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Lowly Bantha Cleaner
08-19-2001, 10:46 PM
While a friend was over the other night at my house he noticed my Jabba's Skiff Guards Cinema Scene on display. He read the names Klatuu, Barada, and Nikto and said that these were from the Army of Darkness starring Kevin Sorbo. I think he said they were the magic words he uttered. I unfortunately have not had the privilege of seeing this movie (*cough, cough*). Can anyone shed some light on this reference?

bigbarada
08-19-2001, 11:03 PM
"Klaatu Barada Nikto" originated from the 1950's movie The Day The Earth Stood Still , they were used by the Creature Shop of ROTJ as a sort of tribute to that film. Similarly, these same words were used for the movie Army of Darkness starring Bruce Cambell (Kevin Sorbo???:confused: ) as a powerful magic phrase.

Lowly Bantha Cleaner
08-19-2001, 11:15 PM
whoops!

I got Army of darkness confused with Kull the Conquerer (I think that was the one)

bigbarada
08-20-2001, 12:29 AM
Having never seen Kull the Conquerer, which I'm told is a good thing, I can't vouch for that movie.

My question is how could ROTJ have taken the names from a movie that didn't come out until eleven years later?

AmanaMatt
08-20-2001, 03:47 AM
Krull was great fun... for the time!

GNT
08-20-2001, 04:06 AM
Originally posted by Lowly Bantha Cleaner
whoops!

I got Army of darkness confused with Kull the Conquerer (I think that was the one)

How can you get those 2 mixed up?

evenflow
08-20-2001, 09:57 AM
The movie that Klaatu Barada Niktu was the Day the Earth Stood Still. I am not sure about all these other things you are mentioning.

Eternal Padawan
08-20-2001, 12:03 PM
I always thought naively that Army of Darkness had taken the names from ROTJ rather than both films giving a nod to the 50's film...but that was back in the day.

JediTricks
08-21-2001, 05:18 AM
Originally posted by Amanamatt
Krull was great fun... for the time! Not Krull, that was the fantasy/sci-fi film that co-starred Liam Neeson and that cool throwing star weapon, Kull the Conqueror was supposed to be the last Conan movie, but Arnie backed out and Sorbo joined the cast after Hercules was almost finished. Kull was another character from the same creator as Conan, so it was in the same theme, but the movie didn't work because of what I believe is bad editing and bad choices on the producers' parts. I thought the movie could have been good if they had played it straight like the Conan movies, but instead they tried to "hip" it to today's youth.


"'Klaatu barada nikto' my metal arse! I'm gonna go destroy some cities!" - Gort's only line, cut from the film. ;)

If I remember correctly, Klaatu is also the name of the alien that brings Gort the robot to Earth, the idea is that if the Earthlings can't be peaceful, they'll be destroyed by Gort so they won't be a threat to the universe. The phrase "Klaatu barada nikto" was the phrase uttered to control Gort.

TeeEye7
08-21-2001, 07:22 AM
Patricia Neal"s full line from 'The Day the Earth Stood Still' was:

"Gort, Klaatu barada nikto"

Which translates to: "Gort, stick your finger in the hole and bring Klaatu back to life! ;)

Bel-Cam Jos
08-21-2001, 10:54 AM
I cannot believe I didn't resurrect this Old Forums thread! It was my baby!
http://209.197.112.151/thread.html?dom=ss&TID=8&PID=367
Here you will find many SW inferences and where they probably came from.

Lowly Bantha Cleaner
08-21-2001, 09:30 PM
My question is how could ROTJ have taken the names from a movie that didn't come out until eleven years later?

I knew and hopefully he knew that those names (Klaatu, Barada, and Nikto) were first used in ROTJ and then borrowed, sorta as a tribute, for the Army of Darkness. What I didn't know was that these references all came from the The Day the Earth Stood Still movie in the 1950's. I never thought ROTJ borrowed those names from the Army of Darkness movie which came out years later.

On another note, I check my e-mail on campus through telnet that has a server titled gort.net. And surprisingly not, there is a klaatu, barada, and nikto server as well.

Starfig873
08-22-2001, 06:27 AM
"Klaatu, Barada, Nik*cough**cough*"

-Final words spoken by Ash (Bruce Campbell) in Army of Darkness

Georgie-poo took references from several movies way back when.
And "The Day the Earth Stood Still" just happened to be one of them.

And go rent Army of Darkness, its a great movie! Very funny! :D

QLD
08-22-2001, 06:58 AM
My friend and I used to watch Army of Darkness one every week. I love it!

Bel-Cam Jos
08-30-2001, 12:23 PM
BUBO: name for growth spots of those who had the bubonic plague.

JediCole
09-03-2001, 10:43 AM
Originally posted by Bel-Cam Jos
BUBO: name for growth spots of those who had the bubonic plague.

Those like Randall in Jay & Silent Bob Strike Back who have been watching the Ray Harryhausen opus Clash of the Titans will also recognize the name "Bubo" as that given to the mechanical owl that served as a surrogate for Athena's real owl which she refused to give over to the likes of Harry Hamlin's Perseus. I'm not sure which reference may have been on the minds of those in the crew who named our much wanted froggy friend, as both may seem strangely appropriate.

stillakid
09-03-2001, 10:58 AM
If you haven't seen the classic saga, I highly recommend watching Evil Dead 2 first, then the original Evil Dead, and finally Army of Darkness. Finish off the evening with Dark Man for a full Sam Raimi night (with a touch of Liam to boot). Can't wait for Spiderman!

Bel-Cam Jos
01-30-2002, 06:17 PM
DAGOBA (Dagobah?): receptacle of sacred relics or ashes in a Buddhist stupa (monument, temple). From Sanskrit dhatu-garbha or relic-receptacle.

JAIPUR (Japur snippet?): city in Rajasthane province of India, founded in 1128 A.D., formerly the capital city of Rajasthane. An astronomical observatory was built there. However, the Jaipur were also allies of the Mughals (an Indian dynasty from the 16th to the 18th centuries) under Akbar (Admiral Ackbar?), a highly-regarded king. Did he "bring you good fortune?" I haven't found that detail anywhere yet.

Rollo Tomassi
01-31-2002, 08:34 PM
hey BCJ, did you ever hear back from Star Wars InSider about your research?

i was thinking you could come up with something here at Sir Steves, like a etymology glossary. And then when SWI puts out their little article, we can all say, "Well obviously they lifted that from Sir Steves Guide..."

You've already done most of the research, it's just a matter of correlating the data, alphabetizing it and setting up a link on the Home page!

Stick it to WOTC! Yeee haw!!!

Bel-Cam Jos
01-31-2002, 11:25 PM
No, not yet, Rollo, but did you actually expect them to respond? I never thought of the alphabetizing aspect; my document is by date of being found. Not a bad idear!
But anger is the path to the Dark Side, beware the more seductive way, Jedi learner! :dead: ;)

SithDroid
01-31-2002, 11:57 PM
I can't believe you haven't seen Army Of Darkness Lowly Bantha Cleaner!

I agree with stillakid, watch Evil Dead 2 first, then Evil Dead, then Army of Darkness!

The Day the Earth Stood Still was the first reference of Klaatu, barada, nikto.

Those were the words Ash also had to recite in Army of Darkness.

Also the names of three Jabba's Skiff guards.

And if I recall, they were used in another movie as well. I can't remember the name of it right now, but if I remember it, I'll post it here. Unless anyone else can think of it?

Lord Malakite
02-01-2002, 12:11 AM
Army of Darkness was a pretty good movie. Shop smart, shop S Mart.

Bel-Cam Jos
02-10-2002, 02:10 PM
SABER (Sabe'?): not say-burr, but saw-bear. Spanish or Portuguese word meaning "to know." The Handmaidens 'knew' who Amidala really was.

Bel-Cam Jos
02-24-2002, 11:23 PM
NABU (Naboo?): Babylonian god of writing and wisdom. The city of Borsippa was where the cult was centered. The city is now in ruins, and was built by King Nebuchadnezzar. A ziggurat there(stepped temple) is believed to be a smaller version of the "Tower of Babel."
Other details I've found are this: Now only a large square swamp is located at the site of Nebuchadnezzar's great ziggurat in Babylon. Because Nabu was the god of knowledge and wisdom, the ancient city of Borsippa was looked on as an ancient seat of learning. It is believed that a large library of clay tablets inscribed in cuneiform was once located there. So far the Austrian archaeologists working at the site have not discovered this library, but they have come across a few clay tablets.

Here are some possibilities for the fallen Jedi Master from TPM -

QI (Qui?): Chinese belief of the soul or total being, an unexplainable manifestation that controls the body. Also spelled "chi."

JINN: in Middle Eastern legend, a demonic being or nature spirit with the power to appear and disappear, as well as to assume human form. Could Qui-Gon be a "genie," merely an energy being (midichlorian?) to bring balance to the Force?

Could Qui-GON Jinn's middle name simply be that he's no longer here, i.e. gone? I don't know...

Deoxyribonucleic
02-25-2002, 12:46 AM
In the original "The Day....." from the 50's "klaatubaradanikto" had to be uttered in order to stop the robot...forgot his name...WHAT WAS HIS NAME????????????:confused: :confused: :confused: :confused: :confused:

JediTricks
02-26-2002, 12:44 AM
"Gort, klaatu barada nikto!"

Gort was the planet-killing robot from "The Day the Earth Stood Still".

Bel-Cam Jos
03-06-2002, 06:39 PM
This first one's been known for a long time, but maybe not everyone knows that!

QUEEQUEG (Weequay?): Character in the novel Moby Dick, who is a Polynesian sailor/harpooner on the ship Pequod.

And more stretches:

PANDA (Ponda Baba?): In Brazilian folklore, a sea goddess. Walrusman was an Aqualish, a water alien, after all.
BABA: A Mesopotamian goddess of health and healing.
OR...
BABA: Another name for the evil god, Seth, in Egyptian mythology. It means "father," or "parent." And in the stories, Seth (or Set) loses his hand in a fight. Ponda Baba's a bad guy who loses a limb. Hmm...
OR...
BABA YAGA (or JAGA): An evil, female witch associated with the life and death cycle, in Slavic and Russian myth. She's the destroyer of life.

These last ones are REEEEEEEEALLY stretchin' it!

Jargo
03-06-2002, 07:18 PM
heh, how you get so big reading words of this kind....

Ponda - ponder = wonder.

Baba - Dada = baby speak for Daddy

Ponda baba = 'who's your daddy?!!!!' :D sorry but someone had to say it..... maybe not then eh...? :(


I'll get me coat.........

Bel-Cam Jos
03-13-2002, 07:00 PM
More details to add onto my my last post about Queequeg. He also has a heavily suntanned face and has a scalp-knot hair style. Just like the Jabba guard! ;)

Bel-Cam Jos
04-03-2002, 01:35 PM
In the H.G. Wells book The War of the Worlds, his description of the Martians sounds a lot like the probots in Empire. They land in cylindar-shaped pods that create craters that they slowly rise out of. The are 100 feet tall (okay, not quite the same), have octopus-type arms and walk on tripod legs. Their Heat-Ray is close to the laser cannon on a probe droid. And all this was written in the 1890s!

Bel-Cam Jos
04-14-2002, 12:12 AM
HERMETIC ORDER OF THE GOLDEN DAWN (Hermi Odle?): An organization that was founded in 1887 about occult and esoteric (hidden) knowledge. Joseph Campbell :) has mentioned the group in his works. The group seems to have nothing to do with the SW character, but perhaps the name was known to Lucas.

Bel-Cam Jos
04-19-2002, 06:11 PM
HAN: Japanese term for a county or region of land, with boundaries. Combining it with "Solo" would make it either "land alone" or "one land." Perhaps like "no man is an island"? :confused:

Bel-Cam Jos
05-02-2002, 11:17 AM
SITH: archaic version of the word 'since.' And the Sith have been around "since" when? It's a stretch, as most of these have been, of course.

Bel-Cam Jos
07-10-2002, 11:59 AM
Some Attack of the Clones names in here (not really Classic Trilogy, but it still fits) -

ANDAMAN (Amanaman?): name of an Indian Ocean island group. Marco Polo was the first European to visit them, and he called it "the land of the headhunters." Perhaps making up the phrase "A man, a man, and a man" sounded funny to Lucasfilm employees?

CAPE WESSEL (Zam Wessell?): city in Australia, in the Northern Territory.

EL CAMINO (Kamino): Chevrolet automobile. This one's pretty obvious, considering Lucas' love of fast, muscle cars.

GENESIS (Geonosis): planet from Star Trek movies that was originally barren and desolate but made new with the Genesis Device. The Clone War "began" on Geonosis, just like the Earth "began" in the book of the Bible "Genesis. Again, probably another easy connection.

MFH
07-10-2002, 08:21 PM
Kull was horrible. A local comic shop gave us free tickets to a sneak preview. The fact that it was free couldn't even save that movie.

Deoxyribonucleic
07-10-2002, 08:29 PM
Originally posted by Bel-Cam Jos
Some Attack of the Clones names in here (not really Classic Trilogy, but it still fits) -

ANDAMAN (Amanaman?): name of an Indian Ocean island group. Marco Polo was the first European to visit them, and he called it "the land of the headhunters." Perhaps making up the phrase "A man, a man, and a man" sounded funny to Lucasfilm employees?

CAPE WESSEL (Zam Wessell?): city in Australia, in the Northern Territory.

EL CAMINO (Kamino): Chevrolet automobile. This one's pretty obvious, considering Lucas' love of fast, muscle cars.

GENESIS (Geonosis): planet from Star Trek movies that was originally barren and desolate but made new with the Genesis Device. The Clone War "began" on Geonosis, just like the Earth "began" in the book of the Bible "Genesis. Again, probably another easy connection.

Lott Dodd

Senator Trent Lott and another Senator (forgot his first name) Dodd :)

Lowly Bantha Cleaner
07-10-2002, 11:22 PM
Originally posted by Deoxyribonucleic


Lott Dodd

Senator Trent Lott and another Senator (forgot his first name) Dodd :)

Good catch D! You are talking about Senator Christopher Dodd from Connecticut. His father also served as a Senator from the state. I wonder if this was a shot at our political system since both are from different political parties?

Deoxyribonucleic
07-11-2002, 12:18 AM
Originally posted by Lowly Bantha Cleaner


Good catch D! You are talking about Senator Christopher Dodd from Connecticut. His father also served as a Senator from the state. I wonder if this was a shot at our political system since both are from different political parties?

I bet it is...I hardly see Lucas being political in nature at all...he's totally got his own universe to run and no one can come close to helping him do it :) He is truly in his own little world :)

scruffziller
07-11-2002, 07:28 PM
Originally posted by JediTricks
Not Krull, that was the fantasy/sci-fi film that co-starred Liam Neeson and that cool throwing star weapon, Kull the Conqueror was supposed to be the last Conan movie, but Arnie backed out and Sorbo joined the cast after Hercules was almost finished. Kull was another character from the same creator as Conan, so it was in the same theme, but the movie didn't work because of what I believe is bad editing and bad choices on the producers' parts. I thought the movie could have been good if they had played it straight like the Conan movies, but instead they tried to "hip" it to today's youth.


"'Klaatu barada nikto' my metal arse! I'm gonna go destroy some cities!" - Gort's only line, cut from the film. ;)

If I remember correctly, Klaatu is also the name of the alien that brings Gort the robot to Earth, the idea is that if the Earthlings can't be peaceful, they'll be destroyed by Gort so they won't be a threat to the universe. The phrase "Klaatu barada nikto" was the phrase uttered to control Gort.
Yep now they are going to be making 2 more Conan movies, ARNIE IS BACK!!!!!!!!!:D

Bel-Cam Jos
07-18-2002, 10:53 AM
MASTIFF (Massiff): A large English hunting dog. It has "a thick-set, heavy body, broad skull, and striaght forelegs."

In H.G. Wells' The First Men in the Moon, the sea under the moon's surface is a blue, milky liquid. Was that early sci-fi novel an influence on the prop men for the Lars homestead?

Bel-Cam Jos
09-17-2002, 07:22 PM
JOCASTA (Jocasta Nu?): Mother of Oedipus, whom he married to fulfill the oracle that said he'd do so. Anakin certainly loved his mother, so maybe that name stayed around Lucas' head for another charcter. Also, as a Jedi librarian/historian, Jocasta "knew" many things about the archives.

The Overlord Returns
09-18-2002, 12:29 PM
It's in either Dutch or Norweigan, but :

Darth Vader = Dark Father.....

Obvious enough.

Bel-Cam Jos
09-19-2002, 06:28 PM
Couple of Joseph Campbell details, noticed in his Masks of God: Primitive Mythology book...

FINN MacCOOL (Droopy McCool?): an Irish giant, a folk character. The book mentions him marrying a princess with the head of a pig (it'd kinda look like the Rebo Band member, eh?).

In Hindu mythology, there is a serpent demon that is a monster that lives in a watery pit, or abyss. It's called a naga, and the word demon is spelled the "old" way: daemon. Put them together, and you get the daemon naga. Dianoga, perhaps?

JediTricks
09-19-2002, 10:24 PM
Texas Guinan (Guinan), a famous and infamous popular actress and speakeasy operator of the 1920s who died in the proverbial gutter only a decade later.

Oh wait, this isn't the Trek board! :D ;)

Bel-Cam Jos
09-21-2002, 05:25 PM
You've ruined this thread now, JT; RUINED! I can't go on... :cry: :D

darthvyn
09-21-2002, 11:32 PM
Originally posted by Bel-Cam Jos
SITH: archaic version of the word 'since.' And the Sith have been around "since" when? It's a stretch, as most of these have been, of course.

i always kinda thought lucas was typing the word "with" and slipped (as the "s" is right underneath the "w" and is struck by the same finger... in "proper" typing style, anyway) and just liked the look and sound of it... i know i type "sith" a lot by mistake when i want to type "with..."

JediTricks
09-22-2002, 11:13 PM
I've heard "SITH" has a much less clean origin, just like the Emperor's original name "Cos Dash-it", Lucas just had a thing for "the s-word". (Sith is a respelling and the Emp's name was "cause the sh..." er, well, you know ;))

Bel-Cam Jos
11-11-2002, 04:33 PM
Still trying to find legitimate proof of Reek (reak- smell badly), Acklay ('lack' in Pig Latin), and Nexu (more than one Nexu is Nexus [necks-us]). None yet.

JINRIKSHA [also rikshaw] (RIC-920 droid): a small, two-wheeled carriage or cart drawn by a person, usually in Asian countries. This was the droid who took Amidala and Anakin to Mos Espa.

Bel-Cam Jos
05-08-2003, 06:30 PM
Wow. To quote Stained, "It's been a while."
SHAKTI (Shaak Ti): Goddess in Indian mythology and religion. Also referred to a Kali, and one of the many names associated with the goddess is "difficult of approach," which in Sanskrit is "durga;" i.e. Durga the Hutt from SW Expanded Universe fame.

DarthChuckMc
05-08-2003, 07:27 PM
I didn't see any other mention of this one, but...


Nute Gunray is a play on Newt Gingrich and Ronald Reagan's names.

Lucas said Wookiee came from a friend of his. They were driving down the road together, and ran over some roadkill or something, and when George asked his friend "What the hell was that?", the friend replied "I think it was a wookiee."

Jawa was borrowed from George's friend Steven's movie JAWS.

Bel-Cam Jos
06-01-2003, 03:36 PM
BITHYNIA (Bith?): Region of Asia Minor (currently around Turkey) in the Roman Empire, known for its wealth and being able to resist Alexander the Great years earlier. Can't find any link to music or bald, fingernail-less people, though. :rolleyes:

Bel-Cam Jos
06-23-2003, 09:44 AM
Originally posted by Bel-Cam Jos
GENESIS (Geonosis): planet from Star Trek movies that was originally barren and desolate but made new with the Genesis Device. The Clone War "began" on Geonosis, just like the Earth "began" in the book of the Bible "Genesis. Again, probably another easy connection.
To amend this one, an issue of SW Insider had a LFL employee say that the root "geo-" meaning rock/earth was also a part. Obviously, the planet in AOTC was rocky.

gtrain29
06-29-2003, 05:38 PM
I didn't see this one on here, but when I went down the elevator from the second floor I noticed it went 2 1 B -- 2-1B.

Now, does anyone know how they got the name Ephant Mon?
(I'm kidding)

Bel-Cam Jos
06-29-2003, 06:26 PM
Now, does anyone know how they got the name Ephant Mon?
(I'm kidding)
"Ephant Mon" is an anagram of the phrase "A Pen Month." It was a book written in 1952 by Fuller Hoax, about a small, poor homeless boy who finds a baby elephant after the circus leaves his town. The boy has to steal to feed the animal, eventually being caught and charged with theft, and put in jail for a month. When he is released, the elephant is gone, and the boy searches for him. By the end of the story, the boy is accidentally killed by the elephant, which is then shot by policemen. Kind of a sad tale.






Now, does anyone know the truth about how they got the name Ephant Mon?
(I'm kidding about this one :p)

Bel-Cam Jos
09-19-2003, 06:35 PM
I may have found something quite interesting, regarding 1138.

In the book The Masks of God: Occidental Mythology by Joseph Campbell (pause for effect here), he mentions the motif of a number in a famous book that he is well-known for studying. Here's the footnote, after he quotes a Biblical verse: "Romans 11:32. This reference, by the way, is the secret sense of the number 1132 that occurs and recurs in all kinds of transformations throughout James Joyce's Finnegans Wake." Perhaps Lucas just changed the last digit to pay tribute to it.

Turambar
09-23-2003, 07:51 PM
"Ephant Mon" is an anagram of the phrase "A Pen Month." It was a book written in 1952 by Fuller Hoax, about a small, poor homeless boy who finds a baby elephant after the circus leaves his town. The boy has to steal to feed the animal, eventually being caught and charged with theft, and put in jail for a month. When he is released, the elephant is gone, and the boy searches for him. By the end of the story, the boy is accidentally killed by the elephant, which is then shot by policemen. Kind of a sad tale.

Interesting. I just always assumed it was a slightly altered Elephant Man since he looks like one.

Bel-Cam Jos
09-25-2003, 09:45 PM
Interesting. I just always assumed it was a slightly altered Elephant Man since he looks like one.
HAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHA!!!!!!!! !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!


(I'm kidding about this one :p )

Bel-Cam Jos
10-15-2003, 11:43 PM
NEMEDIANS (NEIMODIANS?) In Celtic/Roman history, according to The Masks of God: Occidental Mythology, there was a place called Nemed, where the people (called Nemedians) were defeated and had to pay a yearly tribute. Sorta like when the Trade Federation lost in the Battle of Naboo.

CHIMATI NO KAMI (KAMINO?): This was the Japanese god of crossroads and footpaths, as well as the positive force of life and fertility. Kamino certainly is a place where life begins, as clones, and a type of crossroads in the Star Wars saga.

Bel-Cam Jos
10-30-2003, 06:41 PM
An amendment to JINN (Qui-Gon Jinn): In Islamic mythology, there's a jinni (or genie) named Iblis. He was kind of a fallen angel, who broke a rule and rebelled against the established beliefs. It is sort of like Qui-Gon.

WILLS (Whills?): This is not a religious post, but it the history might explain some Force or Jedi aspects. There was a debate in the 7th century about the form of a certain religious figure. Some felt the figure was made of energy that made him powerful and non-human. A group believed the term "will" was more appropriate than "energy," and two written documents were composed, on the doctrine of the wills (one was one "will," with the other two "wills" ). This led to a great debate in this religion. Could this be a precursor to the Journal of the Whills from the SW novel, and could it shed light on the Dark Side of the Force idea?

BTW, both of these are from Joseph Campbell's Occidental Mythology book.

Bel-Cam Jos
11-04-2003, 07:26 PM
HOTH/HOD/HODER/HODR (Hoth): He goes by different names, but this blind Norse god of winter and darkness was tricked into killing his brother, Balder, by the trickster god, Loki. Well, being snowy, I'd say the planet Hoth had an appropriate name. And Leia (sort of in charge of the Rebellion, gets Luke to go out on patrol, almost killing him) is Luke's brother. (Okay, that last part's a strrrrrrrrreeeeeeeetttttch) :p

p.s. By my count, I own 27 of the 60 posts in this thread. Can we rename it "Bel-Cam Has Too Much Time on His Hands"? ;)

Darth Jax
11-04-2003, 09:29 PM
By my count, I own 27 of the 60 posts in this thread. Can we rename it "Bel-Cam Has Too Much Time on His Hands"? ;)

i'm surprised that number isn't higher. you could be a philosophy major or maybe just got the 12 o' clock news blues - either could explain it.

Kidhuman
12-03-2003, 11:45 AM
So I am playing Duke Nukem: Time To Kill a few weeks ago. At the end of one of the boards, he reads a book and chants Klatuu, Barada, Nikto, to open a passageway. Thought it was kind of amusing.

Lowly Bantha Cleaner
12-07-2003, 09:54 PM
This may be a stretch, but the name of the character from Attack of the Clones, ELAN SLEAZEBAGGANO, (the underworld humanoid who tries to peddle his deathsticks to Obi-Wan on Coruscant) could be traced to the fact that he is an unsavory individual. Anyone who tries to sell any illicit even deadly substances for human gratification is a criminal, a low-life, a sleazebag if you will.

Now I don't want to jump to any conclusions but I think that is what the writers had in mind when they named this individual. :rolleyes:

r3pohh yeah
01-15-2004, 05:00 AM
hi, did rotj ever even show han solo in an at-st uniform helmet?????

El Chuxter
03-12-2004, 07:39 PM
Hmm, that was off-subject. I must've missed the connection there. ;)

Since they haven't come up on this incarnation, and I can't recall whether they were brought up on the old forums (may they rest in peace), here's a couple of obvious ones:

REE-YEES: play on "three eyes"

AMANAMAN: named after a name brand of hair dryer

Anyone with any new insights, please add 'em here. :)

Darth Jax
03-13-2004, 01:28 AM
since so many of the other names are completely made-up, why does luke get a normal name?

Bel-Cam Jos
03-13-2004, 09:17 AM
since so many of the other names are completely made-up, why does luke get a normal name?
The old story goes, since George Lucas was the creator, and he based many of the situations and themes on his own life, he was a young kid who loved fast cars and dreamed of ecaping his "place furthest from" the center of the universe (Modesto, CA). Therefore, Luke Skywalker, i.e. Luke S., is simply Lucas himself.

My own observations (see this thread) say that the "normal name" of Han Solo, is a combination of a Japanese term ("han" is a territory or country) and a simple term ("solo" meaning alone). Together, it's like the "no man is an island" cliche' and since Han seems to think he can do it all himself, without anyone else's help, it fits. But that's just my theory.


Originally posted by El Chuxter
REE-YEES: play on "three eyes"

AMANAMAN: named after a name brand of hair dryer

I think you were beaten to those ones already.

Originally posted by Someone in a previous thread here at SSG
4/13/00. Add two letters to Ree and rearrange Yees and you have Three Eyes.

Originally posted by Bel-Cam Jos (me! )
4/19/02 Post # 32. HAN: Japanese term for a county or region of land, with boundaries. Combining it with "Solo" would make it either "land alone" or "one land." Perhaps like "no man is an island"?
7/10/02 Post #34. ANDAMAN (Amanaman?): name of an Indian Ocean island group. Marco Polo was the first European to visit them, and he called it "the land of the headhunters." Perhaps making up the phrase "A man, a man, and a man" sounded funny to Lucasfilm employees?
But where's that Durge comment? :confused:

Bel-Cam Jos
06-24-2004, 09:08 AM
Looooooooooooooooooooooooong time between posts!

MANANNAN MAC LIR (Amanaman?): Irish sea god known as a trickster, he was a shape shifter who could assume different forms. Found out about him in Joseph Campbell's Creative Mythology, the last book in his Masks of God series. I just think the several ways "a man" could've been combined led to the yellow green lizard headhunter character from ROJ.

Rocketboy
06-24-2004, 11:46 AM
After doing a bit of research (internet and my own brain :)), I found a bunch of possible name and word origins.

Padme - Lotus, "Om Mani Padme Hum" has no direct English translation, but often used as a guide is "Hail the jewel in the heart of lotus" or "Behold! The jewel in the lotus!"

Palpatine - Palatine - of or relating to a palace n 1: any of various important officials in ancient Rome 2: (medieval) the lord of a palatinate who exercised sovereign powers over his lands 3: the most important of the Seven Hills of ancient Rome; supposedly the location of the first settlement and the site of many imperial palaces

Jar Jar/Gungan - from Lucas' kids. Lucas had said that his son used to call trucks Gunga and his kids came up with the name Jar Jar Binks.

Jinn - there is the name of Jinn in the Planet Of The Apes novel. Was it a nod to that?

R2-D2 - Stood for Reel 2, Dialogue 2 on the film canisters

One website had many possible Hindu origins for the names. Not trying to get into anything religious, just pointing out more possibilities.

"Shmi" Skywalker - The mother of Anakin Skywalker, her name is widely accepted to be a halved version of "Lakshmi", who is the Consort of Lord Vishnu. Those who worship Lord Vishnu exclusively consider Lakshmi devi to have motherly "shakti" or potency, among a plethora of other potencies.

Padme - The woman who would eventually be the wife of the movie's protagonist Anakin Skywalker. "Padme" means "lotus flower" in Sanskrit, and is widely used in poetry and scripture.

King Varuna - A king of Padme's homeworld of Naboo, the name is obviously a tribute to Veruna, the demigod of oceans. Naboo has many attractive waterways, as can be seen in Episode 2 of the "Star Wars" films.

Gungans - The name of the race of aquatic, sentient beings that most movie fans have found annoying, their name is clearly derived from "Ganga", one of the seven holy rivers in India.

Shaak Ti - The name of a female Jedi master, a simple definition of the word shakti would be "energy" or "potency". When there is a personal embodiment of shakti, it is predominantly in a feminine form.

Depa Billaba - The name of another female Jedi master (played by an actress of Indian origin), who served on the "Jedi Council" in the prequel trilogy. Another transliteration of these two words would be "Deepa Ballabha", which means "the master of the light".

Yoda - I have saved the most interesting for the last. Various sources say "Yoda" is a derivation of the Japanese word "yodan", meaning "conclusion". We are also pointed to "Yodeah", a Hebrew word meaning "knows". The exact word "yoda" is found in Punjabi (sometimes presumed to be from Sanskrit) meaning "warrior". Interestingly enough, we do not see Yoda's warrior prowess until Star Wars: Episode 2. On a sidenote, the word "yoga" came to mind whenever I heard or thought of Yoda's name.

Mandalore - The planet where Jango Fett allegedly originated from, the origin is "Mandala", a symbol of Hindu origin.

The Rishi Maze - This is a part of space which is directly adjacent to the planet "Kamino", as Obi-Wan Kenobi is told. A "Rishi" is a very powerful sage of Vedic times, as has been explained earlier.

Padawan - This is a combination of two sanskrit words. "Pada" means foot, and "wan", actually spelled "van", means forest, in this case, it's related to the spiritual world. This is perceived to mean "a footstep in the forest". In other words, in the words of Obi-Wan Kenobi in Star Wars Episode IV "You've taken your first step into a larger world"

Bel-Cam Jos
06-25-2004, 08:39 AM
Here's the text of my SW name origin findings over the last 5+ years. It's a long Word document, so I'll split it up into a couple posts. Enjoy!

STAR WARS RESEARCH (Posted on sirstevesguide.com)

* = My research.
+ = Othersí research.

* 1138: I may have found something quite interesting, regarding 1138. In the book The Masks of God: Occidental Mythology by Joseph Campbell (pause for effect here), he mentions the motif of a number in a famous book that he is well-known for studying. Here's the footnote, after he quotes a Biblical verse: "Romans 11:32. This reference, by the way, is the secret sense of the number 1132 that occurs and recurs in all kinds of transformations throughout James Joyce's Finnegans Wake." Perhaps Lucas just changed the last digit to pay tribute to it. (9/19/03)

*AKBAR (Admiral Ackbar?): a king I think, thought it meant "great" or "honored" in Arabic. (1/14/00)
*AKBAR was a 16th century Muslim leader known for his military skills and dignified demeanor. (1/17/00)

*ADI: means ''great,'' ''first,'' or ''most prominent,'' in Sanskrit, I think. (6/28/00)

+The stars Alderbaran and Alderamin sound familiar, also. (6/19/01)

*ANDAMAN (Amanaman?): name of an Indian Ocean island group. Marco Polo was the first European to visit them, and he called it "the land of the headhunters." Perhaps making up the phrase "A man, a man, and a man" sounded funny to Lucasfilm employees? (7/10/02)
*MANANNAN MAC LIR (Amanaman?): Irish sea god known as a trickster, he was a shape shifter who could assume different forms. Found out about him in Joseph Campbell's Creative Mythology, the last book in his Masks of God series. I just think the several ways "a man" could've been combined led to the yellow green lizard headhunter character from ROJ. (6/24/04)

AMIDA: an aspect of Japanese Buddhism, I think I recall it having something to do with goodness or light (easy to add a ''la'' to the end for Amidala). (6/27/00)
+I was thinking Amidala might have come from Dalai Lama. (6/27/00)

*I noticed that there are the Antilles Islands in the Caribbean Sea. (6/2/00)

*These terms all appear in a couple Isaac Asimov books, and seem to reflect what they are in the SW universe: GALACTIC EMPIRE and EMPEROR, the JUMP TO HYPER-SPACE, PARSEC, CREDIT, and STAR'S END. (8/3/00)

*BITHYNIA (Bith?): Region of Asia Minor (currently around Turkey) in the Roman Empire, known for its wealth and being able to resist Alexander the Great years earlier. Can't find any link to music or bald, fingernail-less people, though. (6/1/03)

*CAPE WESSEL (Zam Wessell?): city in Australia, in the Northern Territory. (7/10/02)

* CHIMATI NO KAMI (KAMINO?): This was the Japanese god of crossroads and footpaths, as well as the positive force of life and fertility. Kamino certainly is a place where life begins, as clones, and a type of crossroads in the Star Wars saga. (10/15/03)

*DAGOBAH: Heard someone from Sri Lanka mention it as a Buddhist or Hindu term. (1/14/00)
*DAGOBA: Receptacle of sacred relics or ashes in a Buddhist stupa (monument, temple). From Sanskrit dhatu-garbha or relic-receptacle. (1/30/02)

*All the ''Darth'' names are evil-sounding: Maul, Bane (poison, woe, harm), Sideous (insidious: treacherous, seductive, subtle). Except Vader ("father" in some European language; Norwegian??). I expect the new Sith Lord to reflect similar traits. (9/7/00)
+It's Swedish, I believe. I've heard that it's a direct bastardization of the German word for father as well, that ''father'' theory has been around for a LONG time now. (9/8/00)
+''Maul'' means to injure by beating. (9/7/00)

*DENGAR: a transposition of the letters ''E'' and ''A'' from ''danger.'' (11/25/00)

*In Hindu mythology, there is a serpent demon that is a monster that lives in a watery pit, or abyss. It's called a naga, and the word demon is spelled the "old" way: daemon. Put them together, and you get the daemon naga. Dianoga, perhaps? (9/19/02)

*DODONA (General Dodonna?): city in ancient Greece where an oracle of Zeus was located. (10/5/00)

+SLEAZEBAG (Elan Sleazebaggano) This may be a stretch, but the name of the character from Attack of the Clones, ELAN SLEAZEBAGGANO, (the underworld humanoid who tries to peddle his deathsticks to Obi-Wan on Coruscant) could be traced to the fact that he is an unsavory individual. Anyone who tries to sell any illicit even deadly substances for human gratification is a criminal, a low-life, a sleazebag if you will.
Now I don't want to jump to any conclusions but I think that is what the writers had in mind when they named this individual.(12/7/03)

* EL CAMINO (Kamino): Chevrolet automobile. This one's pretty obvious, considering Lucas' love of fast, muscle cars. (7/10/02)

+I remember that the quotation "Water, water everywhere, but not a drop to drink" originally came from a philosopher and/or scientist named Eisley. (4/13/00)
+Actually, "Water, water everywhere but not a drop to drink" came from the epic poem by Samuel Taylor Coleridge called "The Rime of the Ancient Mariner" when the ship get stalled in the middle of the ocean for a long time. There's water everywhere, but it's saltwater and the crew cannot drink it. Classic poem. Absolutely incredible. (4/16/00)
+I know someone named Eisley said something about water... anyone else heard of this? (4/16/00)

*ENDOR: A witch of Endor was mentioned in the Bible (1 Samuel 29:7). And I found out Endor was "a place in the territory of Issachar near the scene of the great victory which was gained by Deborah and Barak over Sisera and Jabin" (Easton's Bible Dictionary). (2/7/00)

+Ephant Mon - Elephant Man? (6/14/00)

+4-LOM: for the love of money (3/31/01)

*FINN MacCOOL (Droopy McCool?): an Irish giant, a folk character. The book mentions him marrying a princess with the head of a pig (it'd kinda look like the Rebo Band member, eh?). Noticed in Joseph Campbellís Masks of God: Primitive Mythology book. (9/19/02)

*GALLI: priests of the goddess Cybele who wore female attire and had long hair, in a late Roman cult. Cybele's attendants were half-animal (Adi Gallia has that long squid tentacle hair). (6/28/00)

*GENESIS (Geonosis): planet from Star Trek movies that was originally barren and desolate but made new with the Genesis Device. The Clone War "began" on Geonosis, just like the Earth "began" in the book of the Bible "Genesis. (7/10/02) To amend this one, an issue of SW Insider had a LFL employee say that the root "geo-" meaning rock/earth was also a part. Obviously, the planet in AOTC was rocky. (6/23/03)

+If you'd like to see lots of references to Greek culture, check out the Jedi Apprentice series. For instance, there's two brothers named Guerra and Paxxi (War and Peace), as well as a villain named Xanatos (which, unless I'm wrong, means death). (4/13/00)

*"Gunga Din," a poem by Rudyard Kipling, is based on battles between the British and Indians (as in the country India) in the late19th-century. Gunga Din was a waterboy-type person who was insulted and mocked by the "better" British soldiers. This was also a film from 1939. Perhaps the Gungan name came from this, and it may explain why the Gungans (and Jar Jar in particular) are so disliked and underestimated. (2/20/00)
+If the theory about "Gungan" is correct, why does Lucas claim it is from his son's word for "machines"? (2/21/00)
*I certainly hope that this does not "prove" that E1 has racist undertones. In retrospect, the British in 19th century India are seen as oppressive and cruel, but at the time they were assumed to be noble and justified. In the book, it says that even the Naboo were distant from or mistreated the Gungans, not just the Trade Federation. These are just theories of course, but in "Gunga Din," the formerly-cruel and rude British soldiers are grateful for Din's help after they're injured. So maybe that's the comparison: loyalty and determination are rewarded in the end.

*HABERU (Aunt Beru?): name of Bedouin invaders, or desert nomads. (7/7/00)

*HAN: Japanese term for a county or region of land, with boundaries. Combining it with "Solo" would make it either "land alone" or "one land." Perhaps like "no man is an island"? (4/19/02)

*HERMETIC ORDER OF THE GOLDEN DAWN (Hermi Odle?): An organization that was founded in 1887 about occult and esoteric (hidden) knowledge. Joseph Campbell has mentioned the group in his works. The group seems to have nothing to do with the SW character, but perhaps the name was known to Lucas. (4/13/02)

*HOTH/HOD/HODER/HODR (Hoth): He goes by different names, but this blind Norse god of winter and darkness was tricked into killing his brother, Balder, by the trickster god, Loki. Well, being snowy, I'd say the planet Hoth had an appropriate name. And Leia (sort of in charge of the Rebellion, gets Luke to go out on patrol, almost killing him) is Luke's brother. (Okay, that last part's a strrrrrrrrreeeeeeeetttttch) (11/4/03)

*ISHI (Ishi Tib?): a Native American of the Yahi tribe found wandering in Northern California at the start of the 20th century. Ishi means "man" in Yahi. But I don't know where Tib might come from. (2/23/00)

*I stumbled onto this name while reading a book on lost African cities and societies, and trying to find it elsewhere I stumbled onto yet another that makes more sense.
*JABA: people of a village called Nok (where they would live in HUTS) near the Niger River. Excavations found a collection of terra cota (pottery) human heads, where one had a hairstyle in ''buns.'' Could this have been an influence on Leia? (11/2/00) But in another book, looking for the Jaba I found...
*JABBAREN: is Touareg for ''the giants.'' Those who spoke Touareg lived in the Sahara Desert near the Tassili area, a rocky, mountainous region about 1000 miles due north of the Nok region. In caves, archeologists found paintings of large alien-looking people (book said they looked like Martians) with big heads, horns, or bird heads, and there were dancers also depicted. I know Jabba the Hut was supposed to be a large, strange creature, so could Lucas have had these in mind? (11/2/00)

Bel-Cam Jos
06-25-2004, 08:41 AM
*JAIPUR (Japur snippet?): city in Rajasthane province of India, founded in 1128 A.D., formerly the capital city of Rajasthane. An astronomical observatory was built there. However, the Jaipur were also allies of the Mughals (an Indian dynasty from the 16th to the 18th centuries) under Akbar (Admiral Ackbar?), a highly-regarded king. Did he "bring you good fortune?" I haven't found that detail anywhere yet. (1/30/02)

*JAWA: an ancient wall-fortified city (now in ruins) located in the Black Desert region of Jordan on the Arabian Peninsula. The descriptions and sketch recreations look A LOT like Ralph McQuarrie's painting of the Jawa home fortresses in The Illustrated SW Universe book. (9/8/00)

*JOCASTA (Jocasta Nu?): Mother of Oedipus, whom he married to fulfill the oracle that said he'd do so. Anakin certainly loved his mother, so maybe that name stayed around Lucas' head for another charcter. Also, as a Jedi librarian/historian, Jocasta "knew" many things about the archives. (9/17/02)

JUTLAND: another name for Denmark (the peninsula ''juts'' out into the sea) and a place of a battle in World War II. (6/12/00)
+As in the Jundland Wastes are not to be traveled lightly? (6/13/00)
+''A battle''? Jutland was the largest naval engagement in history. It was also the first world war. (6/14/00)

*KASSEL (Spice mines of Kessel?): city in Germany where fairs and industry were being introduced in the 18th century. (10/5/00)

*KETWOL could be "low tek (tech?)" backwards, maybe. (5/3/01)

*KI: Sumerian term for earth. (6/28/00)

+I was watching a great old Sci Fi movie last night, ''The Day the Earth Stood Still'' from 1951 and the main character is a man from outer space named Klaatu. This must have been one of George Lucas' favorite movies because towards the end of the film, Klaatu gives a message to his lady friend to deliver to his robot, Gort. The message is ''Klaatu barada nikto!'' The names of 3 of Jabba's guards from Return of the Jedi! (5/22/00)

+The planet ''Corellia'' is a homage too. In Isaac Asimov's book Foundation, there's a planet called Korellia (6/2/00)

*KYOTO (as in Boushh's "Keotay, keeotoh"): Japanese city. (1/14/00)
*KYOTAI KYOTOU would translate in Japanese as "large build/size, leader/magnate/big time robber" (sound anything like Jabba?) (1/17/00)

*LANDO: the name of a 10th century pope. (4/13/00)

*MIWOKS (pronounced "mee-walks" I think): Native American tribe from northern California. (5/11/01)

*MUNDI: another term for world [here there's a painting of Bodhisattva, a Buddhist figure that has many heads that form a cone-shaped design]. (6/28/00)

*NABU (Naboo?): Babylonian god of writing and wisdom. The city of Borsippa was where the cult was centered. The city is now in ruins, and was built by King Nebuchadnezzar. A ziggurat there (stepped temple) is believed to be a smaller version of the "Tower of Babel."
Other details I've found are this: "Now only a large square swamp is located at the site of Nebuchadnezzar's great ziggurat in Babylon. Because Nabu was the god of knowledge and wisdom, the ancient city of Borsippa was looked on as an ancient seat of learning. It is believed that a large library of clay tablets inscribed in cuneiform was once located there. So far the Austrian archaeologists working at the site have not discovered this library, but they have come across a few clay tablets."
+In ROTJ, 3PO says "naboo, acu tak tak" right before the Ewok steals the speeder bike. (2/29/00)

*NEMEDIANS (NEIMODIANS?): In Celtic/Roman history, according to The Masks of God: Occidental Mythology, there was a place called Nemed, where the people (called Nemedians) were defeated and had to pay a yearly tribute. Sorta like when the Trade Federation lost in the Battle of Naboo. (10/15/03)

*There are a few letter-transposed characters, such as Nien Nunb (number nine), R2-D2 (reel two, dialogue 2), or Elom (mole) (4/14/00).

*At the Nixon Library in Yorba Linda, CA., in an exhibit where he first meets his future wife, Pat, Richard Nixon says something like "Don't laugh, because I'm going to marry you someday." For those who've read the E1 novelization, Anakin says a similar phrase to Padme' in Watto's shop. Does that mean Lucas (or Terry Brooks, the book's writer) intended Anakin/Vader to be like Nixon? A once-great leader who falls due to greed and pride? Remember that Watergate was fresh in people's minds around the time Lucas was writing ANH's script. (6/19/01)

*NUBIAN: Name of an Egyptian dynasty, but I don't remember when. Nubia is a region in southern Egypt, I believe. Don't think they had any hyperdrives in those days, unless aliens really did build the Pyramids. (2/29/00)

+Is it not common knowledge that the Nemodian facial features were based on Republican politicians? Nute Gunray is Newt Gingrich. Lott Dodd is Trent Lott. Their facial likenesses along with the names Newt and Lott make it obvious. I will even go further and speculate that Daultry Dofine is based on Ronald Reagan. The face structure, same initial first and last name and Reagan whisper type speech are dead
giveaways. (12/7/00)
+''Gunray'' is ''Reagan'' backwards? The idea was done on purpose though, so I think it was just too easy. (12/7/00)

*In some African tribes, an OBI is a main hut, but I don't see how that relates to an older Jedi Knight. (2/21/00)
*OBI: a waist cloth for a Japanese kimono, goes along with the samurai look to Jedi robes. (3/11/00)

*PADMA (pronounced either pad-MAH or pad-MAY I believe): means ''lotus center'' in Sanskrit, as in meditation in the lotus position (legs crossed and arms extended down to floor). (6/27/00)

*PANDA (Ponda Baba?): In Brazilian folklore, a sea goddess. Walrusman was an Aqualish, a water alien, after all. *BABA: A Mesopotamian goddess of health and healing. OR...
*BABA: Another name for the evil god, Seth, in Egyptian mythology. It means "father," or "parent." And in the stories, Seth (or Set) loses his hand in a fight. Ponda Baba's a bad guy who loses a limb. OR...
*BABA YAGA (or JAGA): An evil, female witch associated with the life and death cycle, in Slavic and Russian myth. She's the destroyer of life. (3/6/02)

*In the H.G. Wells book The War of the Worlds, his description of the Martians sounds a lot like the probots in Empire. They land in cylindar-shaped pods that create craters that they slowly rise out of. The are 100 feet tall (okay, not quite the same), have octopus-type arms and walk on tripod legs. Their Heat-Ray is close to the laser cannon on a probe droid. And all this was written in the 1890s! (4/3/02)

*QUEEQUEG (Weequay?): Character in the novel Moby Dick, who is a Polynesian sailor/harpooner on the ship Pequod. He also has a heavily suntanned face and has a scalp-knot hair style. Just like the Jabba guard! (3/6/02)

+I'm not sure if this is the origin of the name Qui-Gon Jinn, but there is a 5,000-year old Taoist (natural) art and science called "Qigong"(Chi Kung), that is basically cultivating energy for the body, mind, emotion, and spirit. "Qi" is vital energy and "gong" is skill. That would seem to be a fitting meaning behind master Qui-Gon's name. (3/8/00)

QI (Qui?): Chinese belief of the soul or total being, an unexplainable manifestation that controls the body. Also spelled "chi."

*JINN: In Middle Eastern legend, a demonic being or nature spirit with the power to appear and disappear, as well as to assume human form. Could Qui-Gon be a "genie," merely an energy being (midichlorian?) to bring balance to the Force?
Could Qui-GON Jinn's middle name simply be that he's no longer here, i.e. gone? (2/24/02)
An amendment to JINN (Qui-Gon Jinn): In Islamic mythology, there's a jinni (or genie) named Iblis. He was kind of a fallen angel, who broke a rule and rebelled against the established beliefs. It is sort of like Qui-Gon. (10/30/03)

*RANCOR: deep hatred, enmity, hostility. (1/14/00)

+Add two letters to Ree and rearrange Yees and you have Three Eyes. (4/13/00)
*Ree Yees was meant to be like "3 eyes." (4/14/00)

SABER (Sabe'?): not say-burr, but saw-bear. Spanish or Portuguese word meaning "to know." The Handmaidens 'knew' who Amidala really was. (2/10/02)

*SALACIOUS: lewd or obscene, as in a joke. (10/31/00)

*SALLUST (Sullust?): Roman historian from 1st century b.c. who wrote during a period of civil struggles, noting the conflict between military leaders Marius and Sulla. Sallust + Sulla = Sullust? (10/11/00)

+I was reading the NTSB's report of the wreck of the Edmund Fitzgerald when I came across a reference to a place called Sault Saint Marie (apparantly there is one in Michigan and one in Ontario, Canada). Also, I was looking up Chuck Taylor in an on-line encyclopedia and ran across an entry for a Charlotte (Lottie) Dod. Saelt Marae and Lott Dodd inspirations? (3/31/01)

*In the film Seven Samurai, a farmer says the line "We must be made to suffer. It is our lot in life." (2/7/00)

*SHAKTI (Shaak Ti): Goddess in Indian mythology and religion. Also referred to a Kali, and one of the many names associated with the goddess is "difficult of approach," which in Sanskrit is "durga;" i.e. Durga the Hutt from SW Expanded Universe fame. (5/8/03)

*SITH: archaic version of the word 'since.' And the Sith have been around "since" when? It's a stretch, as most of these have been, of course. (05/02/02)

*TATAOUINE: town in Tunisia, in northern Africa. In the Berber language, Foum Tataouine means ''mouth of the springs,'' which is its full name. (11/3/00)

+I was trying to find an address in the UK yesterday and found an area of England called Taunton... any connection there? (12/8/00)
+There's a place (castle? province?) in England called Ton Ton. (6/19/01)

+Considering Vader as a Christ figure (which it's impossible to not do now): he died (in the words of Obi-Wan) "from a certain point of view, stayed "dead" within Vader for THREE movies, and then saved the day with his "resurrection." (4/13/00)

+Here's what I found on the map:
WASHINGTON- Camas, Wapato.
OREGON - Monmouth, Rogue River, Republic.
CALIFORNIA - Fortuna, Biggs, Willows, Ordbend, Banta, Albion, Alder Springs, Alderpoint, Cassel, Hessel, Empire, Imperial, Imperial Beach, Kyburz, Mi-Wuk Village, & San Lucas. (6/30/00)

*WILLS (Whills?): The history might explain some Force or Jedi aspects. There was a debate in the 7th century about the form of Jesus. Some felt He was made of energy that made him powerful and non-human. A group believed the term "will" was more appropriate than "energy," and two written documents were composed, on the doctrine of the wills (one was one "will," with the other two "wills" ). This led to a great debate in Christianity. Could this be a precursor to the Journal of the Whills from the SW novel, and could it shed light on the Dark Side of the Force idea? This is from Joseph Campbell's Occidental Mythology book. (10/30/03)

*WICKET: a small door or gate within a larger entrance. Wicket W. Warrick was a small creature that opened the Rebels to the Ewoks, like a door to victory. A wicket is also some cricket term. (3/7/00)

*In an Isaac Asimov book (Second Foundation, I think), he occasionally uses the word ''wizard'' as an exclamation, similar to Anakin and Kitster in TPM. (9/6/00)
+My Grandma says that ''wizard!'' was an expression from the '40s. (9/7/00)

*YVAIN (Yavin?): knight of Arthurian (King Arthur) legend. (7/7/00)

Bel-Cam Jos
06-28-2004, 10:01 PM
LOGROYS (Logray, Ewok medicine man?): In the story of the Arthurian knights, especially as related to Gawain, Cidegast, the Duke of Logroys, was killed by Gramoflanz, whose family was afraid of magic. Perhaps just seeing the name Logroys and the fact that it has a slight connection to magic gave Lucas an idea for a character name.

ITHER (Ithorian?): Ither is name of a king and knight in Arthurian legend. Could Ither + Arthurian = Ithorian? Maybe, but there's no link to hammerheads that I could determine.

Bel-Cam Jos
06-29-2004, 11:21 AM
PANAKA (Captian Panaka): Panaka Aradhanam is a call to evening prayers or meetings. Panaka is also a spiced, hot drink that is drunk during special ceremonies.

Bel-Cam Jos
06-30-2004, 10:20 AM
I just finished the fourth and final book in the Masks of God series by Joseph Campbell, and found a couple more possibilities for name origins.


EISELEY, DR. LOREN (Mos Eisely): he was a scientist who studied geology and the creation of the earth. He used a term, the "Huttonian revolution" (when there's a major change in studies and theories) named after geologist James Hutton. Was the earth once a "wretched hive of scum and villany" in the early days?

DARKINBAD THE BRIGHTDAYLER (Biggs Darklighter?): in James Joyce's Finnegan's Wake, a character talks in alliteration of Sinbad the Sailor using various letters, and at the end he goes from Tinbad the Tailor/Jinbad the Jailer/Whinbad the Whaler... to Linbad the Yailer/Xinbad the Phtailer and lastly Darkinbad the Brightdayler. The character is obviously a tad out of his mind, but it sounds a little similar to Luke's childhood friend.
Bright - Dark
Dayler - Lighter
Big Bad - Darkinbad
I don't know... :confused:

Bel-Cam Jos
07-03-2004, 04:45 PM
SARLIC (Sarlacc): Old English word meaning "painful." Change the spelling to sarlacc, and you have a new definition of pain and suffering.

Veers
07-14-2004, 08:31 PM
That's right. Those skiff guards name come from the Day the Earth stood Still.

Bel-Cam Jos
07-17-2004, 01:58 PM
After doing a bit of research (internet and my own brain :)), I found a bunch of possible name and word origins.

Palpatine - Palatine - of or relating to a palace n 1: any of various important officials in ancient Rome 2: (medieval) the lord of a palatinate who exercised sovereign powers over his lands 3: the most important of the Seven Hills of ancient Rome; supposedly the location of the first settlement and the site of many imperial palaces

I always thought of the word "palpable," meaning something you can touch or feel, or something that's easily perceived or obvious. For Emperor Palpatine, he seems to be the opposite of those definitions, at least before ROJ came out; he's never seen (except on a shrouded hologram in ESB) and certainly isn't so obvious or easily understood.

And on the Emperor topic, with another obvious-but-not-yet-written...

INSIDIOUS (Darth Sidious): harming, crafty, deceitful, stealthy, subtle, slowly hurting, etc. Sounds like our manipulative Sith Lord, eh?

JediTricks
07-17-2004, 08:30 PM
I thought Palpatine was a reference to the politician in "Taxi Driver" named Palantine.

Bel-Cam Jos
07-22-2004, 02:41 PM
Originally posted by Jedi Tricks:
I thought Palpatine was a reference to the politician in "Taxi Driver" named Palantine.
Emperor: "Now, young Skywalker..."
Luke: "Father! I feel the good in you!"
Vader: "Uh..."
Emperor: "You talkin' to me? You talkin' to me? You must be talkin' to me..."

LORAS TYRELL (Ratts Tyerell?): I was reading the very loooooong first book in the "Song of Ice and Fire" series A Game of Thrones, and there was a character named Lord Loras Tyrell. I thought, I wonder if he'll get eaten by rats, or if that's his nickname. Well, on page 276, this line appears: "...surviving on rats andboot leather while the Lords Tyrell and Redwyne sat outside...." The book is from 1996, so maybe the Lucasfilm designers had read it and were inspired.
BTW, there's also a character named Princess Elia (anagram of Leia, perhaps?)in the book.

Bel-Cam Jos
08-31-2004, 08:55 PM
PADUANS (Padawan?): In Dante's Comedia, which includes The Inferno, Purgatorio, and Paradisio, there's a consistent plot issue about certain city-states fighting amongst each other. Anyway, the people of Padua (who are called Paduans) were responsible for the downfall of one of these other cities. Just like former-Padawans Obi-Wan and Anakin having parts in the fall of the Republic or Jedi Council, maybe?

TUSCANS (Tusken Raiders?): Just like the Paduans above, the people of Tuscany (called Tuscans) also fought other cities. However, I have not read them refered to as raiders yet.

Bel-Cam Jos
09-18-2004, 10:47 AM
I've been reading Dante's The Divine Comedy, which includes three parts: The Inferno, Purgatorio, and Paradiso. I have to wonder if Lucas read these and was influenced by them. I'll need to wait until after ROTS comes out to make final determinations, but the plots and some small details are kind of similar at times.

Bel-Cam Jos
02-12-2005, 09:56 AM
[sing along in your best Weird Al Yankovic voice: "A long, long, time ago..." ]

An obvious one...

GRIEVOUS: causing sorrow or pain

El Chuxter
02-23-2005, 12:08 PM
Forgive me if this has come up before at some point:

Myrkr: The densely-forested world where Luke Skywalker must evade capture by a bad guy who is soon to become a good guy.

Mirkwood: The dense forest where Bilbo Baggins must evade capture by elves, who are (sorta, at the time) bad guys but will soon become good guys.

Ji'dai
03-19-2005, 12:48 PM
*In an Isaac Asimov book (Second Foundation, I think), he occasionally uses the word ''wizard'' as an exclamation, similar to Anakin and Kitster in TPM. (9/6/00)
+My Grandma says that ''wizard!'' was an expression from the '40s. (9/7/00)

The band of school boys in William Golding's Lord of the Flies also use "wizard" as an exclamation.

Bel-Cam Jos
05-21-2005, 09:15 AM
DR. TREADWELL (Treadwell droid?): While sitting in line for ROTS, I was reading Skywalking, the unauthorized/authorized (it says it's unauthorized, but with Lucas' permission :confused: ) biography of George Lucas. Many of you may have known he was in a very bad car accident when he was in high school. Well, the doctor who treated him was Dr. Treadwell, the name of a multi-armed droid in SW.

Bel-Cam Jos
05-22-2005, 10:24 AM
COMMANDO CODY (Commander Cody?): There was a 1950s-era movie serial called Commando Cody: Sky Marshal of the Universe, and the head of the clone army who reported to the Jedi and Chancellor in Revenge of the Sith is named Commander Cody. Also, there was a band from the sixties or seventies called Commander Cody and His Lost Planet Airmen, who named their band after a film of that title, apparently. One of the band members died in a car crash, and of course, Lucas survived one himself, but that's just coincidence, I think.

El Chuxter
05-23-2005, 12:09 PM
I was waiting on this one, but with all the numerous Bush/Palpatine parallels Lucas draws in ROTS, it's gotta be done:

Felucia: Fallujah???

Ji'dai
05-23-2005, 02:34 PM
Darth Plagueis - powerful Sith Lord whose mastery of the Dark Side enabled him to manipulate the midichlorians to create life and defeat death. Darth Sidious (Palpatine) may have been his pupil.

Plague - from the Greek word meaning misfortune. An affliction, calamity; deadly epidemic disease. Also to vex or torment. Source - Webster's New World Dictionary

Bel-Cam Jos
05-28-2005, 10:04 AM
LUMINARIA? UNDULATE? (Luminara Unduli): a luminaria is a small light in honor of someone or something, like those paper bags on sidewalks with candles in them, or what the Relay For Life for the American Cancer Society uses to honor cancer survivors and victims. The word undulate means "to cause to move in a smooth wavelike motion," or "to give a wavelike appearance or form to." I suppose a smooth-moving Jedi of the light side of the Force would be appropriate.

I'm still stumped on "Mustafar." I know that "far, far away" could be related, as it's a far-off isolated world, but I seem to recall hearing the name similarly elsewhere (and not just Mufasa, voiced by DV speaker James Earl Jones). Will inform you what I discover.

Bel-Cam Jos
05-29-2005, 09:35 AM
I'm still stumped on "Mustafar." I know that "far, far away" could be related, as it's a far-off isolated world, but I seem to recall hearing the name similarly elsewhere (and not just Mufasa, voiced by DV speaker James Earl Jones). Will inform you what I discover.Well, here's a stretch, as several of my sleuthings have been.

There is a "primitive artist" who goes by the name of Fakir Musafar. It's based on a 12th century Persian philosopher of the same name who believed that "You can learn about God through your body." Anyway, the current Fakir Musafar is a photographer and tatoo artist who shows people with piercings, markings, and such. Maybe the look of a person with things attached to them was to be a foreshadowing of the cyborg prosthetics Anakin gets to become Vader. I don't know.

BTW, this info came from a few websites I scanned and skimmed over.

Bel-Cam Jos
05-30-2005, 05:28 PM
CAPTAIN BLY (Commander Bly?): The clone commander on Feluscia (sp?) was apparently nicknamed Bly. That was the planet where Allya Secura (sp?) was killed, in a Jedi mutiny. Perhaps like Capt. Bly from Mutiny on the Bounty?

EXECUTIVE ORDER #1066 (Order 66?): This was the presential order from FDR soon after the Pearl Harbor attack that considered Japanese (and Japanese American citizens) as potential risks and required that they be rounded up and put into internment camps. Order 66 was Palpatine's galaxy-wide signal to eliminate any Jedi Knights.

Ji'dai
05-30-2005, 06:33 PM
I wondered about the significance of Order 66. I was thinking along the lines of the coordinated seizure and arrests of the Knights Templar throughout Europe at dawn on Friday, October 13, 1307. But I didn't find any Papal "Order 66" issued from the Vatican :D

Utapau - sinkhole planet home to two sentient species, the Utapauns and the Utai. Tion Medon is an Utapaun. Obi-Wan Kenobi killed Separatist military leader General Grievous on this planet.

Utapau - city in southern Thailand with a Thai naval base. Recently newsworthy since the Thai government offered the naval base as a hub for tsunami international relief efforts.

JediTricks
05-31-2005, 02:34 AM
Lucas has been wanting to use the name "utapau" for at least 6 years, it was Naboo's original name when writing TPM.

2-1B
05-31-2005, 02:38 AM
I thought I read that Utapau was an early name for Tatooine way back in the day ?

JediTricks
05-31-2005, 05:46 AM
That's also true: http://www.starwars.com/databank/location/naboo/?id=bts

El Chuxter
05-31-2005, 12:14 PM
Try thirty, JT. It was the original name for Tatooine.

I thought Order 66 was a reference to the number of the beast from Revelations.

JediTricks
05-31-2005, 07:10 PM
Yeah, gee whiz Chux, I never would have known that if you hadn't told me information from a source I was already citing in the post directly above yours. :p ;)


Ok smart guys, where did Lucas get the name "Starkiller" from? :D

Bel-Cam Jos
05-31-2005, 09:33 PM
Ok smart guys, where did Lucas get the name "Starkiller" from? :DWell, Lucas wanted a character named "Luke S." So, he created "Luke Skywalker." Then, he said, "I hate this sun. It's hurting my eyes, I wish someone would kill the sun, which is a star, of course."

Am I close? :confused:

JediTricks
06-02-2005, 01:34 AM
Dead-on.



:p (Luke S, that's too funny)

2-1B
06-02-2005, 02:24 AM
Oh my, I never got the Luke S connection ! :eek:

Yeah Chux, I think JT was implying that Utapau was considered for Tattooine and then later considered also for Naboo. :p

Bel-Cam Jos
06-02-2005, 07:46 AM
Dead-on.
:p (Luke S, that's too funny)


Oh my, I never got the Luke S connection ! :eek:
In all seriousness, I do believe I'd heard somewhere that the Luke S-lastname was intentional.

We should all be grateful that Francis Ford Coppola didn't direct it first...

Coming to a galaxy near you... The Star Wars, from the Adventures of Copa Lightkiller. :confused: :eek: Now, that's an offer I'd have to consider refusing! ;)

JediTricks
06-03-2005, 05:45 PM
I've heard the "Luke S" thing too, but I dunno, the original hero Lucas wrote was Annakin Starkiller, and when the script got to something like the ANH we know and love, the character was drawn by McQuarrie to look like an older George Lucas (with the Luke-type character being a GIRL!).

"Fran Sith Copel-a" ;)

jlw
06-05-2005, 10:41 AM
Man, I can't believe no none has posted this yet. Although, I am not sure the origin of "Starkiller"; the name "Skywalker" comes from Norse mythology. Lucas has admitted this many times in different interviews. The Norse god "Loki" (Luke) was also called by the name "the Skywalker." So, Lucas = Luke S; Loki "Skywalker" also = Luke S; thus Luke Skywalker.

Also, the name "Yoda" comes from a Japanese producer/director that influenced Lucas. The Japanese producer's last name was "Yoda". Any attempt of etymology between "Yoda" of Star Wars and "yodah, yudah, etc..." of the Hebrew Bible is lacking. "Yodah, yuday, etc.." transliterated into English is Judah. I won't go too deep into it, but there is significant evidence that Sephardic Hebrew (not Yiddish, which Jews speak today) was the Hebrew of the Bible; which pronounced the "Y, yod" as a "J".

Anyway, that is the thing I love most about the Star Wars saga is how GL has blended many different beliefs/ideas/stories from various myths, religions and cultures. To me, the Jedi knights are a blend of a secret society (Freemasons/Rosicruscians); religion (Catholicism/Taoism/Kabbalaist); and warrior (samuria/knights of round table).

Of course the Empire is the Nazis and the Rebellion is the Allied Forces. Luke Skywalker is a type of King Arthur; "Old Ben" Kenobi is a type of Merlin; etc. Another comparison/blend that seemed sorta obvious to me; but when I mention it to other people their like "yeah, I see what you're saying; but I never thought of that;" is Han Solo is the Lone Ranger type gunslinger (Lone/Solo) and Chewbacca is Tonto (the "savage" sidekick).

If you take the two trilogies, the basic premise of each are drawn from different mythologies/fairy tales. The OT is basically your "Dark Knight (Vader) kidnaps the Princess (Leia); takes her to his castle (Death Star); the Princess sends a message in a bottle (droids) to Merlin (Obi-Wan) to rescue her. Merlin asks Arthur (Luke Skywalker) to assist him, Arthur is given Excalibur (Lightsaber). Merlin and Arthur get passage across the Sea (space) on a ship of pirates (Han & Chewie) and rescue the princess. Of course later in the trilogy the heros climb the beanstalk to the city in the clouds (Bespin); Arthur gets his training from the "Drunken-Master" (Yoda); etc., etc., etc.

But the PT is really a Shakespearean Romeo and Juliet type tragedy with various other elements thrown in. Romeo (Anakin) is a demigod; Juliet (Padme) is a politician. The heros visit Atlantis (Gungan city); help a planet of Bigfoots (wookies) fight the revolution; all before Romeo and Juliet both die; etc. etc. etc... Also, since the PT is suppose to represent a more romantic/renessaince type era; there are a lot of things borrowed from old Flash Gordan movies, which also depicted a romantic-type future.

jlw
06-05-2005, 11:24 AM
Another thing to think about is that not all names in the Star Wars saga came from GL. For example the name Orrinmarkko (sp?) i.e. Pruneface's proper name; came from West End Games and is a variant of Erin Marco, a friend of one of the writers for West End Games. Other names are Ponda Baba (which some of you are trying to find a connection to); Coruscant; Bith; Palpatine; etc. None of which were the creation of GL but came from West End Games or other writers.

Something else is I wonder why GL neve got around to using some of the names that were used in the original draft; for example the name "Deak" which was originally one of Anakin Starkillers children; or "Concord Dawn" one of the planet's names. I was at least hoping for a Clone battle on Concord Dawn.

Bel-Cam Jos
06-05-2005, 07:06 PM
Another thing to think about is that not all names in the Star Wars saga came from GL. For example the name Orrinmarkko (sp?) i.e. Pruneface's proper name; came from West End Games and is a variant of Erin Marco, a friend of one of the writers for West End Games. Other names are Ponda Baba (which some of you are trying to find a connection to); Coruscant; Bith; Palpatine; etc. None of which were the creation of GL but came from West End Games or other writers.

Something else is I wonder why GL neve got around to using some of the names that were used in the original draft; for example the name "Deak" which was originally one of Anakin Starkillers children; or "Concord Dawn" one of the planet's names. I was at least hoping for a Clone battle on Concord Dawn.True. I usually ignore the EU names, unless I find something that still seems to fit. But Palpatine is a Lucas creation, I think.

Deak is one of Luke's friends on Tatooine, I believe. He's (she's?) mentioned in the radio drama and novel, right?

Check the dozens of posts in this rapidly expanding thread for all the "proof" we've found!

2-1B
06-05-2005, 07:19 PM
When I saw the Passion of the Christ and that one guy called Judas "Yudah" it reminded me of Yoda. lol

Sincerely,

Frank Skywalker (Fran from Francis and K from Coppo . . . oh nevermind. :D )

Rocketboy
06-05-2005, 08:27 PM
But Palpatine is a Lucas creation, I think.Nope.

Palatine n
1: any of various important officials in ancient Rome
2: (Middle Ages) the lord of a palatinate who exercised sovereign powers over his lands
3: the most important of the Seven Hills of Rome; supposedly the location of the first settlement and the site of many imperial palaces.

Bel-Cam Jos
06-05-2005, 10:47 PM
Nope.

Palatine n
1: any of various important officials in ancient Rome
2: (Middle Ages) the lord of a palatinate who exercised sovereign powers over his lands
3: the most important of the Seven Hills of Rome; supposedly the location of the first settlement and the site of many imperial palaces.What I mean is that he came up with the character name, not West End Games or something. Obviously the names have some allusions to other places, names, or people.

BTW, I always thought of "palpable" as a connection to the Emperor's name.

jlw
06-05-2005, 11:12 PM
Concerning the name "Palpatine" being a creation of George Lucas; I have been a Star Wars fan since 1977; and it was not until I read that name in a West End Game sourcebook in the mid 1990's that I had ever heard of Emperor "Palpatine." Not saying its not possible; but I doubt it.

I do think you are on to something though with a lot of your etymologies. It would be interesting for Lucas to disclose more info on the names used in the movies.

Ji'dai
06-05-2005, 11:46 PM
I think the name Palpatine (referred to as a Senator) is mentioned in one of the OT novelizations, maybe the original Star Wars [ANH]. Palpatine is always referred to as the Emperor in the films though, so the name may been the creation of one of the authors who wrote the novelizations.

BanthaPoodoo
06-06-2005, 11:14 AM
or "Concord Dawn" one of the planet's names. I was at least hoping for a Clone battle on Concord Dawn.

In the Exclusive Star Wars DVD's I bought from England from the Sun & The News Of The World, it states that Jango Fett is from Concord Dawn.

El Chuxter
06-06-2005, 12:11 PM
In the Exclusive Star Wars DVD's I bought from England from the Sun & The News Of The World, it states that Jango Fett is from Concord Dawn.

Yeah, that's one of the famous "continuity fixes," where Jaster Mareel was Jango's commander in the Mandaloreans, and the details are getting all mixed up in the re-telling.

I can't wait for an explanation of the "Stormtrooper who killed his superior officer" origin of Boba from the Dark Empire comics.

Rocketboy
06-06-2005, 05:40 PM
Yeah, that's one of the famous "continuity fixes," where Jaster Mareel was Jango's commander in the Mandaloreans, and the details are getting all mixed up in the re-telling.

I can't wait for an explanation of the "Stormtrooper who killed his superior officer" origin of Boba from the Dark Empire comics.Never read DE. Did Fett say that himself?
If not, then they've already sorted it out (kinda). Boba Fett either spreads or doesn't mind the spreading of numerous rumors about his origin.
Ooooh...mysterious!

JediTricks
06-06-2005, 08:14 PM
Another thing to think about is that not all names in the Star Wars saga came from GL. For example the name Orrinmarkko (sp?) i.e. Pruneface's proper name; came from West End Games and is a variant of Erin Marco, a friend of one of the writers for West End Games. The figure is actually Orrimaarko, and Orrin Marko was the friend's name, created by WEG writer Pablo Hidalgo who has since moved on to writing for the SW Insider and sw.com, and apparently is co-authoring a new SW Chronicles Prequels book with Sansweet to be released some time later this year.



Deak is one of Luke's friends on Tatooine, I believe. He's (she's?) mentioned in the radio drama and novel, right? Yeah, Deak was originally in the film, he hangs out with Windy, both of these guys are seen hanging with Cammie and Fixer in the Anchorhead cut scenes. ("Windy" is also another unused name from the original script, Mace Windy, who was a pilot, and a name that got used another way later on).

jlw
06-07-2005, 12:05 AM
Yeah, I knew I wasn't spelling the guys name right. I had read that story in like Toyfare or something a few years ago.

I think it would be an interesting article in the Insider to go back and ask George where he got the names from. Sorta like "Indiana"; "That was the dog's name" Classic!!

Bel-Cam Jos
06-22-2005, 04:03 PM
TARKAAN (Grand Moff Tarkin?): in the Chronicles of Narnia series, the Calormenes who sometimes fought against those of Narnia had either a family name or title called Tarkaan (female: Tarkheena, I think). Tarkin was a leader on the evil side in Star Wars, so the "evil" ones in the books could've been a source.

CaptainSolo1138
06-23-2005, 09:41 AM
I really didn't want to go through 700 pages to see if this was posted or not, so if it has been smack me.

Dooku is Japanese for 'poison'.

JediTricks
06-23-2005, 09:11 PM
There's a "Search This Thread" search box that comes up when you click it at the top of every thread page, I searched yours and it appears to be unique. If accurate, pretty interesting. I could only find references to "duku" doing a quick google search, an asian-pacific fruit, which I hope wasn't the meaning behind the character's name. ;)

Bel-Cam Jos
06-25-2005, 11:10 AM
Well, some online sleuthing netted me these possibilities for "Dooku."

1. Doku (pronounced "dough-koo" ) is Japanese for "poison," so CaptainSolo1138 was close.

2. Su-doku is a puzzle game from Japan (it was a puzzle or riddle as to who Dooku really was, whose side was he on, etc.)

3. A website poster thought perhaps the "Count" aspect of Dooku's name had the "poison" translation added to "duke," an honorary title, to create "Dooku."

So maybe all are true... from a certain point of view. ;)

CaptainSolo1138
06-27-2005, 09:03 AM
Well, some online sleuthing netted me these possibilities for "Dooku."

1. Doku (pronounced "dough-koo" ) is Japanese for "poison," so CaptainSolo1138 was close.

I read it in the Insider. So they're close. :p

Ji'dai
08-22-2005, 08:27 PM
Obi-Wan Kenobi -

Obi is a Japanese sash or belt, used to tie a kimono about the waist. (The word 'obi' in this context commonly appears in crossword puzzles, which is where I learned the meaning of it).

It is customary in Japanese social situations to add the honorific suffix -san to a person's name (as in Hanzo-san), which is equivalent to Mr, Mrs, Master, Miss, etc. -Wan may be a derivative of this honorific suffix. However, the word wan has other meanings in the Japanese language, one of which is the word "one" (Wan and one are phonetically similar too). This probably led to the wild speculation that Obi-Wan Kenobi might have been cloned - hence Obi-Wan(One) Kenobi, a first generation clone. This has since been discounted by the prequel trilogy.

Ken has multiple meanings in Japanese - one of which is sword or saber. So 'Kenobi' literally means 'sword belt.' The weapon of a Jedi, the lightsaber, hangs from his belt, never far from reach.

Japanese names are traditionally written family name (surname) first, then given name last, so Obi-Wan Kenobi could be a westernized homage to that Japanese naming convention. Plus the Jedi's name rolls off the tongue in a more lyrical fashion.

jlw
08-23-2005, 04:32 PM
There is a website http://www.jitterbug.com/origins/index.html that also gives some info on the origin of Star Wars. I was surprised to see that the opening crawl bit was originally used in Flash Gordon

Bel-Cam Jos
08-11-2006, 05:50 PM
I might get brought up on child neglect charges, as I've left my baby alone for almost a year now! :eek:

These aren't really word/place origins, but the story's from 1971, so maybe subsciously George remembered these details:

From the book The Lonely Men by Louis L'Amour

A woman uses the "you're my only hope" line to get a man to find her lost child.

"That was long ago and far away" was a line.

"The desert is not all hot sun and sand; there's the rocks too. Miles of them sometimes, scattered over the desert floor, great heaps of them now and again, or those great broken ridges of dull red or black rock like the broken spines of animals. They shove up through the sand, and the sand is trying hard to bury them again." [sounds a little like first views of Tatooine, perhaps]

Apaches torture a man tying him to a cottonwood tree. Their camp is below a cliff, where the hero watches them and sneaks in to the camp to free his friend. [kind of like Anakin, Shmi, and the Tuskens in AOTC]

Qui-Long Gone
08-12-2006, 11:12 PM
I just figured Lucas was so clever he thought of everything in Star Wars in a vaccum....

Speaking of inspiration, Lucas took major cues from Kurosawa's film, Hidden Fortress....check out this movie and all his samurai films, especially 7 Samurai and Throne of Blood....freaking amazing....

Also, did anyone ever confirm the term "Darth?" I head two versions, one meaning "dark", i.e. 'Dark-Father/Darth Vader;' but this doesn't hold up to 'Dark-Maul-Sidious, etc. The other I heard was "in," as in: 'In-vader,' In-sidious....
Of course this doesn't work for 'In-maul,' or 'In-tyranus,' which if I remember right, Tyranus is 'King' (Dark-King?)...

JediTricks
08-12-2006, 11:15 PM
In 1971's "Shaft", the title character calls up his girlfriend from a payphone, and they end the conversation thusly:

Girlfriend: "Baby, I love you!"

John Shaft: "Yeah, I know."

El Chuxter
08-13-2006, 12:32 AM
There's also a funny scene with a godawfully bad actress who tells Shaft to close the door himself, but I don't believe it inspired anything in SW.

JediTricks
08-13-2006, 12:38 AM
"Close it yourself, sh***y!" which becomes a catchphrase for the movie somehow. :p Maybe that catchphrase inspired Lucas to go back and make the prequels after all those years, but he misunderstood, thinking it was "Close it [the story] yourself, and make it sh**y!" :D

Mr. JabbaJohnL
08-13-2006, 01:05 PM
I don't know if anyone's mentioned this yet, but "Jinn" (or "Jinni") is some kind of spirit in the Muslim faith (maybe like a genie?). I thought this was cool, as Qui-Gon Jinn is the Jedi who teaches others to become spirits.

Bel-Cam Jos
08-13-2006, 06:40 PM
If you have a couple weeks to spare (j/k... it will take you one, two days straight, tops :rolleyes: ), look through this thread. It's gots lots of info that several have found, including some on Mr. Jinn (qui is an accepted spelling for chi [as in one's own aura or energy], gon could be like "gone" or not here or dead... which would make him a genie of energy who's dead! :D ).

Bel-Cam Jos
12-28-2006, 11:44 PM
I don't recall if anyone had mentioned this one yet:

GRAND ARMY OF THE REPUBLIC: after the U.S. Civil War, the living members of the Union army created an organization made up of former soldiers called the GAP. With the Clone Wars about a split in the government (i.e. a civil war), this connection seems apt.

Bel-Cam Jos
06-26-2007, 02:47 PM
SON OF THE SUN: as related by Thor Heyerdahl, the writer who made the raft and saile dit from Peru to soem Polynesian islands in the late 1940s, Kon-Tiki was the name of either a Peruvian or Polynesian creator/god. His name translates as "son of the sun," meaning being a descendant of the sun itself. With Lucas coming up with that "Son of the Suns" aspect to the Journal of the Whills idea he had, perhaps that was its origin.

JediTricks
06-27-2007, 08:00 PM
Nice find, but the question is, which is more obscure of a reference, the source material or the usage in the movie? ;)

Bel-Cam Jos
06-28-2007, 03:26 PM
Nice find, but the question is, which is more obscure of a reference, the source material or the usage in the movie? ;)The fool who follows him? [rubs Wookiee's head] Isn't this whole thread obscurity to the max anyway? ;)

JediTricks
06-28-2007, 10:31 PM
That's my point, I think the ref you found is less obscure than the SW part. :p

Rocketboy
08-01-2007, 10:13 AM
Came across one today that I haven't heard before:

C-3PO gets his name from the map grid reference of George Lucas' local Post OfficeAnyone know if this is true?

Wiki also mentions it:

The name C-3PO comes from Lucas' hometown map. The post office was located in grid C-3.

Bel-Cam Jos
08-01-2007, 02:53 PM
Came across one today that I haven't heard before:
Anyone know if this is true?

Wiki also mentions it:I don't know if it can be verified, except by Lucas himself, because it depends on the map used. Yes, maps use letter-number X-Y axis grids, but was it a Modesto map? A central CA one? One from a post office zip code map? It sounds cool, but I find it dubious.

Note: Wikipedia is Latin for "I don't know, I'm making this up as I go," therefore that's where the Indy line came from. :whip:

CaptainSolo1138
08-01-2007, 03:03 PM
Came across one today that I haven't heard before:
Anyone know if this is true?The list you saw this on also listed 3PO as only the 45th best robot in film history (behind frickin' battle droids, for God's sake!) so I wouldn't put too much stock in their research methods. :)

Rocketboy
08-01-2007, 10:13 PM
The list you saw this on also listed 3PO as only the 45th best robot in film history (behind frickin' battle droids, for God's sake!) so I wouldn't put too much stock in their research methods. :)True, and they spelled it C3-P0.

JediTricks
08-05-2007, 07:06 PM
You ever notice we have the origin for R2's name all the time and never for 3PO? I don't buy this Post Office thing right now, it sounds very much like an internet rumor/hoax. There's no mention of it in Rinzler's Making of Star Wars, and he added a new twist on R2's name pointing out it was in early drafts because the reference was from when Lucas was making American Graffiti. Any source (beyond Wiki) would be really cool though.

Bel-Cam Jos
02-21-2008, 07:21 PM
WAMPA: Apparently, in the Indian wars of the pre-USA years of the 17th century, there was a tribe called the Wampanoag (in fact, they were the Native Americans who met the Pilgrims in the famous Thanksgiving of '21 gathering). Another tribe was the Pequot, which became the name of the ship in Melville's Moby Dick (the Pequod), which had a character named Queeqeg, which could be the genesis of Weequay, a member of a skiff (small craft) of Jabba.

Oh yeah!

Rocketboy
02-21-2008, 07:37 PM
This may have been mentioned before:
In WWII FDR's Executive Order 9066 authorized the internment of Japanese Americans.
It was upheld by the Supreme Court saying it was permissible to curtail the civil rights of a racial group when there is a "pressing public necessity."

Bel-Cam Jos
03-05-2008, 07:08 PM
Not any new info, but a couple days ago, the Final Jeopardy! question was "What is Endor?" and it mentioned Return of the Jedi in the answer part. Sweet.

CaptainSolo1138
03-05-2008, 07:55 PM
Not any new info, but a couple days ago, the Final Jeopardy! question was "What is Endor?" and it mentioned Return of the Jedi in the answer part. Sweet.
Thanks, BCJ. I wasn't sure where to post that and then I forgot to post it at all.

jjreason
03-07-2008, 07:00 AM
Oh yeah!

I think you mean "o yes" BCJ. :D

Rocketboy
05-17-2008, 10:52 AM
In Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom, during the sacrifice, Mola Ram chants in Hindi, imploring "Kali Ma Shakti de," asking for the "Spiritual power of Mother Kali."

Wiki (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shakti):

Shakti meaning sacred force, power or energy is the Hindu (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hinduism) concept or personification of the divine feminine (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Feminine) aspect, sometimes referred to as 'The Divine Mother'. Shakti represents the active, dynamic principles of feminine power. In Shaktism (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shaktism), Shakti is worshiped as the Supreme Being (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Supreme_Being). However, in other Hindu traditions, Shakti embodies the active energy and power of male deities (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Deity) (Purushas (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Purusha)), such as Vishnu (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vishnu) in Vaishnavism (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vaishnavism) or Shiva (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shiva) in Shaivism (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shaivism). Vishnu's shakti counterpart is called Lakshmi (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lakshmi), with Parvati (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Parvati) being the female shakti of Shiva.

2-1B
05-17-2008, 11:53 AM
Shak Ti is prequel drivel, let's get back on topic with these wonderful OT characters, please. :thumbsup:

Bel-Cam Jos
01-30-2009, 06:23 PM
Sorry, 2-1B. I have to ask about a PT character: I just thought of this. Could Barriss Offee be related to a "coffee barista?" If so, it's pretty weak, but it does sound close.

Bel-Cam Jos
02-02-2009, 07:51 PM
ANAKIM: a race of giants mentioned in the Old Testament. If they were that tall, it might be like they could "walk" on the "sky." [maybe] Or that as a powerful being, Anakin would be a giant of Force ability. [perhaps] And Darth is tall, too. :p

Bel-Cam Jos
03-22-2009, 08:57 AM
I've been reading the facinating Secret History of SW, and while I'm only through the first two chapters (over 70 pages long) which haven't even gotten to the filming of the movie time period, still lots of cool stuff.

According to the author's foot- and endnotes, the terms "bantha" and "sith" came from the John Carter of Mars stories by E.R. Burroughs. Will have to read some to find out for sure (those are on my to-be-read list now... LISTS... :drool: :D ).

Slicker
03-23-2009, 03:26 AM
I didn't read from the beginning but a few I thought of...

Hoth - A German General during the war was named Hermann Hoth
Corellia - There's an Isthmus of Korelia in Norway I believe it is
Kessel - Means "pocket" in German. Such as what surrounded forces would be caught in

Slicker
04-21-2009, 06:37 AM
A few more that I've found:

Motti - I believe it's Norwegian for a pocket of troops
Ashoka - Means "without sorrow" in sanskrit. There was an Indian Emperor (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ashoka_the_Great)named "Ashoka the Great"

Bel-Cam Jos
04-27-2009, 09:27 PM
It obviously has nothing to do with the matte/production painter's name, but I noticed on a map today that there's a Macquarie Island near Australia.

Bel-Cam Jos
06-17-2009, 02:47 PM
While reading the second John Carter of Mars book, The Gods of Mars, I've noticed several details:

BANTH: a large, lion-like beast that roams around and attacks (it actually sounds more like a nexu than an elephant-type bantha animal)

JEDDAK: a title of a tribe leader or warrior (Jedi?)

THORIAN: another title or office, a high level ruler or elder (don't know how this'd fit a hammerhead creature)

There's a scene where the slaves are brought into an amphitheater to battle animals, but they break free, steal some swords, and fight their way to freedom, even after the guards come after them

Bel-Cam Jos
06-18-2009, 04:55 PM
More to add, now that I finished reading G of M...

They mention "repulsive rays" as the technology that allows ships to lift and fly (I prefer "repulsor," as it sounds less gross and unwanted :D ).

PADWAR: military or tribal rank, but not the top level (very similar to padawan).

Rocketboy
09-27-2009, 11:07 PM
This may have mentioned before, but Endor (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Endor_%28village%29) is the name of a biblical village.

El Chuxter
09-27-2009, 11:14 PM
And there was a witch there. I don't believe her name was Charal, though, and I know Wilfred Brimley didn't defeat her with oatmeally goodness.

Rocketboy
09-27-2009, 11:21 PM
And there was a witch there. I don't believe her name was Charal, though, and I know Wilfred Brimley didn't defeat her with oatmeally goodness.One time ALF called Mrs. Ockmonek the Witch of Endor.

Bel-Cam Jos
02-21-2010, 04:59 PM
A nice little book called simply Star Wars by Will Brooker has had a few gems.

21-87: Princess Leia's cell block number was from a film of the same name by Arthur Lipsett. The book also breaks down specific scenes and the films Lucas "borrowed" for said scenes' set-up.

El Chuxter
02-21-2010, 06:42 PM
If you treat the apostrophe as a comma in an anagram, Utris M'toc can be re-arranged to form a title, a la I, Claudius, of a less-than-polite body part. I'm not sure if this is total coincidence, or if someone was playing a dirty joke on fandom.

bigbarada
02-23-2010, 12:10 PM
"Barada" is also the name of a beer company in Damascus, Syria:
http://www.baradabeer.com.sy/english/glance.htm

In ROTJ, the character of Barada was played by Dickey Beer.

I just thought that was too amazing of a coincidence to not pass on. :D

Bel-Cam Jos
02-24-2010, 09:10 PM
I found some director's notes about Mr. Beer:

Acting too light
Acting far too dark
Dry acting
Flat
I done pint out what he is 'posed ta do, he don't
Great job, my bud
Keep him on, just in case

bigbarada
02-24-2010, 09:51 PM
I found some director's notes about Mr. Beer:

Acting too light
Acting far too dark
Dry acting
Flat
I done pint out what he is 'posed ta do, he don't
Great job, my bud
Keep him on, just in case

Your forgot:

Are we going to give him a speaking part? Of coors not!
:cross-eye

JediTricks
04-06-2010, 05:28 PM
Blue Harvest - George Lucas tried to hide production of Return of the Jedi under the name. Lucas is a fan of Japanese director Akira Kurosawa, who himself was inspired to make his classic Yojimbo by Dashiell Hammett's novels The Glass Key and... Red Harvest. The red harvest which inspires the title of the novel is the blood being spilled wholesale in the town of Poisonville. The switch to blue may be a reference to alien blood, or just a simple color switch.

JimJamBonds
04-08-2010, 10:12 AM
Blue Harvest - George Lucas tried to hide production of Return of the Jedi under the name. Lucas is a fan of Japanese director Akira Kurosawa, who himself was inspired to make his classic Yojimbo by Dashiell Hammett's novels The Glass Key and... Red Harvest. The red harvest which inspires the title of the novel is the blood being spilled wholesale in the town of Poisonville. The switch to blue may be a reference to alien blood, or just a simple color switch.

Maybe its a reference to the blue milk as drunk at the Lars homestead in ANH?

TeeEye7
04-09-2010, 03:34 AM
I found some director's notes about Mr. Beer:

Acting too light
Acting far too dark
Dry acting
Flat
I done pint out what he is 'posed ta do, he don't
Great job, my bud
Keep him on, just in case


Your forgot:

Are we going to give him a speaking part? Of coors not!
:cross-eye

No speaking parts for Mr. Beer because he's a known draft dodger. But, we may reconsider because of his work ethic. He really hops to it when the cameras roll, that is if he doesn't mug for the camera. That kind of thing brews discontent with the director. Make him angry, and it may be taps for Mr. Beer!

Bel-Cam Jos
06-15-2010, 06:26 PM
From a book I choose purely on its title (Space Viking) and author's name (H.Beam Piper), there were several SW-related details from this 1963 sci-fi novel.

Protagonist: Lucas Trask
Space ship names: Fortuna, Enterprise, Avenger, Starhopper
Planet name: Hoth
Technology: hyperspace, micro jumps, stars that re-appear after lines of hyperspace
Generic terms: empire, federation, storm-troopers, republic, emergency powers, trade issues, chancellor elected by people tired of corruption and indecision, making well-known names "different" by spelling them differently

JediTricks
06-18-2010, 02:51 PM
Good find! Lucas is such a thief. :p


Not Star Wars, but it made me think of this thread.

Joey Chill - sleazeball criminal character Raymond Chandler's 1935 short story "Spanish Blood". ("Joe Chill" is the criminal who kills Batman's parents, named in 1948.)

El Chuxter
06-18-2010, 03:30 PM
Interesting. I wonder if any other Batman "normal guy" villains are homages (or ripoffs, depending on how you look at it).

JediTricks
06-19-2010, 03:18 PM
Interesting. I bet one could dig and dig and find those sorts of things. On the broader scale, just looking at Dick Tracy's rogues gallery shows where the Batman villain concepts came from: regular mobsters and wacky-characteristics mobsters.


BTW, googling "raymond chandler joe chill" nets us this thread as the 2nd result. :thumbsup:

El Chuxter
06-19-2010, 04:11 PM
Yeah, but it's always been pretty widely acknowledged (even by Kane and Finger, who disagreed on almost everything) that Batman "borrowed" Dick Tracy's rogues gallery.

An awful lot of Batman's villains have corny puns as their names, like Edward Nygma (E. Nygma) and the only recently revealed name Edgar Head. Some have names that fit (Oswald Chesterfield Cobblepot is about as pretentious a name as one can think of for a short fat guy with a tux and parasol, and the ridicule he received for his name in school was later added as a prime motivation for his turning to crime).

I've always wondered if the name "Jack Napier," from the 1989 movie and later TAS (so far as I know, the only sources where Joker actually had any name beyond just Jack), was taken from Alan Napier, who played Alfred on the 60s show. If so, why'd they choose Alfred's name, or did it just have a better ring or was less obvious than Jack West, Jack Ward, or Jack Romero? (I'm 99% sure that Alan Moore's "The Killing Joke" was the first time he was called Jack, which is where they got that half of the name.)

Bel-Cam Jos
06-21-2010, 03:08 PM
POTE SNITKIN: AMC had on a classic movie (can it show any other type? ;) ) called Battleship Potemkin, of which I haven't seen all the way through, but as it has impact in filmmaking (according to the brief internet searching I did) and was likely seen by Lucas in his schooling days. With ships involved, as well as smaller skiffs, in the film, it's possible that name (maybe moreso than the Escape From NY character) fit the guard around Jabba's sail barge.

Bel-Cam Jos
08-08-2010, 07:01 PM
BIGGS: character name from Ray Bradbury's The Martian Chronicles. Spoiler: he gets killed.

El Chuxter
11-21-2010, 03:34 PM
Not a direct correllation, but I've got to wonder if it was inspiration....

The Republic currency is "datary." The Roman currency was a "dinar," plural form "dinarii." Did they just substitute the word "data" for "dina," which means money in so many languages it would be easily recognizable?

El Chuxter
01-13-2011, 02:59 PM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Z1eFdUSnaQM

Ever notice the Gorn (is that right?) appears to be carrying a lightsaber hilt? Wonder if that influenced the design?

TeeEye7
01-13-2011, 03:34 PM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Z1eFdUSnaQM

Ever notice the Gorn (is that right?) appears to be carrying a lightsaber hilt? Wonder if that influenced the design?

If memory serves, those devices were "universal translators" (like a microphone) so that Kirk and the Gorn could talk to each other. I think it was the influence for Mr. Microphone....;)

http://www.greentreegazette.com/RememberThis/load.aspx?art=367

Bel-Cam Jos
06-22-2011, 06:16 PM
The novel The Coming Race by Edward Bulwer-Lytton from the 1850s or so had a few references that could fit for SW...
- the females of the race are called Gy-ei, but are spelled Jy-ei in a semi-phonetic way (seems close to Jedi)
- the vril is the electric 'force' that this race uses has telepathic and some telekinetic uses, they use a staff to focus its energy (like a lightsaber would do?), this energy is in all things, and users vary in their ability to use it

JimJamBonds
06-22-2011, 09:52 PM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Z1eFdUSnaQM

Ever notice the Gorn (is that right?) appears to be carrying a lightsaber hilt? Wonder if that influenced the design?Worst fight ever!

Bel-Cam Jos
03-26-2012, 09:52 AM
It's been a while since I've found something, but driving north this weekend, I saw a Lerdo Road (or some type of driving surface: highway, avenue, street, etc.) and remembered the memorable Ewoks TV movies.

LERDO: in Spanish, this word means clumsy, slow, or idiot-like, and when Wicket uses it in the Ewok movies, it’s a term of insult.

El Chuxter
04-19-2012, 03:02 PM
Not sure if it's come up yet, but Burroughs' Mars series has two especially dangerous creatures called sith and banth. Given that both of these names showed up in the original Star Wars (with one letter added for "bantha"), I'm thinking that's not just coincidence.

Bel-Cam Jos
04-19-2012, 06:34 PM
While reading the second John Carter of Mars book, The Gods of Mars, I've noticed several details:

BANTH: a large, lion-like beast that roams around and attacks (it actually sounds more like a nexu than an elephant-type bantha animal)

JEDDAK: a title of a tribe leader or warrior (Jedi?)

THORIAN: another title or office, a high level ruler or elder (don't know how this'd fit a hammerhead creature)

There's a scene where the slaves are brought into an amphitheater to battle animals, but they break free, steal some swords, and fight their way to freedom, even after the guards come after themNope. Nobody mentioned one of 'em before.

WHITSUN [BERU WHITESUN?], or WHITSUNDAY: Old name for Pentecost, a Christian religious feast day related to the Chosen One, born in a virgin birth, Jesus, 50 days after Easter. Aunt Beru Whitesun-Lars watched over the son of the Son of the Mitichlorians.

JediTricks
04-21-2012, 03:50 PM
Dang, I didn't know both Sith and Banth were in the Barsoom series, that's pretty bad.

I don't think "Sith" as a word shows up in the actual Star Wars OT except in the script.


I had heard of whitsun before, never put it together with whitesun. Seems like a fair lift, unlike Chux's.

El Chuxter
04-21-2012, 04:07 PM
At least Luke's sister wasn't named Thejah Doris. lol

JediTricks
04-21-2012, 04:09 PM
At least Luke's sister wasn't named Thejah Doris. lolAt one point she could have been, the original stages of the ESB script had Luke having a DIFFERENT sister, not Leia. And Lucas does like to pay homage, not licensing fees. :p

Bel-Cam Jos
03-05-2013, 08:04 PM
I guess CW can head into this thread, too.

VIZSLA (Pre Vizsla?): a hunting breed of dog, like a certain hunter Mandolarian, perhaps?

Mr. JabbaJohnL
07-16-2013, 11:38 AM
I'm not sure where else to post this, but the newest Insider (#143) gave some official names to a few of the skiff guards.

*Lathe - the blue-shirted red Nikto who had a figure in the vintage line and last year in TVC
*Pagetti Rook - the Weequay hunter sometimes nicknamed "Queequeg"
*Brock Starsher - the white-suited guard with Doallyn's helmet, as Doallyn was officially not at the battle

Pagetti Rook is a little too cutesy, especially since it seems like an obvious mishmash of Pintel and Ragetti from Pirates of the Caribbean, with "Rook" taken from Ragetti actor Mackenzie Crook's last name. It goes with how The Clone Wars portrayed the Weequay as pirates, and he can match bounty hunter Kiera Swan, I guess. I don't know if Brock Starsher is supposed to be a Venture Bros. reference or what.

Anyway, bigbarada, you have some website updatin' to get to. :D

bigbarada
07-16-2013, 07:16 PM
Anyway, bigbarada, you have some website updatin' to get to. :D

Yeah, I know. I got a couple of emails this morning saying the exact same thing. lol I guess it's good to know that people are paying attention to the site.

Anyways, I agree that Pagetti Rook is too cutesy. After 30 years of calling this guy Weequay, I don't think I will ever get used to the new name.

Brock Starsher is fine. At least now we know for sure that he's not Sgt. Doallyn. I knew that Leland Chee wanted to assign the name Lathe to the vintage Nikto (back when he switched the identities of Klaatu and Yotts Oren), so I'm glad it's finally official.

Bel-Cam Jos
07-23-2013, 12:53 PM
While reading a great book, British Museum director Neil MacGregor's A History of the World in 100 Objects, I came across a couple maybe's.

ASHOKA (Ahsoka?) THE GREAT: I'm not sure if anyone posted this already, but he was a famous leader from India known for his promotion of Buddhist ideals, morals, and tolerance. As a padawan, Ahsoka was often in favor of tolerance, morality, and peace.

SUNAN GIRI (Guri?): a Muslim saint, he was used as a subject in shadow puppet performances. The reason why maybe it could fit the Shadows of the Empire human replica droid, these shadow puppets were models of caricatured people, shown behind a screen so the audience would assume they really could be actual actors.

Bel-Cam Jos
11-27-2013, 11:20 PM
I was in northern Arizona tis weekend, and in the Homolovi State Park visitors' center, I noted the following:

JEDDITO (Jedi?): in a display there was a Yellow Ware Bowl artifact from a kiva, or part of a dwelling used for storing sacred items. The bowl's design included light and dark imagery, in apparent intended dichotomy. The Jedi Order held many things sacred, even its rival, the Sith. Also, in a Hopi puberty ceremony, a photo of a couple of girls had bun-style hairstyles, somewhat like Leia's. I wonder if in Lucas' studies of world cultures and philosophies he came across these names and images.

Bel-Cam Jos
03-13-2014, 09:35 PM
Can't believe I hadn't posted this here before...

442nd INFANTRY REGIMENT (442nd Siege Battalion?): an all-Japanese American group that fought in WWII, one of the most decorated units for the USA in the war. In SW lore, the 442nd was also a decorated Clonetrooper unit.