PDA

View Full Version : the mars rover "spirit" lands safetly!



hango fett
01-04-2004, 06:25 PM
wow. what an awsome moment it was. did anyone else catch it on tv at about 11:50PM EST last night? i can't wait to see more pictures and video from the little rover to see if there was/is life on mars.
do you guys think here was/is?
vocie your opinion!
h

mabudonicus
01-08-2004, 12:17 PM
All's I can say is that I never imagined one could take such expensive, crisp pictures of red dirt and rocks.... apparently it looks even MORE like you'd think it would...

I hope the next mission is to take pictures of what Mars looks like on the inside... I bet it's dark and kinda solid, but you can't be sure without actually doing it.....

Exhaust Port
01-08-2004, 12:46 PM
I missed the whole Mars landing as I haven't watched that much TV over the last week or so. I've had to play catch up online:

http://marsrovers.jpl.nasa.gov/home/index.html

The pictures look great. I like the Columbia memorial plate they added to the rover.

http://marsrovers.jpl.nasa.gov/gallery/press/spirit/20040106b/NAVcam-Patch-01-05-04_br.jpg

Kidhuman
01-08-2004, 01:44 PM
Its pretty cool and all. Checking out other planets. What would be sweet is if some green guys attacked it and bashed it to bits, then flew here and took pics of us so we could beat them down too

stillakid
01-08-2004, 05:34 PM
Its pretty cool and all. Checking out other planets. What would be sweet is if some green guys attacked it and bashed it to bits, then flew here and took pics of us so we could beat them down too


That's an interesting thought. What if some green guys showed up in one of their pix? I'm SURE that the gvnt would clamp down on the whole thing immediately and the general public wouldn't have a clue. Oh, sure, there would be some leaks, but those would be discredited as those whacko UFO loonies. I think that the telltale sign that something extraordinary occurred would be a sudden shift of priorities to mount a manned mission to Mars as soon as possible. :alien:

Exhaust Port
01-08-2004, 05:44 PM
That would be an interesting problem for NASA. If the probe did uncover some amazing proof of not only life but lifeforms would that information make it to the public? Here's a division of the US Government that has been slowing bleeding to death since the start of the Shuttle program. Such evidence would breath new life into NASA overnight.

On another note Stilla, what is your avatar a picture of?

hango fett
01-08-2004, 09:10 PM
thanks for voiceing your opinions! that would be awsome if we found a smokeing gun that aliens exist. lets hope to god they are friendly if they exist...or we are done for...
h

jeddah
01-09-2004, 04:55 AM
That's an interesting thought. What if some green guys showed up in one of their pix? I'm SURE that the gvnt would clamp down on the whole thing immediately and the general public wouldn't have a clue. Oh, sure, there would be some leaks, but those would be discredited as those whacko UFO loonies. I think that the telltale sign that something extraordinary occurred would be a sudden shift of priorities to mount a manned mission to Mars as soon as possible. :alien:

Twinned with the mission on the NASA Mars Mothership was the European Space Agency's Beagle 2 lander. Whilst Spirit was concerned with geology and geography, Beagle 2 was concered with looking for life (microbial or otherwise) but has apparently been 'lost'. :eek: ;)

Incidentally - and hypothetically, is the term 'alien' politically correct? Sounds like it could be a new form of Human racism, only on a galactic scale ? :dis: :rolleyes: In any case, if we saw ETs on Mars, wouldnt that make us the 'aliens' ;)

jeddah

hango fett
01-09-2004, 07:38 AM
thats exactly what i was thinking jeddah. we are aliens to them and they are aliens to us! we are are aliens! aaaaaaaaaaahhhhhhhhhhh!
h

arctangent
01-09-2004, 08:48 AM
ha! at least nasa's mars probe landed in one piece unlike our beagle (beagle? what kind of name is that for an instrument of science sent into space?) which is now just a small patch of oil and mangled metal bits spread across the surface of mars after impacting at 12000 mph!

jeddah
01-09-2004, 11:21 AM
ha! at least nasa's mars probe landed in one piece unlike our beagle (beagle? what kind of name is that for an instrument of science sent into space?) which is now just a small patch of oil and mangled metal bits spread across the surface of mars after impacting at 12000 mph!


..... or so they would have us believe lol

stillakid
01-09-2004, 01:59 PM
I think that the telltale sign that something extraordinary occurred would be a sudden shift of priorities to mount a manned mission to Mars as soon as possible.

Hmm???????????

http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/3910698/

Bush to announce return to the moon
Long-range space strategy to be revealed Wednesday

MSNBC staff and news service reports
Updated: 1:32 p.m. ET Jan. 09, 2004

WASHINGTON - President Bush is preparing to unveil a new space initiative with a long-range goal of returning humans to the moon and establishing a permanent presence there, then moving on to Mars, NBC News has confirmed.

White House press secretary Scott McClellan told reporters Friday that the president would make remarks about the space program next Wednesday in Washington.

"The president is strongly committed to the exploration of space," McClellan said.

McClellan declined to discuss the contents of the upcoming speech, as did NASA spokesman Glenn Mahone.

"We're not going to pre-empt the president," Mahone said, "but we're excited about the news of the announcement next week and what it means for the future direction of NASA."

Speculation within the U.S. space community about a major White House policy announcement has been swirling for months, with some speculating that Bush would say something when he spoke at the Wright Brothers centennial in Kitty Hawk. But the president stayed mum on the subject, despite prodding from actor John Travolta, who urged him at the event to commit to such an idea and even volunteered to go on the first mission.

The U.S. space program is still struggling to recover nearly a year after the shuttle Columbia broke up on re-entry but has been greatly buoyed by Saturday's successful landing of the Spirit rover on Mars and the stunning pictures it has since beamed back.

Congressional sources told Reuters that the administration was also considering setting up a more streamlined hierarchy for guiding the government's wide-ranging space programs and coordinating its research and development. Under this scenario, there could be more exchanges of technology between NASA and the Defense Department.

Some members of Congress have said they want to ensure that the United States remains the global leader in space exploration.

"If we don't do it, somebody else will," said U.S. Rep. Bart Gordon of Tennessee, a ranking Democrat on the House Science Committee. "The Chinese, the Europeans and the Japanese all have the goal of going to the moon. Certainly we don't want to wake up and see that they have a base there before we do."

New technologies and energy sources
The new space plan was spearheaded in large part by NASA administrator Sean O'Keefe, Reuters reported. O'Keefe was appointed by Bush to restore credibility to an agency plagued by budget troubles, including billions of dollars in cost overruns at the space station.

Vice President Dick Cheney also was involved in the policy development, along with other senior Bush advisers. The administration was said to see the initiative as an important national security measure, and experts said it could lead to new technologies and potential new sources of energy.

United Press International quoted administration sources as saying the current plan called for an $800 million boost in space spending for fiscal year 2005, with most of that money going to develop new robotic space vehicles and new human exploration systems. NASA's current budget is about $15.5 billion.

The space budget would be increased in stages for at least the next five years, looking toward the first manned lunar landing of the 21st century in 2013, UPI reported. The lunar effort would set the stage for missions to Mars, White House sources were quoted as saying.

Bush's father, former President George H.W. Bush, had proposed a mission to Mars that was scuttled because of concerns over its high cost. The younger Bush likewise faces budgetary constraints, including a budget deficit expected to top $500 billion this year alone. An ambitious space proposal would likely to face challenges from fiscal conservatives and Democrats who want him to focus on domestic issues like education and health care.

Questioned about the potential costs, McClellan suggested that resources might be reallocated within NASA to support new policy goals. He said Bush would "put forth a responsible budget that meets our highest priorities while working to hold the line of spending elsewhere in the budget."

While some advocates of sending a human mission to Mars have been critical of a new focus on the moon, others see a permanent presence there as a necessary precursor.

"We should go to the moon and set up a research base there. That then will provide the opportunities to develop technologies and systems that will allow us to have human space expeditions to the moon or Mars or other places later," Gordon said.

Looking ahead to Mars
Experts said the goal should be to set up a research base on the moon to test technologies that would be useful on a mission to Mars.

"The idea is to go to Mars. And the way you get to Mars is you go to the moon, and you practice three days from home. It's the equivalent of climbing Mount Rainier and preparing for Mount Everest," Howard McCurdy, a space-policy expert at American University in Washington, told Reuters.

NASA astronaut Mike Foale, one of the two men now orbiting Earth aboard the international space station, also recently compared space exploration to mountain climbing.

"You have to form a base camp, where you have to put all your resources there. Then you work from that base camp further out to get to the peak. ... I think the moon should be a great base camp to go onto Mars," Foale said.

This report includes information from NBC News, Reuters, The Associated Press and Space.com.

stillakid
01-09-2004, 02:54 PM
On another note Stilla, what is your avatar a picture of?


Oh, forgot to answer this... I was looking at the screenshots from SECRET WEAPONS OVER NORMANDY ( http://www.lucasarts.com/products/normandy/splash.htm ) and ran across this gunsight. Somehow it fit in with my tendency to target and shoot down "things." ;)

But what's important is that the game is not available for Gamecube which sucks. I've sworn off PC games and don't plan on buying an X-Box, so I'll just have to wait for other kind of "military" title which is compatible.

hango fett
01-09-2004, 03:08 PM
oh my god! a base on the moon is being talked about this early????? the way they talk, they made me belive it wasn't till 21?? but before then???? wow. i have a new goal. i want to be a meterologist on mars!!!!yeah!

also, now we are "fighting" over the moon with japan, china and others? god....it's gonna blow up before anything big is discovered.....
h

Hasbro'sBountyHunter
01-09-2004, 04:26 PM
I saw the special on the Nasa channel last night. I was extremely impressed by the 3-d simulations depicting what Spirit experienced. Can't wait for Opportunity to land...

hango fett
01-09-2004, 08:59 PM
spirit is about to take her first steps on martian surface. go to www.nasa.gov for more about this cool little robot!
h

Exhaust Port
01-12-2004, 09:19 PM
Oh, forgot to answer this... I was looking at the screenshots from SECRET WEAPONS OVER NORMANDY ( http://www.lucasarts.com/products/normandy/splash.htm ) and ran across this gunsight. Somehow it fit in with my tendency to target and shoot down "things." ;)

But what's important is that the game is not available for Gamecube which sucks. I've sworn off PC games and don't plan on buying an X-Box, so I'll just have to wait for other kind of "military" title which is compatible.
It looked like some sort of WW2 flight sim. I was fortunate enough to get an XBox for Christmas and have been looking for a few games to get. I've been eyeing that game in particular and might just have to break down and get it.


Back on the NASA, space, Mars thing: I too was kind of suprised at the recent announcements made regarding space and the moon. I think it would be a lot better direction of exploration than Mars for humans (send unmanned vessels to Mars) but it's still a hugh step from where we are now. I'll believe it when I see it.

mabudonicus
01-13-2004, 11:08 AM
And it'll be a lot easier to ignore environmental concerns on Mars in the search for "new sources of energy", since the hard work of making it an uninhabitable rock is already done :)

Seriously, though, I think planetary exploration should be viewed as a privelidge(I KNOW:D), one that we as a race frankly don't deserve if our planet is our cosmic resumee... it just seem funny that a faraway planet which may have had life on it at one point would be more scientifically valuable than one with actual established life on it... in a way it seems to be a sort of cosmic autopsy of sorts.... I mean, what if it turns out Mars WAS just like earth, and WE turned it into what it is, then escaped HERE... and now, irony of ironies, we're exploring IT in some effort to improve our situation.......


I'd still rather believe that we could salvage this planet... what do I know, though, I'm not a scientist

stillakid
01-13-2004, 01:55 PM
And it'll be a lot easier to ignore environmental concerns on Mars in the search for "new sources of energy", since the hard work of making it an uninhabitable rock is already done :)
Nice! :D


Seriously, though, I think planetary exploration should be viewed as a privelidge(I KNOW:D), one that we as a race frankly don't deserve if our planet is our cosmic resumee... it just seem funny that a faraway planet which may have had life on it at one point would be more scientifically valuable than one with actual established life on it... in a way it seems to be a sort of cosmic autopsy of sorts.... I mean, what if it turns out Mars WAS just like earth, and WE turned it into what it is, then escaped HERE... and now, irony of ironies, we're exploring IT in some effort to improve our situation.......


I'd still rather believe that we could salvage this planet... what do I know, though, I'm not a scientist

I too am not a scientist but I have a couple comments about that. One is that while it would be ironic if we were "re-escaping" back to Mars, it is impossible unless prehistoric primitive man managed to also hide the pieces to his spaceship somewhere.

As far as salvaging Earth goes, we don't have to worry about that too much. Humanity can't really destroy it. We'll destroy our ability to live on it first. After we're gone, nature will slowly reconstitute the balance of things and the splendor will return without us.

jeddah
01-14-2004, 06:27 AM
And it'll be a lot easier to ignore environmental concerns on Mars in the search for "new sources of energy", since the hard work of making it an uninhabitable rock is already done :)

Seriously, though, I think planetary exploration should be viewed as a privelidge(I KNOW:D), one that we as a race frankly don't deserve if our planet is our cosmic resumee... it just seem funny that a faraway planet which may have had life on it at one point would be more scientifically valuable than one with actual established life on it... in a way it seems to be a sort of cosmic autopsy of sorts.... I mean, what if it turns out Mars WAS just like earth, and WE turned it into what it is, then escaped HERE... and now, irony of ironies, we're exploring IT in some effort to improve our situation.......


I'd still rather believe that we could salvage this planet... what do I know, though, I'm not a scientist

This book is the Lord of the Rings on the subject of Galaxy redemption. It is an epic tale of man's galactic evolution. Very heavy going, all encompassing and complex, but is without doubt the most inspirational thing I have ever picked up in my life.

http://www.aulis.com/twothirds4.htm

The title (Two Thirds) refers to the proportion of planetary citizens needed to evacuate a planet to repopulate another one. The story is accompanied with many diagrams and pictures which you have to refer to throughout to really enjoy the story.

jeddah

stillakid
01-14-2004, 12:30 PM
This book is the Lord of the Rings on the subject of Galaxy redemption. It is an epic tale of man's galactic evolution. Very heavy going, all encompassing and complex, but is without doubt the most inspirational thing I have ever picked up in my life.

http://www.aulis.com/twothirds4.htm

The title (Two Thirds) refers to the proportion of planetary citizens needed to evacuate a planet to repopulate another one. The story is accompanied with many diagrams and pictures which you have to refer to throughout to really enjoy the story.

jeddah


Uh, yeah. ;) I'm all for thinking outside the box and agree with their basic suggestion that it will take a better understanding of our physical universe before we can effectively travel beyond our current boundries, however when this kind of rational thought also happens to be wrapped in one of these whack-job packages, the good part of the message gets lost. He was "given" this information? :rolleyes: A scientific messiah I suppose. Oh brother. Well, like I've always said, not a single one of us really knows what this Universe is all about...where it came from, why it's here, how it really works...so maybe....just maybe they could be correct. But so could Osama Bin Laden. I guess we'll all just have to wait either for science to meticulously research these questions piece by piece or, in the case of death before those conclusions are reached, we'll find out after we expire. Until then, I think that the basic premise of trying to see things from all sides is good, but if they don't tone down the whole "I'm a prophet" thing, that any progress that could otherwise come from their work will be ignored.

jeddah
01-14-2004, 01:56 PM
Uh, yeah. ;) I'm all for thinking outside the box and agree with their basic suggestion that it will take a better understanding of our physical universe before we can effectively travel beyond our current boundries, however when this kind of rational thought also happens to be wrapped in one of these whack-job packages, the good part of the message gets lost. He was "given" this information? :rolleyes: A scientific messiah I suppose. Oh brother. Well, like I've always said, not a single one of us really knows what this Universe is all about...where it came from, why it's here, how it really works...so maybe....just maybe they could be correct. But so could Osama Bin Laden. I guess we'll all just have to wait either for science to meticulously research these questions piece by piece or, in the case of death before those conclusions are reached, we'll find out after we expire. Until then, I think that the basic premise of trying to see things from all sides is good, but if they don't tone down the whole "I'm a prophet" thing, that any progress that could otherwise come from their work will be ignored.

Now you know that's not what I said :p ;) It did not affect me in that way, but is a fantastic yarn. The comparison to LOTR was not made lightly and whilst it is flimsy in comparison to the Tolkien's efforts at 446 pages, in its gestalt, it is a mammoth read.

Now I'm no follower of Raelians, Hale-Bopp cults or whatever, but I think it would be a great loss to judge this book by looking through logic or factual-flavoured spectacles. The premise is exciting, original and highly impressive, managing get such massively complex ideas to gel coherently. That is why I am so full of praise for it.

FWIW, I believe when I choreograph something I am proud of, or write a new song that I have received the inspiration to do so. Now whether that is from my higher self or one of the muses, I like to romanticise the creative process. I'm not saying I'm channelling the result but inspiration is far too nebulous a thing to be labelled as merely a brain function (IMO)

jeddah

stillakid
01-14-2004, 03:53 PM
Now you know that's not what I said :p ;) It did not affect me in that way, but is a fantastic yarn. The comparison to LOTR was not made lightly and whilst it is flimsy in comparison to the Tolkien's efforts at 446 pages, in its gestalt, it is a mammoth read.

Now I'm no follower of Raelians, Hale-Bopp cults or whatever, but I think it would be a great loss to judge this book by looking through logic or factual-flavoured spectacles. The premise is exciting, original and highly impressive, managing get such massively complex ideas to gel coherently. That is why I am so full of praise for it.

FWIW, I believe when I choreograph something I am proud of, or write a new song that I have received the inspiration to do so. Now whether that is from my higher self or one of the muses, I like to romanticise the creative process. I'm not saying I'm channelling the result but inspiration is far too nebulous a thing to be labelled as merely a brain function (IMO)

jeddah

Yes, I know. I didn't to imply that I was implicating you in their maelstrom of thought. ;) Where ideas come from? Who knows. Some who would laugh at Joseph Smith while coveting Moses might also find inspiration in the "radio" which was Stevie Ray Vaughn. While hopefully time will tell, for the time being I personally like to believe that there are 11 or more unseen dimensions out there as predicted by String Theory and that our "souls" are the remnant energy of the shattered consciousness which so many prefer to describe as God. If just one of those mysteries can be uncovered in humanities inevitable reach toward the stars, then it cannot happen too quickly.

stillakid
01-20-2004, 05:55 PM
Just what we thought!

mabudonicus
01-23-2004, 10:06 AM
"It's just a cheap piece of junk........ just a cheap, 400 million dollars piece of junk"-Me, yesterday

Sorry for the insensitivity, I've been having a heated discussion with my buddy lately, concerning space exploration, and I've been fighting the "what a silly waste of time and money" side.... I don't want to argue here, of course, but if anyone can explain what real good mars exploration will do without mentioning any sort of capital gains, I'd honestly like to hear it (and if the answer includes learning new techniques for super-deep-sea exploration I will make a raspberry sound:D)