service?" he asks us. Well, no, we replied. He then explained that we left a really small tip. I was so dumbfounded, we all were, that we just threw together another $10 bucks or something to make him go away. I fired off a letter to the management (Pig and Whistle, Hollywood, CA) lambasting the utter gaul of this waiter and also tossed in some harsh words about the payscale which would drive a guy to chase customers down the street for a tip. Of course, I never heard back from anyone.

This is a f'd up world we live in.

Deoxyribonucleic
12-10-2003, 04:28 PM
Release your wrath up thee (Quiznos) Derek :Pirate:

Sorry that happened, I can't believe the gaul of people these days, I really, really can't!! I know it's only 2 or 3 dollars, but it's YOUR 2 or 3 dollars to do with as YOU please! Dang, I just sat there shaking my head after reading your post..........

El Chuxter
12-10-2003, 06:00 PM
Aw, c'mon baby, leave some change behind
She was a b****, but I don't care
She brought our food out on time
And wore a funky beret in her hair

C'mon baby, leave some change behind
Everybody's good enough for some change
Some f***in' change!!

I can't believe I beat kidhuman to that one!

jjreason
12-10-2003, 06:19 PM
That's a theft. Not only should you report it to the restaurant manager, you should get the local police to generate an occurrence with the tip-taker as a suspect. I can't imagine they'd charge him, but it would be good info for them to have. Might make it hard for him to get a job dealing with cash in the future as well, which would serve him right.

SirSteve
12-10-2003, 06:57 PM
It seems like everywhere you go, there is a tip jar. I personally tip a waiter well if he/she does a good job but tipping at the sub shop, doorman (I don't see a need to tip someone to open a door), bathroom (sorry, I just like to get my own towel when I am in the bathroom), chinese take-out (that's take-out, not delivery), pizza delivery guy (there is no such thing as "FREE DELIVERY"), BUFFETS and on and on is just ridiculous in my opinion. I love New York City but cannot stand all the tipping that is expected. Is it not enough I took my business there in the first place?? When I went to Japan, that's the one thing I really liked... no one works off of tips there. It's an insult to offer them a tip. It's something we should learn from. Pay the employees more and forget the tipping. If the don't do a good job, fire them.

Turbowars
12-10-2003, 08:26 PM
Conveniently enough, this was a topic of discussion on Tom Leykis the other day.

My personal feeling is that the idea behind tipping has been lost. Look, if giving somebody a couple extra bucks is compulsory, then add it to the bill automatically. But in our society, you're made to feel like a pariah if you don't give at least 15%. That's bs. I do my job everyday and don't have my hand out expecting "a little extra." Why should anyone else expect the same?

Oh, right. Waiters and such don't make that much money. Well, who's fault is that? Why should I be expected to make up for a cheapskate boss who fails to pay his employees a fair wage? It's my understanding that restaurants get away with paying less because it is assumed that tips will bring the employee income back up to something resembling minimum wage. Bollocks to that!

We should all give tips only if:
A) you want to get better service than all the other shmucks standing around you. Fair? No, but bribery happens all the time and you can either wait the 30 minutes for a lousy table or fork over a 20 to get faster and better service.

B) the service you were given was exemplary. Like I said, I go to work everyday and don't expect anything beyond a paycheck for what I do. Compliments are welcome but hardly expected and "tipping" isn't part of the equation for most career people.

I was having lunch with out of town friends at a restaurant last year when we inadvertently left a small tip. Quite by accident, one of the guys just did the math wrong. In any case, there was more than enough for the bill and "some" extra for the tip. Unbelievably, we were ready to cross the street down the block, when the waiter comes running after us with his hand out. :eek: "Was there something wrong with my service?" he asks us. Well, no, we replied. He then explained that we left a really small tip. I was so dumbfounded, we all were, that we just threw together another $10 bucks or something to make him go away. I fired off a letter to the management (Pig and Whistle, Hollywood, CA) lambasting the utter gaul of this waiter and also tossed in some harsh words about the payscale which would drive a guy to chase customers down the street for a tip. Of course, I never heard back from anyone.

This is a f'd up world we live in. I can't believe you tipped him again. I would done one thing, walked away with a few choice words. I see this a lot at 31 flavors also. I mean come on, tip a guy because he had to bend a little to scoop some ice cream. I think not. One thing to stop doing is using credit cards. Use cash, it wont happen.

AdmiralPiett
12-10-2003, 11:57 PM
There's a Quizno's near my work and usually when I go there, the guy has actually told me "We don't accept tips here" as I'm signing my receipt. I think every shop must be run by a different franchise owner.

Jedi_Master_Guyute
12-11-2003, 12:05 AM
Aw, c'mon baby, leave some change behind
She was a b****, but I don't care
She brought our food out on time
And wore a funky beret in her hair

C'mon baby, leave some change behind
Everybody's good enough for some change
Some f***in' change!!

I can't believe I beat kidhuman to that one!

Ah, c'mon Chuxter, what if
she bares your children without tears,
and without the usual cost of labor (labor! labor! labor!!)
would you call her a freak?!?
would you call them Gods?!?!??


hehehehehehehehe k, not the same album, but all my "throwing copper" lyrics allude me at the moment. :D

stillakid
12-11-2003, 12:07 AM
I can't believe you tipped him again. I would done one thing, walked away with a few choice words.


Like I said, we were all kind of in shock. I'd never seen such a thing before. Besides, we didn't intentionally try to short him.

The whole problem is that so many people feel entitled these days to things they didn't earn.

Exhaust Port
12-11-2003, 12:26 AM
I was having lunch with out of town friends at a restaurant last year when we inadvertently left a small tip. Quite by accident, one of the guys just did the math wrong. In any case, there was more than enough for the bill and "some" extra for the tip. Unbelievably, we were ready to cross the street down the block, when the waiter comes running after us with his hand out. :eek: "Was there something wrong with my service?" he asks us. Well, no, we replied. He then explained that we left a really small tip. I was so dumbfounded, we all were, that we just threw together another $10 bucks or something to make him go away. I fired off a letter to the management (Pig and Whistle, Hollywood, CA) lambasting the utter gaul of this waiter and also tossed in some harsh words about the payscale which would drive a guy to chase customers down the street for a tip. Of course, I never heard back from anyone.

This is a f'd up world we live in.
Because my job puts me on the road a lot I get the pleasure of taking many hotel vans to and from airports. It's customary to give the van driver a $1 tip for the ride. Why? I started thinking about this and can't see any reason that it's necessary. It's the van drivers job to drive from A to B and back as well as help load the occasional bag. It's the job description. A flight crew can vary from 2 to as many as 20+ for some international widebody aircraft. These van drivers make a killing in tips for doing nothing more than their job.

So I've stopped tipping van drivers UNLESS I've requested special service like a trip to a local resturant to eat that is out of their way.

Now it's really frustrating deal with people who don't understand the whole tip thing. Remember, it's for service above and beyond the norm. I can't even count how many times myself and the crew have had to wait out in blowing snow, rain, cold winds, etc. while we wait for a late van. These pickups are arranged months in advanced and are the norm everyday. Even after suffering for 45 minutes at curbside or being nearly killed by the fist-pumping driver people will still tip!! Wah? :( Where's the penalty for not fullfilling their contractual service?

I've been told by several fellow pilots that they've actually had van drivers yell at them when they don't get a tip, even to go as far as follow them into the hotel lobby demanding a tip. Man, they were lucky I wasn't there. I would have given both the driver and the hotel management a good talking to. Crap like this ticks me off.

A tip should be earned, not expected!

bobafrett
12-11-2003, 12:29 AM
Well, as a person who works for tips, I must say that I dated a girl who tipped her pizza guy a dollar. If the establishment charged a delivery fee, she wouldn't tip at all. That was until she worked delivering pizza and found out just how far the money goes. I use my own car to deliver in. I'm given a $20 bank to make change for the customer. If I have no deliveries, I get the $20 but that's it. I don't get paid an hourly wage. Then if I do have a delivery I get $1.25 delivery fee to cover gas and wear and tear on my car. Tonight I had 10 deliveries. Lets see:

Bank = $20.00
Fees@ 10 X $1.25 = $12.50
---------
Total without tips = $32.50 not hardly enough to live on.

Of course a majority of the customers tip anywhere between $2.00 to $3.00 because you are out there bringing the pizza or food to there house. The whole transaction takes less than a minute between myself and the customer, but they pay to have the food brought to them to they don't have to leave the house and deal with the traffic, or weather or the crowded parking lot.

However, I agree that there are some professions that deserve tips, like hair stylists, wait staff, bartenders, cab drivers, and delivery people. But Quiznos? The next thing you know the pharmacist will want to be tipped to make your medications. I do see tip jars at Starbucks.

mastermatt24
12-11-2003, 12:36 AM
WOw
I say everyone should stop going to quiznos and write "nasty" letters to the corperation. Why should someone take that 2 or 3 dollars from us without asking? That is a bunch of BS. As said before tipping is for exceptional service and not much more. Why go to a sandwich store anyways when you can make your own?? (I dont like quiznos because when they "toasted" my sandwich the burnt it) :mad: Oh well ill just pay with cash for now on. Has anyone found those new clone wars animated figs from target?

Kidhuman
12-11-2003, 12:54 AM
You dont tip at Quiznos. It is there job to make food. I dont tip at buffets either. I aint cheap, but you need to earn your tip.

Kidhuman
12-11-2003, 12:56 AM
Aw, c'mon baby, leave some change behind
She was a b****, but I don't care
She brought our food out on time
And wore a funky beret in her hair

C'mon baby, leave some change behind
Everybody's good enough for some change
Some f***in' change!!

I can't believe I beat kidhuman to that one!


I havent checked this thread. Great tune

Turbowars
12-11-2003, 01:08 AM
Well, as a person who works for tips, I must say that I dated a girl who tipped her pizza guy a dollar. If the establishment charged a delivery fee, she wouldn't tip at all. That was until she worked delivering pizza and found out just how far the money goes. I use my own car to deliver in. I'm given a $20 bank to make change for the customer. If I have no deliveries, I get the $20 but that's it. I don't get paid an hourly wage. Then if I do have a delivery I get $1.25 delivery fee to cover gas and wear and tear on my car. Tonight I had 10 deliveries. Lets see:

Bank = $20.00
Fees@ 10 X $1.25 = $12.50
---------
Total without tips = $32.50 not hardly enough to live on.

Of course a majority of the customers tip anywhere between $2.00 to $3.00 because you are out there bringing the pizza or food to there house. The whole transaction takes less than a minute between myself and the customer, but they pay to have the food brought to them to they don't have to leave the house and deal with the traffic, or weather or the crowded parking lot.

However, I agree that there are some professions that deserve tips, like hair stylists, wait staff, bartenders, cab drivers, and delivery people. But Quiznos? The next thing you know the pharmacist will want to be tipped to make your medications. I do see tip jars at Starbucks.See there where I do tip well. The Pizza guy always gets a $5 to $6 tip from me. It's the same guy and I don't want him to add anything to the pizza that he shouldn't.:p My wife likes to tip when the service was good or bad. I draw the line the there. If the service is bad or it take a long time to get the check, The person gets either no tip or something like 25 cents to make a point. I have rules when I go out to dinner. The service will get a nice fat tip, if my drink it alway full, they check to see if everything is OK a few time, not too much, the order was right, the food was still hot and the check was there before I had to ask. I don't think those are hard to follow.:Pirate:

bobafrett
12-11-2003, 01:14 AM
Has anyone found those new clone wars animated figs from target?

I think that's a question for another thread, say in the Clone Wars catagory under collecting! Cool?


You dont tip at Quiznos. It is there job to make food. I dont tip at buffets either. I aint cheap, but you need to earn your tip.

Does that mean if I showed up at your door in a thong with your pizza, I'd earn a better tip? :greedy:

Turbowars
12-11-2003, 01:17 AM
I think that's a question for another thread, say in the Clone Wars catagory under collecting! Cool?



Does that mean if I showed up at your door in a thong with your pizza, I'd earn a better tip? :greedy:You would at my house swee.... Oh sorry, wrong site, LOL:crazed:

bobafrett
12-11-2003, 01:24 AM
See there where I do tip well. The Pizza guy always gets a $5 to $6 tip from me. It's the same guy and I don't want him to add anything to the pizza that he shouldn't.:p My wife likes to tip when the service was good or bad. I draw the line the there. If the service is bad or it take a long time to get the check, The person gets either no tip or something like 25 cents to make a point. I have rules when I go out to dinner. The service will get a nice fat tip, if my drink it alway full, they check to see if everything is OK a few time, not too much, the order was right, the food was still hot and the check was there before I had to ask. I don't think those are hard to follow.:Pirate:

I tip the person who does my hair a minimum of $5.00, unless they butcher my hair which has happened on occasion. I have heard that you aren't supposed to tip the owner of a hair salon if he/she does your hair. Any truth to that? I was going to a place and the owner almost always cut my hair, but I tipped him the same, and he never turned down a tip.

My former girlfriend and I went to dinner with her brother and her mom. We ate at a Red Lobster and I think the bill with drinks came up to $65, so we left our waiter a $20 tip, and my girlfriend starts almost having a fit saying we were tipping him way to much, so her brother and I pulled out another $5 each and added it bringing his tip to $30. She shut up before we paid him anymore. :D

Turbowars
12-11-2003, 01:27 AM
You are just one Wild and Crazy Guy!! For that did she perform any tricks? The waitress that is.

bobafrett
12-11-2003, 01:41 AM
You are just one Wild and Crazy Guy!! For that did she perform any tricks? The waitress that is.

No, but the food and beverages were brought out in great time, and it was some of the best service we had at that restaurant. Beside, I had a little more money than I do now.

Deoxyribonucleic
12-11-2003, 02:06 AM
A tip should be earned, not expected!

PerrrrrrrrrrrrrrFectly well tipped...er..I mean typed! ;)

plasticfetish
12-11-2003, 03:46 AM
That's a theft. Not only should you report it to the restaurant manager, you should get the local police to generate an occurrence with the tip-taker as a suspect. I can't imagine they'd charge him, but it would be good info for them to have. Might make it hard for him to get a job dealing with cash in the future as well, which would serve him right.
I agree. You really should call your bank and contest this charge, and then I'd give the police a call. I'm pretty sure, once you sign your receipt, it's probably a form of fraud for them to go back and change the total in any way. For all you know, this person does this constantly and assumes that no one will notice.

Oh, and no ... the Quizno's guy doesn't deserve a tip anyway.(Geez, sounds like the Quizno's guy doesn't deserve a job.)

Kidhuman
12-11-2003, 08:27 AM
Does that mean if I showed up at your door in a thong with your pizza, I'd earn a better tip? :greedy:



If you did that I would kick your butt. :crazed: :crazed: .

I tip myy pizza or any delivery guy at least two bucks. If I go out to eat at a restaraunt, at least five bucks. Bring my food to me, hot and fresh and a timely manner is earning it. Not making a sandwich like a deli. Deivery people and waiters count on tips to make a living. Do you tip the chef at Chez Burger King?

stillakid
12-11-2003, 10:29 AM
Well, as a person who works for tips, I must say that I dated a girl who tipped her pizza guy a dollar. If the establishment charged a delivery fee, she wouldn't tip at all. That was until she worked delivering pizza and found out just how far the money goes. I use my own car to deliver in. I'm given a $20 bank to make change for the customer. If I have no deliveries, I get the $20 but that's it. I don't get paid an hourly wage. Then if I do have a delivery I get $1.25 delivery fee to cover gas and wear and tear on my car. Tonight I had 10 deliveries. Lets see:

Bank = $20.00
Fees@ 10 X $1.25 = $12.50
---------
Total without tips = $32.50 not hardly enough to live on.

Of course a majority of the customers tip anywhere between $2.00 to $3.00 because you are out there bringing the pizza or food to there house.



See there where I do tip well. The Pizza guy always gets a $5 to $6 tip from me. It's the same guy and I don't want him to add anything to the pizza that he shouldn't

Okay, see, here's where the bs starts. First off, the customer should not be expected nor compelled to make up for a low paycheck. If "you" want/need more money, either demand more from your employer or go get a better job. Simple as that. If your overhead demands that you have more income, then don't take a low pay job in the first place.

Second, this notion that your "product" is being held hostage in some way unless the "ransom" is paid. Call it low level consumer terrorism. Some Biatch on the Leykis show called from a Starbucks and said that she intentionally left the lid loose on some guy's coffee cup because he never tipped her anything. Now we're supposed to worry that some schmuck kid is going to spit in our pizza just because his boss doesn't pay him enough? Hey, kid! How 'bout spittin' in your bosses pizza instead? He's the root of your problem, not the customer who is already paying way too much for flat dough with some overpriced toppings on it.

Unbelievable.

scruffziller
12-11-2003, 11:29 AM
Yea that is defiantley stealing. If you could get the receipt back or your copy to show that you drew a line through it, you would most certainly have a case. I would try to pay with cash next time. Fool proof.
Working for WAL MART, as an employee, you are required to refuse any gratuity.
You could get fired for it if you accept one. This is done because they want to keep the employees non-biased towards all customers and not to develop favortism to who ever shells out cash to in tips.

Exhaust Port
12-11-2003, 11:44 AM
Agreed Stilla, this method of employee pay is outdated and needs to be eliminated. It's not the responsibility of the customer to pay more for what they ordered so the waiter can get paid. Employees shouldn't be held responsible for begging for their wages from customers.

Now this type of system can work but due to the laziness of the average resturant worker it doesn't. There is a small chain of drive-in resturants in this area (Swensons if you are ever in NE Ohio) that gives the best service I've seen yet at any resturant. Year round, these guys (and now girls too) literally run to and from your car. I haven't had to wait for more than 1 minute for service in the 10 years I've been going there. Quick and accurate service is a huge source of pride for this company and it pays off for the employees. All the tips earned go into a "tip pool" that is then divided up equally among all the employees working that night. This way no single employee is responsible for any particular car or area. The closest employee waits on the car. The next employee in the kitchen brings out the next order to be completed. The closest employee to a waiting car (their lights are on) will settle the bill and take all the garbage. It's a great system and the waiters and waitresses make a fortune from tips. I've known a few people to work there and on a busy summer day they can take home $100-200 in tips alone. Of course they bust their butt whether it's 80 degrees and sunny or 10 degrees and snowing. A year round drive in resturant, gotta love it. :)

bobafrett
12-11-2003, 01:47 PM
Okay, see, here's where the bs starts. First off, the customer should not be expected nor compelled to make up for a low paycheck. If "you" want/need more money, either demand more from your employer or go get a better job. Simple as that. If your overhead demands that you have more income, then don't take a low pay job in the first place.

Second, this notion that your "product" is being held hostage in some way unless the "ransom" is paid. Call it low level consumer terrorism. Some Biatch on the Leykis show called from a Starbucks and said that she intentionally left the lid loose on some guy's coffee cup because he never tipped her anything. Now we're supposed to worry that some schmuck kid is going to spit in our pizza just because his boss doesn't pay him enough? Hey, kid! How 'bout spittin' in your bosses pizza instead? He's the root of your problem, not the customer who is already paying way too much for flat dough with some overpriced toppings on it.

Unbelievable.

Okay, first of all, if you want a pizza/food delivered to your door, then you should give the guy/gal who delivered it something. I have never spit in any customers pizza for not tipping. We have one lady who tips anywhere from nothing to maybe .30 cents. She orders every week, and no one wants to take the delivery, but we do with a smile on our face. Yet she lives a 3 minute drive from the place. She has a car to get there, and yet she chooses to have the pizza delivered. I have other customers who live about the same distance away, and they tip $5.00. When you give a tip, you are saying "Thank you" since you either don't want to come pick up your food, or in some cases, you simply can't (your hosting a party, or you don't own a vehicle). You won't believe the way deliveries go up when the weather gets incliment, such as rain, or snow, or wind gusts, yet here you are risking your life as the roads ice over, and your customers sit in their warm houses.

There have been times where I will have to make a choice, do I want to go somewhere that I sit down, and be waited on, or do I just want to eat at a place like McDonalds where you take care of everything but the cooking of your meal. I eat out a lot, lets face it, I can't cook to save my life. If I choose to eat at a restaurant where I will be served by a waitperson, then I will tip them depending on the service. If I have the food delivered, I will tip since I don't feel like going out. But if I'm eating a sandwich at a Quizno's where I'm basically getting the same service as a McDonalds or Subway, then I am not going to tip. They are not bringing my sandwich to my table, they are not filling my soft drink.


Agreed Stilla, this method of employee pay is outdated and needs to be eliminated. It's not the responsibility of the customer to pay more for what they ordered so the waiter can get paid. Employees shouldn't be held responsible for begging for their wages from customers.


So are you saying we should have 2 different price catagories for the pizza customers? One price for those who pick up, and another price for those who want the food delivered? I think tipping is a much more accurate way to show how much you appreciate the service that you are getting. If a restaurant raises your meal prices so the waitstaff can make more on the check, then what motivation does your waitstaff have to get your meal or drinks to you? I worked at Wal-Mart and we had some lazy people working for us, yet they made the same wages I was making when I started. By working harder, I earned bigger raises for myself. A waitperson by working harder to make you happy, is going to earn himself a better tip.

On a side note here, and way before I ever delivered pizza, Domino's pizza had this gaurantee that your pizza would be to you in half an hour or it was free. During a day when there was an ice storm, and the roads were icy several friends of mine and I ordered a Domino's pizza. The pizza got there in I think 40 minutes. My friends were telling me "It's free, they didn't get it here in 30 minutes", but I paid for the pizza, and gave the driver a good tip, because he was out there risking his car in dangerous conditions.

Exhaust Port
12-11-2003, 02:24 PM
So are you saying we should have 2 different price catagories for the pizza customers? One price for those who pick up, and another price for those who want the food delivered? A delivery fee? Sure, I would pay a delivery fee to have a TV or couch delivered to my house why not food? It shouldn't be the responsibility of a customer to tip a furniture delivery team enough to pay for their salary. Again, a tip is an "extra" for service above and beyond. How is someone bringing a pizza to my house above and beyond? It isn't, yet if I don't tip that driver he will earn nothing for the service. Should I be allowed to tip less if he drove only 1 mile and the weather was clear? Should I be expected to tip more if the drive was 5 miles and snowing? He's providing a service, it's not of my concern how hard or easy it was to accomplish. That same furniture delivery team won't charge more if you live on a 3rd floor apartment than if you lived in a 1 story ranch house.

The pizza place I call says the pizza will be at my place in 30 to 45 minutes. It arrives in 35 minutes. Why should I tip the driver? Didn't he just do his job? How was his involvement any more important than the guy who made the pizza? The cooks aren't getting any of that money. Do we tip the mailman? Doesn't he just do his job of delivering the mail to our house?


I think tipping is a much more accurate way to show how much you appreciate the service that you are getting. Yes, tipping does show appriciation for good service but we have 2 problems with that. 1. Tips are expected therefore service suffers without fear of penalty 2. Tips are needed by the worker since he's paid less than minimum wage.


If a restaurant raises your meal prices so the waitstaff can make more on the check, then what motivation does your waitstaff have to get your meal or drinks to you? That's a matter of pride and an employer will have to have standards set. As we have it now, the waitstaff needs tips but why is it that I get appauling service 2 out of 3 times I go out? Because tips are expected, therefore not earned. Obviously the modern lazy waitstaff feels that no matter what service they provide they will still walk away with X amount in tips a day.


I worked at Wal-Mart and we had some lazy people working for us, yet they made the same wages I was making when I started. By working harder, I earned bigger raises for myself. A waitperson by working harder to make you happy, is going to earn himself a better tip.
Food service is the only service industry that I'm aware of where the employees income is so dependant on tips. Obviously it's not working as we all have stores of awful service. Non-food delivery services don't work that way. Cleaning services don't work that way. Lawn mowing services don't work that way. They all charge a service fee and any tip that the customer pays is above and beyond that.

A cleaning crews service shouldn't depend on possible tips. They come in and clean your house or office to the standards of the job description. Any perks they throw in, say they're quiet or quicker than advertised, then a tip would be in order. But if all they did was their job as quoted then a tip wouldn't be necessary. If a pizza delivery person brings me a pizza as quoted than no tip should be necessary.

I drove charter buses for years and never expected a tip. I drove as safe as I could every trip and never did so with the expectation that someone would give me a few bucks for doing so. It was my job to drive them safely from point A to B. I loaded and unloaded their bags but that was my job, why did I need extra money for that? I was on the clock getting my hourly wage anyway. The customers hired a professional driver and that is what I tried to give them. My level of serviced didn't change if it was sunny or snowing. Perhaps it was pride but I did everything to the nth degree because I wanted to not to impress the customers and hope for a tip.

Not to say that I didn't get an occasional tip but that was only for those trips where you spent days with a group on the road. I can say that I never got a tip on a one day trip. Even those where I would put 400 miles on the bus and 8 hours behind the wheel. I never thought twice about it, it was my job.

Kidhuman
12-11-2003, 04:32 PM
Ands whats up with places adding gratuity to your bill? What if they doa crappy job, I wouldn tip them to begin with.

Jargo
12-11-2003, 05:00 PM
Hate to be a pedant but the correct spelling is gall, as in gall bladder. Gaul is a person from the gallic region of Europe.

And just for the record, I totally depise anyone who expects a tip be it a waiter or a pizza delivery punk or a damn elevator operator or bellhop. I flat out refuse to tip anyone unless my whim dictates I must. Usually if I happen to fancy the person waiting table or whatever. But this auto tip charge thing hads found its way over here to Britain now and really bugs so much that I just don't eat out anywhere ever. I'd rather go hungry than be harrassed by some beggar.
I mean you look at the quantity of fod you get at most places and it isn't worth what they charge for it. Then there's astronomical charges on anything you drink be it alcohol coffee or bottled water. And then they want you to tip the guy who made you wait for your food and forgot to bring half of it and ignored you for twenty minutes while he flapped around the busboy he has the hots for or whatever. The guy who was rude and aloof and sarcastic and unhelpful. I don't think so.

And before anyone lambasts me because they happen to be a waiter who isn't like that, I too have done my fair share of waiting tables. I've seen it all from both sides of the counter.

derek
12-11-2003, 05:43 PM
**UPDATE**

i called the quizno's i visited the other day and explained my situation to the manager. she was really nice and said the 20% overcharge was a "bank error" or something like that. i don't know if it's true or if she was just covering her employees, but i'll give her the benefit of the doubt....for now.

she assured me when the charge actually goes thru, it will be what it should of been......... we will see. lol

still, even if it really was a "bank error", that tip option shouldn't even be on a quizno's credit card receipt, meesa thinks! :p

good shot jansen
12-11-2003, 05:45 PM
yoiks! tipping has made it's way to the other side of the pond?

when i lived in london in '87, tipping was usally limited to the higher end of eating establishments, never pub life (which is where i spent 99 and 44/100% of my free time). your pint cost 90p you paid with a pound coin, got your 10 p back, and all was well with the world. never a need to tip anyone after a night of debauchery (well, back then the pubs closed at 11:00pm so you couldn't get into too much trouble). but tipping was never expected at all.

only when i had to take a client out to lunch at some stuffy place like simpson's in the strand was a tip expected, (and if none was offered, there were no complaints), but pretty much that was it.

i have noticed tip jars being placed at all kinds of sandwhich and pizza shop counters. usally i deposit whatever change in coins i get back into the jar, mostly cause i find carrying around large pocketfull's of change most annoying.

i've always tipped based on quality of service, one of the gauges that i would use in determining the ammount of tip to leave, was how often the wait person would empty the ash tray from the table. as we don't allow smoking in-doors anymore, that's one less thing that i have to tip about.

i usally don't give it much of a thought, if the service was good, the tip is too, if the service was bad, the tip follows suit.

El Chuxter
12-11-2003, 05:45 PM
derek, that sounds like a load of crap to me. Possibly. Unless the balance was the available balance. Some places will run a temporary charge through for a different amount than the actual charge (and it's possible Quizno's does that based on a 20% tip).

plasticfetish
12-11-2003, 05:50 PM
Avoid the Noid!


On a side note here, and way before I ever delivered pizza, Domino's pizza had this guarantee that your pizza would be to you in half an hour or it was free.
Now you're talking about one of the jobs I had in college. I worked at Domino's back when and just about when, they stopped that promotion. Too many accidents caused by drivers speeding to get their deliveries done in time or be penalized by Domino's management.

I made decent money off tips, you never ask for them or whine when you don't get one ... usually it all evens out when you end up with a really good one from a different person. In the case of pizza delivery though, it's generally explained that the tip money is going to be your compensation for all of the wear and tear on your car. Which BTW is why I quit that job ... my transmission died and I was done.

The biggest problem with tipping, is when it becomes understood and expected that those gratuities are going to be a part of your income. Going to work for a place and having them tell you that you'll be making an awful rate, just because you can make it up in tips is a sad reality in most cases.

stillakid
12-11-2003, 07:44 PM
Okay, first of all, if you want a pizza/food delivered to your door, then you should give the guy/gal who delivered it something. I have never spit in any customers pizza for not tipping. We have one lady who tips anywhere from nothing to maybe .30 cents. She orders every week, and no one wants to take the delivery, but we do with a smile on our face. Yet she lives a 3 minute drive from the place. She has a car to get there, and yet she chooses to have the pizza delivered. I have other customers who live about the same distance away, and they tip $5.00. When you give a tip, you are saying "Thank you" since you either don't want to come pick up your food, or in some cases, you simply can't (your hosting a party, or you don't own a vehicle). You won't believe the way deliveries go up when the weather gets incliment, such as rain, or snow, or wind gusts, yet here you are risking your life as the roads ice over, and your customers sit in their warm houses.

There have been times where I will have to make a choice, do I want to go somewhere that I sit down, and be waited on, or do I just want to eat at a place like McDonalds where you take care of everything but the cooking of your meal. I eat out a lot, lets face it, I can't cook to save my life. If I choose to eat at a restaurant where I will be served by a waitperson, then I will tip them depending on the service. If I have the food delivered, I will tip since I don't feel like going out. But if I'm eating a sandwich at a Quizno's where I'm basically getting the same service as a McDonalds or Subway, then I am not going to tip. They are not bringing my sandwich to my table, they are not filling my soft drink.



So are you saying we should have 2 different price catagories for the pizza customers? One price for those who pick up, and another price for those who want the food delivered? I think tipping is a much more accurate way to show how much you appreciate the service that you are getting. If a restaurant raises your meal prices so the waitstaff can make more on the check, then what motivation does your waitstaff have to get your meal or drinks to you? I worked at Wal-Mart and we had some lazy people working for us, yet they made the same wages I was making when I started. By working harder, I earned bigger raises for myself. A waitperson by working harder to make you happy, is going to earn himself a better tip.

On a side note here, and way before I ever delivered pizza, Domino's pizza had this gaurantee that your pizza would be to you in half an hour or it was free. During a day when there was an ice storm, and the roads were icy several friends of mine and I ordered a Domino's pizza. The pizza got there in I think 40 minutes. My friends were telling me "It's free, they didn't get it here in 30 minutes", but I paid for the pizza, and gave the driver a good tip, because he was out there risking his car in dangerous conditions.

I disagree entirely with your basis for argument. You're still saying that a customer should feel compelled to pay for a service which is part of the business's original offer. Meaning, for example, pizza delivery is part of the business model. I call up and order a pizza. They either will hold it for me to pick up or I can ask that it be delivered. In the pick-up scenario, there is a frickin' tip jar at the window "for the cook." So I'm supposed to tip the guy for doing nothing more than his job? Explain that to me. Same goes for the delivery scenario. It's your JOB to get in a car and drive boxes around town. Don't like it? Don't take the job.

I'm still missing the part where you're going above and beyond the call of duty by getting behind the wheel. I was under the mistaken impression that that was the job description of a delivery person, rain or shine. It's the establishment's duty to set parameters for services like that. So if the roads are too dangerous, then they have the right to tell the phone customer that they are not delivering that night. How about this scenario? The "local" Dominoes Pizza which is listed for my town won't deliver to my house because I'm outside the mileage radius. Turns out I have to call the one in the next town over which just happens to be closer. Anyhow, if that "local" establishment saw fit to bend the rules and deliver to me anyway, then there is a perfect justification for a tip. Point is, yes, a tip is a nice way of saying "Thank you," but you didn't finish the statement. It's "Thank you for going out of your way to help out when you didn't have to." Otherwise, it's not really a "tip", is it? It becomes a compulsory part of the bill without a set number attached to it, so that what happens (as in the case of the .30 cent lady above), when somebody gives what they think you deserve (or all they can afford), ungrateful saps who think they're entitled to more than they have earned whine and moan.

stillakid
12-11-2003, 07:49 PM
Hate to be a pedant but the correct spelling is gall, as in gall bladder. Gaul is a person from the gallic region of Europe.


Ackk! Sorry about that. I'm usually a lot more careful, but in my haste, I decided to not look that up even though I wasn't sure it was correct. The gall of me. ;)


And before anyone lambasts me because they happen to be a waiter who isn't like that, I too have done my fair share of waiting tables. I've seen it all from both sides of the counter.

Same here. Not once in all the tables I waited on (in my younger days), did I ever "expect" a tip. I was entirely grateful for every penny someone chose to give me no matter the amount. If it was a smaller tip, I assumed that either I failed to give the service they expected (which prompted me to work better) or they just didn't have more to give at that time. Either way, the tip is their choice to give, not mine to be entitled to.

Deoxyribonucleic
12-11-2003, 11:18 PM
Hate to be a pedant but the correct spelling is gall, as in gall bladder. Gaul is a person from the gallic region of Europe.


DOH! THat was me hehe...you no pedant mon amie. Ya know, I had it like that at first and I thought it totally looked wrong, but so did "gaul" but by then I just didn't care even though my dictionary is in rolling distance from where I sit at my chair/computer :eek: :crazed:

This "tip" discussion reminds me of the "phone solicitation" thread hahahaha but of course I don't have a link to it :stupid:

JediTricks
12-12-2003, 01:16 AM
Stilla's right about the delivery cost being factored into pizza (the cheapest to make AND most popular fast food in the US), which is why it says "free delivery" on their ads. That's also why they offer takeout-only specials. It's the same thing with any food, the restaurant factors in the costs of paying people to cook and serve your food, otherwise you'd just be paying for the raw materials. Does that mean you shouldn't tip? That's up to you and your personal tastes, but consider this, every time you reward the current "expected tipping to compensate for low pay" philosophy, you're reinforcing the notion that this is an acceptable situation, and in the long run that's not helping either party.

bobafrett
12-12-2003, 01:59 AM
A delivery fee? Sure, I would pay a delivery fee to have a TV or couch delivered to my house why not food? It shouldn't be the responsibility of a customer to tip a furniture delivery team enough to pay for their salary. Again, a tip is an "extra" for service above and beyond. How is someone bringing a pizza to my house above and beyond? It isn't, yet if I don't tip that driver he will earn nothing for the service. Should I be allowed to tip less if he drove only 1 mile and the weather was clear? Should I be expected to tip more if the drive was 5 miles and snowing? He's providing a service, it's not of my concern how hard or easy it was to accomplish. That same furniture delivery team won't charge more if you live on a 3rd floor apartment than if you lived in a 1 story ranch house.

The pizza place I call says the pizza will be at my place in 30 to 45 minutes. It arrives in 35 minutes. Why should I tip the driver? Didn't he just do his job? How was his involvement any more important than the guy who made the pizza? The cooks aren't getting any of that money. Do we tip the mailman? Doesn't he just do his job of delivering the mail to our house?

Yes, tipping does show appriciation for good service but we have 2 problems with that. 1. Tips are expected therefore service suffers without fear of penalty 2. Tips are needed by the worker since he's paid less than minimum wage.

That's a matter of pride and an employer will have to have standards set. As we have it now, the waitstaff needs tips but why is it that I get appauling service 2 out of 3 times I go out? Because tips are expected, therefore not earned. Obviously the modern lazy waitstaff feels that no matter what service they provide they will still walk away with X amount in tips a day.

First off, I don't see where a tip is going to cover a salary. I don't expect a tip, I never ask for a tip, nor am I allowed to. You should tip your driver for bringing the food to your door, instead of having to get up off your duff and go get the pizza or food your self. Like I've said, a tip is a way of saying "Thank you" since for wharever your reason maybe, you couldn't or wouldn't drive to pick it up. I get and average of $2.50 a tip per delivery. I have never told a customer "Hey you only tipped me $1.00, this is how I make my salary". If a waiter or waitress fails to give you good service, then you shouldn't be forced to give them a tip. In fact, most of the establishments I go to leave the tip as an option for you. If you have been waiting around for an hour for your food, and the restaurant isn't packed with a line going out the door, and you see your waiter standing around, then I feel you shouldn't tip him. I've gone to restaurants where I have requested to sit in a different section, because I notice the waitperson who took care of me poorly the time before is going to be my waiter again. Yes, sure as a pizza delivery driver I am doing my job, but I am using my own vehicle, putting many miles, using gas that I paid for, and you as a customer tip me to cover the miles I have driven, so you can get whatever it is done with just the minot interution of having to answer the door.

Mailmen make a lot more than I do even "with" tips. Trust me, my Uncle was a postal worker, and guess what, he gets tips around Christmas. Some years he makes around $500 to $600 from some of the people on his route. He's not the only one, I work with a guy who also works as a postal person, and he gets about the same. I've even taken the postal exam once to try to get into a job like that. The tips aren't expected, but they are given to him as a way of saying "Thank You". I'm sure there are other professions where you give a little more to show your appreciation, like flower delivery.



Food service is the only service industry that I'm aware of where the employees income is so dependant on tips. Obviously it's not working as we all have stores of awful service. Non-food delivery services don't work that way. Cleaning services don't work that way. Lawn mowing services don't work that way. They all charge a service fee and any tip that the customer pays is above and beyond that.

A cleaning crews service shouldn't depend on possible tips. They come in and clean your house or office to the standards of the job description. Any perks they throw in, say they're quiet or quicker than advertised, then a tip would be in order. But if all they did was their job as quoted then a tip wouldn't be necessary. If a pizza delivery person brings me a pizza as quoted than no tip should be necessary..

Well, I beg to differ. I went on a cruise several years ago. On the last day of the cruise there were several envelopes placed in your cabin to tip everyone from the people who cleaned your room and made your bed, to your waiter, and his assistant, to the steward. All together, I think there were 5 or 6 people whom you were asked to leave a tip, and about half of them, you never even saw, and wouldn't know they were around, except when you returned to your cabin in the evening to find fresh towels and linen. I wish I could have afforded to tip more, but I had spent so much while I was on shore. And when I was on shore, some of the tours we went on passed a hat around for you to tip the person who took you around for your tour of whatever you saw that day.


I drove charter buses for years and never expected a tip. I drove as safe as I could every trip and never did so with the expectation that someone would give me a few bucks for doing so. It was my job to drive them safely from point A to B. I loaded and unloaded their bags but that was my job, why did I need extra money for that? I was on the clock getting my hourly wage anyway. The customers hired a professional driver and that is what I tried to give them. My level of serviced didn't change if it was sunny or snowing. Perhaps it was pride but I did everything to the nth degree because I wanted to not to impress the customers and hope for a tip.

Not to say that I didn't get an occasional tip but that was only for those trips where you spent days with a group on the road. I can say that I never got a tip on a one day trip. Even those where I would put 400 miles on the bus and 8 hours behind the wheel. I never thought twice about it, it was my job.

Yes, but as a bus driver, I'm sure you had a license that allowed you to drive one of those large vehicles. Doing so, you upped what you are worth, just as an over the road truck driver. Therefore you were paid a larger wage, then someone who drives their own car/vehicle. I'm sure you weren't responsible for the maintence cost on the bus, the gas it took to drive same said bus, nor the insurance to cover the bus and it's passengers in the case of an accident. I have those expenses. I pay for the gas, I pay for new tires, I pay for the oil changes, and maintence, I pay for the insurance to cover my car should I get involved in an accident. The money I make from this job, puts food on the table for my son and I, pays for gas and I have some left to pay a few bills, as well as school activities for my son. :zzz:

stillakid
12-12-2003, 02:26 AM
You should tip your driver for bringing the food to your door, instead of having to get up off your duff and go get the pizza or food your self.
I'm just trying to understand this because I really don't get it. But I don't see why it matters what the reason is for someone taking advantage of a service that the establishment offers. Whether I'm just lazy, or don't feel like driving to pick up a pizza, couch, or refrigerator, when the business tells me that they will deliver something, I am under the distinct impression that they are going to do it without me being compelled to fork over even more money than has already been agreed to. So when you say that "you should tip your driver for bringing the food to your door..." I have to ask, why? What's the rationale? Isn't that delivery service part of the purchase price of the item? If not, they why isn't that "tip" added automatically to the bill?


Yes, sure as a pizza delivery driver I am doing my job, but I am using my own vehicle, putting many miles, using gas that I paid for, and you as a customer tip me to cover the miles I have driven, so you can get whatever it is done with just the minot interution of having to answer the door.
Again, you're taking out a failure on the part of your boss (and yourself for not demanding that the owner pay for those expenses) on the customer. Maybe we all ought to pay the grocery store a "tip" because we're all too lazy to go out to the farm to pick up the food from there. Right? My own job requires "extra" driving at times and I always charge a mileage cost on my invoice. (I think the Federal rate for 2003 is $.36 a mile). Try charging your boss for that wear and tear. Also, your tax accountant should be writing off a significant amount on your taxes if you use that vehicle primarily for business use.

But based on your statement above, it sounds a lot like you're really bitter that you have to drive around in the first place. :sur: Again, who cares why people want stuff delivered to their house instead of going out for it themselves. It's irrelevant. Most of us are hired to do some specific job and we go do it at a pre-agreed to price. Expecting a "tip" just because we are inconvenienced by the necesssity of having to leave the comfort of our own homes is a mindset I can't wrap my mind around.

From all I've heard and read, the common thread in all of this is that people don't think that they are being paid enough at work so they expect the customers to make up for it under the guise of "appreciation." I kind of like this idea though. It's growing on me. I shoot a lot of stuff that winds up on TV, so the next time everybody watches the tube, they can mail me a tip in appreciation for all the hard work I've done. :)

bobafrett
12-12-2003, 02:40 AM
I disagree entirely with your basis for argument. You're still saying that a customer should feel compelled to pay for a service which is part of the business's original offer. Meaning, for example, pizza delivery is part of the business model. I call up and order a pizza. They either will hold it for me to pick up or I can ask that it be delivered. In the pick-up scenario, there is a frickin' tip jar at the window "for the cook." So I'm supposed to tip the guy for doing nothing more than his job? Explain that to me. Same goes for the delivery scenario. It's your JOB to get in a car and drive boxes around town. Don't like it? Don't take the job.

I'm still missing the part where you're going above and beyond the call of duty by getting behind the wheel. I was under the mistaken impression that that was the job description of a delivery person, rain or shine. It's the establishment's duty to set parameters for services like that. So if the roads are too dangerous, then they have the right to tell the phone customer that they are not delivering that night. How about this scenario? The "local" Dominoes Pizza which is listed for my town won't deliver to my house because I'm outside the mileage radius. Turns out I have to call the one in the next town over which just happens to be closer. Anyhow, if that "local" establishment saw fit to bend the rules and deliver to me anyway, then there is a perfect justification for a tip. Point is, yes, a tip is a nice way of saying "Thank you," but you didn't finish the statement. It's "Thank you for going out of your way to help out when you didn't have to." Otherwise, it's not really a "tip", is it? It becomes a compulsory part of the bill without a set number attached to it, so that what happens (as in the case of the .30 cent lady above), when somebody gives what they think you deserve (or all they can afford), ungrateful saps who think they're entitled to more than they have earned whine and moan.

I don't see where I ever said a customer should feel "compelled" to tip for the services for doing my job. In the past in fact, I have even offered the customer money back if I feel they have paid to much in a tip. Some customers I have as regulars pay me more, and I no longer ask them if they want change.

At the store where I work, we have to set a delivery area or radius, every establishment does. We have a fairly large delivery area though as it is. Do I ask or expect the customer who lives two towns over for more than the one that lives just down the block? No, nor do I get more.

Some pizza places have heated trucks that they offer the drivers to make deliveries in, and those places keep the delivery charge for maintenance on those vehicles. All the pizza places in my town have the drivers use their own cars. I personally keep the heat way up so that the pizza stays warm as when it left the store. Often times it gets very uncomforatably hot, but I want the pizza to arrive hot even though we deliver them in insulated bags. Is that above and beyond enough service for you? Or do I need to set your table and serve the pizza to you too?

BTW, one of my regulars tonight tipped my $9.75 on a $30.25 order, and he lives three blocks from the pizza joint I work at. Guess what, I printed him up a Christmas card and wrote him a note about how much I appreciate the way he and his wife take care of me. He's not the only customer who is getting a greeting from me either, but that's me. :D Maybe the amount I get, is due to the area where I work being the wealthiest county in Illinois, or maybe I'm just :cool: .

bobafrett
12-12-2003, 02:57 AM
My own job requires "extra" driving at times and I always charge a mileage cost on my invoice. (I think the Federal rate for 2003 is $.36 a mile). Try charging your boss for that wear and tear. Also, your tax accountant should be writing off a significant amount on your taxes if you use that vehicle primarily for business use.

Yes, my tax guy does write off the mileage, it only lessens the amount of tax that I have to pay, since I am my own contractor.


But based on your statement above, it sounds a lot like you're really bitter that you have to drive around in the first place. :sur: Again, who cares why people want stuff delivered to their house instead of going out for it themselves. It's irrelevant. Most of us are hired to do some specific job and we go do it at a pre-agreed to price. Expecting a "tip" just because we are inconvenienced by the necesssity of having to leave the comfort of our own homes is a mindset I can't wrap my mind around.

From all I've heard and read, the common thread in all of this is that people don't think that they are being paid enough at work so they expect the customers to make up for it under the guise of "appreciation." I kind of like this idea though. It's growing on me. I shoot a lot of stuff that winds up on TV, so the next time everybody watches the tube, they can mail me a tip in appreciation for all the hard work I've done. :)

No, I'm not bitter about having to drive. I love it in fact, no boss crawling down my back, working on my own, being able to listen to the radio, and greeting the customer. I'm just tired of having to defend being tipped. I mean I'm not the one who set up the whole tipping, or who is to get tipped for what services nor what percentage each tipped individual should make. This has been in place since before I was born.

If you don't feel like tipping your pizza driver or who ever it is, then that's your prerogative. Besides, I have just spent the last hour on this thread alone, and I really want to move on to reading about something else. Or since it is almost 2 am, I should probably get to bed. :zzz: zzz

Tonysmo
12-12-2003, 05:00 AM
What was the original auregment? oh yeah.. Quizno's... they should be tipped for the funny commercials. okie, they arent THAT funny.

Tipping should remain a personal thing, a personal thank you from the tipper.

There are alot of good points and I tend to see where Boba is coming from as I dont see him as bitter, just trying to make it in this godforsaken society and enjoying what life hands him, the people he meets etc. I know I enjoyed my time as a waiter, and had many tips that werent monetary at all. I had a 10 top and the guy in charge drove a sweet 911. At the time I think I was more interested in the mans car than I was in knowing the % of the tip I would be getting should be X amount.. That man saw that I liked his car and let me pull it around for him. That was an awesome experience for me, and it didnt cost him too much except a few skipped heartbeats while watching me drive his Porche.

Expecting a tip is too much though - and having someone chase me down for one would not have a good ending.

and dont even get me started on Strip Clubs.. uh.. hello.. your paid to strip! you dont need my $1! unless you go above and beyond,,, ok.. now Im crackin myself up.


I like to pile up a stack of ones on the table when I sit down to eat at an establishment.. as the glass stays empty, a dollar is taken away.. as the dirty plate stays stacked on the edge of the table, a dollar is taken away.. spill the water? uh oh.. another dollar gone! Talk about motivation!

Exhaust Port
12-12-2003, 10:07 AM
Yes, but as a bus driver, I'm sure you had a license that allowed you to drive one of those large vehicles. Doing so, you upped what you are worth, just as an over the road truck driver. Therefore you were paid a larger wage, then someone who drives their own car/vehicle.
You seem to be changing your point. A tip if for service and isn't dependant on what a customer "assumes" an employee is making or worth. Yet, my service was less deserving of a tip because you "assume" I'm getting paid more? Should a more senior waitress who's getting paid more per hour be tipped less because she's making more than the junior waitresses? My service was a 12 hour a day job where as a driver spends 5 minutes delivering my pizza.

You've just brought a bias mindset into the art of tipping for a service. It's not only what they do but it's an impression of how much they need the money? Next time you ride a bus or fly you might want to tip the driver/pilots because I can guarantee that they aren't making nearly what you think they are.


I'm sure you weren't responsible for the maintence cost on the bus, the gas it took to drive same said bus, nor the insurance to cover the bus and it's passengers in the case of an accident. I have those expenses. I pay for the gas, I pay for new tires, I pay for the oil changes, and maintence, I pay for the insurance to cover my car should I get involved in an accident.
I'll trade you a years worth tire and oil changes for one opportunity for you to dump a bus lav after 3 days on the road.

Now you seem to be arguing that a tip as to pay for the incidentals that you accrue for being a delivery driver. When the business says free delivery than any cost the driver has isn't my concern. If the delivery service wants the customer to pay for the service than institute a delivery fee.

Yes, you accure wear and tear on your car as a result of your job but so does every worker as they drive to and from work. I had a 30 minute drive to the bus garage in to pick up my bus. I shouldn't expect customers to tip me to make up for the wear on my vehicle. You're providing a service, the means by which you do so is of no concern and isn't the responsibility of the customer.

stillakid
12-12-2003, 11:39 AM
I don't see where I ever said a customer should feel "compelled" to tip for the services for doing my job.


No, you didn't and I'm not intentionally trying to single you out. :) I'm just trying to understand why many service workers (Quiznos, Starbucks, Pizza cooks, Pizza Delivery, etc.) expect a tip. As of December 2003, the reason probably has more to do with precedent than anything else. This society has been trained to pay at least 15% to certain people whether the service was good or not. Often I've heard people say, well the service was slow so only give him 15%. :confused: Huh? See 15% is ground zero and is pretty much an expected add on to the bill. If you give any less, you're in danger of getting intentionally crappy service (or worse! :eek: ) from the individual the next time. It's this sense of entitlement which drives service personnel to expect at least 15% or more for merely doing their jobs. It also allows certain industries the convenient excuse to pay their people low wages with the expectation that the customers will make up for it via tips.

Now don't get me wrong. I'm all for tipping so long as the service was above and beyond. I even think that tips should be tax exempt income. A tip is my way of saying thank you to the person, not the government. But you driving around in an uncomfortably hot car is a nice gesture, but A) how are your customers supposed to know this? and B) why should it matter? The mission of a pizza joint is to make the pizza the way it was ordered, and when delivery service is offered, to get it to the customer as hot and fresh as possible. I imagine that the delivery radius is designed partially with this purpose in mind. I don't care if the driver has to deliver to 5 houses before mine. If it's late or cold, that's the business's fault. Hire more drivers to ensure that the basic service is fulfilled.

But as far as Quizno's or Starbucks goes, I'd like to hear an example of how it could even be possible for someone to go above and beyond. I mean, what is there to do. How can you improve the process of pouring coffee in a cup or making a sandwich? :confused:

Exhaust Port
12-12-2003, 12:45 PM
Well there was that "Women of Starbucks" issue of Playboy. :D

bobafrett
12-12-2003, 01:24 PM
You seem to be changing your point. A tip if for service and isn't dependant on what a customer "assumes" an employee is making or worth. Yet, my service was less deserving of a tip because you "assume" I'm getting paid more? Should a more senior waitress who's getting paid more per hour be tipped less because she's making more than the junior waitresses? My service was a 12 hour a day job where as a driver spends 5 minutes delivering my pizza.

You've just brought a bias mindset into the art of tipping for a service. It's not only what they do but it's an impression of how much they need the money? Next time you ride a bus or fly you might want to tip the driver/pilots because I can guarantee that they aren't making nearly what you think they are.


I'll trade you a years worth tire and oil changes for one opportunity for you to dump a bus lav after 3 days on the road.

I'm not the person who set the rules on who was to be tipped, and who wasn't. When I started working for the Pizza place I work at over 8 years ago, I was told that I get X amount for coming to work, and if I had no deliveries, I could keep that money. If I had a delivery I got X amount for a delivery fee to cover the gas and wear and tear on my car. If I got tipped, that was fine. If not, I wasn't allowed to question the customer as to why they didn't tip. A tip was a "thank you" for bringing the food to the door. Every establishment that delivers has their own policy on how much they pay their help, how much of the delivery fee they get to keep, and I'm sure that none tell the driver to refuse a tip. I don't know what a customer assumes I make, but if it wasn't for the tips, I wouldn't be working there. I don't see a lot of people knocking down the doors looking to be a delivery person.

I never said you as a bus driver don't deserve a tip, but no where in the rules of tipping does it say you have to tip a bus driver. I drove a small bus to pick up kids for Headstart. I never got tipped for that, nor did I expect to be tipped. I've worked 8 years in the weight room at the local Y.M.C.A. wiping up the sweat of those who workout, reracking the 100 lb. dumbells after some muscle bound guy leaves them on the floor at the other side of the weight room, and I don't get tipped for that. In fact I just found out recently that it's nice to tip the maid service that cleans your hotel room. I never knew that. I have always tipped my barber/stylist, a waiter, bartender and cab driver, because I was taught in life to tip those people. I didn't make the rule, I just do it because it is what was taught to me by society. One of my first jobs was bussing tables. I earned a percentage of the waitstaffs tips, for getting the tables cleaned as fast as possible so they could get more customers seated, and make more tips for themselves. Now, had I grown up and never had to tip anyone, because it wasn't accepted much like it is in Japan, I belive was mentioned in someones earlier post, then I wouldn't have ever gone into this job thinking about being tipped. That's not "expecting" a tip, merely wondering if customer "A" was going to tip.


Now you seem to be arguing that a tip as to pay for the incidentals that you accrue for being a delivery driver. When the business says free delivery than any cost the driver has isn't my concern. If the delivery service wants the customer to pay for the service than institute a delivery fee.

Yes, you accure wear and tear on your car as a result of your job but so does every worker as they drive to and from work. I had a 30 minute drive to the bus garage in to pick up my bus. I shouldn't expect customers to tip me to make up for the wear on my vehicle. You're providing a service, the means by which you do so is of no concern and isn't the responsibility of the customer.

First I must say that we have it printed in out menus that there is a delivery fee of $1.25. No where does it say "free delivery", and the owner even tells a customer, should they ask, that there is the said fee, but that it does not include the tip. If an establishment offers free delivery, it's probably as an incentive to the customers who order from a place like ours to lure the business away by saving the customer the small deivery fee.

Hey, I've worked many jobs that I don't get paid for the drive or wear on my vehicle. Once again, I'm not the person who said this job is one wear you can earn tips, and this job doesn't. I'd much rather bust my butt doing physical labor like I did when I was at Wal-Mart, earning a wage, showing that I was worth every penny they paid, getting and earning my raises. But as long as society sets the guidelines on who gets tipped, and the customers continue to tip, then I will continue to accept tips for my services. To the best of my knowledge, a majority of the customers I deliver to don't mind tipping, because they order for delivery week in and week out. I know most of my regulars and they like it when I come to the door. Anyway, I'm probably rambling, as my mind has gone numb.

Oh, and when you tuck a dollar into a strippers waistband, is it considered a tip? :ermm: Just curious. :eek:

JediCole
12-12-2003, 03:13 PM
A few thoughts on tipping...

I grew tired of the ongoing fight about tipping that was starting to turn into anyone who is in a position where tips have become customary having to defend themselves personally as if they are somehow obliged to refuse tips offered them. Why should anyone who works at a restraunt or delivers pizza be held accountable for society's expectations. The point where one should be taking real issue with tipping is when someone in said position makes demands of that social perogative. This is to say, a waiter who chases down a customer for not giving at least 15% tip, regardless of the level of service provided. Or anyone in any such position who does the telltale throat-clearing noise when a tip is not produced at a satisfactory rate.

The ironic thing is that tipping is an import from overseas that was once considered below American wait staff. It has been a nuber of decades since that was the status quo, but there truly was a time when tipping was looked down upon, almost as an afront to the waiter or waitress. So though it is easy to look at the modern tipping phenomenon as uniquely American, it did not originate here. But of course it did not take too long for Americans to adopt the practice. And in more recent years, exaggerate to the extreme.

The Quisno's incident that sparked this thread is ideally an isolated incedent but is non the less inexcusable. Like many, I had always considered the "tip" line at fast food places just to be an artifact of the merchant credit card software (why produce two different types, one for fast food, one for traditional). This may or may not be the case. I'm not sure if anyone has made a solid determination. The problem with this Quisno's incident is not that the tip line was there, but rather that someone in the employ of that restraunt is guilty of theft, plain and simple. This is tantamount to a gas station attendant memorizing or writing down gas card numbers of customers and using their credit cards to finance his own purchases at the store. This does happen, by the way. My dad caught such theft on the part of a gas station once because he only used his card for gas purchases and always used even dollar amounts. Snacks tend to give odd dollar amounts when rung up, hence the obvious discrepency in charges.

But back to the whole issue of tipping in general. I will say that the concept has managed to get way out of hand in this country. Having no frame of reference for the state of tipping internationally, I cannot speak with certainty, but I would suspect that this inflation of the practice is uniquly American. It certainly smacks of as much. I've always had a kind of dubious feeling about tipping in general. I suspect that as tipping became prevalant in this country, restraunts and other employers used it as an excuse to reduce the wages of the employees (the arguement going something like this, "I pay you enough to make this worth doing, but you make your real money on tips. You don't put enough effort into it, you get what you deserve, put a lot of effort into it and make more than you would if I paid a straight salary!"). The idea is that it puts the onus on the wait staff to perform and "earn" their income. However, it is usually the highest maintainance customer that tips the least. I can't say if the practice is fair or not, it just is what we have in this day and age.

I am willing to tip about 10% on average if there is at least some degree of service. Actually 10-15%. For run of the mill service, 15% is my cap. The one thing I do like about tipping is that it can serve as an acknowledgement of a job done above and beyond. And every now and then I have encountered a waiter or waitress who truly did go above and beyond, and was shown due appreciation. I also use what I call the "iced tea gauge". For those not accustomed to the ways of the South, I drink a LOT of iced tea, especially when dining out. I discovered at a young age that it was the only drink other than coffee (at least when I was growing up) that you could have refilled ad nauseum at no extra charge. These days even sodas fall into this category, but back in the old days it was not the case. So I grew fond of tea and drink copeous quantities with my restraunt meals. As a result, the benchmark of good wait staff is attentiveness to the level of tea in my glass. That goes a long way in my book.

As for other places that seem to be associated with tips, I tend to tip a buck or two to pizza delivery people. It's just me, but I'm willing to give a little extra to someone doing a job I would not. I usually give a big tip if it is rainy, icy, or otherwise hazardous out. Mrs. JediCole and I are fond of Chinese Buffets and I tend not to tip there as you pretty much have to get everything yourself. I've never tipped a delivery person for furniture and the like. Usually the delivery is a service of the retailer or is a service I have to pay extra to use, so I feel no need to subsidize their workers.

For me the absolute worst case of tip inflation I've seen to date was a hot dog vendor out in front of a hardware store! There was a tip jar on the cart! I could not believe it. I know many of you are from large metropolitan areas where cart vendors are prevailant, but this was just the one guy out in front of a Lowe's peddling pricey hot dogs! I'm sorry, but this was taking the idea of tips to the extreme. What's next? Tipping the policeman who writes you a ticket for speeding? That's a tough job and does not pay so great by comparison. Will we see tip jars on the teachers' desks in Elementary Schools? Where does it end?

stillakid
12-12-2003, 03:35 PM
Oh, and when you tuck a dollar into a strippers waistband, is it considered a tip? :ermm: Just curious. :eek:


As far as the IRS goes, I don't know how they define that income. But I look at it this way. You pay a fee to get into the place. Then you pay separately for the overpriced drinks. The price of admission (at the door) buys you the entertainment of watching. If you choose to start dropping dollar bills on the counter, then you are paying for personalized attention. More $ equals more and sometimes better attention. So it really isn't a tip in that case. The lap dance has a set price (around $20 bucks or so) which is for the basic service. You owe that no matter what. But if you think that she went above and beyond the call of duty, or you want to become a "regular" or whatever, then any additional money becomes the "tip." It isn't compulsory and that's the key part of the Quizno's, waiter, delivery problem.

Kidhuman
12-12-2003, 05:02 PM
I just had food delivered and tipped the guy 2 bucks :D.

JediCOle, I used to live in NYC, and now in Va. I understand what u mean by the "Iced Tea Guage". NOw where I live, 95% of the beverages are refillable for free, Even at Wendy's and So on. I dont tip at Wendy's, but places like Shoney's buffet and Golden Corral(damn the got good food there) if my drink is topped off every few minutes, they will get a decent tip. If you dont pay attention to my table u get squat. Buffets are one of the hardest places to tip, because I get my own food, and pay at a seperate area. If you want a tip at those places make sure I got fresh rolls and full glasses and clean plates, because I go to eat, not dilly dally.

Chinese restaraunt buffets are the worst it seems.I usually have like 6 plates stacked up(mine, sweetrain's, the two kids, and round 2 dishes) before they clear em off. I have to hassel the waitress for another refill. And they think they deserve a tip for that? HELL NO!!!. I dont care that you brought me a receipt and a fortune cookie, I dont want either to tell you the truth.

Bobfrett, as far as strippers go, Stillakid is right. If you want the "extra attention" your gonna have to pay for it.


Derek, sue the rat b*****d for everything. Rename the store Dereks SUbs, NO tipping allowoed.

I use dto work for Home Depot as a lot attendant back in the day(@93 or so). We were not able to accept tips from anyone. We had customers that would force us totake tips. I told them I can not take it, if u must tip me, put it in my apron pocket. That way I didnt accept it, it was forced upon me. Some customers(regular contractors and such) would buy us lunch from the local deli once a week. Just show up and say here ya go. But we would rake in 200 bucks a week in forced tips. The rule is if you get tips there, you're supposed to hand the money to the Employee Fund for everyone to share(money would go to Christmas Parties and such for employees). What we would do is out of the 200 a week we got is hand in 50 bucks tokeep them off our backs. We loaded 100 pieces of sheetrock into there trucks along with 200 2x4's. It was wrong but what can you do.


Tipping is overrated. Dont tip, make empay the employees what they are really worth.

Exhaust Port
12-12-2003, 09:56 PM
Tipping is overrated. Dont tip, make empay the employees what they are really worth.
I think you hit the nail on the head there kidhuman. Employers are getting away with paying dirt cheap labor costs in the service industry by selling the hope of tips to make up for the difference and possibly greater return. As our thread is showing that particular methodology is outdated as service as degrated as workers now expect $X per customer. It has also leaked into certain jobs where tipping is rather absurd. Tipping a guy whose only job is to deliver something from point A to point B?? As Stilla said, how is it possible for someone to go above and beyond with that? But the job is set up so that tips are a necessity to make up for the low hourly rate.

Those employers will argue that without this type of system that their products will have to have a higher price to account for the non-tip style of employee salary. So be it. Rather than charging me $15 for a pizza, they charge $12 and assume that we'll tip those last $3 to the driver. Give it up. Charge the $15 up front and be done with it. But the only way that this will change is if: (1) Customers stop tipping out of habit and only in those cases where the service is really above and beyond. (2) The employees have to decide to stop having to rely on those tips to make up for their crappy pay. (3) Finally, employers have to sell their no-tip policy as a reason to use their service albeit a higher price than their competitor. Perhaps if those 3 steps would happen then tipping would return to that fine art used only in those special instances where the service was extrodinary, not ordinary.

Deoxyribonucleic
12-12-2003, 10:06 PM
A few thoughts on tipping...
Or anyone in any such position who does the telltale throat-clearing noise when a tip is not produced at a satisfactory rate.


Like Ralph, the doorman on "The Jeffersons" ;)

hehe, that guy was ALWAYS clearing his throat for more money :greedy:

Lowly Bantha Cleaner
12-12-2003, 10:52 PM
It is clear to us that there are those deserving a tip, i.e. a waitress, skycaps, or deliveryperson who puts some effort into their service. A couple bucks is normal for the latter two and 15% of your total bill for the waitperson is the standard fare, and obviously that number fluxuates depending on service.

However, I always assume that the waitperson gets charged a crummy fee per hour, below the minimum wage and has a family to feed. My mother constantly says, "I was raised on tips." She grew up with her four siblings and our grandfather, a bartender, was the only income of the family. Yet, she had a typical lower-middle class upbringing, due to the tips my grandfather, an amicable fellow, received. They were able to go on trips every year, and even though there were times when money was very tight, my mother never knew it. She looks back and realizes just how important tips were to her family's well-being. Whenever, I tip, I bregrudingly (because by nature I am a tightwad, plus I don't make much $$$) keep that in mind, and go above the standard 15%.

Now the people who get your drinks at buffets, do deserve a tip, but not the same you would give to the waitperson who fully serves you. A couple of bucks seems appropriate. The same goes for newspaper boys (and exotic dancers :kiss: )

I can't think of a reason to tip a fast-food worker unless you feel your service was so exceptionally special or maybe if you feel sorry for the person.

And yes, even the lady who brings you your drink at the casino deserves one, even though you may be down a couple hundred and you feel that the only way to cut your losses, would be to get even by taking advantage of free drinks. She probably has a family to feed too.

2-1B
12-13-2003, 01:30 AM
I like to tip generously and try to do well all the time.

However I will admit that I am prone to tipping the ladies more than their male counterparts. Something about male waiters just bothers me, if I'm sitting in a Perkins or some place like that I get bummed out when a dude comes to wait on us.

I'll probably catch hell for that, probably deservedly so - but I'm just being honest. Yeah, I'm definitely more loose with my tip money when he or she is a she. :crazed:


As far as the IRS goes, I don't know how they define that income. But I look at it this way. You pay a fee to get into the place. Then you pay separately for the overpriced drinks. The price of admission (at the door) buys you the entertainment of watching. If you choose to start dropping dollar bills on the counter, then you are paying for personalized attention. More $ equals more and sometimes better attention. So it really isn't a tip in that case. The lap dance has a set price (around $20 bucks or so) which is for the basic service. You owe that no matter what. But if you think that she went above and beyond the call of duty, or you want to become a "regular" or whatever, then any additional money becomes the "tip." It isn't compulsory and that's the key part of the Quizno's, waiter, delivery problem.

stillakid, thanks for the clinical run through on strip joint procedure. :D :D :D
Now if you can just edit in your views regarding Champaign Court etiquette, we'll be all set. :crazed:

plasticfetish
12-13-2003, 01:34 AM
You know, really what it boils down to, is that you tip certain people who do certain jobs for a reason ... you want to reward their good service and encourage it for the future. Waitresses, pizza delivery people, the skycap at the airport are all good examples. You give 15 to 20% to that waiter/waitress if they made a big effort for you and you hope that in the future, they'll remember you and won't hesitate to go that extra mile next time they see you. Skycaps are a perfect example ... my father has always flown back and forth across the country for his job. Years ago he always used to lug tons of garment bags full of samples around. He got to know all of the skycaps really well, tipped them well and they always made perfectly sure that his bags got to where they needed to be. Nice tip = no lost luggage. For the pizza guy, you tip them well, and maybe next time when there's supposed to be a 50 minute wait for that pie, they'll remember your address and see that you get yours in 20 minutes.

So, no ... tipping isn't and shouldn't be mandatory in most cases, but it does serve a purpose whether you agree with it or not.

stillakid
12-13-2003, 01:57 AM
stillakid, thanks for the clinical run through on strip joint procedure. :D :D :D
Now if you can just edit in your views regarding Champaign Court etiquette, we'll be all set. :crazed:


Sure thing. I don't like to beat around the bush. Oh, and I'm afraid I'm not familiar with a "Champaign Court." Sorry.

Kidhuman
12-13-2003, 08:34 AM
Does anyone tip the mailman at Christmas? I usually dont because I never have a set mail-man. But my parents have and some friends also have. Just wondering.

Exhaust Port
12-13-2003, 10:36 AM
No tip from me. I guess I don't want to reward the craming and stuffing that my mail gets in my little mailbox. But even if I was happy with the service I wouldn't tip, it's just not a job that one can really improve on.

stillakid
12-13-2003, 10:50 AM
This morning, the newspaper delivery guy slipped in his Christmas card along with his home address written inside. The "hint" is pretty obvious.

First of all, this isn't like a restaurant where the wait staff doesn't have to ask. But essentially doing everything but include a self-addressed stamped envelope asking for a handout is kind of rude, don't you think? I mean, if I wanted to give the guy a tip, I'd think of it myself then pull out an envelope and leave it by my door with his name on it.

Second, what has he done to deserve a tip anyway? It's not like I live in the Arctic and he has to tramp through snow drifts everyday. Even if he did, he knows the inherent conditions (for whereever he is living) and has agreed to do the job. Yeah, it shows up on time (most of the time) and, well, that's about it. That pretty much sums up the job description, no? So what praytell should convince anyone to hand over even more money to somebody who is just doing their job?

JediTricks
12-15-2003, 01:00 AM
The Quisno's incident that sparked this thread is ideally an isolated incedent but is non the less inexcusable. You wish! A friend of mine has been a waiter at places like Dennys & Sizzler for over a dozen years, says this sort of thing goes on all the time, especially if the server considers the customer to be especially rude or cheap. They see it as appropriate justice, vigilante behavior; friend or not, I still see it as theft and fraud.



*issue of tipping strippers* As far as the IRS goes, I don't know how they define that income. I can confirm for a fact that the IRS considers that standard tipping and like any other service that sees tips, expects an amount to be entered on the Gratuities line of the tax forms. Some folks don't put anything and it makes them look obvious, others put a low number since a big goose-egg is a sore thumb and that seems to work. The thing is, in many areas, some stripclubs don't offer any wage at all and some even charge the girls to dance there and then take a chunk of their tips. So you're paying to watch them strip and dance, tipping here should be either a reward for an especially entertaining routine or personal attention; just because you paid a door charge doesn't make you entitled to anything but watch. ;)


I agree with LBC about tipping buffet workers who refill your drinks and clear your table, if they do good, they get something, but they didn't bring me nothing or take my order, so it's not the same level as a waiter would get.

And after watching my postal worker fill the mail in my building the other day, she owes me a tip! Not only did I get several pieces for other apartments, and usually she adds in mail for other addresses, but I watched why the former happens, she slowly puts the mail on the lip of the box, accidentally drops it, picks it up, stares at it then the box numbers, then puts it in a different box! Maybe if she had put her hand closer to the box the first time, it would have saved her the trouble of bending down and putting it in the wrong place! So no tip for her.

Mandalorian Candidat
12-16-2003, 03:55 PM
Does anyone remember that Seinfeld episode where George has to buy lunch for Steinbrenner everyday at the calzone place? He feels that he has to leave a tip for the cook/manager/worker, yet whenever he puts it in the jar the guy turns his back so George "doesn't get credit" for leaving the tip. I wonder how many of us feel guilty like that and leave the tip so we win some sort of social approval or are we leaving tips because we are genuinely grateful for the "prompt service" that we received (doesn't TIPS stand for To Insure Prompt Service?).

Maybe it's the wuss side of me speaking out here, but if I don't feel that the service was par or if the server was somewhat rude or nonattentive I won't leave a tip at all. Then when I'm ready to leave I kind of do so more hurredly than if I did leave a tip. If the service didn't merit a tip I shouldn't leave one or feel that I'm required to do so, right?

I think it's the recent stronger emphasis that our culture has placed on tipping that makes me feel guilty or wrong if I don't leave something no matter what kind of performance the server has given. However, the other night I went out to a Chinese buffet and did leave a generous tip. Why? Even though I got my own food and soda, she was really attentive at clearing the plates and other used items and was genuinely friendly in a manner that said "I'm here to help you without expecting anything in return." I wish things could be more like that when going out rather than "give me a tip or I'll give you some spit."

2-1B
12-24-2003, 06:01 AM
Sure thing. I don't like to beat around the bush. Oh, and I'm afraid I'm not familiar with a "Champaign Court." Sorry.


HBO had a documentary series a few years ago called G-String Divas, it was pretty good. :)
Anyway, it focused on a very glitzy strip club and not only did they have a special for . . . private dances . . . but it was actually called the Champagne Court because the strippers tried to seel the guys expensive bottles of the drink to chug while they paid $$$ for their time.

Not that I know from experience ;) but none of the places around here are as fancy as that type of place.