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View Full Version : What's the lesson supposed to be?



rbaumhauer
10-25-2004, 03:08 PM
Okay, we all know how George wanted to create a "modern myth", based on his reading of Campbell, etc. Myths tell us "universal truths", teach us lessons about life.

From the OT, the "lesson" at the core of the Star Wars Saga seemed pretty clear - believe in yourself, trust your feelings, and anything is possible (even turning an irredeemable Bad Guy back to the light).

Throw in the PT (and the Extra-Special Editions), and the lesson becomes problematic. What are we supposed to learn from the whole six-part Saga now?

"Don't take innocent children from their slave mothers in order to train them (or not) to be Superheroes, without freeing their moms as well, or Bad Things might happen"?

Or,

"Bad people can come from any background"?

Or,

"No matter how many innocents you slaughter, killing your Dark Master before he can kill your son is a Free Pass to Valhalla, complete with the gift of your youthful good looks for all eternity"?

Thanks, George - I'll try to keep these valuable lessons in mind.............

Rick

Bel-Cam Jos
10-25-2004, 06:58 PM
I still believe that the lesson is the triumph of the individual over the evils of the many. However, I think that the other lessons could be:

There is good in all of us.
Patience and self control are the keys to happiness.
Anyone, with faith and desire, can be powerful.
Stength comes from within, and with close friends.

And perhaps most importantly:

Not all stories must be life-changing, canonic (sp?) tales; they can be simply fun.

Kidhuman
10-25-2004, 08:09 PM
I think the lesson is no matter what we think of the movies, they can change at the drop of a hat

Rocketboy
10-25-2004, 09:32 PM
Never really saw any lessons. Just a fun story of Good vs Evil.

Unless you count the lesson: Don't be an annoying whinning brat or your dad will cut your hand off!

stillakid
10-25-2004, 09:47 PM
The lesson of Luke Skywalker used to be that any naive kid from nowhere USA could really become a hero if he believed in himself ("Luke, trust your feelings!").

Now, that's blown clear out of the water as we have learned that it takes little parasite bugs to make it happen. Way to go, George! You clever dude you.

Slicker
10-26-2004, 02:25 PM
Unless you count the lesson: Don't be an annoying whinning brat or your dad will cut your hand off!Don't forget about him pushing you down the steps first.

Kidhuman
10-26-2004, 04:36 PM
But to beat all, he tried to shoot him out of the trenches of the DS. :beard: :D

Ji'dai
10-26-2004, 07:36 PM
Well, in TPM there was the "circle of life" theme that ran through the movie: the symbiotic relationship between the midichlorians and their Jedi hosts; the relationship between the Gungans and dee Naboo - how the invasion affects both species and that they must put aside their differences and unite. There's probably a lesson there somewhere.

There's the common theme of unlikely heroes forming an alliance to overcome an almost omnipotent enemy.

Don't judge a creature by it's appearance & size matters not - even the most insignificant of creatures can be quite powerful or make a formidable ally (Yoda, Ewoks).

Overall it's the story of a hero, his fall from grace, and his ultimate redemption. Yes, I mean Jar Jar Binks. He might still surprise us in ROTS, only time will tell.

chewie
10-26-2004, 09:21 PM
The original trilogy to me seemed to be a political statement that a small group of people, or even an individual, can make a difference in their form of government.

The prequel trilogy seems to be even more political but with a different slant. This time the lesson being that we should be wary of our government so that it does not take over complete control of our lives.

Bel-Cam Jos
10-27-2004, 07:47 AM
Never really saw any lessons. Just a fun story of Good vs Evil.

Unless you count the lesson: Don't be an annoying whinning brat or your dad will cut your hand off!Actually, if you're going that route, the lesson would be: Don't be an annoying whinning brat or you'll end up on a deserted planet and have your adoptive family killed then have your father try to shoot you out of the trenches of space station then have him push you down the steps prior to cutting your hand off but then you get to kick him down and cut off his hand before seeing him offer cryptic advice while dying, realizing he aged really fast and get the shaft by first getting to become a ghost but later getting replaced by his younger, hotter-to-the-girls, hairier self.

Maybe THAT'S the lesson. :rolleyes:

Rocketboy
10-27-2004, 10:28 AM
Actually, if you're going that route, the lesson would be: Don't be an annoying whinning brat or you'll end up on a deserted planet and have your adoptive family killed then have your father try to shoot you out of the trenches of space station then have him push you down the steps prior to cutting your hand off but then you get to kick him down and cut off his hand before seeing him offer cryptic advice while dying, realizing he aged really fast and get the shaft by first getting to become a ghost but later getting replaced by his younger, hotter-to-the-girls, hairier self.

Maybe THAT'S the lesson. :rolleyes:And that's a lesson we all can live by.

*Signals the NBC "The More You Know" graphic*

Mr. JabbaJohnL
10-27-2004, 05:20 PM
For the Anakin story, the lesson is, make the right decisions. You must control your feelings and think of others, you can't just disregard everything and everyone but yourself.

The same, actually, goes for Luke, in ANH and ESB but mainly in ROTJ.

The lives of Anakin and Luke were basically the same, but they made different decisions. When their parental unit(s) was killed, Anakin slaughtered all the Tuskens, for his own satisfaction; but Luke decided to become a Jedi and work for a greater good, to make sure this wouldn't happen to other people like him. When the temptation to join Palpatine and the Dark Side grew unbearably strong, Anakin gave in and became Darth Vader; Luke resisted with all his power and continued on the light path (no matter what the comics say!).

Stillakid, the prequels don't ruin Luke's adventure, it still shows that if life sucks, things will get better.