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darthbooger
11-13-2009, 11:23 AM
I doubt it, since I saw the movie adaptation a few years ago.

:D I dont believe there was a movie adaption of this book. But there may have been a cheesy made for tv Sci Fi channel movie that was alot like it. I started reading it in wal mart and it seemed like a good read :ninja:

El Chuxter
11-13-2009, 12:57 PM
I lost all respect for King as an artist after he claimed The Dark Tower would be his last book and tie everything together, then it didn't, then he went back on his word and started churning out crap again. (Is there a Green Mile or Rita Hayworth & The Shawshank Redemption anywhere in his post-DT work? I rest my case.)

Rocketboy
11-13-2009, 10:50 PM
I dont believe there was a movie adaption of this book. But there may have been a cheesy made for tv Sci Fi channel movie that was alot like it. I started reading it in wal mart and it seemed like a good read :ninja:That was a joke, hence the attached poster for the Simpsons Movie (where a giant dome was placed over Springfield).

DarthQuack
11-15-2009, 06:16 PM
Just finished the book tonight....I don't know if I was let down at the end...I really enjoyed it, just kind of eh at the end I guess.

JimJamBonds
12-09-2009, 06:03 PM
A few hours ago I finished A Perfect Mile. Its about Sir Rodger Banniser, Wes Santee and John Landy and the quest to be the first man to break the 4 minute barrier in the mile.

Bel-Cam Jos
12-09-2009, 06:50 PM
I finished Secret Missions: Breakout Squad the other day. Not bad; it's no Jude Watson YA story, but it got better as it progressed, unlike some that taper off. But the subtitle of book #2, "The Curse of the Black Hole Pirates" just sounds too creepy. :Pirate: :eek:

OC47150
12-13-2009, 07:39 PM
A friend lent me several of the Jedi Quest and Jedi Apprentice books to read. These books are out of print and hard to find. Quick reads but I enjoy them.

Rogue Warrior: Dictator's Ransom. Richard Marcinko is an ex-Navy SEAL who's written fictional accounts of his adventures. They're pretty interesting. Dictator's Ransom has him working for the North Korean leader on trying to locate the NK dictator's missing son.

I started reading Valkyerie, about the July 1944 Hitler assassination. It's written by the last-living conspirator.

TeeEye7
12-18-2009, 10:53 AM
A colleague at work (the same one who lent me Don Felder's book) plopped Chuck Negron's Three Dog Nightmare on my desk last night. Another woeful tale of a rocker who had everything implodes. First few pages have been good. After tonight, I'm on vacation, so I've got some reading material right off the bat!

JimJamBonds
12-19-2009, 10:26 AM
Reading Death Troopers now, very good so far and it moves fast. Not a childrens Star Wars novel either. :thumbsup:

I finished Death Troopers last night, ehhh maybe its the zombie thing but I didn't think it was all that great. Not bad but not outstanding.

OC47150
12-20-2009, 08:16 PM
Finished Valkyrie. It was good. I know there are several WWII buffs out there, and I recommend it to them.

My Christmas present to myself was a copy of the Art of CW. Between a coupon and some Borders Rewards points, I got it for a good price.

JimJamBonds
12-20-2009, 10:01 PM
Finished Valkyrie. It was good. I know there are several WWII buffs out there, and I recommend it to them.

I consider myself one of those buffs so thanks for the heads up OC! :thumbsup:

Rocketboy
12-20-2009, 11:18 PM
Nevermind. Mistook this for the movies thread.

Almost finished with the original novel that inspired Flash Forward.
Very little of the novel remains in the series. Mosaic is there, Llyod Simcoe is the main character, and something that may or may not be the cause of the flash forward in the series.

TeeEye7
12-30-2009, 04:05 PM
I finished Three Dog Nightmare by Chuck Negron. Some may find it interesting, especially if you're into rockers, but I had difficulty getting through it.

Negron was a full-blown heroin addict and he blames everything in life on his addition. That's convenient. You're just weak, Chuck. Your twin sister had the same crummy childhood and you say she came out just fine. You just made a bunch of bad decisions in life and we're supposed to be sympathetic.

He goes into great detail about his addiction and criminal activity (home invasion robberies, burglaries, etc.). Somehow, I guess he's looking for a sympathetic reader. Not this boy. You may have had a rocky start in life, Chuck, but you blew a tremendous opportunity. You like blaming other people and things more than yourself. I know many people who have had a crummy start in life but have prevailed into people I admire, because I work with them daily (I'm referring to one of my colleagues in my unit in particular).

I can only recommend this book if you're into psychology, rehabilitating drug addicts (in that respect it's a very good study but I don't think it was Negron's intention), or other community services that attend to drug addicts. He salutes them no end for the success in breaking his addiction (which only took 19 years).

DarthQuack
12-31-2009, 07:57 PM
Still trying to power myself through Planet of Twilight and Barbara Hambly's authoring......Someone shoot me now please.

JimJamBonds
01-01-2010, 07:05 PM
I finished Vaylkrie just a bit ago, while and interesting subject I gotta say the book was dry and long winded. For whatever reason it just never really caught my interest, ohh well maybe I'll have better luck tomorrow at the library.

Rocketboy
01-01-2010, 09:05 PM
Finished Flash Forward a week or so ago.
Not bad, but not great. Easy to see why they chose the basic idea and other bits and pieces rather than the entire book.

About half way through The Lovely Bones. Seeing the trailer really piqued my interest. So far it's an amazing book, but also incredibly sad.

TeeEye7
01-03-2010, 01:55 PM
My oldest brother gave me a gift card to Borders for Christmas. Mrs. TI7 and I spent quite a while at our local store to see what we might find (I already had a few ideas as to what to look for). Unfortunately, the store was in the post-Christmas state of chaos: unkempt and no selection.

Undaunted, I went on line and ordered the following from Borders last night:

The Life and Legacy of Annie Oakley by Glenda Riley (I think her story is fascinating on many levels). And, thanks to JimJamBonds' recommendation, I'm picking up Call of Duty: My Life Before, During, and After the Band of Brothers by Lynn D. "Buck" Compton.

I love histories and biographies, so this should sate me for a while. I still have a bit left on the gift card and I may go back to Borders and give another look at a couple of books on Winston Churchill and Theodore Roosevelt (my favorite president) that I almost picked up yesterday.

JimJamBonds
01-04-2010, 06:46 AM
And, thanks to JimJamBonds' recommendation, I'm picking up Call of Duty: My Life Before, During, and After the Band of Brothers by Lynn D. "Buck" Compton.

Carp you better like it then! lol

pbarnard
01-04-2010, 05:05 PM
Finished the first of three volume edition of the Chinese tale of 3 Kingdoms (which part was recently made into the Red Cliff movies), and is the story of the fall of the Han dynasty.

JimJamBonds
01-10-2010, 03:40 PM
I finished reading Born to Run: A Hidden Tribe, Superathletes, and the Greatest Race the World Has Never Seenby Christopher McDougal this morning. For those that like to run I recommend reading it, its a quick read that I didn't want to put down. Its about Christopher McDougal asking the question 'why do we run' and the surprising answers he finds.

TeeEye7
01-10-2010, 05:35 PM
Carp you better like it then! lol

I'm about half way through Compton's book. And yes, not only do I like it, I really like it!

Good call, JJB! :thumbsup:

JimJamBonds
01-11-2010, 08:30 PM
Good call, JJB! :thumbsup:

Thanks TE7! Its pretty amazing what he all did after leaving the service.

TeeEye7
01-12-2010, 03:02 AM
I finished Compton's book tonight. WOW!
Held my interested for many reasons:

--I'm interested in WWII history.
--Interested to hear his side of Band of Brothers.
--LOVE his views on what America should be.
--As JJB says: "amazing what all he did after he left the service". Amen to that!
I was especially interested in his law enforcement career (for obvious reasons)
--the Sirhan Sirhan case was especially fascinating to see from an insider's view.
--....and he reminded me of my dad!

JimJamBonds
01-12-2010, 06:48 AM
Compton could have written a book about:
-Time in the service
-Time as a cop
-Time as a lawyer
-Time as a judge

And he was all of those things, pretty crazy!

DarthQuack
01-12-2010, 08:16 AM
FINALLY finished Planet of Twilight.....hopefully I will never see the name Barbara Hambly again.....she almost turned me off from Star Wars for good.

Onto The Crystal Star. :thumbsup:

Bel-Cam Jos
01-12-2010, 07:05 PM
DQ, why are you doing that to yourself? You have so much to live for!

Rocketboy
01-12-2010, 10:35 PM
Finished The Lovely Bones - great, sad book. Too bad word is the movie sucks.

Started Up In The Air.

DarkArtist
01-13-2010, 07:17 AM
currently reading Death Troopers. just started so I'm only about 7 chapters in. interested to see how this plays out.

has anyone joined that Star Wars Galaxies offer in the back of the book for the continuing storyline. was curious if it was worth signing up for ?

Bel-Cam Jos
01-13-2010, 07:48 PM
has anyone joined that Star Wars Galaxies offer in the back of the book for the continuing storyline. was curious if it was worth signing up for ?Since I checked the book out from the library, I guess I missed that. So, nope. No joining for Bel-Cam.

DarkArtist
01-15-2010, 11:27 AM
I have to say. I'm really enjoying Death Troopers. the book is really good. I'm about 100 pages away from finishing it and looking forward to finding ouot how it ends. might get the subscription for the Star Wars Galaxies series and see how the entire story-arc plays out

JimJamBonds
01-15-2010, 04:11 PM
... might get the subscription for the Star Wars Galaxies series and see how the entire story-arc plays out

How many are there in that series?

JediTricks
01-15-2010, 06:28 PM
Since I got my ipod touch for xmas, I have been using it occasionally as an e-reader. I've read a couple Dashiell Hammett stories and have a slew more of that and Raymond Chandler books saved in there so far. It turns out my lack of reading is just that I hate dealing with the physical books, they're relatively heavy and I don't like dealing with the spine having to be a choice - I like flat books, but hate breaking the book's spine. Right now, it's just hard-boiled detective tales for the most part, although "Afraid of a Gun" involved no detectives. But "Bodies Piled Up", that short story would make a cool movie.

Bel-Cam Jos
01-18-2010, 09:31 AM
Finally read an entire book. I have had less time to read lately, so it's been a stretched-out process. :upset:

I wasn't aware that the Darth Bane books were a trilogy (says so in the third book's acknowledgements page), but I suppose I shouldn't have been surprised. These have all been good reads, and Darth Bane: Dynasty of Evil kept me guessing and reading on. Ending is either expected or surprising, depending on how you focused on plotlines and details; that's the mark of a good novel. Good job, Drew K.!

Anyone know of any online auctions for more time? ;)

JediTricks
01-20-2010, 02:26 AM
Read Raymond Chandler's "The High Window", good book with a slightly unsatisfying wrap-up.

JimJamBonds
01-24-2010, 10:12 AM
I finished Hitler's War by Harry Turtledove this morning. The long and short of it is what would have happened if Nevil Chamberlin wouldn't have given into Hitler's demands, thus World War II would have started a couple of years earlier. The war wasn't finished when the book was so I presume this will be a new series.

OC47150
01-24-2010, 07:01 PM
Finally finished the first Coruscant Nights book. It wasn't bad, but just disjointed. The author had written several SW books before, and it was like he pulled his favorite characters from the past and drop them in one story.

I picked up Deathtroopers for a great price last night. Might have to read that next.

dr_evazan22
01-24-2010, 08:02 PM
I felt that 1st Coruscant Nights book was a little slow to read as well, but the next 2 in the series were better.

I still need to pick up Deathtroopers and the latest Darth Bane book.

JimJamBonds
01-27-2010, 04:55 PM
This morning I finished Duel In The Sun, its about Alberto Salazar, Dick Beardsby and the 1982 Boston Marathon which has been called the best marathon ever run. Its a quick read and nothing all that special.

JimJamBonds
01-31-2010, 11:14 AM
Yet another running book for me, this time it was Sub 4:00, it follows Allen Webb and the University of Michigan track team for a season back in 2001. Allen was the first high school boy to break the 4 minute mile in 36 years, infact he broke the national mile record which was 38 years old.

JimJamBonds
02-01-2010, 06:51 AM
Last night I finished book two of The Journal's of Lewis and Clark. They are the Nicholas Biddle edition from 1904. I've been reading them off and on for several years. While the Journals have great info they can be quite boring at times. Lots of woke up, traveled in this direction etc with nothing all that "special" happening. Plus at times Clark would copy what Lewis said and vice versa so you can read the same dry report twice for the same day. That being said the Journal's are an absolute AWESOME source of info on one of the most badash trips made. One of these years I'll read the entire Journal.

JimJamBonds
02-06-2010, 05:03 PM
I finished the first Darth Bane book today, some good stuff yet like most EU plenty of cheese and crap.

DarthQuack
02-09-2010, 06:17 PM
Just finished The Crystal Star. Pretty decent story, liked reading about the children and beginning to get a better feel of them and their characters. Onto Before The Storm!

Rocketboy
02-10-2010, 12:33 AM
Just finished The Accidental Billionaires - The Founding of Facebook: A Tale of Sex, Money, Genius, and Betrayal by Ben Mezrich.
Picked it up when my Borders closed for like $8.00. Good, compelling story about the start of one of the most popular websites of all time. Hopefully the movie currently in production is good.

InsaneJediGirl
02-10-2010, 12:43 AM
I finished Star Wars : Millennium Falcon. It was super cheesy and a waste of trees. I mean really, do we have to destroy ALL the mystery in the SW universe?

DarkArtist
02-10-2010, 01:47 PM
currently reading the Han Solo trilogy (Paradise Snare, Hutt Gambit and Rebel Dawn) looking forward to getting the Shadows of Mindor and the next book of the Legacy of the Force series.

JimJamBonds
02-16-2010, 08:21 PM
I finished Chi Running, its a method of running that the author created out of Tai Chi. Some of the info I find helpful and other parts are a little to 'out there' for my taste.

Warped
02-16-2010, 08:25 PM
I just started Star Wars : Millennium Falcon, and just finished Yoda Dark Rendezvous. (had it sitting on a shelf and finally read it)

Rocketboy
02-16-2010, 11:19 PM
Finished my 4th book of the year, Richard Matheson's The Box, a collection of short stories that included "Button, Button," the inspiration of the recent movie The Box.

I read the similar I Am Legend collection before that movie came out and enjoyed it quite a bit. This one not so much.

darthbooger
02-17-2010, 09:59 PM
What other short stories are in that book Rocketboy? I was aware of I am Legend , but thats all I ever knew about this author.

Rocketboy
02-17-2010, 11:55 PM
What other short stories are in that book Rocketboy? I was aware of I am Legend , but thats all I ever knew about this author.The full list:
Button, Button
Girl of My Dreams
Dying Room Only
A Flourish of Strumpets
No Such Thing as a Vampire
Pattern for Survival
Mute
The Creeping Terror
Shock Wave
Clothes Make the Man
The Jazz Machine
'Tis the Season to be Jelly

Most are pretty forgettable and/or have no real point of payoff to them.

OC47150
02-18-2010, 08:17 PM
I'm on a Jack Higgins kick. Finished Night Judgement at Sinos and am reading Sheba right now.

JediTricks
02-19-2010, 02:32 AM
The last few weeks, I've read a few more Dashiell Hammett short stories, most with the Op. Last week I read Raymond Chandler's excellent "The Big Sleep" - the movie version with Bogie and Bacall can't hold a candle to the book. And even better, I live just a few blocks from where Philip Marlowe lived in the story, that was a nifty surprise!!!

Today I finished up the second Marlowe book, "Farewell, My Lovely". Having seen the movie (better than Bogie, but still pales in comparison to the book), I unintentionally ruined the surprise ending, but the book was still pretty good if a tad overly racist for my tastes (and it flip-flops on that matter). Great book for about 3/4s, the last quarter you start to realize some of the weird stuff going down is more or less massive red herrings, and it feels a bit cheap. Still, it holds its own long enough that I didn't mind too much while I was in the moment, the ending itself being a satisfying explanation of as much as the author allowed.

I bought all 5 of Dashiell Hammett's novels as used paperbacks from Amazon for $4 a piece (and with Prime, no shipping fees, that was a nice touch) so that's next on my agenda, along with more of his short stories on the iPod, which also holds 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea - which I haven't read in over 20 years, so that should be good - and there's also a Charles Dickens mystery story on there waiting for me to get really bored ;), and a Sherlock Holmes merely because I've grown too lazy to pull my complete Holmes hardcover library out of the closet.

Tonight or tomorrow I'm going to start on Red Harvest, which seems to be the Op's introductory book. The Continental Op is the prototype for all hard-boiled detective characters, including for Sam Spade and Philip Marlowe, so I am really looking forward to this book.

El Chuxter
02-19-2010, 08:23 AM
Red Harvest is an awesome book and shouldn't take too long. The Big Sleep is near the top of my reading list.

JediTricks
02-20-2010, 03:21 AM
Red Harvest is already proving the kind of book I soak up the details on, which slows down my reading a little, in a good way. I'm only a couple chapters in, but the Op in this book is so much more interesting than in the short stories, if I didn't know better I'd think Hammett was ripping off Philip Marlowe, which says A LOT about the Op since that character is a decade before Marlowe.

The Big Sleep is one of those books where I wished I enjoyed the act of holding a book more so I could go buy it to have a physical copy, but it's just never been me, going back to paperbacks feels like a step backwards (it was a financial decision, they were a little cheaper as used paperbacks).

TeeEye7
02-20-2010, 01:30 PM
Finally finished The Life and Legacy of Annie Oakley by Glenda Riley. Zoiks! Waaaaaay more scholarly that I expected! It was more of a text book for a women's studies class than the standard biography that I had hoped. Good stuff, but I was hoping for something on the lighter side.

El Chuxter
02-20-2010, 09:39 PM
Currently reading Crime and Punishment; between the length, the density, and the small amount of time I have to read, it could take a while. So far, it's well worth the effort, though.

Bel-Cam Jos
02-21-2010, 05:02 PM
I heard that Punishment gets killed by Crime in the end. Oops; forgot to post that as a SPOILER. My bad, Chux.

pbarnard
02-26-2010, 09:33 AM
Reading one Grimm's Fairy Tale a night to the baby between my dinner and his evening feeding/bath time.

Myself: Finally getting around to reading Silver Chair and The Last Battle in the Chronicles of Narnia, Iowa Code on Radon Mitigation and Home sales, Science Special from the annual meeting in San Diego, Nature: Neuroscience like I do every week.

JediTricks
02-26-2010, 03:36 PM
Red Harvest was a surprise. The first half felt like episodic serials, which it was, but I was engaged by the characters and Poisonville itself. The second half really gets crazy, the Op is killing or getting so many people killed it's shocking. And then the 17th murder was a true gasp, and stuff gets really wild and interesting, and then it ends with a little deus ex machina, although I was glad to see the Op was using logic to get there.

I read the second Op novel, The Dain Curse, and this one was intentionally segmented, and more of a regular mystery. The first 2 tales are downright interesting, but feel like they could have been decompressed even more. Then the 3rd tale starts getting a bit pale and maudlin for the titular character, and while the mystery was interesting, I had started to pick up the pieces faster and had already known who the big baddy was. The last tale was really odd, the Op gets sentimental helping someone kick morphine and almost by magic catches the bad guy, although some of the stuff with the hotel and the other ops was good. The end chapter is a downright disappointment, a rambling explanation of how there were no red herrings, that the villain had his hand in EVERYTHING, and there was far too much of a happy ending - I would have liked to have seen the Op comment on the villain's final fate at least.

OC47150
03-03-2010, 07:07 PM
Seven Men at Daybreak. An account of Czech commandos to assassinate Reinhard Heyrich in 1942. Interesting tale in the fact that some of the commandos were real bumblers and the best made plans too fall apart.

DarkArtist
03-04-2010, 12:57 PM
just finished reading the second book of the Han Solo trilogies Hutt Gambit... just started the third book Rebel Dawn. so far i like the series.... would really love to see them do series of other characters like Luke or Leia... i read the Lando adventures and it was alright.

picked up the last 2 books of the Mandolorian Armor series, Slave Ship and Hard Merchandise as well as Luke Skywalker and the Shadows of Mindor i believe....still have 3 of the Republic Commando books to read not counting Order 66 as well as the Millennium Falcon book..... have quite a bit of reading to keep me going for a few months.

looking forward to the continuing Legacy of the Force series as well.

JimJamBonds
03-04-2010, 04:49 PM
Last night I finished Pre: The Story of America's Greatest Running Legend, Steve Prefontaine. It was a quick read, in brief Prefontaine was from Oregon and the best US runner in the 70's before he died in a car accident in 1975. To this day the next great American runner is compared to Pre.

Bel-Cam Jos
03-05-2010, 07:13 PM
Actually read an entire novel, taking about 2-3 weeks to do so. :( But hey, a read's a read, I guess. Paul S. Kemp's Crosscurrent, a stand-alone SW book. It had some moments, both wretched and decent, but overall I have no desire to read a continuation of this story (if in fact it goes beyond the final page). But what's the deal with Outcast STILL having a "sneak preview" at the back of a SW book; it's been published for about (more than?) a year now?!? :confused:

OC47150
03-07-2010, 11:25 AM
Death Troopers. It's been a very long time since I had a hard time putting a book, SW or otherwise, down. But Death Troopers was it for me. Great book. Enjoyed the writer.

JimJamBonds
03-12-2010, 09:03 AM
I finished (another) running book last night. Running With The Buffalo's. It follows the University of Colorado cross country team during the 1998 season. If you don't run, well then don't bother reading it because you probably won't like it. lol

Bel-Cam Jos
03-12-2010, 10:19 AM
Is (huff) it written (puff) as if (huff) you're (puff) on a (huff) run (puff) with them? (huff) :rolleyes: Is there any significance to the '98 team (did they win a title, overcome adversity, have a special athlete, etc.)?

JediTricks
03-12-2010, 03:23 PM
Been reading more detective fiction, mostly Dashiell Hammett. Lots of short stories.

Maradona
03-12-2010, 06:59 PM
Been reading more detective fiction, mostly Dashiell Hammett. Lots of short stories.

The Continental Op is king.

JediTricks
03-13-2010, 03:23 AM
Hell's yeah!!! Some of the stuff the Op does in these tales is more exciting than anything Hollywood has ever done, he drove a dead man's car off a cliff onto the villain in the story I read last night, then framed the guy for the only murder he didn't have a hand in!

Maradona
03-13-2010, 08:45 AM
I've always questioned why Sam Spade was made more popular than the Op. Sure Bogart attained iconic status playing him, but the Op was way more entertaining and influential. Cinema from Japan to Italy to Hollywood has stolen from Hammett's man, not to mention the other hardboiled writers that followed.

JediTricks
03-13-2010, 03:25 PM
It's the movie, plain and simple. The twists in The Maltese Falcon are largely lifted from the earlier Op stories - Bob Teal's murder opens the Falcon story and carries that first mystery all the way through to the end. The funny thing is, The Maltese Falcon is a remake of a film 10 years earlier that is nearly the same film, in fact Sydney Greenstreet and Peter Lorre are riffing off the first film's versions of their characters, it's eerie.

Oddly, I think Bogart would have been perfect as The Op, could have made a series out of that. He's short, can do overweight, and certainly not classically handsome. But it's not what Hollywood wanted, sadly. Because of that film and that role for Bogie, Sam Spade became a household name for a private eye despite having just 1 good story in Hammett's writings (there are 3 more shorts but they're not as good). It's really the Op who is the private detective that should have been on everyone's mind.

When I started reading the Op's short stories, they were pretty dry but it was clear where Raymond Chandler got his inspiration. Once I got to the longer short stories, as well as the 2 Op books, the Op becomes more of a rounded character and works more in the violence and gray areas and it's like reading Philip Marlowe with 30% less description of the furniture. Hammett really created an archetype with the Op.

I read The Girl with the Silver Eyes last night, great stuff, lots of twists without feeling cheap and I was gladly surprised to find about 2/3rds in that it is the second half of a 2-parter, the first part I had read the night before. The Op mows down his own informant with the client's car.

JediTricks
03-23-2010, 04:57 PM
I've been reading a lot of the Op short stories lately, coming close to the point where I'm going to need to track down the last 2 stories that aren't in any published books. Some of them have been really wild, fanciful fare where the Op is in the middle of a crazy island battle, but others are really awesome like where the Op ends up sticking up the thieves in 1 story - HE ROBS THE ROBBERS! That was great.

El Chuxter
03-23-2010, 05:41 PM
I'd so kill to see a really good film, or even graphic novel, version of the Op that stays true to the character. Reading The Dain Curse, I kept wondering why the hell it wasn't a movie. Turns out it was, but apparently not a very good one.

Maradona
03-23-2010, 07:21 PM
If you look at Hammett's work, much of it was adapted into films and they were usually successful (Maltese Falcon, Thin Man series) during the classical Hollywood period. Despite this, his best character was not exploited the way he sh/could have been. The Op is so tough, he doesn't even need a name.

A friend of mine recently turned me onto the Ed Brubaker Criminal and Sleeper series. They are fun to read and reminiscent of the hardboiled era.

JediTricks
03-23-2010, 11:55 PM
I'd so kill to see a really good film, or even graphic novel, version of the Op that stays true to the character. Reading The Dain Curse, I kept wondering why the hell it wasn't a movie. Turns out it was, but apparently not a very good one.It was a '70s miniseries. James Coburn, who is tall and handsome, played "Hamilton Nash" (get it?) the not-so-nameless Op who worked out of... NEW YORK CITY! ("Get a rope") =

Red Harvest is the basis for 3 movies, I believe, including Yojimbo and Miller's Crossing. But I must admit, the Op has so many great tales that someone could make not only a really good movie out of 1 or a few at a time, but a damned decent series really.

Oh, and I had a really annoying situation the other night. I'm getting low on Op stories, and I decide to stay up late and read one of the last few, and I get a few pages in and I realize I've seen this as a movie. It's the second Thin Man movie! I love the Thin Man movies, but this pretty much wrecked the mystery aspect of the short story.



If you look at Hammett's work, much of it was adapted into films and they were usually successful (Maltese Falcon, Thin Man series) during the classical Hollywood period. Despite this, his best character was not exploited the way he sh/could have been. The Op is so tough, he doesn't even need a name.The Op being intentionally anonymous is part of what makes him such a great character IMO, he's anyman, everyman, he's not a movie star hero, he's a frumpy street-smart guy who uses his brains and doesn't flinch for danger or dames. (Yes, I enjoyed writing that :D)


A friend of mine recently turned me onto the Ed Brubaker Criminal and Sleeper series. They are fun to read and reminiscent of the hardboiled era.Ed Brubaker, isn't he a comic writer?

El Chuxter
03-24-2010, 12:05 AM
He is, and those are both comics, I believe. :) Haven't read them, but I've heard they're good.

Red Harvest was also the basis for Last Man Standing, which wasn't bad. I just think it takes a few too many liberties with the story. I need to watch it again sometime; I recall liking it, but not being floored, and don't remember it too well.

Maradona
03-24-2010, 12:10 AM
He is, and those are both comics, I believe. :) Haven't read them, but I've heard they're good.

Red Harvest was also the basis for Last Man Standing, which wasn't bad. I just think it takes a few too many liberties with the story. I need to watch it again sometime; I recall liking it, but not being floored, and don't remember it too well.

Yes, those are comics worth reading. Red Harvest is also the basis for Yojimbo which was remade into Fistful of Dollars, the beginning of the "Man with No Name" trilogy, in which ironically the lead character is called by name.

JediTricks
03-24-2010, 12:14 AM
Part of Bruce Willis' 1990s phase of phailure. ;) I didn't see it, all I remember is he kept trying to break out into serious acting and it kept failing at the box office.

I said a couple pages back that Bogie would have made a great Op for his era, far better than Sam Spade. If an Op movie had been made 15 years ago, it would have been Bob Hoskins, but once he did Eddie Valiant from Roger Rabbit, the die was cast.

El Chuxter
03-24-2010, 12:18 AM
I could actually see Mark Wahlberg playing the Op. It might sound odd, and he might need a few more years on him, but it could work. I dunno about Hoskins; I picture the Op as a little more buff.

JimJamBonds
03-24-2010, 11:09 AM
Last night I finished When The Mississippi Ran Backwards. It revolves around events that took place during the New Madrid (Mo) earthquakes in 1811 - 1812. They were the biggest earthquakes to take place in the United States outside of California.

JediTricks
03-24-2010, 03:31 PM
The Op is 190 pounds, around 5' 7", overweight, balding, in his 40s, and earnest in his task. I just don't picture Marky Mark that way.

Last night I read an Op story where Hammett described a gun shooting at our hero as "squirting lead", and I laughed because that was almost a silly 1950s cliche compared to most of the hard-boiled descriptions in these stories.

Maradona
03-24-2010, 11:06 PM
If you find a film called Bad Day at Black Rock, you'll see Spencer Tracy give an Op style performance. It would have been epic for him to play the Op back in that period and it might have made ironic sense, given how close he was with Bogie in real life. They each would have played characters from the same author.

My 500th post!!!! Yay me!

Bel-Cam Jos
03-25-2010, 03:55 PM
I finally got around to Dan Brown's The Lost Symbol. I like his style (it makes for quick, easy reading when a 500+ pager has 135 chapters), even if I figured out much of the surprise and twist ideas pretty early on. I liked it a lot for the first 100 chps. or so, but it really slowed down with about 8 left. Overall, a good read.

Bel-Cam Jos
04-05-2010, 09:08 PM
Aside from the Peter Pan books he's started writing very frequently (I have read the first two, IIRC), I think I've read every Dave Barry book. I just finished Science Fair a YA novel that seemed kind of like his Big Trouble to me. It's as funny as a young adult audience book usually is, but there's quite a bit of Star Wars references (and I'm talking DL-44 stuff, not just Luke Skywalker and Chewbacca) and even some veiled social commentary. I predicted several of the "surprises," but the way Barry handled them was decent. I liked it.

JediTricks
04-06-2010, 04:52 PM
Finished reading The Lady in the Lake last night. I enjoyed a little more than Chandler's The High Window and The Big Sleep, and absolutely loved the character of Jim Patton, but the switch was really obvious early on and kept bothering me, the title even makes it somewhat obvious. It was nice to have cops be bad but not TOO bad, especially cops from Bay City.

JediTricks
04-06-2010, 05:15 PM
I forgot, right before that I read Dashiell Hammett's "The Glass Key". This book was mixed for me, the mystery aspects were shallow and got lost a few times only to reappear deep at the end in a rather out-of-left-field manner. The way the mob acted in this seemed less stupid than most stories in general, and I liked that. But the characters all felt pretty hollow, some were puppets, others weren't as bad but never felt entirely whole even when their motivations were natural and unique to them. It was the same with the locations, they were simply words on a page most of the time never quite coming to life the way he or Raymond Chandler would bring their locales to life. That would have been ok here if the characters were holding up their end of the bargain, or vice-versa, but not both locale and characters being shallow. Ultimately, it was ok but the concept of a crook being a sleuth held a lot more promise than was delivered here.

The used copy I bought of Amazon was very dried out compared to the other Hammett books I got at the same time, making it fragile and yellowed almost to the point of frustration. I guess $4 books can't all be genius. ;)


This book has a younger female character nicknamed "Snip" by the protagonist. I wonder if that's where they got "Snips" in The Clone Wars from.

Bel-Cam Jos
04-06-2010, 06:29 PM
This book has a younger female character nicknamed "Snip" by the protagonist. I wonder if that's where they got "Snips" in The Clone Wars from.Nope. Lucasfilm says it was a total original concept, like the entire saga was.

JediTricks
04-06-2010, 08:30 PM
Oh, right, I forgot. And the spaghetti western gunslinger movie Django never existed.

Bel-Cam Jos
04-07-2010, 07:17 PM
Oh, right, I forgot. And the spaghetti western gunslinger movie Django never existed.Yes. That is exactly right. :pleased:

I might actually be able to finish another book before this week is over. :eek:

JediTricks
04-07-2010, 08:26 PM
I read a Continental Op story last night that took place in another country. That was surprising. Pretty good stuff, no mystery whatsoever though, it was mainly intrigue and not an overwhelming amount of that even.

DarkArtist
04-08-2010, 10:53 AM
currently reading Hard Merchandise the 3rd book in the Bounty Hunter Wars Trilogy... was finally able to find a couple of this at retail a few weeks back... so far the books are decent, not the best I've read but enjoyable.

the next series of books I want to tackle are the Republic Commando books, but first will be the New Legacy of the Force book Backlash.

Bel-Cam Jos
04-10-2010, 09:49 AM
Finished an autobiography of Dan Rooney of the Steelers. I figured, with all the negative press surrounding some of the current players' actions, I needed to know more about someone with a good reputation. Nice stories, if written simplistically. Good to learn more of the history of the Pittsburgh football team (it used to be called the Pirates first).

JimJamBonds
04-13-2010, 09:31 AM
The other day I finished The King of Vodka: The Story of Pyotr Smirnov and the Upheaval of an Empire. The upheaval isn't just what happened to Smirnov's family after he died but of Russia itself. It was a decent read, it shed some light on the liquor industry in Russia 100+ plus years ago which was alright. Hopefully I can find something else of interest when I go to the library later today.

DarthQuack
04-13-2010, 12:30 PM
Finished up I Hope They Serve Beer in Hell by Tucker Max.....vile, disgusting, gross.

Loved every minute of it! I definitely recommend it to anyone! :thumbsup:

JediTricks
04-13-2010, 04:57 PM
Read a Continental Op story which is a western, horses and "cut 'em off at the pass" and everything. The Op gets shot in it. It was an ok story, I think this is one that could have been fleshed out to a whole novel to expand upon the mystery and the town and characters some more.

Maradona
04-13-2010, 07:14 PM
Read a Continental Op story which is a western, horses and "cut 'em off at the pass" and everything. The Op gets shot in it. It was an ok story, I think this is one that could have been fleshed out to a whole novel to expand upon the mystery and the town and characters some more.

I always love when the Op says he has to catch a "stage" to get where he's going.

JediTricks
04-13-2010, 11:13 PM
That's been in a few stories, but oddly, despite this being an actual western story, he mentions it's an automobile stage! That is some weirdness. There was a Philip Marlowe story that mentioned a stage as well.

Bel-Cam Jos
04-18-2010, 11:15 PM
It doesn't count as a finished book, but I completed "The Langoliers" short story of the Four Past Midnight collection. I'd seen the TV movie version and wanted to read the story; I'm not sure which I prefer, as both were strong. Am trying to get through the other three stories in it now.

JediTricks
04-19-2010, 03:15 PM
Read the Op story, The Big Knockover. This was entertaining, but straight adventure, no real mystery stuff in it. Started the next story, glad to see it's a sequel.

Before that, I read from the collection "The Big Knockover", Hammett's autobiographical Tulip, telling the story of Hammett's stay at friends' only to have a longtime friend drop by. Reading this was surprising because there was a lot more current stuff in it, first thing was a television, but there were also adult themes and terms that are unchanged today, and I was impressed by how smart the players were, it reminded me that people 60 years ago appear to have been naturally much smarter and better informed than today. Being able to have an aside conversation about the theory of relativity and the nature of light as waves and particles just blows me away.

OC47150
04-19-2010, 07:17 PM
D-Day: the battle for Normandy by Antony Beevor and Karen Traviss' SW: Clone Wars: No Prisoners.

I'm a big D-Day fan (one of my favorite books of all time is The Longest Day). I picked up Beevor's book at the library and intended just to read about the invasion but ended up reading the entire book. It was well written and researched.

But I had to take a short break from it and read CW: No Prisoners. Another good Traviss SW outing. I liked the idea of the splinter Jedi group.

JimJamBonds
04-20-2010, 08:21 AM
Last night I finished LEGIONARY: The Roman Soldier's [Unofficial] Manual. Its a tongue in cheek book about life and history of a legionary in Ancient Rome. Its a pretty good read, fairly fast and rather informative.

DarkArtist
04-20-2010, 02:19 PM
just finished The Bounty Hunter Trilogy Hard Merchandise on Saturday...currently reading Republic Commando True Colors. still have yet to pick up the new Legacy of the Force series

JediTricks
04-20-2010, 02:23 PM
Finished $106,000 Blood Money, which was a worthy sequel to Big Knockover, but the ending was a little small after all that went down. Still, the 2 stories together really paid off nicely, and felt like a good way to finish The Op (there are a handful more stories, but they're pretty hard to find).

Next up is probably The Maltese Falcon, or Hammett's Sam Spade short stories (I know they'd be out of order, but I hear they're not as good - I just can't decide though).

TeeEye7
04-27-2010, 03:37 AM
A-20 Havoc at War (I won off of eBay) by William Ness.

A British publication, so it has colourful language. I never knew airplanes landed on tyres before!

JediTricks
04-28-2010, 06:44 PM
I'm about halfway through the Maltese Falcon now. It's SO slow because I have to work extra hard not to hear Bogie, Peter Lorre, and the rest of the movie cast in my head while reading their characters' passages. The movie script is taken almost verbatim from the book, even if the casting ain't.

JimJamBonds
04-28-2010, 06:51 PM
A day or two ago I finished reading The Edge of Terror. Its about a group of American missionaries and miners who hid out from the Japanese in the Philippines during World War II. While it was an interesting read I thought it would be a bit more about the guerrilla movement against the Japanese.

TeeEye7
05-02-2010, 01:30 PM
Arrived yesterday from Amazon:

With The Old Breed by E.B. Sledge and Helmet For My Pillow (from Parris Island to the Pacific) by Robert Leckie.

These are two of the works on which HBO's miniseries The Pacific is based. I've started Sledge's book first, then it's on to Leckie's.

JediTricks
05-02-2010, 01:44 PM
Finished The Maltese Falcon last night. Damn was that a good ending, right to the last sentence in the book. I don't know how anybody can claim this isn't Hammett's finest work, the characters are far more nuanced, there's no "3 act obviousness", you never hear what people are thinking except by their actions and dialogue, and the main character doesn't even get roughed up or find a big clue, it's all so much more interesting than the standard detective novel. And it rarely feels antiquated, no crazy racism, not a ludicrous amount of focus on the gay guys, there's blatant sex, not a whole lot of focus on the era with its prohibition and mobsters and such.

BTW, from the 2 movie versions, I had always assumed Wilmer was Gutman's punk, but the book makes it seem like he's actually Cairo's boy toy, that was quite a surprise.

The copy I had was a paperback from '84 and has more typos and issues than a standard e-book! :D

JimJamBonds
05-03-2010, 09:23 AM
Yesterday I finished Blood & Wine: The Unauthorized Story Of The Gallo Wine Empire. It tells the story of how Gallo became the huge business it now is, unknown to me there were 3 Gallo brothers not two and Ernest and Julio would do anything to promote and protect the winery. Going so far as to SUE THEIR BROTHER FOR THE USE OF HIS NAME! It was quite the eye opening read.

JimJamBonds
05-07-2010, 05:59 PM
Today I finished a real quick read called: The Runner's Rule Book. Which was written by Mark Remy. As the name states its a 'rule book' for runners, some of the stuff is legit, for example: Never Miss a Chance To Thank a Volunteer. While other rules are more goofy such as: If you are looking at new running shorts and you wonder if they are too short, chances are they are.

JimJamBonds
05-08-2010, 03:02 PM
I finished another one, this one called SUBMARINE! It was written by an officer of the submarine service in the US Navy during WWII. It was a bit dry at times but all in all it was an interesting read.

Bel-Cam Jos
05-09-2010, 08:29 AM
I finished another one, this one called SUBMARINE! It was written by an officer of the submarine service in the US Navy during WWII. It was a bit dry at times but all in all it was an interesting read.With the exclamation point, it made my think it would be a water version of Airplane! Now, if they only did a disaster movie about a bus... Bus!

TeeEye7
05-09-2010, 01:01 PM
I finish With the Old Breed by EB Sledge last night. As posted above it's Sledge's memoir of his time in the Pacific in WWII. Brutally honest, gut-wrenching, and very much an anti-war work (without realizing it, perhaps). Probably the best personal account of war I've ever read. Sledge is also fiercely proud of the Marines with whom he served. Highly recommended!

OC47150
05-09-2010, 07:34 PM
I first read With the Old Breed and Helmet for My Pillow back in junior high. I want to reread them.

JimJamBonds
05-10-2010, 10:38 AM
With the exclamation point, it made my think it would be a water version of Airplane! Now, if they only did a disaster movie about a bus... Bus!

No not exactly, although I found it funny that some submarines had ice cream makers installed in them!!!

JediTricks
05-10-2010, 05:51 PM
A Man Called Spade - short story after The Maltese Falcon. Pretty standard stuff, really read like a Continental Op story, not as interesting of a Sam Spade tale.

Bel-Cam Jos
05-10-2010, 06:28 PM
No not exactly, although I found it funny that some submarines had ice cream makers installed in them!!!"The sounds you hear are torpedoes smashing against the hull of the sub. Oh, by the way, we're out of ice cream." AAAAAAAAAAAHHHHHHHHHHH!!!!!!!! :D

JimJamBonds
05-10-2010, 06:37 PM
"The sounds you hear are torpedoes smashing against the hull of the sub. Oh, by the way, we're out of ice cream." AAAAAAAAAAAHHHHHHHHHHH!!!!!!!! :D


The first part was not covered but the second part WAS talked about how morale was low after the motor burnt out, was fixed and then burnt out again, only to be fixed yet again. After each 'fixing' the crew celebrated with BAKED ALASKA!

JediTricks
05-11-2010, 09:36 PM
Just converted 6 more ebooks over to work with my ipod touch thanks to Calibre, Textify, Stanza Desktop, and Notepad++. Yes, it takes a lot of work to make these things work, but it's worth it.

TeeEye7
05-12-2010, 02:48 AM
Finished Helmet For My Pillow by Robert Leckie. This work along with EB Sledge's With The Old Breed has reinforced just how much HBO's The Pacific sucks. A classic case of how the books are much better than the movie.........

Maradona
05-12-2010, 10:41 PM
Just finished reading the Astonishing X-Men Omnibus written by Joss Whedon. I was skeptical and had no expectations. I was pleasantly surprised. Some of it, I found, was much better than the rest, particularly the beginning. Overall, this is the first run of X-Men I've read since Claremont left the book when I was still a teenager and I lament that there is no more of this story to read after this.

JimJamBonds
05-17-2010, 11:28 AM
I just finished: Lance: The making of the greatest champion. I've been a cycling fan for quite a few years so there wasn't too much 'new info' in there but it was still a good read. If you're not a fan of Lance and/or think he is a doper then don't bother reading.

DarkArtist
05-18-2010, 07:35 AM
currently reading Republic Commando Order 66..... I'm about 1/2 way through it. can't wait to finish and get 501st.

TeeEye7
05-18-2010, 11:18 AM
I just finished: Lance: The making of the greatest champion. I've been a cycling fan for quite a few years so there wasn't too much 'new info' in there but it was still a good read. If you're not a fan of Lance and/or think he is a doper then don't bother reading.

Speaking of Lance....he's competing in the Amgen Tour of California. This Thursday, one of the legs of the race terminates about 2 miles from my house (and actually, the competitors will race less than a mile from my house). Too bad I have to work. I'd like to see it.

TeeEye7
05-20-2010, 04:12 PM
Oops! Lance crashed and burned today of the fifth leg of the Amgen. We locals were looking forward to seeing him cross the finish line. Not to be....

JimJamBonds
05-20-2010, 10:18 PM
Oops! Lance crashed and burned today of the fifth leg of the Amgen. We locals were looking forward to seeing him cross the finish line. Not to be....

Did you see any pics of him after the crash? That did not look like it was fun.

El Chuxter
05-20-2010, 10:32 PM
The 'roids protected him from serious damage. If the bad karma from the whole Sheryl Crow incident didn't result in the universe forming a giant butt to poop on him until he suffocated, he's pretty much invulnerable.

TeeEye7
05-21-2010, 03:23 AM
Did you see any pics of him after the crash? That did not look like it was fun.

No, sir, my son told me about it as I was heading out the door to go to work. I've DVRed the 5th leg and I hope to see it this week end.

Bel-Cam Jos
05-23-2010, 08:55 AM
Bel-Cam is great!
He read a book!
Yay yay for me!
:rolleyes:

Finished DB's newest, I'll Mature When I'm Dead: Dave Barry's Amazing Tales of Adulthood. And my town gets a shoutout (okay, maybe it's more of a whisperout) in it. Funny, but not so LOL as previous books. Still, Mr. Barry is a good observer and humor.

JediTricks
05-24-2010, 03:44 PM
Read Raymond Chandler's "The Little Sister". It was a bit frustrating at times because they made a movie out of it in the late '60s, so tiny pieces were connecting ahead of time despite the movie going off in different directions. This was an interesting tale, some good suspense, but felt a little hollow in the second half and had a finale that was a bit much.

JimJamBonds
05-25-2010, 08:11 AM
I finished another one yesterday this one was called: Magic and Larry: When The Game Was Ours. As the name implies it was about Larry Bird and Magic Johnson and their rivalery that started in college and continued into the pros. All in all it was a good and enjoyable read.

Bel-Cam Jos
05-25-2010, 06:31 PM
Do you know if they based that recent cable show on Bird/Magic off of this book? Or were they somehow related (i.e. released around the same time)?

DarkArtist
05-27-2010, 12:02 PM
Finished Order 66 over the weekend and started 501st yesterday. can't wait to finish. was shocked how they handled the whole Order 66 with Darman and Etain. still a good book all together.

i really hope they continue this series further, there is so much story they can tell to fill in the gaps between the movies.....would really love an action figure set of the Imperial Commandos with removable helmets.

JediTricks
05-31-2010, 03:25 PM
Read "The Thin Man", which is where a lot of this all started, having watched all 6 movies again recently I decided I wanted to see how the original stacked up to the book. Surprisingly, the movie is better than the book, I don't get to say that very often. The book has less Nora, less carefree fun, and is more wrapped up in the hangups of the Wynant family than in going to scenes and looking for clues. Was surprised to see Asta isn't a wire terrier or a boy. And the book builds and builds, gets into that "clack clack clack" roller coaster ascension thing, and then just stops and says "here ya go, here's the answer" instead of a fun ride. It doesn't seem as clever as The Maltese Falcon or Red Harvest, and while it enjoys the prohibition-era storytelling, it doesn't lend a lot of location flavor.

InsaneJediGirl
05-31-2010, 08:21 PM
I am/was trying to read Star Wars : Outcast but I really can't get into it. I may be setting it down for awhile(aka giving up) and buy something else to read that isn't Star Wars related.

JimJamBonds
06-01-2010, 09:04 AM
Finished Meriwether Lewis last night. Which by the name of the title suggests is about Meriwether Lewis of Lewis and Clark fame. It explores his life, time as Governor of Louisiana territory and his death.

Bel-Cam Jos
06-01-2010, 09:16 AM
Not Floyd [Meriwether] and Lennox Lewis? :p

Daryl VayDar
06-01-2010, 01:20 PM
Finished Order 66 over the weekend and started 501st yesterday. can't wait to finish. was shocked how they handled the whole Order 66 with Darman and Etain. still a good book all together.

I bought the paperback of 501st when it came out, read it about halfway through within the first week, and then it sat untouched on my nightstand until this past Saturday when I picked it up again...

Hopefully it works out better for you, but I thought this one was by far the weakest entry of the series. I've got about 75 pages left to go and a few things are happening now, but I really enjoyed the first few, and this one is kinda leaving me cold.

I'm mixed on the series continuing w/o Traviss, but there are some great characters here and it would be sad to see them fade away.

JediTricks
06-01-2010, 03:02 PM
Read a Hammett short story last night, "A Man Named Thin", a cute little idea of a bookish, poetry-writing investigator for his father's insurance company. The whodunit aspect of the story was very similar to The Op and many of Hammett's other short stories, but the style was a little different in the character's mannerisms. I think if there had been more breathing room in the story or a sequel, it would have been dandy, but I'm not surprised it didn't go any farther.

Bel-Cam Jos
06-01-2010, 03:23 PM
See, people? How fun it is to find a theme and read based on it? Couple summers back, I read "secret" books (Secret Life of Bees, Secret Garden, The Secret [which made me laugh more than any non-humorous book ever], and some other novel with "secret" in the title). I often seek out books based on authors' last names (alphabetical, uncommon letters like X/Y/O/Z/V/etc., odd names), too.

JimJamBonds
06-02-2010, 08:30 AM
Not Floyd [Meriwether] and Lennox Lewis? :p

NO! Talk about a huge disappointment. lol

JimJamBonds
06-02-2010, 07:04 PM
I took down another one: Marathon: The Ultimate Training Guide by Hal Higdon. If you can't figure out what this one is about then re read the title and sub title, there is a bit of a hint there. :smartash:

JimJamBonds
06-03-2010, 10:53 PM
I banged out another quick one over the last 24ish hours. Why We Suck by Dr. Denis Leary. Plain and simple if you don't like his comedy you won't like his book. I do so therefore I did.

JimJamBonds
06-08-2010, 11:45 AM
This seems to have become my personal thread as of late, well I finished another book a day or so ago. The Eagle Has Landed by Jack Higgins. Its supposed to be based 50% on actual events. The senerio is Churchill is going to an secluded area of England to spend the weekend during the war. The Nazi's find out about this and a group of German paratroopers in to kill/capture the P.M. Needless to say of course it didn't work.

El Chuxter
06-08-2010, 11:47 AM
Because Churchill was a ninja, right?

I knew it.

JediTricks
06-08-2010, 08:47 PM
Because Churchill was a ninja, right?

I knew it.
The film "Beverly Hills Ninja" was based on those events.

OC47150
06-09-2010, 07:11 PM
This seems to have become my personal thread as of late, well I finished another book a day or so ago. The Eagle Has Landed by Jack Higgins. Its supposed to be based 50% on actual events. The senerio is Churchill is going to an secluded area of England to spend the weekend during the war. The Nazi's find out about this and a group of German paratroopers in to kill/capture the P.M. Needless to say of course it didn't work.

One of my faves. I've read it at least three times. A lot of little subplots don't make it to the movie version. You need to give the sequel, the Eagle Has Flown, a try, JJB.

I finished Millinuem Falcon yesterday. It was an okay book.

Also read an interesting thriller called Zero Hour, about a terrorist called the Prince of Darkness hired to cripple the U.S.'s banking sector. The book was written in the mid-1990s but still pretty good.

DarthQuack
06-09-2010, 07:19 PM
Since I can't seem to get into the Black Fleet Crisis right now....I started a book called Broken Harts. It's a book written by Owen Hart's wife after he died :(

JimJamBonds
06-09-2010, 07:49 PM
One of my faves. I've read it at least three times. A lot of little subplots don't make it to the movie version. You need to give the sequel, the Eagle Has Flown, a try, JJB.

I'm way ahead of you OC, I am reading The Eagle Has Flown and I should finish it in the next day or so.

JediTricks
06-10-2010, 03:58 PM
I started "The Long Goodbye", and it's easily the hardest story of all my hardboiled detective stories so far to put down.

JimJamBonds
06-11-2010, 11:34 AM
One of my faves. I've read it at least three times. A lot of little subplots don't make it to the movie version. You need to give the sequel, the Eagle Has Flown, a try, JJB.

I finished The Eagle Has Flown yesterday and it didn't really do much for me. I'm not sure exactly what caused those feelings but I didn't really feel all that rapped up in the story.

Bel-Cam Jos
06-11-2010, 01:19 PM
The flight gave me opportunities for reading, so I finished Using the Force by Will Brooker, a book about the Star Wars fan culture, set right around the release of EpII in 2002. Some parts of it are good and balanced on the subject, but his coverage of fan fiction and films was too excessive for me. And any book that heavily cites message boards as sources is going to be a little weak in the research department.

Currently am in between a SW EU novel, and Darwin's famous book.

dr_evazan22
06-11-2010, 09:24 PM
For the WW2 guys...
Sometime last year I posted about a book about a B-17 bomber called the Swamp Ghost. The plane had been found in Papa New Guinea.

An update from Comcast.net / ap:

World War II bomber 'Swamp Ghost' returns to US

LONG BEACH, Calif. — A B-17 bomber that lay in a New Guinea swamp for decades after being forced down during a World War II combat mission has been returned to the United States after years of salvage efforts.

The forward fuselage of the so-called "Swamp Ghost" was displayed Friday at the Port of Long Beach in an emotional, patriotic ceremony attended by kin of some of the now-deceased aircrew.

"I know this a happy day for Dick," said Linda Oliver, the 89-year-old widow of bombardier Richard Oliver, the last living crewman who died in August. She regretted he did not see the warbird's return.

"He longed for this to happen, but this wasn't to be," said Oliver, of Tiburon, Calif.

The frail widow watched a flag presentation by an Air Force honor guard and a flyover by vintage World War II fighters before her three children helped her climb steps to peer inside the fuselage sitting atop a truck trailer in the parking lot of the harborside restaurant The Reef.

The four-engine B-17E Flying Fortress was built by Boeing in November 1941, flew from California to Hawaii days after the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor and then island-hopped to Australia.

It went down on Feb. 23, 1942, on its only combat mission after being damaged by enemy fire during a raid on Japanese forces at Rabaul in New Britain and losing fuel.

Army Air Corps Capt. Fred Eaton piloted the aircraft to a belly landing in what turned out to be a swamp and the nine crewmen survived a six-week ordeal escaping the swamp and making their way to safety.

"Often in my life the courage and the perseverance that Dad and his fellow crew members demonstrated gave me courage to face some of the challenges we've all met in life," said the bombardier's son, Mike Oliver of Richmond, Va., who was born while his father was missing in action.

An Australian air force crew came upon the B-17 in 1972. Sustaining little damage in the landing and virtually undisturbed for years, the intact craft became coveted by salvagers of historic warplanes.

John Tallichet, president and CEO of Specialty Restaurants Corp., recounted how his father, company founder and World War II B-17 pilot David Tallichet, started efforts to recover the plane in the 1980s but didn't live to see its return. "One of his purposes in life was to bring this plane to the United States," he said.

The B-17's remote location and difficulties in gaining governmental permission to remove it from New Guinea would leave it in its watery resting place for many more years, gaining the nickname "Swamp Ghost" along the way. Westerners trekking to the site removed many items as souvenirs during that time.

The effort to bring home the plane was carried on by Pennsylvania businessman Fred Hagen, a friend of David Tallichet who has located a series of aircraft lost during World War II, leading to repatriation of missing airmen's remains.

In 2006 Hagen organized a salvage operation in which the B-17 was cut into sections that were flown by helicopter to a port. However, a dispute over authority to remove the plane held it up in New Guinea, and then its status as a warplane delayed its shipment through New Zealand, Hagen said.

The B-17 finally arrived in Long Beach last month.

Hagen said the cost of recovering the bomber was approximately $1.5 million.

It may be restored to flying condition and housed in a museum, or perhaps reassembled at less expense for display in a setting recreating the jungle swamp where it landed 68 years ago, Hagen said.

In a poignant scene, Linda Oliver, stood in front of the plane with a photo of her late husband in uniform, assisted by daughters Kathy Oliver Cataldo of Richmond, Va., and Karen Braughton of Sebastopol, Calif.

JimJamBonds
06-11-2010, 10:08 PM
Very cool Dr. E, this story sounds familiar. I think I saw a special on the Swamp Fox on Discovery or the Hitler Channel a few years ago.

TeeEye7
06-12-2010, 03:41 AM
Thanks for the update, Doc!

These restorations are so critical to maintaining our history! The New England Air Museum is currently restoring an A-26 Invader which flew with the 416th Bomb Group, 671st Bomb Squadron, of the 9th Air Force in WWII. My uncle (who was killed) was a member of that unit:

http://www.sgamboti.com/cts/a-26_project/index.htm

JimJamBonds
06-12-2010, 03:40 PM
Wow, again very cool! Thanks TE for the link!

Bel-Cam Jos
06-15-2010, 06:32 PM
I'm off to a slow start for summer reading (only 3 books, about 800 pages). Read an odd '60s-era sci-fi book Space Viking by H.Beam Piper. Mixed a lot of mythologies and history in an Earth's future setting, mainly as Scandinavian regional details, with these SVs raiding and sometimes being reasonable. Very abrupt and predictable ending, far too simplistic. It wasn't bad, but neither was it good. It might have been an influence on George Lucas, as the main character was Prince Lucas Trask of Tarith. Maybe; but then again, if it was, that might explain some things. :rolleyes:

OC47150
06-15-2010, 09:52 PM
The Wrath of God by Jack Higgins. Three men with varied backgrounds find themselves working together in post-revolutionary 1920s Mexico. This is the second Higgins novel I've read lately where it's written in the first person.

Reading Han Solo at Stars' End right now.

El Chuxter
06-15-2010, 11:58 PM
Working on The Mothman Prophecies. It's quite good, and going much more quickly than I'd expected. John Keel is like Graham Hancock in that he's such a good writer that you are willing to overlook that he's a crackpot (though, in fairness, Keel seems a lot more level-headed than Hancock or a lot of other pseudo-scientists, and is mostly reporting incidents without much commentary).

I understand the movie sucks eggs, but I still might want to check it out once I'm done.

JimJamBonds
06-16-2010, 08:25 AM
Working on The Mothman Prophecies. It's quite good, and going much more quickly than I'd expected. John Keel is like Graham Hancock in that he's such a good writer that you are willing to overlook that he's a crackpot (though, in fairness, Keel seems a lot more level-headed than Hancock or a lot of other pseudo-scientists, and is mostly reporting incidents without much commentary).

I understand the movie sucks eggs, but I still might want to check it out once I'm done.

I was just going to ask if its better then the movie which as you said Chux sucked.

Maradona
06-16-2010, 11:40 AM
Working on The Mothman PropheciesJohn Keel is like Graham Hancock in that he's such a good writer that you are willing to overlook that he's a crackpot (though, in fairness, Keel seems a lot more level-headed than Hancock or a lot of other pseudo-scientists, and is mostly reporting incidents without much commentary).

Graham Hancock and many of the old Coast to Coast AM crowd during Art Bell's reign are extremely entertaining writers. If all they wrote were true, and they certainly believe it is, we'd all live in a much more comic book-ish universe.

Bel-Cam Jos
06-18-2010, 03:18 PM
I wanted something a little older and funnier, so I found a book by Steve Allen, Make 'Em Laugh. It worked on me; I decided to leave the library yesterday because I couldn't hold in my laughter in one chapter. ;) Most of it was retelling stories or scripts of bits and shows.

OC47150
06-18-2010, 03:41 PM
I finished HS at Stars' End and started HS and the Lost Legacy. It's been years since I've read these books, and it's a fun return to a pre-ANH world.

Bel-Cam Jos
06-24-2010, 11:20 AM
Inspired by my vacation to FL and the Kennedy Space Center, just finished Failure Is Not an Option by former NASA flight controller Gene Franz. Both facinating and disappointing: amazing to read how the space departments created technology and programs out of almost nothing, with the support of the government and the American people, despite all the dangers involved; disappointing because, as his epilogue stated, there is no support for space exploration much anymore, to the detriment of society. :(

Maradona
06-24-2010, 11:44 AM
there is no support for space exploration much anymore, to the detriment of society. :(

I have a family member who is an engineer at Nasa and the stories he tells are incredible in terms of how much the climate has changed over the years. Wonder has left our national collective unconscious when it comes to space travel. Interestingly, that decline coincides ironically with birth of and expansion of Star Wars. Logic would seemingly dictate the opposite.

Bel-Cam Jos
06-28-2010, 11:06 AM
Two more, to reach the 2000+ pages read mark so far this summer.

For Buckeye Fans Only! by Rich Wolfe. He has a series of books by/for/about sports teams and players. Famous and insider people wrote brief reflections and essays on various Ohio State memories and topics. It started out as "let's write about Woody Hayes or Jim Tressel," which was interesting but got repetitive, and became a nice read by the end.

Frames by Loren Estleman. I've read a few of his other books and like his style. This was about a "film detective" (archivist and preserver of old movies) who finds a lost cut of a silent film in a decaying theater. It was pretty good; dialogue was funny and witty throughout.

So, I've read 7 books (averaging about 285 pages each), each author starting with a different letter of the alphabet (A, B, E, G, K, P, and W), so I'll see how long I can go without repeating a letter (I've started a "V" writer); that'd be cool if I can read exactly 26 books this time.

JimJamBonds
06-28-2010, 06:45 PM
The Unwritten Rules Of Baseball. This is often something that is said and I've always wondered why somebody wouldn't write them down, well somebody did (sorry I don't recall the author). Oddly enough I actually knew most of the rules and the ones I didn't know weren't shocking. Still, it was a fun quick read.

Bel-Cam Jos
06-29-2010, 10:09 AM
The Unwritten Rules Of Baseball. ... Still, it was a fun quick read.For being unwritten, it should've been quick.


...


I know, the rules were typed, not written. :p

And, I should have read The Devil and Daniel Webster or something for post #666 above. :evil:

Bel-Cam Jos
06-30-2010, 06:17 PM
In a totally unfair and perhaps blasphemous analogy; read Candide, Zadig, and Selected Stories by France's 18th century Eminem, Voltaire. :rolleyes: It was sometimes humorous, occasionally risque or rude, but mostly depressing and negative, as most satires of political and societal ills tend to be.

JimJamBonds
06-30-2010, 06:28 PM
Do you mean me BCJ??? I read Candide in college. I don't remember.... well, anything but I know I read it in college.

El Chuxter
06-30-2010, 09:06 PM
Please do not insult Voltaire by comparing him to such a talentless turdburglar as Inneedofanenema.

Bel-Cam Jos
07-01-2010, 08:59 AM
The word "read" should've said "I just read," not an imperative verb that sounds like "red."

Everything was classier "back in the thine day." Voltaire had talent and some sense of subtlety, even being jailed, beaten, and hunted down for his writings. M&M just melts people's mouths and won't give a hand.

And Chux, your comment about him is insulting to turdburglars. :p

DarthQuack
07-01-2010, 03:47 PM
Picked up Before the Storm again to read.....hopefully I'll not lose interest this time. :)

JimJamBonds
07-01-2010, 06:58 PM
The word "read" should've said "I just read," not an imperative verb that sounds like "red."

Save it for the grammer thread BJC! :D

Bel-Cam Jos
07-01-2010, 08:38 PM
Save it for the grammer thread BJC! :DKelsey Grammer has a thread here? Sweet. :p

And, I erred in my reply. The line 'The word "read" should've said "I just read," not an imperative verb that sounds like "red."' Should've been 'The word "read" should've said "I just read," not an imperative verb that sounds like "reed."' Oh how a single letter causes so much wow; I mean, woe. :rolleyes:

My BSLOS for this oversight?
"I'm so gangster, I'm so thug.
You're the only one I'm dreaming of."

BTW, I read a very interesting book, simply because the author's last name started with 'U,' one of the rare ones on my all-time ABC list. The Miracle Life of Egdar Mint, by Brady Udall was more ironic in its title. Sometimes gut wrenching in its scenes and character choices, usually brutal, at times salacious, occasionally LOL-worthy, and surprising in other parts. I can identify with the can't-throw-stuff-away aspect, but the rest of Edgar's life is not really close to mine. I liked it, despite all the "bad" parts; in fact, that's what made it a good read. Red? Redd? Reed?

Bel-Cam Jos
07-06-2010, 11:47 AM
Numbers, numbers, numbers.

Read my 800th book in my all-time list, which was my 10th this summer (a little under 3k pages read, still 10 different author letters). John Steinbeck's Sweet Thursday, a sequel to Cannery Row. Quite funny at times, a nice easy read, but still Steinbeckian in style, of course.

Maradona
07-06-2010, 03:39 PM
My favorite Steinbeck novel is The Acts of King Arthur and His Noble Knights. His retelling of Mallory is so moving. I lament he never was able to complete it.

OC47150
07-07-2010, 09:16 PM
Finished Han Solo and the Lost Legacy. It's nice to revisit this old series.

I reread William Shatner's Tek War book. It wasn't too bad.

Bel-Cam Jos
07-09-2010, 05:19 PM
It turns out that Amy Tan isn't just a made-up author character from an old Simpsons episode. :rolleyes: She's written several books, including The Bonesteer's Daughter. While I can't say I can really share many of the experiences in the novel, Tan's style is detailed without bogged down in details, emotional without being sappy, sly without being sarcastic, and historical without dryness. It's about a woman (I was misled as to who was the protagonist from the first third of the book, but that's part of its themes) who learns about her past in China, pre-WW2 to the present in San Francisco, with some late-20th century family issues thrown in for good measure. It even because somewhat of a mystery towards the end. A very good story.

Rocketboy
07-10-2010, 12:50 PM
Looks like I haven't posted in this thread since March...

Since my last post here, I've read:

No One Here Gets Out Alive - My 2nd or 3rd time reading the Jim Morrison bio.

Hiroshima - Details the true ordeals of 7 survivors of the bomb.

Quarry In The Middle - A pulp Hard Case Crime novel.

A Simple Plan - About 3 guys that find a downed airplane containing 4 million dollars and follows the downward spiral their lives take from the greed.

Prozac Nation - A young woman's journey through Hell in dealing with severe depression. This one took me a while to get through this one because of the dark subject matter and repetitiveness.

DarthQuack
07-10-2010, 02:30 PM
Just ordered Death Troopers and Luke Skywalker and the Shadows of Mindor.

Bel-Cam Jos
07-10-2010, 10:15 PM
Just ordered Death Troopers and Luke Skywalker and the Shadows of Mindor.And one of these is a pretty good read. And one of these is one of the top (bottom?) three worst EU novels ever written.

Bel-Cam Jos
07-11-2010, 09:10 PM
Halfway through my goal to read 26 books, each by a different author alphabetically, this summer. Finished letter Z: First Landing by Robert Zubrin. It's a novel about starting the first Mars colony, with a 5-person astronaut crew. It started out as a science book, then became a science fiction story, then to a fiction tale (almost a mystery of space horror style), and ended as a geek/nerd fan fic story. Not too bad overall.

JimJamBonds
07-11-2010, 10:16 PM
And one of these is a pretty good read. And one of these is one of the top (bottom?) three worst EU novels ever written.

I read one of those and I'd agree with you on that B-CJ.

DarkArtist
07-12-2010, 08:54 AM
finished Star Wars Crosscurrent while on vacation - decent book had a somewhat ok storyline but kinda turned into Death Troopers at the end.. all in all I would give it a C+.

currently reading Star Wars Backlash - decent book, fast reading have about 100 pages to go (started this yesterday). looking forward to finishing and then getting Star Wars Allies.

Bel-Cam Jos
07-13-2010, 10:50 AM
Two more, up to 15 this summer (about 4400 pages as yet).

I felt that I needed to read a teen vampire book that wasn't Twilight, and I needed an 'F' author, so Bite Me! by Melissa Francis was the choice. It began as an awful try-to-sound-hip-and-young teen angst story, but it turned into a veiled rip-off of Harry Potter, and clearly now a series. I can't wait for the sequel, Love Sucks. Seriously, that's the title, but not seriously about not being able to wait. This was not great, but I'm not its audience.

Chasing Destiny by Stephen Overholser. I wanted a western genre, and hadn't read an 'O' author; ta dah! It was a simple style of writing, but quite authentic, in that it didn't really have "fiction" plots, where characters you wouldn't think to die did, while others lived. The end was abrupt, but appropriate to the story. Not very detailed, but again, that fit the narrator's characterization. A decent read.

Letters left:
I have D, I, and N in hand.
C, H, J, L, Q, R, X [how will I find this'n easily?], and Y are still remaining.

JimJamBonds
07-13-2010, 12:34 PM
I have D, I, and N in hand.
C, H, J, L, Q, R, X [how will I find this'n easily?], and Y are still remaining.

Is the letter the first name or last name or either? You might want to look into if Yao Ming has a biography out. :D

As for X, maybe the writings of St. Francis Xavier? :D

Bel-Cam Jos
07-13-2010, 01:11 PM
Last name. I tend to use my local libraries, just searching their databases. There's an around-the-house book by an 'X' author; I may go that route. That's been how I've found some interesting reads (as well as some duds, too :rolleyes: ) I would not have encountered otherwise.

DarthQuack
07-13-2010, 02:52 PM
And one of these is a pretty good read. And one of these is one of the top (bottom?) three worst EU novels ever written.

Well as long as Barbara Hambly isn't writing either one I'm fine :)

dr_evazan22
07-13-2010, 07:39 PM
The Autobiography of Malcolm X?

JimJamBonds
07-14-2010, 09:07 AM
The Autobiography of Malcolm X?

No its under "L" (his name was Little).

Bel-Cam Jos
07-15-2010, 03:12 PM
Actually, I do have that book, but I was looking for something a little (no pun intended) more uplifting in tone. And my library lists it under both 'X' for X, Malcolm and 'H' for Haley, Alex.

I choose a comedian's book, I Shouldn't Even Be Doing This! by Bob Newhart. I did LOL once or twice, but it was more thoughtful and reflective than funny throughout. I liked it.

Bel-Cam Jos
07-18-2010, 05:54 PM
Now have read 18 books (and passed 5K in pages read), with the days of summer waning. :( Recents?

Two Parts Textbook, One Part Love by, as the book cover stated "America's Number One Teacher" LouAnne Johnson (she wrote the book that became the film Dangerous Minds). It was a "recipe" book for teaching suggestions and advice. Sometimes, she and I are exactly on the same page, other times she contradicts herself in the book, while yet more instances have her almost telling me to give up the teaching profession. It will help me to start another year in the classroom, as I'll reconsider some of my policies and expectations, but it didn't change my life.

White as Snow by Tanith Lee. My sci-fi book club's topic for the next discussion is "fairy tales," and this book was on the suggested readings list. It was a retelling of Snow White. It mixed in the myth of Demeter, Hades, and Persephone and combined various versions of the Snow White story. A few times, it was interesting, but manily it was too wordy and confusing to follow. An "ugh" rating for me.

Letters left to read: C (one library has it checked in, but it's farther from home and not along my normal errands route), D (a 400+ pg book with scientific trends takes a while), H, I (in progress right now), Q, R, X, and Y. Can I do it? Mebbe...

JediTricks
07-18-2010, 07:21 PM
NERRRRRDSSSSS! ;)

Unfortunately, real life and the runup to SDCC has ruined my reading schedule, but I have a plan, I'm going to bring the ipod touch and read in long lonely lines at the con. :D

Bel-Cam Jos
07-19-2010, 09:00 PM
Two more short ones, really only due to their authors' names.

Toxic Friends, True Friends by Florence Isaacs. It was apparently targeted towards women, but I did learn I'm a horrible person. With the occasional good friend thrown in.

Home Sense by Eduardo Xol. This was an interior decorating book, with probably half pictures/half text. I needed an 'X.' This fulfilled the need.

Just under 6000 pages with the 20 I've read (averaging around 285 pages each). Need six more, and I have four of them (C, D, H, and R) on my dresser; Q and Y remain undecided.

Bel-Cam Jos
07-23-2010, 03:46 PM
Getting closer to the end o' summer for me :cry: and trying to reach the 26 goal (broke the 6000 page barrier, 4 books to go).

Parenting Young Athletes the Ripken Way by Cal Ripken Jr. I'm not a parent, but I thought seeing a perspective of many of the parents of my high students could help for motivation or understanding. I wil say this; Cal picked the right career, as he isn't the strongest writer, style-wise. His points are clear and easy to understand, but a bit too simplistically.

The Winner Stands Alone by Paulo Coelho. I like his style. This one turned into a bit of a mystery, and while you could consider the end a surprise or an expected cliche, it was still well done. It is set in Cannes during the film festival, with the theme of celebrity and fame as traps, plus obession gone right (at least in the minds of those obessessing). Not for those seeking an uplifting tale of perserverance (think a type of The Devil Wears Prada the novel, not the Disney-ized film version, story).

Bel-Cam Jos
07-26-2010, 07:32 PM
Two letters left: D and H, for 26 of 26.

Red, White, and Brew: An American Beer Odyssey by Brian Yaeger. I'm no beer drinker at all, but his was a 'Y' letter. I have taken a country trip before (not seeking breweries and beer sellers). He is clearly well-versed in this subject, and his style is easy to follow and in good detail. The people he met are interesting, too. Not bad, despite my lack of interest in the overall subject.

Dog On It by Spencer Quinn. I needed a 'Q,' and puns are always a plus. I now will seek out his other "Chet and Bernie Mystery" story(ies?). Told from the POV of a dog (don't know his breed) named Chet, it's a down-on-his-luck private detective tale. Not all that mysterious and shocking, but well done with the dog's perspective (all the issues with memory, food, lack of color seen, etc.) and good motifs ("have I told you ____ already?" "don't get me started with ___" ) and funny parts. I really liked this one.

Rocketboy
07-27-2010, 12:09 AM
Just finished Dances With Wolves by Michael Blake, which was of course, turned into the Costner movie. Excellent book.
It's been years since I've seen the movie, so I can't compare them until I get my Extended Cut (4 hours long!) in the mail any day now.

There are like 4 or 5 books I want to read next, so I need to decide soon.

Bel-Cam Jos
07-28-2010, 01:16 PM
Broke the 7K page mark, so far.

Book #25 is the penultimate in my attempt to read the alphabet by author: Pompeii by Robert Harris. It's a historical fiction set around the days before Vesuvius erupted. It was quite authentic sounding (if you ignore the more recent era profanity terms that make it seem a bit anachronistic to me). I appreciated the drawn map at the front as a nice geographic reference. Not too bad.

Letter 'D' is written by Charles Darwin. I'm halfway through it. I should finish it by the time my body adds two more legs and a prehensal [sp?] tail. :rolleyes:

Bel-Cam Jos
07-29-2010, 03:26 PM
Well, my journey toward the alphabet goal is now complete. The Origin of Species by Chuck D :rolleyes: finished it up. A VERY detailed account, much like someone explaining a textbook. Now I can say I read it all the way through; whew.

The breakdown:

Allen, S (humor)
Brooker, W (Star Wars)
Coelho, P (fiction)
Darwin, C (history/science)
Estleman, L (detective mystery)
Francis, M (youth fiction)
Golden, C (Star Wars)
Harris, R (historical fiction)
Isaacs, F (self-help)
Johnson, L (education)
Kranz, G (science/history/biography)
Lee, T (fantasy)
Miller, K (Star Wars)
Newhart, B (humor)
Overholser, S (western)
Piper, H (sci-fi)
Quinn, S (detective mystery)
Ripken, C (sports/parenting)
Steinbeck, J (fiction)
Tan, A (fiction)
Udall, B (fiction)
Voltaire (satire)
Wolfe, R (sports)
Xol, E (home & garden)
Yaeger, B (beer geography :squareeye )
Zubrin, R (sci-fi)

26 books, about 7500 pages. But since there's still a week and a half left before school resumes :cry: I can try and add a few more books to the total by doubling up on letters, of course.

OC47150
07-29-2010, 07:18 PM
A Bridge Too Far, Cornelius Ryan. I first read this book years ago and, after watching the movie again recently, I pulled the book off the shelf. Boy, so much stuff went wrong on this mission that it's not even funny, and a lot of the details didn't make it to the film version.

I started SW Clone Wars: Gambit.

DarkArtist
07-30-2010, 11:17 AM
currently 60 pages away from finishing Fate of the Jedi Allies...really loving this series. can't wait for the next book Vortex.

might have to pick up The Clone Wars : Gambit as I need a book to read on the flight to Orlando for CV...

Bel-Cam Jos
08-05-2010, 07:04 PM
Passed by the ABC26 mark with two more books for 28 total: SW: Old Republic: Fatal Alliance was decent. Read the second of two (so far) "Chet and Bernie Mystery" books by Spencer Quinn, Thereby Hangs a Tail. This one wasn't as fun as the first, but the crime was better (if that's not inappropriate to say) to follow: clues less obvious, more doubt and suspense, even though the crime itself was horrible. It ends with a few possible storylines for a third book, for both the human (Bernie and his potential relationships) and the dog (Chet and his physical condition). I may have to follow this series now. :thumbsup:

I might have time for one or two more before Monday is my last "summer" day. I sure hope so! (would love to reach 30 books for the second time since keeping track)

OC47150
08-05-2010, 10:00 PM
Passed by the ABC26 mark with two more books for 28 total: SW: Old Republic: Fatal Alliance was decent.

Is that the new one that just came out?

Bel-Cam Jos
08-06-2010, 09:56 AM
In my best Phil-Hartman-as-Ed-McMahon voice: "You are correct, sir."

OC47150
08-06-2010, 06:18 PM
I thumbed through it at the store recently and am thinking about picking it up. I'm getting the Old Republic comics right now and that time period interests me.

Bel-Cam Jos
08-08-2010, 10:02 AM
With a day and a half left in summer, I might be able to get another in, but book #29 was Ray Bradbury's The Martian Chronicles. I really thought I'd read this before (which goes along with some of the plot), but then I realized that portions were in the student anthology text from school (and the chapters were from magazines, so it's somewhat serialized). A good story, sometimes hard to follow for brief moments, but again, that's part of the confusion the characters experienced.

DarkArtist
08-09-2010, 11:23 AM
finished reading Clone Wars Stealth and currently reading Indiana Jones and the Army of the Dead by Steve Perry....this is the first Indy book I've ever read and looking forward to seeing how it stacks up.

Stealth was good but left too much open at the end....looking forward to seeing how Seige ties everything up.

JimJamBonds
08-10-2010, 07:26 PM
A few days ago I finished Tocqueville's Discovery Of America. Alexis de Tocqueville in 1830 spent about 9 months traveling America, after returning to France he wrote the hugely famous "Democracy In America" which as you can probably guess tells of his trip to America. This book tells about Tocqueville's life and times including (of course) his trip through America.

OC47150
08-10-2010, 08:00 PM
Finished Karen Miller's second CW novel: Gambit Stealth. Not too bad.

Started reading Ryder Windham's second CW-themed novel today.

Bel-Cam Jos
08-11-2010, 07:40 PM
I did it! Not only read the first 26 all from different lettered-authors, but also reached the 30 book plateau for the summer! You want the numbers; you know you do.

For Summer 2010...
-Total books read: 30.
-Total estimated pages read: 8700.
-Average page length of book: 290.
Breakdown by genre...
-Star Wars: 4.
-SciFi/Fantasy: 4.
-Western: 1.
-Education: 1.
-Humor/Satire: 3.
-Young Adult: 1.
-Science: 2
-Fiction: 5.
-Sports: 2.
-Mystery: 3.
-Help: 2.
-Travel: 2.

Summer Reading From 2004-2010...
-Total books read: 190.
-Total estimated pages read: 51,100.
-Average page length of book: 269.

JimJamBonds
08-12-2010, 02:01 PM
Running Anatomy This book emphasises the proper development of the musculature and supporting anatomy to allow runners to use the most efficient techniques over a variety of grades, terrains and speeds, optimise performance both mechanically and aerobically and avoid common injuries. Distributed by Syndetic Solutions, Inc.

OC47150
08-12-2010, 06:43 PM
Congrat, Bel-Cam! That is quite a feat.

I finished Secret Missions #2 today. Not a bad read. Now I have to figure out when the next one is released.

Bel-Cam Jos
08-12-2010, 07:02 PM
Thanks, OC! I am about halfway through SM #2. According to Barney's No Bull website, Star Wars The Clone Wars : Secret Missions #3: Duel at Shattered Rock is due out Feb. 17, '11.

Rocketboy
08-12-2010, 11:44 PM
Just finished reading The Chris Farley Show.
A simultaneously hilarious and heartbreaking biography.

It's hard to imagine what could have been and what never was...

Farley was originally attached to star in Kingpin (as Randy Quaid's character), The Cable Guy (as Jim Carrey's character in a FAR different version of the film) and Shrek (as Shrek - he even did the first round of recordings before he died).

Farley also wanted to do some more serious work and star in a biopic of "Fatty" Arbuckle (David Mamet even completed the script).

El Chuxter
08-12-2010, 11:46 PM
I knew about the Shrek thing, but the others are pretty interesting. I have to assume I would not like the bio, though, since I am the anti-Rocketboy.

JimJamBonds
08-14-2010, 06:47 AM
And what about all the roles that Kevin James is now getting that I figure would have gone to Chris.

The Shrek thing is interesting, did that project get delayed a bunch of times or something because that seems to be an awfully long time between his involvement and the eventual release?

Bel-Cam Jos
08-14-2010, 07:37 PM
Finished the 2nd Secret Missions book. It had some funny parts (Cad Bane watching a DVD with special features), some SW lines (Han's Falcon complaints), and a suprise near the end. I was sure that one of the characters was that stand-in actor for Jabba in Docking Bay 94 from SW, though.

Rocketboy
08-14-2010, 09:25 PM
And what about all the roles that Kevin James is now getting that I figure would have gone to Chris.That is exactly what I thought when I saw Grown Ups. It would have been so much better with Farley.


The Shrek thing is interesting, did that project get delayed a bunch of times or something because that seems to be an awfully long time between his involvement and the eventual release?I'm not sure how long it was delayed, but back then a CGI movie took a lot longer to make. And IIRC, voice recording is usually done well in advance of the animation. I know the character was reworked when Mike Myers came aboard so that may have delayed it somewhat.

JimJamBonds
08-16-2010, 02:57 PM
That is exactly what I thought when I saw Grown Ups. It would have been so much better with Farley.
It dawned on me when I watched a special about Grown Ups and the guys were saying how long they have been friends, most from the SNL days if not longer. KJ on the other hand is VERY new to the group.

I'm not sure how long it was delayed, but back then a CGI movie took a lot longer to make. And IIRC, voice recording is usually done well in advance of the animation. I know the character was reworked when Mike Myers came aboard so that may have delayed it somewhat.

I fired up the google machine and read a bit about Farley and his work on Shrek. It was pretty interesting and well worth the time to read. The story in that version of Shrek was quite different from what we ended up seeing.

DarkArtist
08-26-2010, 08:33 AM
having a hardtime picking up the Indiana Jones and the army of the Dead book again...started reading this on the flight to CV and just couldn't get into it...it's kinda slow and not grabbing my attention...going to attempt to read it this weekend but not holding my breath.... I might pick up the the third CW novel Stealth this weekend and read that instead.

JimJamBonds
08-27-2010, 05:13 PM
I finished reading Islands of the Damned: A Marine at War in the Pacific by R. V. Burgin. As the title suggests its an account of a Marine in the Pacific during WWII. Unlike most books of this type there isn't much "pre war" story and even less "post war story." Its written in the manner of somebody who isn't a professional writer. It reads as if R.V. was in the room telling you the story of the war and how he was involved. While of course there was a professional writer it reads like a conversation and not like a book.

Bel-Cam Jos
08-29-2010, 11:21 AM
Timothy Egan's The Worst Hard Time, a survivors' account of living in the Dust Bowl region during the Great Depression. I've shown a similar video from PBS as background for The Grapes of Wrath with my sophomore students; in fact, a couple of the people interviewed for the documentary were also interviewed for this book. Both a sad and powerful tale of people living with things outside their control, and unfortunately, far too similar to some issues in the country today.

TeeEye7
08-29-2010, 02:55 PM
Here's another suggestion on that topic, BCJ:

http://www.amazon.com/Children-Dust-Bowl-School-Weedpatch/dp/0517880946

Jerry Stanley was a history professor of mine whilst I was a youngster in college in more civilized times. It might play well to your student's age group.

Bel-Cam Jos
08-29-2010, 07:18 PM
Here's another suggestion on that topic, BCJ:

http://www.amazon.com/Children-Dust-Bowl-School-Weedpatch/dp/0517880946

Jerry Stanley was a history professor of mine whilst I was a youngster in college in more civilized times. It might play well to your student's age group.That does sound interesting! :thumbsup:

JimJamBonds
09-02-2010, 06:31 PM
I finished reading 1814 The River Wars. Its an alt history novel where the Trail of Tears is changed. The Cherokee move west not because they are forced by Jackson but rather they move because this is the best deal they can get for their people thus avoiding what actually happened. I've started reading 1825 The Arkansas War where the Cherokee nation and the US go to war.

Bel-Cam Jos
09-04-2010, 09:11 AM
While I found the title to be too harsh, sadly I found much in Mark Bauerlein's The Dumbest Generation to fit what I see in the young of society today. Obviously playing off the "Greatest Generation" category for those who grew up around the Great Depression and WWII, it shows how education (more the lack thereof) and new technologies are contributing to the intelligence and thinking skills becoming less valued and utile for teens and young adults. In a way, his points support how I'm teaching my students (as the proper way), but it's not easy to be the "old fogey" in terms of how I expect them to think and USE THEIR OWN BRAINS instead of ALWAYS trying to rely on something else to do their thinking and decision making for them.

Oh, and the cover has Transformers raising a flag, like Iwa Jima.

Maradona
09-04-2010, 12:16 PM
While I found the title to be too harsh, sadly I found much in Mark Bauerlein's The Dumbest Generation to fit what I see in the young of society today. Obviously playing off the "Greatest Generation" category for those who grew up around the Great Depression and WWII, it shows how education (more the lack thereof) and new technologies are contributing to the intelligence and thinking skills becoming less valued and utile for teens and young adults. In a way, his points support how I'm teaching my students (as the proper way), but it's not easy to be the "old fogey" in terms of how I expect them to think and USE THEIR OWN BRAINS instead of ALWAYS trying to rely on something else to do their thinking and decision making for them.



I love this text. I actually assigned it for a non-fiction independent reading project last semester and the students who read it and those that viewed their presentations were amazed by the numbers he presents in the book. I always encourage my students to email the authors of their texts, living obviously, and ask them something relevant. Mr. Bauerlein was kind enough to respond to each student. A popular alumni of our school went on to be one of his students at Emory, so maybe that was why he chose to respond to them. Regardless, this text is an alert to the emergency happening across the nation when it comes to the youth. Another text along a similar vein is Robert Shaw's The Epidemic, another independent reading selection for my class.

JimJamBonds
09-10-2010, 12:22 PM
I finished reading 1825 The Arkansas War. Its an alt history book where a separate country is 'made' for Indians in the 18teens. Long story short there is a war between the US and Arkansas. Its an ok read, nothing special.

Based on BCS's above post I picked up The Dumbest Generation today and I'll start reading it later tonight.

JimJamBonds
09-13-2010, 09:33 PM
Well I started reading The Dumbest Generation but I just couldn't do it. Not that it wasn't well written or an interesting topic but because it was just too sad to read. Kudos to BCJ and Maradona for being able to complete it.

Bel-Cam Jos
09-13-2010, 11:43 PM
Well I started reading The Dumbest Generation but I just couldn't do it. Not that it wasn't well written or an interesting topic but because it was just too sad to read. Kudos to BCJ and Maradona for being able to complete it.I bought it sometime earlier this year, and once I finally started reading it, it took me awhile. I remember thinking "I need to get this done so it's out of my head" at one point. It did temper any teaching enthusiasm I had for a few days. :(

JimJamBonds
09-14-2010, 10:37 AM
I bought it sometime earlier this year, and once I finally started reading it, it took me awhile. I remember thinking "I need to get this done so it's out of my head" at one point. It did temper any teaching enthusiasm I had for a few days. :(

Yeah I understand that one, however when I was reading it I thought it was good to know this stuff. That said I couldn't do it.

OC47150
09-14-2010, 08:57 PM
The Jedburghs. These were special ops teams, comprised (many times) of a British, American and Frenchmen, were parachuted into France before and after D-Day to better organize the French Resistance. This effort was done with great success. Interesting book.

The Bormann Testament, by Jack Higgins. One of Higgins' earlier works that had been updated. Apparently, he couldn't include some of the parts when it was originally published in the 60s, but now came. A German is trying to sell Martin Bormann's manuscript, and several parties don't want that happening.

Bel-Cam Jos
09-15-2010, 07:20 PM
My sci-fi book club chose The Hunger Games by Suzanne Collins. It was quite good, but I didn't love it as much as some of the members did. It's a YA version of The Running Man and "reality" TV shows, but pretty violent and gory at times.

TeeEye7
09-18-2010, 03:00 PM
I attended my second reunion of WWII vets of the 416th Bomb Group just a few days ago and was able to have 416th veteran and author Ralph Conte sign my copy of his book, Attack Bombers We Need You! (it's pretty much considered The Bible of the 416th) as well as L.N. Smith M.D. who wrote Darwin's War; Science, Politics, Warfare, Faith and Sacrifice: The 416th Bomb Groups Sacrifices to Defeat Euginics. Dr. Smith's father was a pilot in the 416th. Very cool meeting both authors and "family" members. This will be a nice legacy for my own family! I think a re-reading of both books is in order.

sith_killer_99
10-03-2010, 02:28 PM
Recent audio books include:

Reagan in His Own Voice: Ronald Reagan's Radio Addresses
Speaking My Mind: Selected Speeches with Personal Reflections (by Ronald Reagan)
When Character Was King: A Story of Ronald Reagan (by Peggy Noonan)
The Road to Serfdom (by Friedrich A. Hayek)

Just started "Atlas Shrugged" by Ayn Rand.

I also read "The Overton Window" by Glenn Beck over Father's Day weekend.

DarkArtist
10-05-2010, 10:57 AM
currently reading Star Wars The Old Republic Fatal Alliance....borrowed it from the library...pretty decent book have about 100 pages left to read...hoping to put a dent in that tonight and have it finished by tomorrow...

still waiting for the library to get in a copy of Clone Wars Seige (have it on hold when it comes in):thumbsup:

JimJamBonds
10-13-2010, 04:06 PM
I finished reading A general's life : An Autobiography by General of The Army: Omar N. Nelson. General Bradly was the last person to achieve the rank of 5 stars. He was born in Missouri, went to West Point, became commander of US troops in Europe during WWII, overhauled the VA, became Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff. While its an interesting read it can get bogged down in details. But overall a good read.

JimJamBonds
10-20-2010, 02:20 PM
Last night I finished Admiral "Bull" Halsey, as the name suggests its about Admiral Halsey who commanded in the Pacific during WWII. Its a typical WWII bio, good but nothing special.

DarkArtist
10-21-2010, 09:52 AM
finished Fatal Alliance and Clone Wars Gambit: Seige...

thinking about trying out those Alex Cross books but not 100% at the moment... looking forward to 11/30 and the release of Fate of the Jedi Vortex:thumbsup:

Bel-Cam Jos
10-21-2010, 07:30 PM
looking forward to 11/30 and the release of Fate of the Jedi Vortex:thumbsup:I noticed that the CD book and novel have slightly different blaster poses by Han.

I finished a non-SW book! Hooray for Bel-Cam! Hooray for me! :D :D :D
Spencer Quinn's newest "Chet and Bernie Mystery" titled To Fetch a Thief came out about a fortnight back, but the library didn't get it in until this week. I was looking forward to it with bated breath (dog pun humor), but it turned out to be a more serious tone story than the previous two. Still a good story, I just never laughed while reading (can't even recall a chuckle). It sounds like the characters are fleshing themselves out and the themes and motifs are realistic, just would prefer the funny and joking style of the first books (and the premise was to find a missing circus elephant, too).

OC47150
10-25-2010, 07:02 PM
Read Coruscant Nights 2. I enjoyed it better than the first, but found the Typho crushing on Padme to be a little unbelievable.

Also finished Fate of the Jedi Backlash. Not too bad...until the end. SPOILER:




The Sith mysteriously appearing in their spacecraft and shuttles wasn't very believable.

I enjoyed this Jedi book better than the last one. I think it's because Allston's a capable writer.

Next up is Operation Mincemeat, the Man Who Wasn't There operation from WWII.

JimJamBonds
10-26-2010, 06:49 PM
I finished Hitler's Holy Relics the other day. It follows the story of various art works that the Nazi's took from various countries back to Germany. The best known would be relics from the Holy Roman Empire. It was a very interesting read, one of the best things I've read in quite some time.

TeeEye7
10-31-2010, 03:53 PM
Finally finished The 9th Air Force In World War II by Kenn Rust. I understand it's pretty much considered the bible with regards to the tactical air force that supported the ground troops in their march to Berlin. Rust covers the origin of the 9th in North Africa and its move into Europe.

The book is out of print and I had to chase it down on eBay (took me almost two years to get it at a decent price). Very much worth the effort and a good read.

A good look at the "down and dirty" jobs the 9th had to do in Europe with little recognition. The 8th air force with the heavy bombers (B-17s and B-24s) grabbed all the headlines while the 9th with its medium and light bombers were responsible for a lot of the successes on the ground. Patton had high praise for the 9th.

If interested, you'll probably have to look in a library to find the book.

JimJamBonds
10-31-2010, 06:00 PM
So in a nutshell the 8th bombed the cites and whatnot and the 9th was closer to front line operations?

TeeEye7
10-31-2010, 11:26 PM
Exactly. The 9th provided close air support (P-38s, P-47s, and P-51s) for our ground troops; medium bombers (B-25s, B-26s) and light bombers (A-20s, A-26s) went after bridges, buzz-bomb sites, air fields, marshaling yards, train depots, radar sites, etc. (something you almost never see in WWII movies). There were also recon and night fighting wings. Their specialty was to bomb from medium heights down to ground level (the light bombers would go on strafing missions after their bomb runs, when possible).

They worked hand-in-hand with the ground troops to help their advance while at the same time went after the German's abilities to move troops and re-supply to the front. The 9th instituted a program of exchanging ground troops with air crews as forward observers. Each understood the other's missions in that way and it worked to their mutual advantage. Almost universally, however, the ground guys thought the air guys were nuts to fight that way and vice versa.

These sites may be of interest. My uncle, Lt. William Edward Cramsie (who was KIA), flew for the 416th Bomb Group (L) of the 9th Air Force:

http://wgs.cc/416/index.html

http://www.sgamboti.com/416th_BG_Photo_Gallery/index.htm

JimJamBonds
11-01-2010, 03:47 PM
Very cool, I just did a search of my area libraries and they do not have the book you mentioned which is a bummer. What you mentioned sounds really interesting.

JimJamBonds
11-03-2010, 10:30 PM
I finished yet another Harry Turtledove book the other day. This one was Hitler's War: East and West. In a nutshell WWII starts a couple of years early and in this second installment of the Hitler's War series Germany attacks the Soviet Union and also invades the Scandinavian counties as well. If you're familiar with Turtledove then you know his style and what to expect. Not his best work but still a solid read.

Bel-Cam Jos
11-08-2010, 07:37 PM
Once more, the staff of The Daily Show puts together a fun book, this time it's Earth (The Book), a guide for supposed alien visitors to understand human history and behavior. I laughed several times, was shocked once or twice, and was bored at other instances. Overall, pretty funny and satirical; sounds like their program.

JimJamBonds
11-09-2010, 06:32 AM
7 Deadly Words: The Life and Crimes of George Carlin. This was a pretty good bio, however if you've read his autobio that came out earlier this year then this book didn't break much new ground. Still, if you're a Carlin fan its still a good read reguardless.