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stillakid
01-14-2004, 01:42 PM
In this month's issue of Popular Science (page 36) there is an article about 3-D printers that you have to see if you haven't heard about this yet.

Essentially, they have a machine which, much like a 2-D inkjet printer, shoots out layers of plastic and wax to create a full 3-dimensional object. Once the "printing" is complete, the object is placed in an oven to melt the wax away and you're left with your object. Right now, it looks like they're doing coffee mugs and basic toys (things without moving parts), but the possibilities and amazing!

popsci.com doesn't have a link to the story on the web so you'll have to pick up the magazine itself, but here is a link to one of the systems they talk about:

http://www.3dsystems.com/products/multijet/invision/index.asp :eek:

LTBasker
01-14-2004, 03:25 PM
I remember seeing that sort of thing an episode of Next Step on Discovery Science, looks cool. Just think of the possibilities too, get one SA CLone figure and use him as a template in a bunch of poses to print out Clones like the ones in the 3-packs. :D

stillakid
01-14-2004, 03:46 PM
I remember seeing that sort of thing an episode of Next Step on Discovery Science, looks cool. Just think of the possibilities too, get one SA CLone figure and use him as a template in a bunch of poses to print out Clones like the ones in the 3-packs. :D


Yep, that's what I was thinking too. :) But that $30,000 price tag doesn't make it practical yet. The article says that Hewlett Packard has created a prototype that could sell for $1000. This could turn out to be Hasbro's "Napster" in few years.

Exhaust Port
01-14-2004, 03:55 PM
This technology will be quite interesting to watch develop over the next 20-30 years. As you stated, the possibilities are amazing.

LTBasker
01-14-2004, 07:32 PM
This could turn out to be Hasbro's "Napster" in few years.

Probably not unless it gets a very convient price tag, I mean to make a functioning figure you'd probably have to take it apart on each seperate piece and build each one. It could be great for Hasbro in the end though, just think if figure companies used this! No more physical production molding! Every figure could be replicated perfectly each time! :eek: Maybe even with color, so no more horrible paint jobs...

This could be good, very very good...yes...

stillakid
01-14-2004, 07:41 PM
Maybe even with color


There is a color version of the technology available. :)

LTBasker
01-14-2004, 07:50 PM
Yeah, I was thinking though that maybe stuff like pupils in eyes might need to be painted. Unless it can color in things itself, and not just print in color. Such as Hasbro's molding stuff like the Imperial Officer figure in black for the black suit to cut down on paint. If the machine can seperately paint, that would be great. Maybe they could even use real scan to get molds, scan the molds, and then scale them down in the machine to print for a figure.

JediTricks
01-15-2004, 07:58 PM
Last year, Popsci had an article about a university converting discarded printers into living tissue builders, sounds to me like an extension of that idea.

The 'Xir
01-16-2004, 01:03 PM
just wait 'til quantum computers come into play about 30 years from now! Then your head will really spin! :crazed: Is it Live, or is it Mem...The Matrix?! :eek:

Stemp Fester
01-19-2004, 04:26 AM
Right now, it looks like they're doing coffee mugs and basic toys (things without moving parts)

I had a magazine a few years ago with an article about these 3D printers - moving parts can be (and have been) accomplished! I was amazed back then when I read the article - the designers were making chains with the machine, where each link in the chain was a completely individual piece (no seams or joins). They were also making balls inside of balls inside of balls, again each ball completely independent with no joins or seams.

Amazing stuff!


But that $30,000 price tag doesn't make it practical yet.

If I remember correctly (probably not though :ermm: ), a few years ago the price was about $150,000. Could only be a few years now before the household replicator is a standard appliance. I'll be making myself a SA Clone army! :crazed: We can make Hasblow redundant!!! :evil:

LTBasker
01-19-2004, 04:45 PM
I dunno, you'd have to factor in the cost of materials. I doubt it'll be like Enterprise described it, where they can take your waste from the toilet and turn it into spare material for making things. :p

That's why it seems like instead of household units making Hasbro redudant, Hasbro would probably gain from it. Just think of what we would see from something like this, affordable ships even? They would only have to sculpt them, then place them for printing. None of that expensive molding or anything. The only thing the price of such a thing would even have to measure out is probably the materials, the resources needed to run the machine, and the processes for getting it packaged. That cuts out alot of what is usually paid for in the retail prices.

They could probably even make affordable 1:1 scale ships, with plenty of features. The possibilities are insssaaaaaannnnne :crazed:

stillakid
01-19-2004, 06:32 PM
They could probably even make affordable 1:1 scale ships, with plenty of features.

Hmm, I'll need a new garage.

JediTricks
01-20-2004, 05:58 PM
I dunno, you'd have to factor in the cost of materials. I doubt it'll be like Enterprise described it, where they can take your waste from the toilet and turn it into spare material for making things. :pOn Star Trek (pre-"Enterprise" naturally), the replicator system required more than just waste, starships that use replicator technology (an offshoot of transporter technology) have a store of raw materials that the system draws from to use as the basis for its creations - whether foodstuff or not. Waste materials were filtered through a different replicator system several times to convert the waste back into its raw materials.



...What are you all staring at me for?!? :stupid:

:D (yeah buddy, Trekkie since the day I was born!)

stillakid
01-20-2004, 05:59 PM
On Star Trek (pre-"Enterprise" naturally), the replicator system required more than just waste, starships that use replicator technology (an offshoot of transporter technology) have a store of raw materials that the system draws from to use as the basis for its creations whether foodstuff or not. Waste materials were filtered through a different replicator system several times to convert the waste back into its raw materials.


...What are you all staring at me for?!? :stupid:

;) :D (yeah buddy, Trekkie since the day I was born!)

So Star Trek is basically just recycled sh**? ;)

JediTricks
01-20-2004, 06:28 PM
Just their food and uncomplicated small items like vases and Data's left ear.

BTW, don't think I didn't catch that Stilla; do I really need to invoke the placement of irony that you are bashing Trek as being recycled on a Star Wars board? :D

LTBasker
01-20-2004, 07:33 PM
So Enterprise is basically just recycled sh**? ;)

Now it makes sense, Stilla. ;)

stillakid
01-20-2004, 07:43 PM
Just their food and uncomplicated small items like vases and Data's left ear.

BTW, don't think I didn't catch that Stilla; do I really need to invoke the placement of irony that you are bashing Trek as being recycled on a Star Wars board? :D


What? Me? Bash something? Heavens to Betsy no! :D

JediTricks
01-20-2004, 11:28 PM
Good job Captain Edit! Seriously though Basker, you have to define that vague variable, since "sh**" in this case clearly means "ST:Voyager" -- see, the substance in question may and often should be used to describe Voyager, but conversely, Voyager can't be used to describe said substance. :P :D You could say "that season of Voyager was complete excrement" but you couldn't say "those animal droppings look an awful lot like an episode of Voyager". ;)

stillakid
01-20-2004, 11:32 PM
On Star Trek (pre-"Enterprise" naturally), the replicator system required more than just waste, starships that use replicator technology (an offshoot of transporter technology) have a store of raw materials that the system draws from to use as the basis for its creations - whether foodstuff or not. Waste materials were filtered through a different replicator system several times to convert the waste back into its raw materials.


Either way, you said it first. I just kinda boiled it down to the basics. ;)

LTBasker
01-21-2004, 12:19 AM
You could say "that season of Voyager was complete excrement" but you couldn't say "those animal droppings look an awful lot like an episode of Voyager". ;)

But you could say:

"There's more sense in that cat's litter box than even a portion of Voyager plots."

JediTricks
01-23-2004, 12:19 AM
But you could say:

"There's more sense in that cat's litter box than even a portion of Voyager plots."How about: "Archer's dog produces more quality product after eating cheese than Enterprise's writers and producers". ;)

LTBasker
01-23-2004, 01:06 AM
LOL, indeed. But getting the thread back on track, do you suppose we'd ever see household versions? It would be pretty cool if you could make your own figures from various things that toy companies won't make. (Like oh say...female Marvel characters..)

stillakid
01-23-2004, 10:42 AM
LOL, indeed. But getting the thread back on track, do you suppose we'd ever see household versions? It would be pretty cool if you could make your own figures from various things that toy companies won't make. (Like oh say...female Marvel characters..)


Undoubtedly. I can't remember where I read it or who said it, but when the first computers were being put together (the ones that filled entire rooms), somebody suggested that there never would be any need for more than 3 or 4 computers in the entire world. He was either thinking that everyone would simply tap into those few machines or that the common person would have no use for a computer.

Once the price on these goes down to something on a consumer level, they'll sell probably just like DVD players. Then that opens up the need for the "software"...the designs that you feed into the machine to create stuff.