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Darth Jax
06-08-2004, 07:36 PM
this thread was inspired by JBF's thread about horror films, specifically Jacob's Ladder. i'm curious as to what other forumites consider a 'horror' film. are there specific elements involved in such a classification in your opinions? or is the term horror film just a catch-all for any movie featuring the supernatural, gore, or scares galore?

i've seen Jacob's Ladder a couple times but wouldn't consider it to be a horror film, thus my above question.

James Boba Fettfield
06-08-2004, 07:52 PM
Well, if the film contains the supernatural, gore, or scares then I usually will call it horror.

Now there's exceptions. The Casper movies contained the supernatural, but they are not horror. Same thing with The Haunted Mansion. The Passion and Braveheart had gore galore, but they weren't horror.

I suppose it really depends on the tone of the film combined with those aforementioned characteristics.

Wish I could answer that Jacob's Ladder question. Give me a few days and I'll let you know why or why not I might consider it horror.

Turbowars
06-08-2004, 08:57 PM
I consider The Thing to be a horror film and in my opinion is the best horror film that I have seen. I know there are people that wont agree, but I saw it when I was pretty young and it scared the hell out of me. It's setting, top notch make-up, great cast, music and the fact that there are parts that will never be explained(When I meet John Carpenter he wouldn't even tell me) just has a cool eery effect on me.

Reefer Shark
06-08-2004, 09:29 PM
I agree with ya Turbo.

John Carpenters the Thing is one of the best movies of all time IMO! My old VHS copy is all worn out, and I'm thinking I'm gonna have to buy the DVD eventually. Hopefully we'll get some cool special edition deal someday. Hell, they make every other movie into a special edition dvd these days :rolleyes: , why not the Thing?

I would clasify this one as "sci-fi horror".

Turbowars
06-08-2004, 09:44 PM
I have the Collectors Edition Widescreen DVD. It has some great features, you know the making and stuff. I know I have said this before, but Carpenter got such crap for this film it seem as if he believes it crap. He's such a bitter guy, but still love yah John! Oh and yeah a Sci-Fi Horror it is.

B'Omarr Monkey
06-08-2004, 11:33 PM
Reefer, buy "The Thing" that's already available. The extras mainly consist of interviews, but they are really detailed. I don't think there was a lot of making of footage for this movie. The production schedule was hell, and Rob Bottin ended up in the hospital from wearing himself out, so i don't think anyone was doing too much behind the scenes filming for posterity. I doubt there will be a better deluxe version of this movie. I've seen it double-packed with another movie (I forget which one) at Best Buy, so you can probably get it very cheap now.

Horror covers a very wide range of movies. Depending on the person asked you could probably include "King Kong" and "Se7en." The gore aspect is really unimportant. Most of my favorite horror films were made between 1920-1968. The Friday the 13th movies, while being a great showcase for Tom Savini's effects, weren't much more than that. The acting and stories were terrible.

I recently posted some movies that others weren't mentioning on the Five Favorite Horror Films thread, that were made after 1968. You might want to go check it out.

Darth Jax
06-09-2004, 12:20 AM
Horror covers a very wide range of movies. Depending on the person asked you could probably include "King Kong" and "Se7en." The gore aspect is really unimportant. Most of my favorite horror films were made between 1920-1968. The Friday the 13th movies, while being a great showcase for Tom Savini's effects, weren't much more than that. The acting and stories were terrible.

I recently posted some movies that others weren't mentioning on the Five Favorite Horror Films thread, that were made after 1968. You might want to go check it out.

i browse that thread periodically. but i was more interested in finding out why someone thinks se7en is a horror film, not that they think its one of the all-time best.

i wouldn't consider either king kong and se7en. but i'm not sure i can delineate what criteria i make that judgement with at this time.

Kidhuman
06-09-2004, 12:22 AM
I go along the same lines of JBFF with classification. Jacobs Ladder is with out a doubt Horror.

Also The Thing is one of the best horror movies to date.

B'Omarr Monkey
06-09-2004, 11:29 AM
i browse that thread periodically. but i was more interested in finding out why someone thinks se7en is a horror film, not that they think its one of the all-time best.

i wouldn't consider either king kong and se7en. but i'm not sure i can delineate what criteria I make that judgement with at this time.

I think it's a fine line, and it depends on the viewer. I would consider King Kong more of a fantasy movie like The 7th Voyage of Sinbad, or Lord of the Rings, but it is also, technically a monster movie, so I guess that could be comsidered horror. I would also classify the original Godzilla movie as a horror movie, and few others in the series, but would not include most of the series such as Destroy All Monsters, which I would consider fantasy. The original movie was clearly meant as a horror movie as an instoppable dark force of destruction wipes out entire cities and populations. The other movies are escapism.

"Se7en" falls into that fine line between crime-thriller and horror that movies like "Night of the Hunter" and "Silence of the Lambs" fall into. I think these movies can all be considered horror for the same reasons that "Halloween" or "Psycho" can be considered horror. After all those are simply men with knives movies. "Se7en" and the others are about mysterious faceless/masked men who commit attrocities of a grand magnitude upon their victims. They're all Bogeymen. It's this faceless/masked bogeyman that keeps films like "Friday the 13th" on the lust of horror films. Otherwise, they'd just be dull murder thrillers like "The Bone Collector."

Hellboy
06-09-2004, 06:19 PM
Well I think you'll find most movies fall into multiple genre classifications. You could call "The Thing" either sci-fi or horror but it's described better as sci-fi/ horror. Maybe it falls more into the horror category but it contains elements of both types of movies so either are appropriate.

I personally wouldn't apply the horror classification to a movie unless the primary intention of the filmmaker is to shock the viewer. Whether thats achieved through psychological material, gore, the supernatural or anything else that has the potential to scare, a horror film is something thats designed to play off of our fears.

B'Omarr Monkey
06-09-2004, 09:33 PM
That's a good defining term, HB about the intent to shock.

I was in Best Buy today to buy "The Creeping Flesh," which I ended up not getting because I forgot to bring my wallet. :rolleyes: Anyway, it was interesting to see what movies were included in the Science Fiction section and which movies were included in the Horror section. I would have definitely done some rearranging, but on some there really is a fine line. "The Beast from 20,000 Fathoms" is under Horror, though it leans more towards SF. Hammer's "The Devil Rides Out"/"Rasputin" double feature was under SF though that is most definitely Horror.

An interesting case are the Alien movies. The first one is more Horror than SF, the second one pretty much out and out SF, the third one about half and half, and the third more SF.

"The Hunchback of Notre Dame" starring Lon Chaney was classified as a horror movie, though now in these PC times, Quasimodo is more and more absent from Universal's pantheon of monster greats. Of course, that could have something to do with the evil Disney empire who made the model kit compnay, Polar Lights, retitle their resissue of teh Aurora Hunchback of Notre Dame kit as "The Bellringer of Notre Dame," because, apparently Disney owns the title. How? You've got me, but that's a horror story of it's own.

2-1B
06-11-2004, 03:31 AM
I certainly cannot offer a strict list of criteria but here is my initial reaction to an EXCELLENT question:

for me, all of my favorite horror movies seem to have one thing in common: "it can't be possible." What I mean is that there is usually one or more elements which means it can't be 'real.'

Obvious examples:
A Nightmare on Elm Street
The Exorcist
Dawn, Day of the Dead

I could put a zombified Jason Vorhees on that list, but then again the original Friday the 13th was entirely plausible (excluding the Jason-in-the-water scene if you take it literally).

Hell, I don't know what to say. My initial reaction to Se7en is that it falls under the crime-thriller category because it's realistic. But you know, Halloween isn't THAT much different. IF you throw out all the later Thorn nonsense as well as the repeated returns to life . . . the original Halloween is just about a wacko who escaped an asylum and went on a killing spree. All too possible in today's world. :(

So, I don't know. There are obvious indicators like Zombies, Ghosts, Dream Demons, Monsters, etc. but then there are some other examples which are hard to label.

Wait - who the hell cares, anyway ? :crazed:

Sidiously Darth
06-13-2004, 01:12 PM
Okay, I've seen several mentions of Se7en and Silence of the lambs. These fall under the category of Suspense Thriller. Yes there is some gore but not horror type gore.

Sixth Sense & Stir of Echos fall into the Supernatural Thriller area.

The original Godzilla is Sci-Fi all the way.

The old Dracula movies with Bela Lugosi, Christopher Lee & Frank Langella are pure horror. While lite on the gore, they are still strictly horror. Which brings me to a personal pet peeve towards the new generation of horror movies. At what point was it decided that Dracula had to turn into some horrible monster in order to do his thing. I like the idea of dracula turning into a wolf, mist or bat not some hulking winged monster thing. The old style dracula was manipulative, decietful, and sometimes charming... at least to the ladies. The new draculas have tried that but then they just transform and carnage takes place. Isn't that Jason, Freddy & Michael's schtick?

The movie I blame this on is Bram Stoker's Dracula. While encompassing the above traits, he did turn into a huge winged monster when he couldn't get his way. :rolleyes: