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Bel-Cam Jos
06-22-2005, 12:03 PM
I don't know if this is more of an "Other" movie or "TV" section thread, since it was on television, but I think it's more of a non-SW movie idea. This show aired last night, and I enjoyed it. Mainly because of all the classic, older films I haven't seen, or just didn't realize that the famous lines I'd heard for years came from them (Sunset Blvd. comes to mind right now). [Their site's been busy this morning, so I'll post the listlink when I can. Like now: AFI Top 100 Movie Quotes list (http://www.afi.com/tvevents/100years/quotes.aspx) ]

Some omissions, at least from my point of view ("... the Jedi are evil" hee hee):

quotes
"No, I am your father." - SWE5: ESB
"I am not an animal!" The Elephant Man
"It's good to be the king." - History of the World, Part I
"Ten minutes to Wapner." - Rain Man
"As you wish." - The Princess Bride
"Yes, Virginia. There is a Santa Claus." - Miracle on 34th Street (was this line actually said in the movie, though?)
"The list is life." - Schindler's List
"I'm your worst nightmare." - First Blood, or Rambo: FB2
"Am I a clown...?" - Good Fellas

movies
The African Queen
Shaft
Butch Cassidy & Sndance Kid
It's a Wonderful Life
Blazing Saddles

actors
John Wayne
Eddie Murphy
Jimmy Stewart (how was he left out? :confused: )
Marilyn Monroe



Discussion?

Mr. JabbaJohnL
06-22-2005, 01:08 PM
I was at least glad that "May the Force be with you" was #8. I don't like it how so many were from books that were adapted into films; the same goes for their other lists (Attacus Finch as the greatest film hero ever? What?). They relied waaaay too heavily on Casablanca, I thought my head was going to explode if they had any more quotes from there.

El Chuxter
06-22-2005, 01:11 PM
I fired off a profanity-laden e-mail to some friends of mine earlier, and here's the clean version:

A lot of the quotes I have no problem with whatsoever. Casablanca was represented six times and, frankly, that may not have been enough. We are talking about the most quotable film of all time here. And it's very tough to argue with "Frankly my dear, I don't give a damn" or "I coulda been a contendah."

It bothered me that some of the selections were actual quotations, and others were more "catch phrases." Like "May the Force be with you." Memorable, yeah, but as a quotation it's a bit flat. Same with "Hasta la vista, baby" or "Yo Adrian." And then there are quotations that clearly are based solely on delivery, like "My precious" representing Gollum's weird voice. No real criteria apparent at all for the selections.

"Plastics."
WTF? I've seen The Graduate a few times, and it's a damned good movie. Great movie, even. No problem whatsoever with "Mrs Robinson, you're trying to seduce me," which was also on the list, albeit much lower for some inexplicable reason. The word (it's not even a line, for Christ's sake!) "plastics" never stood out to me whatsoever.

"Win just one for the Gipper" and "Who's on first?"
These were both in the 90s?!?!? And both Jerry Maguire and the Terminator films get TWO entries that outranked these? Serious WTF moment here.

It's a Wonderful Life was notably absent, which is very odd for any AFI list. Love it or hate it (and it's a classic that deserves the hype, methinks), I find it odd that AFI left it off.

Two other highly quotable, critically acclaimed movies were missing as well: Sling Blade and Pulp Fiction.

Also missing was some movie that seems mildly quotable. I've seen it once or twice. I think the name is something like, oh, I don't know, THE PRINCESS BRIDE!!

Seriously, that flick's as quotable as Casablanca. If nothing else, "Hello. My name is Inigo Montoya. You killed my father. Prepare to die."

It was especially odd that Rob Reiner, Billy Crystal, and Chris Sarandon were among the commentators, and not a single quotation from it! C'mon. "Have fun storming the castle."

"My precious" did NOT belong. I don't care how great the Lord of the Rings films are, it just shouldn't have been there.

However, since it was, and therefore there's no rule about lines from adaptations of other works that use the exact same stinking line as the original, Spider-Man's "With great power comes great responsibility" was conspicuous in its absence.

With the presence of so many one-word quotations, I could've seen Captain Jack Sparrow's "Savvy?" making an appearance.

Tim Burton was slighted again, as normally is the case in AFI lists. Seriously, the guy's done enough good stuff that someone could recognize it ONCE.

"Beetlejuice. Beetlejuice. Beetlejuice!"

"Have you ever danced with the devil by the pale moonlight?"

"Mistletoe can be deadly if you eat it."
"A kiss can be even deadlier if you mean it."

"Paging Mr Herman. Mr Herman, you have a telephone call at the front desk."

Nothing from the Indiana Jones films. "I don't know. I'm making this up as I go along."

The only line from a Woody Allen film was from Annie Hall, and was spoken by Diane Keaton. That alone should tell you something's wrong. Woody ALWAYS gives himself the best lines. Diane or Mia or Mira or Julia or whoever are always window dressing.

The little trivia questions they posted before commercial referred to three films as "films in our countdown," when they weren't, making their absence even more obvious: The Lion King (NO animation was represented), The Producers (NO Mel Brooks films either), and The Empire Strikes Back.

Which brings us to a personal subject for me: Star Wars. I read somewhere the only nominee from the ENTIRE SERIES was "May the Force be with you." Again, sort of dull. Why nothing from The Empire Strikes Back? NFC. You've got quite a few great lines from Han alone. ("I know" and "Who's scruffy looking?" come immediately to mind.) And you've got the really blatantly obvious "I am your father."

And Yoda is quotable in every movie: TPM ("Fear leads to anger, anger leads to hate, hate leads to suffering"), AOTC ("Truly wonderful, the mind of a child"), ROTJ ("Soon I will rest, yes, forever sleep").

Combine ESB and Yoda and how in the name of everything that's good and just in the world can you NOT come up with at least one quotation worthy of the top 100? Seriously. I challenge anyone to fully isolate themselves from any SW geeks (read: don't open e-mails from me for a week) and not hear someone use one of Yoda's lines from ESB!

"Looking? Found someone you have, I would say."

"Come, good food, come."

"Wars not make one great."

"Judge me by my size do you?"

"Luminous beings are we, not this crude matter."

"Try not. Do or do not. There is no try."

I can go on, but the point is any of these are more etched into public consciousness (supposedly one of the main criteria) than, say, the last line of Shane.

And comedy. Very underrepresented. How about "Bueller? Bueller?" (Curiously, this showed up in the intro.)

Hell, let's get low-brow. Where's "Shampoo is better. I go on first and clean the hair"?

Maybe those aren't AFI-type movies. But if you want to be snobby, don't put frigging Jerry Maguire on the list twice for two of the lamest lines in film history.

But what do I know? Had I done the list, there's a possibility that "Me Grimlock kick butt!" might have made the final cut.

Exhaust Port
06-22-2005, 01:35 PM
I agree with what you're saying El Chuxter. "My precious" had no place in there but I disagree a bit about "Plastics" from The Graduate. It's from before my time but talking to several people who were a part of the late 1960's they all quoted the "Plastics" line when mentioning the movie. I don't get it but maybe because I'm not in my 40's.

A few others I didn't get:

100. "I'm king of the world!", "Titanic," 1997. ---- This movie just hasn't stood the test of time IMO. Sure it sold a lot but it didn't tell a great story. This line just happens to be the one quote folks remember. I remember a lot of worthless quotes but that doesn't make them good.

99. "I'll get you, my pretty, and your little dog, too!", "The Wizard of Oz," 1939. ---- This line just isn't that great. I mean it's good but not Top 100. There have to be other lines in the movie that could top this one.

82. "Toga! Toga!", "National Lampoon's Animal House," 1978. ---- Funny and frequently quoted in frats around the country but not a Top 100 IMHO.

78. "Open the pod bay doors, HAL," "2001: A Space Odyssey," 1968. ---- I figured they would use "Dave, what are you doing Dave?".

76. "Hasta la vista, baby," "Terminator 2: Judgment Day," 1991. ---- Quoted frequently but it always felt like a "I'll be back" wannabe. It never had the same impact.

-----------------------


What about:

"I've got a bad feeling about this." - any SW movie.

"But this goes to 11." - Spinal Tap

At least 1 quote from a Monty Python movie:

"Run away! Run away!"
"I fart in your general direction."
"Perhaps if we build a large wooden badger."
"She's got HUGE....tracks of land."

I agree with your Princess Bride quote EC.

"Hello. My name is Inigo Montoya. You killed my father. Prepare to die."

how about...

"Inconceivable!" or "As you wish."

JimJamBonds
06-22-2005, 01:49 PM
94 I feel the need - the need for speed! Top Gun
98 Nobody puts Baby in a corner. Dirty Dancing


Uhhh what's this? I would think that "No, I am your father!" or "These go to 11!" would have been better picks, but what do I know??? :crazed:

2-1B
06-22-2005, 02:12 PM
Ron Burgundy should be on the list, the man was a legendary orator.

2-1B
06-22-2005, 02:14 PM
I was kidding about Ron Burgundy belonging on that list (or was I ? :sur: ) but seriously, why didn't The Big Lebowski get any love ? Memorable quotes throughout. :)

El Chuxter
06-22-2005, 03:10 PM
Monty Python wasn't eligible, as this was a list of quotes from American films only.

Of course, you could argue that being made by a New Zealander (?) in New Zealand, LOTR:TTT wasn't eligible, either. :p

Exhaust Port
06-22-2005, 03:35 PM
*AFI defines an American film as an English language motion picture with significant creative and/or financial production elements from the United States.

So what part did LOTR meet?

Bel-Cam Jos
06-22-2005, 04:58 PM
I will add to my opening post.

I forgot The Grapes of Wrath. What about the "Whenever there's a cop beatin' up a guy..." line? Or some of the Ma Joad ones?

I thought the "As you wish" motif from The Princess Bride would've worked.

I wanted A Christmas Story to make it, but I knew it wouldn't.

No Paul Newman lines? Cool Hand Luke had the Boss speaking. Nothing from BC & SDK, Color of Money, The Hustler?

The AFI website said that had 400 quotes and people voted for the top 25% of them. Jimmy Stewart had 4, he got shafted. :mad: No John Wayne? JOHN WAYNE?!?

El Chuxter
06-22-2005, 05:33 PM
"Here's to my brother George, the richest man in town!"

A friend of mine pointed out that Westerns got shafted pretty badly, which hadn't occurred to me but seemed obvious after the fact.

Where was The Magnificent Seven?

"Mister, we deal in lead."

JimJamBonds
06-22-2005, 11:18 PM
I was kidding about Ron Burgundy belonging on that list (or was I ? :sur: )

Well I guess you'll just have to keep your fingers crossed that Mr. Burgundy shows up on the AFI Top 100 Movie's that feature Jazz Flutists.lol

Mad Slanted Powers
06-23-2005, 02:12 AM
"Yes, Virginia. There is a Santa Claus." - Miracle on 34th Street (was this line actually said in the movie, though?)

As far as I know, this wasn't from a movie. It was in the answer to a letter a girl wrote to the New York Sun a long time ago. I recall seeing a cartoon based on it when I was a kid. I've only seen Miracle on 34th Street once, so I can't be sure about what is in it.


99. "I'll get you, my pretty, and your little dog, too!", "The Wizard of Oz," 1939. ---- This line just isn't that great. I mean it's good but not Top 100. There have to be other lines in the movie that could top this one. I actually find myself using this quote once in a while. Sometimes it can be funny to just add "and your little dog, too!" to other lines.


78. "Open the pod bay doors, HAL," "2001: A Space Odyssey," 1968. ---- I figured they would use "Dave, what are you doing Dave?".
I've only seen it once, but I probably would have used the "I'm sorry, I can't do that Dave" or whatever the line is.

"Looking? Found someone you have, I would say."

"Come, good food, come."

"Wars not make one great."

"Judge me by my size do you?"

"Luminous beings are we, not this crude matter."

"Try not. Do or do not. There is no try."I think the only one of these Yoda quotes that is really known much outside of Star Wars fans, and thus worthy of the top 100 would be that last one.

Of course, one of my favorite lines from a Star Wars movie is "What I really need is a droid that understands the binary language of moisture vaporators." :D

Slicker
06-23-2005, 03:14 AM
Well I guess you'll just have to keep your fingers crossed that Mr. Burgundy shows up on the AFI Top 100 Movie's that feature Jazz Flutists.lolJazz flute is for little sissy girls.:p

I really wish that MTV would do one of these lists. I can't stand the damn channel with a passion but they always seem to have really good movie awards (where else would Napoleon Dynamite win best picture, and yes I know it was MTV's movie but it was a damn good one) and they would no doubt pick "I am your father" as the #1 movie line.

Lowly Bantha Cleaner
06-23-2005, 12:10 PM
I really wish that MTV would do one of these lists. I can't stand the damn channel with a passion but they always seem to have really good movie awards (where else would Napoleon Dynamite win best picture, and yes I know it was MTV's movie but it was a damn good one) and they would no doubt pick "I am your father" as the #1 movie line.

Nah, MTV wouldn't do a good job of it. AFI, to its credit, never forgets the Golden Age of Hollywood nor movies of the 40's and 50's that many of our generation have never seen or long forgotten. Case in point, the quotes from Sunset Boulevard, Citizen Kane, and Grand Hotel. It's important to keep the memory of these great movies alive. MTV would laden it's quotes only from blockbusters, comedies, or shallow, teen-driven films like "Clueless."

An omission that I wanted to see included was from Willy Wonka and the Chocolate Factory (forgive me is I misquote) "Did you ever hear the story of the boy who got all that he wanted? . . . He lived happily ever after."

General_Grievous
06-23-2005, 01:56 PM
I really wish that MTV would do one of these lists. I can't stand the damn channel with a passion but they always seem to have really good movie awards (where else would Napoleon Dynamite win best picture, and yes I know it was MTV's movie but it was a damn good one) and they would no doubt pick "I am your father" as the #1 movie line.

No they wouldn't. They would have picked "Gosh! Friggin' idiots!" as their best movie quote because MTV is run by complete dumbasses. Take the recent movie awards for example. They picked Jimmy Fallon to host it. Tumors are funnier than Jimmy Fallon. They picked Ben Stiller over Doc Ock as best villain. Stupid white trash media ***** Lindsay Lohan got best actress while more deserving nominees like Natalie Portman or Hilary Swank.

And to top that off, they give the under-average Napoleon Dynamite best movie, over movies that were a lot better, namely all the other nominees: Ray, Spider Man 2, The Incredibles, and Kill Bill vol 2.

The MTV award shows are rigged.

And AFI can go hang, too, for not including "Luke, I am your father".

I disagree also with past decisions of theirs, too. Atticus Finch is NOT the best movie hero. Indiana Jones, Superman, Batman, Spider-Man, and Luke Skywalker all surpass him in my book.

Why does AFI waste their own time with best movie quotes? Why not do "Best 100 Nude Scenes in Film", AFI???

Okay, I'm done ranting.

Lowly Bantha Cleaner
06-23-2005, 04:19 PM
And AFI can go hang, too, for not including "Luke, I am your father".

I disagree also with past decisions of theirs, too. Atticus Finch is NOT the best movie hero. Indiana Jones, Superman, Batman, Spider-Man, and Luke Skywalker all surpass him in my book.

I thought at first Atticus Finch wasn't a good choice to be the top movie hero but now the more that I think about it, I disagree. Simply because Atticus was a realistic character who confronted a more pressing issue than any evil super-villain bent-on world domination. He was a normal human being, not granted any special strength, will for adventure, or powers, like all the characters mentioned above. Instead, he had the moral courage and strength to go against the grain of the mentality of his townspeople to do what was right.

General_Grievous
06-23-2005, 06:22 PM
I can see your point, but movies are all about escapism. People go to movies to see extraordinary feats, like those done by superheroes, for the purpose of good vs. evil, rather than see a more ordinary story, like one that takes place in a courthouse. I mean, Atticus Finch worked well on paper, at least that's what I thought when I read "To Kill a Mockingbird" in 9th grade. But for the most part, more people go to movies to see Spider-Man swinging through New York City, fighting supervillains rather than to see a lawyer defend an innocent man, myself included. That's why I think that AFI should have picked someone like Indiana Jones as their top hero because movies are all about stuff like that. Atticus Finch was a great character, but compared to other film heroes like Indiana Jones, Batman, etc., he just fell flat to me.

Mad Slanted Powers
06-23-2005, 08:11 PM
I can see your point, but movies are all about escapism. People go to movies to see extraordinary feats, like those done by superheroes, for the purpose of good vs. evil, rather than see a more ordinary story, like one that takes place in a courthouse. I mean, Atticus Finch worked well on paper, at least that's what I thought when I read "To Kill a Mockingbird" in 9th grade. But for the most part, more people go to movies to see Spider-Man swinging through New York City, fighting supervillains rather than to see a lawyer defend an innocent man, myself included. That's why I think that AFI should have picked someone like Indiana Jones as their top hero because movies are all about stuff like that. Atticus Finch was a great character, but compared to other film heroes like Indiana Jones, Batman, etc., he just fell flat to me.

Movies aren't just about that. That is why sci-fi/fantasy movies and comedies rarely win the big awards. I too was disappointed in Finch as a choice as top hero, but he is not a bad choice for the reasons LBC mentioned.

El Chuxter
06-24-2005, 01:11 PM
Atticus Finch might not be able to beat Indiana Jones, but he could talk him out of fighting. That's real heroism.

Bel-Cam Jos
06-24-2005, 11:03 PM
I got tired of looking through 103 pages of a PDF file, but if you check the link in the first post of this thread for the 400 quotes on the ballot, you can see which ones didn't make the cut.

- We could've had another (indirect) Star Wars quote with "Klaatu, nikto barada" from The Day the Earth Stood Still. :o

- I'm surprised at the profanity on some of the nominees (which might explain why they weren't chosen). :speech:

- Ace Ventura: PD's "Alrighty then!" was there, but "The horror..." from Apocalypse Now was omitted. :confused:

BTW, Atticus Finch was not a movie hero. He was a life hero. Those are rarer. And more honest and admirable.

Bel-Cam Jos
06-21-2007, 06:32 PM
I couldn't find a thread for the AFI Top 100 films list from '97 (or was it '98? it was before these new Forums were open, of course), so maybe I should make this a new thread, but oh well. Last night, the new 10th anniv. edition of the list was on TV. I can't find a copyable list online, but I did locate the top 10s (plus a little cult following picture :rolleyes: ) from the first and most recent lists (see below). Just a little rearranging of the previous; but I missed the first 75 or so, so I don't know how the whole list changed.

NEW LIST (Old List)

1 CITIZEN KANE
2 THE GODFATHER
3 CASABLANCA
4 RAGING BULL
5 SINGIN' IN THE RAIN
6 GONE WITH THE WIND
7 LAWRENCE OF ARABIA
8 SCHINDLER'S LIST
9 VERTIGO
10 THE WIZARD OF OZ
13 STAR WARS

1 Citizen Kane
2 Casablanca
3 The Godfather
4 Gone With the Wind
5 Lawrence of Arabia
6 The Wizard of Oz
7 The Graduate
8 On the Waterfront
9 Schindler's List
10 Singin' in the Rain
15 Star Wars

Thoughts?

UKWildcat
06-21-2007, 07:34 PM
I was shocked to see that The Shawshank Redemption came in at #72, I thought it would have been atleast in the top 20. I also wasn't a fan of Goodfellas and Pulp Fiction coming in at #92 and #94, respectively; I thought they should have been somehwere in the 25-50 range (although I would rate them higher than that). Overall a pretty good group of movies, even though I haven't seen half of them. I did watch the entire show last night which is always entertaining, even though I didn't agree with some of the placements.

DarthQuack
06-21-2007, 08:36 PM
I've gotta take a look at the website and see how everything else stacks up...kinda disappointed with the SW drop though...

Lowly Bantha Cleaner
06-24-2007, 08:47 PM
It's a wonder that Star Wars didn't drop substantially on the most recent list considering that in the last 10 years, the Special Edition was released. :rolleyes:

General_Grievous
06-24-2007, 11:01 PM
What's so great about Citizen Kane? I thought it was one of the most boring movies I've ever seen.

Kidhuman
06-24-2007, 11:22 PM
What's so great about Citizen Kane? I thought it was one of the most boring movies I've ever seen.

You aint getting an argument from me, but I guess for its time it was a great flick. Sorry bastages if thats what they looked forward to

Bel-Cam Jos
06-25-2007, 11:45 AM
I've gotta take a look at the website and see how everything else stacks up...kinda disappointed with the SW drop though...Unless I got my wires crossed, didin't SW move up from #15 to #13? Mebbe I goofed... :confused:

I heard that some movies moved over 40-some places from the old list; wow.

JON9000
06-25-2007, 12:29 PM
Raging Bull at #4? Seriously? Actually, this list is pretty much BS. It should be called the 100 Movies Most Fashionable to Call the Best at this Moment.

Lowly Bantha Cleaner
06-25-2007, 12:45 PM
What's so great about Citizen Kane? I thought it was one of the most boring movies I've ever seen.

It's a film school student's wet dream.

Almost every shot in that movie was by design (it's been years since I have seen the movie, all of these memories may be a bit off). We see a lot of subtle stuff too that contributes to the lure of the movie. For instance, when Kane is young and just married, he and his wife are dining together at their table at a close distance. As they get older, and he grows more aloof, the distance between them is subtly more apart as well. We see camera shots from the floor when Kane is on the rise as a man. When he is on the decline the shots are from above. In the famous opening Rosebud seen, we see a camera shot that appears to be reflected off the snowglobe which Kane has dropped.

And there are tons of these shots scattered throughout the movie. Many of them are subtle, but at the time they were revolutionary and in a way, changed the way films were done. Also consider the fact that Orson Welles was 26 years old when that film was made, shows that he was a genius at a young age.

General_Grievous
06-25-2007, 01:23 PM
It's a film school student's wet dream.

Almost every shot in that movie was by design (it's been years since I have seen the movie, all of these memories may be a bit off). We see a lot of subtle stuff too that contributes to the lure of the movie. For instance, when Kane is young and just married, he and his wife are dining together at their table at a close distance. As they get older, and he grows more aloof, the distance between them is subtly more apart as well. We see camera shots from the floor when Kane is on the rise as a man. When he is on the decline the shots are from above. In the famous opening Rosebud seen, we see a camera shot that appears to be reflected off the snowglobe which Kane has dropped.

And there are tons of these shots scattered throughout the movie. Many of them are subtle, but at the time they were revolutionary and in a way, changed the way films were done. Also consider the fact that Orson Welles was 26 years old when that film was made, shows that he was a genius at a young age.

But the greatest movie ever takes more than just camera techniques. Did they even factor in plot and acting to their decision? Personally, I think "The Godfather" is much more deserving of the title.

Lowly Bantha Cleaner
06-26-2007, 12:51 PM
Citizen Kane is more than innovative camera shots. More importantly, it tells an in-depth story of a man who overcomes humble beginnings, works hard to acheive fortune, squanders it on his desire for power, and shows the crumbling descent of a broken man later in his life who is obsessed with finding the one link to innocence from his childhood. Welles gives a remarkable performance of a man from his early 20's until his death somewhere in his 80's. The Godfather deserves and gets the recognition it does.

Mad Slanted Powers
06-26-2007, 11:48 PM
I couldn't find a thread for the AFI Top 100 films list from '97 (or was it '98? it was before these new Forums were open, of course), so maybe I should make this a new thread, but oh well. Last night, the new 10th anniv. edition of the list was on TV. I can't find a copyable list online, but I did locate the top 10s (plus a little cult following picture :rolleyes: ) from the first and most recent lists (see below). Just a little rearranging of the previous; but I missed the first 75 or so, so I don't know how the whole list changed.

NEW LIST (Old List)

1 CITIZEN KANE
2 THE GODFATHER
3 CASABLANCA
4 RAGING BULL
5 SINGIN' IN THE RAIN
6 GONE WITH THE WIND
7 LAWRENCE OF ARABIA
8 SCHINDLER'S LIST
9 VERTIGO
10 THE WIZARD OF OZ
13 STAR WARS

1 Citizen Kane
2 Casablanca
3 The Godfather
4 Gone With the Wind
5 Lawrence of Arabia
6 The Wizard of Oz
7 The Graduate
8 On the Waterfront
9 Schindler's List
10 Singin' in the Rain
15 Star Wars

Thoughts?Looks like you have to register on the afi site to download the lists. I don't think it used to be that way because I remember looking at the lists before. The World Almanac has the original list.

Bel-Cam Jos
06-27-2007, 11:16 AM
Looks like you have to register on the afi site to download the lists. I don't think it used to be that way because I remember looking at the lists before. The World Almanac has the original list.That's what I found to be the case. I found the top 10s from news articles, and [thought] I remembered the positions of SW on the old and new ones.

And as far as C.K. goes, it's a movie version of the life of newspaper baron William Randolph Hearst. As LBC said previously, it's also the story of a man's life, who on the surface appears to have it all (figuratively and literally) only to find it all burn away (figuratively and literally). Keep in mind that this was 1939, and many of Welles' techniques were new and innovative (see Hitchcock, Coppola, Ford, Spielberg, etc.) at the time. It deserves to be where it was ranked, although I thought The Godfather would usurp its position this time.

JON9000
07-18-2007, 11:56 AM
"Yes, Virginia. There is a Santa Claus." - Miracle on 34th Street (was this line actually said in the movie, though?)


No, this line was not said in the movie, nor any other movie that I am aware of. The quote comes from a newspaper feature, answering a letter from a young girl named Virginia to the editor asking if Santa Claus really exists.

Mad Slanted Powers
07-18-2007, 08:21 PM
No, this line was not said in the movie, nor any other movie that I am aware of. The quote comes from a newspaper feature, answering a letter from a young girl named Virginia to the editor asking if Santa Claus really exists.
There was a cartoon based on the Virginia story, though. I recall seeing it as a kid.