PDA

View Full Version : Reading!



Pages : [1] 2 3 4 5

Rocketboy
07-09-2005, 11:14 PM
I've been on a pretty decent reading kick as of late and I'm looking for something new.

Not too long ago, I finished Chuck Bariss' Confessions of a Dangerous Mind.
Very good book, a lot better than I expected. For those that don't know, "Gong Show" host Chuck Bariss claims he while he created shows like "The Dating Game" and "The Newlywed Game" he was also an assassin for the CIA. Not so sure I believe his claims, but as you read the book you almost want to believe it. Saw the movie afterward and was really disappointed by it.

Also recently read Dean Koontz's Odd Thomas. It's about title character Odd Thomas, a guy that can see dead people. That is where the similarities with The Sixth Sense end - this book is actually entertaining. It ran a little bit long at times for me at times though.

Just finished a very old an d beat up copy of Johnny Got His Gun by Dalton Trumbo. Also very good and scary in a "I couldn't imagine" type of way. Imagine being a WWI soldier and getting blown to bits and surviving but you have no arms, legs, eyes, teeth, and a tongue.
If you've ever seen the Metallica video for "One" they play clips of the '71 movie version in it.

Currently, I'm in the middle of Star Wars: The Approaching Storm and The Partly Couldy Patriot by Sarah Vowel.
TAS is decent but nothing special. The latter is a collection of articles, essays, and pieces she did for various magazines and NPR. Pretty good, but politically nerdy stuff.

I'd like to find Gregory McDonald's Flecth Won. All the bookstores near me don't have any in stock. The possibilty of Kevin Smith doing a new, book faithful version (maybe with Zach Braff as Flecth) has snagged my curiosity.
Has anyone read Motley Crue's The Dirt? Saw it the other day, but passed. I didn't really want to spend $15 on a paperback that I'm not so sure I'd like.

Anyone have a summer reading list...
or just a reading list in general...
or just finished reading anything?

darko666
07-09-2005, 11:24 PM
i plan on reading books that pertain to Greek and Norse mythology to further expand my knowledge.

other than that, i usally collect "Art Of" books. i love to read and study all the concept art and learn what the artsist did to achieve the design. since i'm taking art classes then moving onto computer anaimation classes these books do help out a lot. i have a huge collection of them, spanning from Star Wars to Anime/Video Games.

mastermatt24
07-10-2005, 12:56 AM
Right now im reading Force Heretic 3 and I hope to finish that by the end of the week so I can read the last two of the NJO in Alaska (two long plane rides). :D I hope I can finish them.. but I found out that theres a gym at the marriot- so Im gonna be in there a lot.. (Is it hard to read on a treadmill..? I dont have a treadmill but run 3 miles a day at my old middle school's track right by my house) Ok.. back to books. IF i finish NJO when Im in alaska I will be able to purcahse Dark Nest 1 when im in Northern CA (auburn). Then after that maybe I'll read Zahn's trillogy and dulogy.. but I do have to read some junk for school: Huck Finn, Ethan Frome and Genesis (bible). Not too bad, but I have to do a lot of essays and junk with Huck Finn.

900 posts Hurray!! Only a hundred and ill be the big one 000. :)

jjreason
07-10-2005, 02:59 AM
Right now I'm reading "Road to Hell", which is a book about how outlaw motorcycle gangs became the leading organize crime faction in Canada. It's moving along pretty well. The last book I read before that was "Labyrinth of Evil" (twice) and the novellization of EpIII. I'm winding up for the big release of Harry Potter and the Half Blood Prince, but was kind of hoping to go over part 5 again before I started it. Might not be enough time.

A friend recommended Chuck Pahlaniuk (sp?), who wrote "Fight Club", so I checked that book out. It's quite good, and quite faithful to the movie :D .

I also enjoy reading Stephen King and Elmore Leonard, pretty typical stuff.

Ji'dai
07-10-2005, 12:33 PM
I'm currently reading the ROTS novelization and a horror collection called "From the Borderlands." Prior to that I read "House of Blood" by Bryan Smith, "Shadows of the Empire" (first time!), and "In the Night Room" by Peter Straub.

Looking over my reading list for the past year it seems to be dominated by horror, with entries from Stephen King (Christine, Green Mile, Pet Sematary), William F. Nolan (Nightworlds), Richard Matheson (Hell House), Peter Straub (Houses Without Doors, Lost Boy Lost Girl) and Michael Crichton (Andromeda Strain).

Throw in a sprinkling of scifi/fantasy with L. Ron Hubbard (Battlefield Earth) and Douglas Addams (Dirk Gently series).

I'm getting tired of horror though, it's just too damn depressing. All those people getting killed, mangled bodies and such. So time for something more uplifting or lighter in tone. Maybe a historical account - I think "1776" by Richard McCullough looks interesting. I've never read any of Harry Potter's adventures so I might start on them.

InsaneJediGirl
07-10-2005, 10:30 PM
I've been reading just an odd collection of books,none to be in a real set genre or series like I normally read.So far,I have finished rereading "The Martian Chronicles" by Ray Bradbury and currently reading "Something Wicked Comes This Way" and "The Toynbee Convector" also by Bradbury.In the same SciFi/Paranormal vein,read Slyiva Browne's "Secrets and Mysteries of the World". Wasnt a bad book,found that very interesting.

Also finished awhile back "The Making of a Surgeon" by William Nolen. The book was certainly dated by todays standards,but I liked the way it was written.Has some good bits of humor injected in.

I plan on reading "Hot Lights,Cold Steel" by Michael J. Collins and the lastest Harry Potter of course.I'd like to read "Ideas & Opinions" By Albert Einstein,but dont know if I'll get there before summer ends :crazed:

Rocketboy
07-10-2005, 11:35 PM
A friend recommended Chuck Pahlaniuk (sp?), who wrote "Fight Club", so I checked that book out. It's quite good, and quite faithful to the movie :D . Not sure what's harder: spelling or pronouncing his name! :D
I want to read his new one, Haunted, a collection of short horror stories that, according to what I've heard (which may be just publicity), some people have actually passed out from reading it.

JimJamBonds
07-11-2005, 12:28 AM
Those are some good choices there Rocketboy! What do you think of Confessions? It seems hard to belive that its true but then again??? Johnny Got His Gun nice bedtime reading huhh? Johnny is probably one of the most messed up books I have ever read. If you want to go up in time a bit Slaughterhouse Five is another nice bedtime reader.;)

As for me I'm currently working my way through the OT, currently I'm at ESB. A memoir by David K. Webster called Parachute Infantry. Mr. Webster was a Screaming Eagle, he was in the 101st Airborne during WW II and this tells his tale (he was one of the characters in the Band of Brothers mini-series). I'm constantly reading historical books that range from French and Indian War, Lewis and Clark, War of 1812 etc. through World War II.

As I posted in another thread I'm eagerly awaiting the newest Harry Turtledove book Drive to the East. Also on my can't wait for list is Band of Brothers by Alexander Kent who has written a series based during the era of tall ships, if you like Master and Commander then you'd like this series.

Bel-Cam Jos
07-11-2005, 09:13 AM
I'm a teacher, and an English teacher at that. My students go to the beach or the mountains on their breaks; I go to the library.

This summer:
- The Uses of Enchantment Bruno Bettelheim (about fairy tales' value, George Lucas was inspired by it to write SW)
- Emotional Intelligence Daniel Goleman (another Lucas influence, this time on the Prequels, but less interesting than T.U.of E.)
- the 7 Chronicles of Narnia books
- Their Eyes Were Watching God Zora Neale Hurston
- The Bridges of Madison County James Waller (just wanted to read what all the hype was about those years ago: eh :ermm: )
- Charlotte's Web, Stuart Little E.B. White (the latter was hilarious! )
- Remembering Woolworth's Karen Plunkett-Powell (nice nostalgic look back a the early 5 & 10 store chain)
- others that I forget right now.

Last summer:
28 different books, almost 9000 pages. Loved every minute of it. The greatest thing about reading is that one must take time to do it. It is a conscious effort, and IMHO, better than almost any film. Mostly.

El Chuxter
07-11-2005, 01:18 PM
I recently finished Zorro by Isabel Allende. A mega-talented Latin American writer tackling the tale. Until Gabriel Garcia Marquez writes the book where Luke finds out about his mother, this will be the coolest crossover book of this sort ever written.

I'm currently reading Memoirs of a Geisha. This seems to be another excellent book thus far.

JimJamBonds
07-11-2005, 01:31 PM
I'm currently reading Memoirs of a Geisha. This seems to be another excellent book thus far.

A friend of mind read Memoirs of a Geisha and she loved it, I believe it is going to come out as a movie in November.

Rocketboy
07-11-2005, 04:20 PM
Those are some good choices there Rocketboy! What do you think of Confessions? It seems hard to belive that its true but then again??? Johnny Got His Gun nice bedtime reading huhh? Johnny is probably one of the most messed up books I have ever read. If you want to go up in time a bit Slaughterhouse Five is another nice bedtime reader.;) Confessions... was great read. I want to believe Bariss, because he really makes it seem plausible, but on the other had, it was guy from the flippin' Gong Show! :D
Johnny... was so real life scary. It was indeed messed up.
I've read Slaughterhouse Five. Another great one. A bit hard to follow initially, IIRC.

A memoir by David K. Webster called Parachute Infantry. Mr. Webster was a Screaming Eagle, he was in the 101st Airborne during WW II and this tells his tale (he was one of the characters in the Band of Brothers mini-series).Loved B.O.B. (the miniseries - haven't read the book...yet). I may have to check that one out.

Also on my can't wait for list is Band of Brothers by Alexander Kent who has written a series based during the era of tall ships, if you like Master and Commander then you'd like this series.Didn't Ambrosewrite that? Or is it another book with the same name?

Rocketboy
07-11-2005, 10:43 PM
Forgot to mention a few others...

Kevin Smith's Silent Bob Speaks - a collection of the writer/director's various articles from the past few years. You know a guy can tell a good story when he talks about his poop and makes it interesting. He also rants about thing like Spider-Man, his hatred for "Greasy" Reese Witherspoon, the making of "Jay & Silent Bob Strike Back," his hetero love affair with Ben Affleck, lap dances, and more.

Not so sure they count as books, but I read a few of the "Sin City" graphic novels (The Hard Goodbye and Booze, Broads, & Bullets). Still ticked I didn't get a chance to see the movie...

JimJamBonds
07-12-2005, 12:40 AM
Didn't Ambrose write that? Or is it another book with the same name?

You are correct on both accounts, Amrose (who on the whole I think isn't worth the hype) wrote Band of Brothers about Easy Company of the 506 PIR, 101st Airborne Div. during WW II. This other Band of Brothers is by a different guy who writes historical fiction and is set during the tall ship era. I think this one will be just prior to the American War of Independence.

solidjb
07-12-2005, 05:24 PM
A friend recommended Chuck Pahlaniuk (sp?), who wrote "Fight Club", so I checked that book out. It's quite good, and quite faithful to the movie :D .


I read Fight Club, Choke, Lullaby, Invisible Monsters and Diary last summer. I think I liked Choke the best (only because the movie ruined Fight Club) but they were all interesting (albeit wierd) reads.

Right now I am reading "Squandered Victory" by Larry Diamond - a book about the US in Iraq.
I just finished "War of the Worlds" by H.G. Wells because I'd never read it before
and "Hound of the Baskervilles" by Arthur Conan Doyle because I had never read that before either.

Rocketboy
07-23-2005, 10:57 PM
While camping I read 2 books and got a loittle more than half way through a third.

Star Wars Revenge of the Sith novelization. Parts of it are better than the movie (Anakin's seduction to the dark side, for example). And there were a few mentions of expanded universe stuff that shouldn't have been in there, IMO (how many besides hardcore fans know who Ventress is?).

Found a copy of Gregory McDonald's Flecth Won. Good, funny, fast paced stuff. I definitely see Kevin Smith doing this book as a movie.

About half way through Iris Chang's The Rape of Nanking. In December 1937 the Japanese army invaded the Chinese city of Nanking and went ****ing berzerk. In as little as six weeks, they brutally murdered an estimated 300,000 Chinese people. In the process of the killing, they savagely raped as many women as they could find (and age didn't matter), looted and burned much of the city to the ground. The Japanese soldiers had fun doing it too. They made up games with the killing, such as seeing how many can they behead in an hour or how fast can they kill 100 people. Sick, disturbing, and all too real.

Bel-Cam Jos
07-24-2005, 04:51 PM
Others read so far:

- The Ways of White Folks Langston Hughes
- Harry Potter & the H-B Prince JK Rowling (a little small press, cult following book ;) )
- Ishmael Daniel Quinn (a very interesting dialogue about life and the people of the world)
Currently reading:
- The Story of B Daniel Quinn (see above)

Bel-Cam Jos
07-30-2005, 12:12 PM
A few more reads...

My Ishamel Daniel Quinn (a different version of the very interesting dialogue about life and the people of the world; it's the "end" of that series of stories)
O Pioneers! Willa Cather
That puts my book count at 20, roughly 4900 pages... and counting! :)

Cuurently starting A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man by James Joyce. I can't remember if I've read the entire book before (I know I was tested on parts of it in a high school class). Need to remind myself of Joyce's style before I tackle his Finnegan's Wake; Joseph Campbell was married to this book, I believe, since he wrote about it, oh I'd say maybe ONE-HUNDRED MEEELLION TIMES!
Also trying to find a library with a decent copy of The Tale of Genji by Murasaki Skikibu, possibly the world's first true novel, written by a Japanese woman about 800 years ago, I think.

Bel-Cam Jos
08-08-2005, 02:22 PM
Here are a few more I've finished...
The Rain God Arturo Islas (an interesting Mexican-American story of culture clashing and maturing)
The Wedding Dress Carrie Young (a collection of stories about Norwegian settlers in the Dakotas)
The Poorhouse Fair John Updike (my first Updike read, his first novel; a weird 1984 meets Driving Miss Daisy story)
Dark Nest I: The Joiner King Troy Denning (read my review of it in its own thread here).

I think that puts me at 25 books at around 6300 pages this summer. My goal is always to reach at least 20 in the summer (c'mon! it's almost 3 months worth of "free time" off :rolleyes: ). BTW, I keep a list (anyone who knows me, knows that "Bel-Cam" is an anagram for "list maker" ;) ) of all the books I've ever read, at least as many as I can recall or find proof (minus comic books, magazines, trivia books, really short books, or kids picture books). It's at 560 books, of which 193 are Star Wars ones. And I hope to keep it growing! :D

dr_evazan22
08-09-2005, 05:49 PM
Bookos I read a long time ago and recommend... My favorite book is Autobiography of Malcolm X. Reading about his change from criminal to militant firebrand, to the path of peace is amazing. Reading about his experiences in Egypt and Mecca (I think it was Mecca), and his realization of what Islam is really about was very touching. Then, reading the epilogue about his assassination and funeral brought tears to my eyes.

After seeing "Bram Stokers Dracula" at the movies I wanted to erad the book, and it was great.

Currently reading the newest SW book - Joiner King.

JimJamBonds
08-17-2005, 10:55 AM
I finished last night the new Harry Turtledove book "Drive to the East" another great alternate history novel. Sadly my reading 'list' has been mighty thin I just can't get into books this summer, although I do have my eye on a biography on Hank Greenberg.

mastermatt24
08-17-2005, 02:49 PM
I stopped The Joiner King half way through to read Huck Finn for school.. I be done with that on Thursday, and I still have to read Ethan Frome.. :o

Rocketboy
08-17-2005, 07:57 PM
I recently finishd Sarah Vowel's Take the Canoli, more of her short essays and pieces from NPR in print. Pretty good and less political that the other one of hers I was reading.

Bel-Cam Jos
08-18-2005, 04:22 PM
Well, all the lines in airports are great for reading, so after a brief vacation, I have 4 more to add to the list...

Last of the Jedi #2: Dark Warning Jude Watson (not as good as the really good #1)
Because Writing Matters Carl Nagin (a teacher training book)
Columbus in the Americas William Least-Heat Moon (a concise look at the "discoverer" of the New World
Weird Tales From Shakespeare Katharine Kerr & Martin Greenberg (an anthology of Shakespeare plays in new contexts and settings; pretty cool)

So that's 29 books, around 7000 pages. More?

Rocketboy
08-18-2005, 04:48 PM
Last of the Jedi #2: Dark Warning Jude Watson (not as good as the really good #1)Is that out already?
The first one was a fairly entertaining read, but from the description I read about #3, it sounds like the series won't be about Obi-Wan, but will follow the new former Jedi introduced in #1, which will probably stop me from buying them.

Bel-Cam Jos
08-18-2005, 06:58 PM
Is that out already?
The first one was a fairly entertaining read, but from the description I read about #3, it sounds like the series won't be about Obi-Wan, but will follow the new former Jedi introduced in #1, which will probably stop me from buying them.It was released in late July. The story (without giving away any spoilers) has Obi-Wan having to decide if he'll do things around the galaxy or stay on Tatooine to protect Luke, but there are some Jedi who weren't killed in the Order #66 purge, so the series could revolve around them, I guess. The parts I'm interested in are when Qui-Gon's voice is heard (some are flashbacks, but others are current conversations between he as a ghost and Obi-Wan).

Rocketboy
08-18-2005, 10:12 PM
July, huh? Wow, I thought it was slated for September. I didn't see the first one until August (after the initial April oops release).
I'll have to keep an eye out for it.

El Chuxter
08-19-2005, 11:17 AM
I get the impression the release dates for these LOTJ books are just suggestions. Book I came out early in some areas, too.

InsaneJediGirl
09-05-2005, 09:25 PM
I thought LOTJ #2 was going to come out in September too. Wow,I'm behind lol

I just finished reading Esperanza Rising.Its more of a "young adult" book but excellent historical fiction of migrant workers in the Great Depression.Sad book in all really,but has a great message at the end to never give up.

Ji'dai
09-08-2005, 12:52 PM
As young Dawn with finger tips of rose touched the world yesterday I finished reading Homer's The Iliad and The Odyssey. The translation, by Robert Fitzgerald, was a traditional one, keeping to the original verse and form (or as is possible in English). The translator used archaic spellings for people and places (Akhilleus/Achilles, Ilion/Troy, Aias/Ajax, Kyklops/Cyclops) but I got used to it.

I had forgotten that the The Iliad, a chronicle of the Trojan War, takes place in the tenth and final year of the siege and ends with the death of Hektor. The Trojan Horse, the fall of the city, and the fates of the other famous Greek fighters, are mentioned in The Odyssey.

I started on a collection of plays by Sophocles last night: Antigone, Oedipus the King, and Oedipus at Colonus. I also grabbed a copy of Fitzgerald's translation of Virgil's The Aeneid at the library too.

Rocketboy
09-08-2005, 05:29 PM
I had forgotten that the The Iliad, a chronicle of the Trojan War, takes place in the tenth and final year of the siege and ends with the death of Hektor. The Trojan Horse, the fall of the city, and the fates of the other famous Greek fighters, are mentioned in The Odyssey. Aw jeez, that for the flippin' spoiler warning!
:D


I haven't had a whole lot of time to read as oflate, but on my breaks at work, I struggling...errr...working through The Approaching Storm. I think I'm on the last chapter (thank the maker).

Rocketboy
09-29-2005, 11:22 PM
Finished "The Approaching Storm" a few days after the last post.
Boy did that ever suck.
Reminded me why 95% of EU sucks.

Finished "Jurassic Park" the other day. Great book. Better than the movie, which I re-watched after finishing the book, and it wasn't as bad as I remembered. And te kids were just as annoying in the book as they were in the movie.

Now reading "December 6" by Martin Cruz Smith. Only 35-40 pages in, but so far so good.

El Chuxter
09-30-2005, 01:05 PM
I'm in the middle of Jitterbug Perfume by Tom Robbins. Like every other book by him I've read, it's a great read, but to try to explain it would pretty much entail quoting the entire novel. :)

Daz
09-30-2005, 05:58 PM
My favourite books by genre:

Sci-Fi:

The Mars trilogy - Kim Stanley Robinson

Altered Carbon/Broken Angels/Woken Furies - Richard Morgan

Voyage - Stephen Baxter

Heir to the Empire/Dark Forces Rising/The Last Command - Timothy Zahn


Political:

No Safe Place/Protect and Defend/Balance of Power - Richard North Patterson


Historical:

Gates of Fire/Tides of War/Alexander - Steven Pressfield

Gates of Rome/Death of Kings/Field of Swords - Conn Iggulden

Pride of Carthage: A novel of Hannibal - David Anthony Durham

Eagle in the Snow - Wallace Breem

Mystery/thriller:

Anything be Micheal Connelly or Jeffery Deaver


Legal :

Anything by Richard North Patterson

Graphic Novels:

Preacher - Garth Ennis

Transmetropolitan - Warren Ellis

Watchmen - Alan Moore

Hellblazer -various

Least favourite author and novel :

Dan Brown - Da Vinci Code
I f**king hate that novel its everywhere, whenever I use the train it's gauranteed there'll be at least fifteen people reading it in my carraige alone all hunched over their seats devouring it like pod people:mad: . Wake up people the Da Vinci Code is the biggest load of over hyped Sh*te ever to be published in 2000 years.

El Chuxter
09-30-2005, 06:31 PM
Least favourite author and novel :

Dan Brown - Da Vinci Code
I f**king hate that novel its everywhere, whenever I use the train it's gauranteed there'll be at least fifteen people reading it in my carraige alone all hunched over their seats devouring it like pod people:mad: . Wake up people the Da Vinci Code is the biggest load of over hyped Sh*te ever to be published in 2000 years.

Why don't you tell us how you really feel? :p

I'm actually with you on this one. I tried reading it to see what the big deal was, and it was so poorly written, I couldn't get through the first twenty pages. The supposedly shocking theories he put forth have been around for centuries.

I'd rather watch Jurassic Park III again than finish that piece of tripe.

Ji'dai
09-30-2005, 08:08 PM
I really liked The Da Vinci Code. Though it wasn't the first exposure I've had to that interpretation of the Grail legend, I still thought it was interesting. I'm not looking forward to the film version though.

Daz
10-01-2005, 09:04 AM
El Chuxter I'm actually with you on this one.

Thank god I'm not alone:grin:



El Chuxter I tried reading it to see what the big deal was, and it was so poorly written.

Gullible Sh*te that I am I went out and bought both this and his other one Angel & Demons based on the hype(more money then sense me). Imagine my dismay when I discover it's written by a complete hack probably with the use of a writing by the numbers self help manual. :mad:


El Chuxter I couldn't get through the first twenty pages. The supposedly shocking theories he put forth have been around for centuries.


Given that I had already spent my hard earned cash (ok maybe hard would be pushing it) I some how pushed on past page twenty past the cliched character introduction and onto the transparent made for movie cat and mouse set piece set In the Louvre .Now quite how the cat never caught the mouse I'll never know seen as they seemed to stop every five minutes to study a painting and have the professor lecture his lady friend and the reader for about thirty pages at a time. Such was the length of these lecture's that I was nearly half way through the book and they still hadn't left the bloody Louvre. It was at this point that I just said money be damned I've wasted enough time on this tripe and threw it away, if I wanted lecture's I'd be in college.

Bel-Cam Jos
10-01-2005, 10:46 AM
I guess I'll have to step in the voice of reason (:p kidding). The DaVinci Code was one of the best reads I've had in a while. I was not "shocked" by the theories, but the pacing was excellent. Were there some extended passages of extreme details? Yes. But the chapters weren't any longer than, what, 5 or 6 pages? That's concise writing; so what if that's semi-scripted. I don't know if I truly felt a closeness to the characters, by plot-wise and structurally, it was a great book, IMHO.

Bobby Fett
10-08-2005, 07:39 PM
I just finished The Battle of Corrin by Herbert and Anderson. I've always liked the Dune series.

Right now, I'm half way through Dreadnought: Britain, Germany, and the Coming of the Great War by Robert Massie. If you like history, I recommend this one highly, but be forewarned: there is a second volume - Castles of Steel: Britain, Germany, and the Winning of the Great War at Sea. About 1700 pages total.

I don't have anything on the agenda after that. Yet.

Ji'dai
01-18-2006, 02:52 PM
I was burned out on epic poetry after finishing the books and plays mentioned in my last post (The Iliad, The Odyssey, Virgil's The Aeneid, Sophocles' plays Antigone, Oedipus the King, and Oedipus at Colonus).

Around Thanksgiving I flew through all six Harry Potter books in a whirlwind two week period and had pretty good time doing that. Rowling must place some enchantment on her books because I simply could not put them down. I can't wait for the last volume now.

I read the epic Beowulf around Christmas time in an interesting bilingual translation by Irish poet Seamus Heaney. The modern English translation of the poem is presented side by side with the original Old English manuscript. It's amazing how much the English language has evolved in a thousand years. I recognized a few words in the OE script still in use in modern English and German, but most of the words were alien to me.

I most recently finished Dante's The Divine Comedy, which details the author's guided tour through Hell, Purgatory, and Heaven.

Needing something a little lighter, I picked up Mark Twain's The Adventures of Tom Sawyer and Huckleberry Finn at the library last week.

mastermatt24
01-18-2006, 10:46 PM
Those are both pretty good for lit novels. I enjoyed Huck more for some reason.

Rocketboy
01-18-2006, 10:48 PM
With Ji'dai readin' all that (mostly) classic lit, I've been re-reading a ton of my old comics, mostly X-Men stuff from the 90's.
Ahhhh nostalgia.

JimJamBonds
01-19-2006, 01:08 AM
One of the things I do is historical reenactments, I've been putting together a new "persona" (a member of the Corps of Topographical Engineers) so I've been reading info on historical survey's and other exciting stuff like that. :squareeye

Bel-Cam Jos
01-20-2006, 06:29 PM
I hadn't posted any of my recent readings here for a while, so I might've forgotten a few. I actually have not had a much time as I used to read, but I sneak in a couple here or there.

- The first 12 books of the Series of Unfortunate Events (these are great, even if they're supposedly for kids! there's a lot of allusions and comments that I'm certain most kids might miss, and they're around 200-300 pages each, so they'll take some time to finish)

- Casino Royale (my first Ian Fleming James Bond novel... and my last one; ugh)

- SW: Dark Nest III (not too bad, but not too great either)

- SW: Dark Lord (this was one of the best SW novels I've read, ever, not just recently, with quite a bit of insider info into the mind and body of Anakin/Vader)

I'm about 1/3 through a mystery/crime novel Something Borrowed, Something Black by Loren Estleman (not bad so far)

El Chuxter
01-20-2006, 06:32 PM
I've been bogged down by Dark Nest III: Swarm War for a while myself. I just cannot get interested in those stupid bugs!

James Boba Fettfield
01-30-2006, 06:33 AM
I just finished Richard Matheson's I Am Legend a few hours ago.

Wow, how the hell I've missed reading this book until now is beyond me. I am glad I did, though.

After reading the ending, I can see why Matheson's work was natural for use on The Twilight Zone.

It was great to finally read a novel that I enjoyed and I'd certainly take 100 more novels like I Am Legend over much of the "classic literature" being forced onto me in college.

Ji'dai
01-30-2006, 04:33 PM
I just finished Richard Matheson's I Am Legend a few hours ago. I want to read that one too but someone lost/stole the copy from the library. They did get in Matheson's Hell House, which is a pretty decent haunted house story. I Am Legend was made into a watchable sci-fi flick called the Omega Man with Charlton Heston. Heston plays the last healthy man on Earth after a plague wipes out most of mankind and mutates the remaining survivors. It was parodied on one of the Simpsons THOH episodes ("Homega Man," I think).

Heston made quite a few sci-fi films in the late 60s early 70s, which is probably what killed the genre until Star Wars revived it :D

Oh excuse me, my microwave Soylent Green is done.

James Boba Fettfield
01-30-2006, 05:26 PM
I almost bought Hell House, too, but decided against it. Then I almost bought a three volume set that collects his short stories, but didn't do that either. I thought I should read I Am Legend and the selection of short stories it includes first to see if I like his writing style. I do, too. The man is clear and to the point and he seems (so far) to know how to end his stories in a way that you don't know what's going to happen until you finish the last sentence.

I've been curious to see The Omega Man before I knew about the novel's connection. I think there was another movie inspired by it with Vincent Price, too.

However, I would hope I Am Legend receives a proper movie adaptation that stays a bit more faithful to its source material because this novel would make a kick *** movie.

Ji'dai
01-30-2006, 08:27 PM
You'd think vampires would be pretty mined out by now. Still, with the popularity of Underworld and Blade franchises, we might see a faithful adaptation of I Am Legend. Though they'd probably turn it into a dark surbuban comedy or something.

Has anyone picked up a copy of Stephen King's new one, Cell? The plot is a twist on the "Night of the Living Dead" with cell phones being the primary vector for the infection after a mysterious "pulse" turns users into vicious maniacs.

It's gonna be awhile till I get a chance to read it since the library website says my position in the holds queue is #20. :upset:

James Boba Fettfield
01-30-2006, 08:39 PM
I'm holding out hope for it to be done, Ji'dai. My fear is that too many people will think it is a ripoff of other sources when in fact Legend is usually being borrowed from by the new stuff.

I haven't started reading Cell, but I did pick it up on Sunday after much thinking and Guyute telling me to "get it now." The dedication to Matheson in the book is why I picked up I Am Legend.

I also picked up Keene's two dead books (The Rising, City of the Dead) and two horror anthologies (Dark Delicacies, The Dark Descent). I went on a kick where I decided it's time to start expanding my personal library and what better way to do that than to get some horror in there.

Been too long since I've read any horror...except for that college course in Poe last quarter.

James Boba Fettfield
02-17-2006, 08:18 PM
For reasons unknown to me and because I already have a big stack of books to read, I decided it would be a good idea to pick up Matheson's Hell House, Richard Laymon's One Rainy Night, and Robert McCammon's Swan Song.

First it was the dvds, now it's the books. Where will the needless buying stop?

OC47150
02-24-2006, 12:14 PM
- Casino Royale (my first Ian Fleming James Bond novel... and my last one; ugh)

Need to give old Ian another try, Bel. My fave is From Russia with Love. Read it at least three times.

John Gardner and Raymond Benson picked up the mantle and wrote some good Bond books, too. Benson also wrote the two Splinter Cell books, too.

Alistair MacLean is one of my favorites: the Guns of Navarone, Ice Station Zebra. The master storyteller, he is.

Jack Higgins is a good fast read. I have gotten through some of his more recent works in a weekend.

Read a lot of military history books, too. Reading one about Hitler and the bunker at home.

I also thoroughly enjoy Jude Watson's SW books. Bought the latest in the Last Jedi series; haven't read it yet.

InsaneJediGirl
03-27-2006, 11:20 PM
I finished reading Unexplained Mysteries of World War 2 by William Breuer. Not bad,although some things have been reported as inaccurate. Mostly just a fun read for rarely heard stories of WW2,certainly wouldnt take much of its historical accounts.

JimJamBonds
03-28-2006, 12:08 AM
The threads.

Slicker
03-28-2006, 04:57 AM
Right now I'm reading The Rise and Fall of the Third Reich for about the 10th time. It's absolutely my favorite book ever and I plan on reading the damn thing over and over until the pages fall out.

OC47150
03-28-2006, 08:07 AM
I finished reading Unexplained Mysteries of World War 2 by William Breuer. Not bad,although some things have been reported as inaccurate. Mostly just a fun read for rarely heard stories of WW2,certainly wouldnt take much of its historical accounts.

Sounds interesting. I might have to pick that one up.

Slicker
05-23-2006, 05:39 AM
Right now I'm reading The Rise and Fall of the Third Reich for about the 10th time. It's absolutely my favorite book ever and I plan on reading the damn thing over and over until the pages fall out.I just finished up all 1,200+ pages of Rise and Fall so now I'm onto Inside the Third Reich written by Alber Speer, Hitlers personal arcitecht turned armaments minister who alot of historians call the most honest Nazi since he didn't deny anything at Nuremburg and was honest about everything. He was sentenced to 20 years in Spandau prison (the same prison Hitler was imprisoned in in 1923 for his failed putsch) and that is where he wrote these memoirs.

I've also started reading The Da Vinci Code. I didn't buy it, I borrowed it and I just wanna see how much the movie was like the book since I liked the movie.

JimJamBonds
05-23-2006, 02:08 PM
I'm about half done with End of the Beginning. Its a follow up book of alternate history by Harry Turtledove. In the first book Days of Infamy Japan not only attacks Pearl Harbor on Dec 7, 1941 but they invade and take the Hawaiian Islands. In this book the American's are mounting an attack against Japan, the ground forces are about to land.....

Dominic Guglieme
05-23-2006, 02:31 PM
Various magazines, and Darth Maul: Shadow Hunter. (Expect a review in the next few weeks.)

mastermatt24
05-23-2006, 10:51 PM
Circa pg 100 in Triple Zero, I would love to finish it before Betrayal comes out at the end of the month. Also just finished the Great Gatsby, which I thought was sooooo absolutlely pointless! Have any of you guys read it?

James Boba Fettfield
05-24-2006, 12:13 AM
Also just finished the Great Gatsby, which I thought was sooooo absolutlely pointless! Have any of you guys read it?

I don't believe Gatsby is pointless. Heck, I even thought it was a delightful read that doesn't require the same intensity from the reader that the likes of...oh say Joyce would.

El Chuxter
05-24-2006, 12:32 PM
Gatsby is one of my all-time favorites. Go read it again. :p

Dominic Guglieme
05-25-2006, 07:30 PM
"Rise and Fall" is a fantastic book. Gatsby is not objectively bad, but it is force-fed to many people.

And, yes, Fitzgerald beats Joyce hands down. Joyce is a large part of the reason I left English as a major.

Bel-Cam Jos
05-26-2006, 10:00 AM
I haven't posted much in this thread lately because...
1) SSG has been down, of course,
2) since my school dropped its 20-minute silent reading period so I haven't had as much time to read, and
3) II haven't had as much time to read (only 4 books in the last few months :( ).

But, I've read...
Rebel Commando: 000 which was okay story-wise, but well-written nonetheless.

A Million Little Pieces by James Frey, which had the most wretched, disturbing first 50-some pages of any book I've ever read. I actually had to put the book down, leave it, and purposely do some other activity to take my mind off it. But, by the end, it was a good read; who cares if it was an "exaggerated" memoir. It could be a good lesson for someone needing a helping hand.

The Gun Seller by Hugh Laurie (the guy who plays Dr. Gregory House on... well, House the TV show) which was funny at the start, but petered out by the end. I can see a lot of the character "House" in this story.

And I'm currently reading a new biography of Roberto Clemente (in chapter 4 so far).

As far as TGG goes, I can't label it "THE Great American Novel" (I give that to Steinbeck's Grapes of Wrath) but I'd consider it "A Great American Novel." It's meant to show the shallowness and thoughtlessness of the rich at a time when things were supposed to be great. Sorry if my English teacher-ness is oozing out, even if I've never actually taught the novel to my students (here, it's an 11th grade title and I teach 9th and 10th).

OC47150
05-26-2006, 12:02 PM
Bel-Cam, you're the first person I know who has read A Million Little Pieces.

I was on a WWII kick for a while. Read The Bunker by James O'Donnell. It was slow at first but picked up. I actually sat it down and read a book or two before coming back to it.

I started to read The Murder of Adolf Hitler, but it delved into medical issues way too much. I couldn't finish the first chapter.

More recently, I read Timothy Zahn's Outbound Flight and Luceno's Dark Lord. Very good. I highly recommend both. I've also read the third book in Jude Watson's Last Jedi series; I'll have to pick up the fourth.

Reading a cheap WWII thriller at home now.

At the gym, I've read Robert Harris' Fatherland, a post-WWII thriller, and am now re-reading Heir to the Empire. It's the second time for Heir; read it about 10 years ago.

And yes, reading at the gym makes the time on the treadmill go by quicker. :thumbsup:

Bel-Cam Jos
05-26-2006, 08:04 PM
Bel-Cam, you're the first person I know who has read A Million Little Pieces.

And yes, reading at the gym makes the time on the treadmill go by quicker. :thumbsup:I wanted to read for myself to delve through all the hype in the news about it. I find most of that unfounded now. I read The Bridges of Madison County, Who Moved My Cheese?, The Sisterhood of the Traveling Pants, Fried Green Tomatoes at the Whistlestop Cafe, The Da Vinci Code and Left Behind #1 for the same reasons. Media hype often blows things out of proportion (news flash! really? :p ).

Read anywhere! I tried doing that while driving, but now I'm floating with a harp, and wings on my back... :rolleyes:

OC47150
05-26-2006, 08:08 PM
I want to reread The DaVinci Code after I see the movie. I've had interesting conversations with those who've read it.

My niece and nephew live 90 minutes away. I can get through a Jude Watson SW book on the trip up and back.

LusiferSam
05-26-2006, 10:09 PM
I just started the The Dark Tower series. One of my uncles lent my the whole series last summer, but just haven't had the time (or wanted to make the time) to start until now. I'm about half way though the The Gunslinger. I'm not sure whether I like it yet or not. There's only been two books I've never finish and less the story picks up a bit one of the later books might be the third.

mastermatt24
05-26-2006, 11:17 PM
Gatsby is one of my all-time favorites. Go read it again. :p
Thats ok- Ive already started on the Catcher in the Rye, which Im enjoying much better. :yes:

El Chuxter
05-29-2006, 12:28 AM
A'ight. It's no Gatsby, but it is a fine piece of American literature. However, please seek help if you find yourself compelled to buy every copy of it that you see. :)

mastermatt24
05-30-2006, 01:34 AM
Why would I do that??? :cross-eye

Ji'dai
06-14-2006, 03:36 PM
Lessee... after finishing Twain's Huck Finn and Tom Sawyer, I read several SW EU titles: Luceno's Dark Lord: The Rise of Darth Vader, Zahn's Outbound Flight, and Anderson's Jedi Academy Trilogy: Jedi Search, Dark Apprentice, & Champions of the Force.

Next was Stephen King's Cell, a rather unsatisfying tale. I thought The Stand much better.

I also read H.G. Well's The War of the Worlds, The Time Machine, & The Invisible Man, before heading into the deep with Peter Benchley's Jaws. The movie strays somewhat from the original novel so it might be worth a read if you liked the film.

Next up was historian David McCullough's 1776, detailing the tumultous year in American history from the siege of Boston to Independence to Washington's daring attacks at Trenton and Princeton.

After that I read Michael Crichton's Timeline and Sphere, both of which have been adapted into films. I preferred Timeline's 14th century time-travelling historians to Sphere's group of boring scientists who investigate a crashed American spacecraft from the future out in the Pacific.

I just finished Robert Harris' Fatherland, a political thriller set in 1964 Nazi Germany. If you're a fan of alternate history and find Nazis endlessly fascinating, then you might check this one out.

OC47150
06-14-2006, 05:39 PM
I just finished Robert Harris' Fatherland, a political thriller set in 1964 Nazi Germany. If you're a fan of alternate history and find Nazis endlessly fascinating, then you might check this one out.

I reread Fatherland just recently. Excellent book. If you haven't read Harris's Enigma, I highly recommend it, too. A WWII thriller set in England and involving the Bechley Park code breakers.

I'm reading Heir to the Empire at the gym. Second time for that one, and I'm thoroughly enjoying it.

Bel-Cam Jos
06-14-2006, 06:36 PM
I finished The Accident by Elie Wiesel (Holocaust survivor, wrote Night, that Oprah featured on her show), which is semi-non-fictional. Not bad.

Am currently reading something by the guy who wrote All I Ever Needed to Know I Learned in Kindergarten that's okay; kind of Chicken Soup For the Soul-esque to me.

I'm impatiently waiting for Legacy: Betrayal to get returned to the library. (to whomever has it out, it's due in today! :mad: ).

Slicker
06-14-2006, 06:47 PM
I'm reading a big arse World War II day by day book. I like the way it's written because the days are presented as a newspaper article yet it gives the facts and kinda alludes to what really happened and some behind the scenes stuff.

JimJamBonds
06-15-2006, 11:46 AM
I reread Fatherland just recently. Excellent book. If you haven't read Harris's Enigma, I highly recommend it, too. A WWII thriller set in England and involving the Bechley Park code breakers.

I have also read Fatherland and thought it was pretty good as well. Thanks for the tip on Enigma I'll look into that one. :thumbsup:

Bel-Cam Jos
06-20-2006, 11:51 AM
The last two summers, I've read at least 28 books each, and at least 5000 pages (for those who don't know me, I loooooove keeping track of things via lists), so I'm on my way with three and 600.

All I Really Need to Know I Learned in Kindergarten and Maybe (Maybe Not) by Robert Fulghum. They're peppy, positive stories of life that people need to remind themselves of every so often. Not bad, easy reads.

The Dharma of Star Wars by Matthew Bortolin. Very heavy on the Buddhism aspect, for obvious reasons. I actually noted about 7 editing errors (including referencing a line from AOTC and listing it as TPM) and the guy really dislikes Jar Jar and the Prequels. It was okay, but I don't think I'll be shaving my head and wearing safron robes anything soon.

Am starting The Philosophy of Star Wars, but I'd like to begin Legacy: Betrayal if the person who STILL HASN'T RETURNED IT TO THE LIBRARY ON TIME does so. This might almost make me consider possibly thinking about wondering if I should actually buy the book. :rolleyes: Nah.

Rocketboy
06-20-2006, 12:43 PM
I'm reading a few books right now.

Forever Odd by Dean Koontz - actually been reading to for a while now. I'll pick it up a few times every now and then. It seems to drag on at times and, so far, it's not as good as the first one.

Haunted by Chuck Palahniuk - about half way through. A bit disappointed after the great things I read about it. I shouldn't be too surprised though, since I hated Fight Club (the movie).

The Amazing Adventures of Kavalier and Clay by Michael Chabon - Just started this one. I read a newsbit about Natalie Portman may be in a movie version of this and read up on what it was about. Sounded pretty good: A Jew that seeks refuge in the US in 1939 hooks up with his cousin to create a hit comic, The Escapist. It's a Pulitzer Preize winner and at 600+ pages it could take me a few weeks.

Jarhead by Anthony Swofford - Already read it once, but I picked it up for $5 hardcover and will probably read it again after I finish what I have on my plate.

El Chuxter
06-20-2006, 01:27 PM
Kavalier and Clay's a good one. Hadn't heard about Nat being in the film version.

DarthQuack
06-20-2006, 05:51 PM
Finished The Da Vinci Code and started Christine by Stephen King.

Rocketboy
06-20-2006, 10:31 PM
Kavalier and Clay's a good one. Hadn't heard about Nat being in the film version.It's a recent development from the last few days.
From the author's website (http://www.michaelchabon.com/works/):

The fate of this project--whether it will move at last from the nebulousness of pre-pre-production into really-truly pre-production, with a budget and cast and everything, will be decided on or around 12 July 2006. Miss Natalie Portman is a strong likelihood for the part of Rosa; other casting is ongoing, as are work on the script (a lot of cutting) and tests conducted by a number of top-drawer animation studios (for the comic book elements). Quick answers (as of this date): Golem: yes. Antarctica: yes. Gay love story: yes. Ruins of World's Fair: no. Long Island: no. Orson Welles: no. Salvador Dali: yes. Loving reference to Betty and Veronica: no. Stan Lee: no.

El Chuxter
06-21-2006, 01:38 AM
Wow. I hope I'm not spoiling much for you, RB, but to take out Stan (and the other real-life Golden Age creators who cameo) seems a bit wrong. At least they had the guts to leave in the love story. (And, truthfully, we can probably thank the success of Brokeback Mountain for that.)

I just finished reading Maus (both volumes). I picked up Volume II at a going-out-of-business sale several months ago, but the store didn't have Volume I. It arrived in the mail today (after I finally ordered it online) and it's not a work that is easily put down. Three and a half hours later, I want to personally thank Spiegelman for writing this masterpiece. It's not the Schindler's List of comics (it doesn't leave you with the same gut-wrenching feeling of emptiness), but easily on par with The Pianist, a moving, profound character study against the backdrop of the Holocaust. Even if you don't normally read comics--and especially if you do and haven't read this--you owe it to yourself to read it ASAP.

Rocketboy
06-21-2006, 12:12 PM
Couldn't agree more with Maus.
Maus is the kind of comic that people who think comics are kiddie stuff should read.

Dominic Guglieme
06-22-2006, 05:56 PM
My problem with Maus is the same one I have with most WWII fiction. There was a great deal more happening than a mass killing.

So, anyone know how Hitler came to power? (Hint: He was a popular leader.) That is as, if not more, important than the pogroms that followed.

El Chuxter
06-22-2006, 06:05 PM
Absolutely. Hitler was arrested and sentenced to death at one point, and yet still took power because he had incredible charisma (I've heard stories of German Jews who snuck into rallies to see what the big deal was about, and the guy apparently had even them almost buying his anti-Semitism) and because he touched a deeply-rooted bigotry throughout Europe and was able to shift the blame for the immense mistakes of the post-WWI government.

There are definitely stories to be told from that angle. But that isn't the point of Maus, or Schindler's Ark/List (depending upon whether you're reading or watching), or most other tales (both factual and fictional) from the Holocaust. Their intent, insomuch as the German conquest and Holocaust is concerned, is to put a human face on the tragedy, to hammer home the fact that civilization can never allow such events to happen again.

These stories are supposed to, no matter how incredible soul-crushing they may seem, have a hopeful tone--some people, no matter how few, survived what happened, and they (and further generations) have the power to educate the world.

A story about Hitler's rise to power would, by necessity, have to be an examination of a truly dark side to human nature--the side of humanity that most Holocaust stories are, by their very nature, opposed to.

BTW, I'm not sure to what degree it was fictionalized (I assume some minor details were changed, and, of course, the characters are animals and not humans), but Maus is a biography of Art Spiegelman's father, Vladek, not a fully fictionalized work.

Slicker
06-22-2006, 06:48 PM
So, anyone know how Hitler came to power? (Hint: He was a popular leader.) That is as, if not more, important than the pogroms that followed.Oh, boy you've opened a pandoras box with me. To add to what Chux said I shall add what will no doubts turn into a novel. Ready? Here goes.

Hitler served in the German army during the Great War. It is proven fact that he was a good soldier and even won the iron cross second class (an award rarely given to enlisted. Hitler rose to the rank of Corporal) and in 1918 Hitler was the victim of a gas attack (the one reason many think he didn't use gas during WWII) and it was under these conditions in a hospital recovering that he heard of the surrender of the German forces.

Early in his career he made much of the "November Criminals", the people that signed the surrender papers and were in the government, and the "stab in the back" theory (i.e. the German nation was stabbed in the back by its own leadership). Both were widely accepted by the German nation even before Hitler hammered them into there heads.

Skipping details I'll move to 1923 when Hitler and the Nazi party attempted to take over the Berlin by means of a putsch (coup). They marched on the capital and were fired on by police. Hitler was arrested and put in Landsberg prison where he dictated Mein Kampf to Rudolf Hess (future Deputy Fuehrer who flew to England in 1941 to get peace terms) and several others.

Upon his release he found the party in shambles with much infighting and many of the leaders either in prison or in exile (Goering was in Switzerland and Ernst Rohm was in Italy I believe). The party was worse off than when he took over and to add to it the world economy, and more importantly, the German economy were improving. This was a blow to a party such as the Nazis who thrived on the poverty and fears of the populace. With the economy doing better people were less inclined to join a party that put blame on the government. Hitler slowly rebuilt the party until, in 1929, the stock market crashed. This was just the even that Hitler, and the Nazi party, needed. The Germans started defaulting on war reparation payments and the value of the German mark fell sharply (I think at one point it took 4 BILLION Reichsmarks to equal $1 US).

The Nazi party was in business. During the ensuing election years the Nazis steadily gained more seats in the Reichstag (German parliment basically) and in 1931 (I think) they gained the most seats out of all of the parties but were still short of a majority rule.

Fast forward again to January 30, 1933 when Hitler was made Chancellor by German President and WWI hero Paul von Hindenburg. This was a big step forward but Hitler dare not more against the president for the German people still loved the old man (he was nearing 90). The following year Hindenburg died and Hitler immediately declared himself president of Germany and thus had his grip. Certainly in the early years he was tested but come the beginning of the war no group dare encroach on his power (Hitler had long made Germany a one political party state).

The only real threat to his power came on July 20, 1944 when the German generals attempted to assinate him. Hitler miraculously lived and went on a killing spree. In total 3 field marshals, many generals and lower ranking officers, and many of the conspirators families met a grisley demise. Hitler had many of the conspirators strung up by piano wire on meat hooks and let them die a slow death. After the July 20th bomb plot no one dare oppose Hitler. And, although the war was clearly lost, Hitler never lost his complete control over the country and the people continued to blindly adore him.


As you can tell I voraciously read most anything about the war and I retain dates and facts to an almost ridiculous point.


I realize that you probably knew the answer to your own question (hence the hint) but just in case I figured I'd go off.

Rocketboy
06-22-2006, 11:36 PM
Yeah, and before that, Hitler wanted to be an artist.

El Chuxter
06-23-2006, 12:58 AM
I was actually considering earlier asking Slick if he (or "you" if this is Slicker reading) bought into the theory that, had Hitler's career as an artist not totally crashed and burned, World War II would either not have happened or been a very, very different conflict.

Banthaholic
06-23-2006, 10:35 AM
just finished SW Dark Rendezvous last night. The book was alright, though took me a while to finish as I onyl read bits and pieces here and there.

Next up Zahn's Outbound Flight, which has been collecting dust and begging to be opened since the day it came out.

Bel-Cam Jos
06-23-2006, 11:52 AM
just finished SW Dark Rendezvous last night. The book was alright, though took me a while to finish as I onyl read bits and pieces here and there.

Next up Zahn's Outbound Flight, which has been collecting dust and begging to be opened since the day it came out.Those are two good SW books, Banthaholic, although I preferred the Yoda novel better. You will find that O.F. may leave more questions unanswered than cleared up (I won't spolierize it for you, but there is a thread in this section you can check or reply to when you're done).

Slicker
06-23-2006, 03:09 PM
I was actually considering earlier asking Slick if he (or "you" if this is Slicker reading) bought into the theory that, had Hitler's career as an artist not totally crashed and burned, World War II would either not have happened or been a very, very different conflict.If he had become a full fledged good artist (he could draw buildings with some skill but his human forms were very pathetic) I do indeed believe that the war would never have started. I've read in more than one book that his burning hatred for the Jews stemmed in good part from the head of the art college he applied for. He turned Hitler down and that is what some think started him down the dark path. Even during the war most of his close friends were architects and artists. He even went so far as to keep most artists out of the armed forces even during the last hellish years when every man, and boy, was needed.

Banthaholic
06-23-2006, 03:10 PM
Those are two good SW books, Banthaholic, although I preferred the Yoda novel better. You will find that O.F. may leave more questions unanswered than cleared up (I won't spolierize it for you, but there is a thread in this section you can check or reply to when you're done).
I'm really excited for this one. The Zahn books got me restarted again in SW back in '93. I'll definitely check out that thread (when I finish the book of course).

Dominic Guglieme
06-23-2006, 06:31 PM
Maybe we should move the Hitler discussion to the RP forums. In any case, I am reading "Horus Rising" by Dan Abnett, and a book on Tsar Nicholas, "The Last Tsar" just now.

And, as for Hitler (before the move), I disagree. As noted above, Hitler tapped into popular sentiment more than he created them. There was tremendous anger in Germany following Versailles. And, removing Hitler would not change the complacency of 1930s Europe as a whole.

Rocketboy
06-24-2006, 12:24 AM
(he could draw buildings with some skill but his human forms were very pathetic)Pfffft! What do you know about art? :p

I saw the movie "Max."
It was totally John Cusack's fault.

Slicker
06-24-2006, 01:58 AM
Pfffft! What do you know about art? :p
The only thing I know about Art is "Nachos? Hot dogs are better"

Bel-Cam Jos
06-30-2006, 06:32 PM
I just finished two, If Life is a Bowl of Cherries-What I am I Doing in the Pits? by Erma Bombeck (a humorist from the 70s and 80s, I'd heard of this and just wanted to check it out... it's "mother" and "getting older" humor, but as one who had a mother and knew people getting older it's still a chuckle) and Wicked by Gregory Maguire (not anything like I'd heard the musical was about, not bad but not really good though).

JimJamBonds
07-01-2006, 09:01 PM
Thanks for the tip to read Enigma (I forget who mentioned it) once I started reading it the pages just flew by.

OC47150
07-13-2006, 02:25 PM
Thanks for the tip to read Enigma (I forget who mentioned it) once I started reading it the pages just flew by.

You're welcome! Harris has a book out about the space race set in the 50s or 60s that I have at home but haven't read.

I finished the second MedStar: Battle Surgeons book. Interesting, but it didn't move as quickly as the first one.

I borrowed Operatives, Spies, and Saboteurs : The Unknown Story of the Men and Women of World War II's OSS by Patrick K. O'Donnell from a friend and finished it in a week. Great book for the WWII spy buffs.

Currently reading Drink with the Devil by Jack Higgins. He's an old stand-by for me. Quick, easy reads. Fast dialogue. I should finish it in a night or two. Then I think I'll re-read The Eagle Has Landed.

Bel-Cam Jos
07-13-2006, 07:20 PM
Finished the 5th Last of the Jedi (fast reads are often good, this one's not too bad, but Watson has done better) and Pride and Pejudice (finally got around to reading this one, it was slllllllloooooooowwwwww getting started, but by the 2/3 mark it was pretty good). Will start Trojan Odyssey by Clive Cussler next, on a recommendation of a friend.

JimJamBonds
07-14-2006, 01:45 AM
You're welcome! Harris has a book out about the space race set in the 50s or 60s that I have at home but haven't read.

I started another Harris book, this one deals with the death of Stalin. I read maybe 40 pages and I just couldn't get into it so I returned it to the library. I'm interested in Harris' book called "Selling Hitler" which is non fiction.

Bel-Cam Jos
07-14-2006, 11:52 AM
With all the talk of historical and military books out there, I want to read The Art of War, but my local libraries all have had their copies out for a long time. Should that be a red flag in the Patriot Act surveillance? (j/k, really US govt, I was just kidding)

Slicker
07-14-2006, 12:02 PM
Speaking of "war" books my most recent read is "Life and Death of Adolf Hitler" by Robert Payne. It's a good book but he borrows very heavily from Shirers Rise and Fall.

Rocketboy
07-19-2006, 01:02 PM
I started and am about half way through "Dark Lord: The Rise of Darth Vader." So far, not too bad. The Vader stuff is easily the best parts. The Jedi in the book are fairly boring.

Bel-Cam Jos
07-30-2006, 02:08 PM
"Regrets, I've [read] a few..."

Here are the recent reads I've read...

Nothing's Sacred by Lewis Black. I know of his "irreverent" comedy, and his autobiography supports that attitude, but the title says it all. Ugh, not funny to me.

SW On Trial by David Brin & Matthew Stover (with a middle name now). I met the author (Brin) standing in line at this year's Comic-Con, but overall it was a just-okay read, occasionally funny and sometimes thought-provoking.

Shadow Moon and Shadow Dawn by Chris Claremont and George Lucas. These are the first 2 parts of the trilogy "from two of the most celebrated imaginations of our time," and I am only finishing the third one because I'm 2/3 of the way there. It continues the story from Willow, but I am uninterested in how the characters live/die/react, nor how the kingdom is saved/destroyed/forever changed. Boooo-ring. Quite disappointing. :sleeping:

DarthQuack
07-30-2006, 03:10 PM
Currently reading Christine by Stephen King, The Last Vampire Series by Christopher Pike, and the 250+ Spectacular Spider-Man comics I won on eBay.

El Chuxter
07-30-2006, 05:59 PM
I tried reading that Shadow whatever mess years ago. I couldn't get through the first one. When you start by killing all but the main character, and change his name, it seems like you may as well just create a new universe.

Bel-Cam Jos
07-31-2006, 12:14 PM
I tried reading that Shadow whatever mess years ago. I couldn't get through the first one. When you start by killing all but the main character, and change his name, it seems like you may as well just create a new universe.(Bel-Cam hooks himself up to electro-shock device)

BBZZZTT!!!!

(Bel-Cam takes happy, feel-better pills)

GULP! UUUMM!

(Bel-Cam attends positive thinking and empowerment seminar)

WHOO-HOO!! YEAH!! I CAN DO IT!!

Ahhhhh! And when I've finished this awesomely great trilogy with exceptional characterization and smooth, easily transitioned plotlines, I will tell you all how excellent it turns out!

Wait. That statement just ended with a preposition... that means it's bad. Oh no... :eek:

Slicker
07-31-2006, 12:19 PM
I just started reading a WWI day-by-day book again. I finished it last night but started reading it again at work this morning to kinda better absorb the info in it.

Bel-Cam Jos
08-04-2006, 04:42 PM
I did something I seldom do with reading. I started other books before I finished one. :eek: While still laboring through the third in the Shadow War trilogy (now almost 300 pages in), I read:

Carrie by Stephen King. I really liked it; it even made me a tad uneasy going to bed after reading it, even though I knew the basic story ending from the movie shots I'd seen (haven't seen the entire movie all the way through).

I wanted to read my first Louis L'Amour book, and when checking the shelf at the library, what title jumped out at me?... Lando. It was good. I may read some more L'L's later, since they're short and easy to follow.

OC47150
08-04-2006, 04:58 PM
I did something I seldom do with reading. I started other books before I finished one.

I do that all the time. Sometimes you have to.

I'm still on my Jack Higgins kick. Rereading The Eagle Has Landed.[I] I read if for the first time about 10 years ago. Boy, there's a lot of little sub-elements I've forgotten about.

Going to read the sequel next, [I]The Eagle Has Flown.

JimJamBonds
08-05-2006, 12:24 AM
With all the talk of historical and military books out there, I want to read The Art of War, but my local libraries all have had their copies out for a long time.

Ahh the Art of War... by whom: Sun Tzu? Clausewitz? Napoleon? Frederick the Great? And yes I have each of the above authors version of the 'art of war.'

I finished "The Grapple" by Harry Turtledove his latest in a long string of alt history books where the South won the CW, the South also won a war in the 1880's against the US. The US won WWI and in the current series WW II is being fought.

I'm working on "Beyond Band of Brothers: The War Memoirs of Major Dick Winters" which shouldn't be confused with "Biggest Brother" another bio on the life of Maj. Winters.

Next: back to "When the Mississipi Ran Backwards" about the New Madrid earthquakes in 18teens and then "Nelson's Sailor's" about sailors during the Napoleonic War period.

Bel-Cam Jos
08-05-2006, 10:09 AM
I do that all the time. Sometimes you have to.I like to devote the time and focus to just one at a time, but there are times it doesn't work.


Ahh the Art of War... by whom: Sun Tzu? Clausewitz? Napoleon? Frederick the Great? And yes I have each of the above authors version of the 'art of war.'I go with the original, and I believe Sun Tzu wrote the first of those you listed. I found a copy that was a picture book (actual art in The Art of War? How odd... ) with few words... could it have been the first War for Dummies? ;)

JimJamBonds
08-05-2006, 10:20 AM
I go with the original, and I believe Sun Tzu wrote the first of those you listed. I found a copy that was a picture book (actual art in The Art of War? How odd... ) with few words... could it have been the first War for Dummies? ;)

Yes Sun Tzu wrote the first 'Art of War.' Although I already have one copy I'd like to get another version of it one of these days. :crazed:

El Chuxter
08-05-2006, 09:33 PM
While not a "book" in the traditional sense, I'm currently loving every page of the first volume of Cerebus the Aardvark. This is one of those I've heard of for years and never actually read. Long story short, I was trying to grab as many book as fell into that category as I could in the half-price bins at Comic-Con and got two later volumes. As they likely wouldn't make sense (given that this is supposed to be one hugely massive epic tale), I ordered Volume I online and it came a few days ago. Very, very good stuff, and very highly recommended.

It may be a sign of maturity (or immaturity, depending on your point of view) that I only had two comics with this character, and they were crossovers into TMNT and Spawn. And now the TMNT issue is even more precious to me, and I'll take the Spawn issue out of the pile of Image comics that are keeping the table legs from wobbling.

Bel-Cam Jos
08-08-2006, 11:32 AM
As a MMILM (Massively Multiple Item List Maker), I have always loved to chronicle and organize various things throughout my life. For example, I am up to 629 books read in my life (that I can document), with 20 of 'em coming this summer (my goal is 30). That number actually seems low when I think of it, but then I consider 1986-1992. I was heavily into comic book collecting, spending about $30 a week (when comics were $.75 to $1.50 each) in new comics, plus the not-so-occasional back issues. So that period probably impacted the "real" books I could've been reading then, but I do not regret that in the least. Comics are learning tools (for me: various world mythologies, some arcane words and references explained, standard patterns of plot and characterizations, etc.). So, Chux, keep on readin' that "non-traditonal" book you've got; and I only have TMNT #8, the one that includes Mr. Cerebus.

And other books finished:

Shadow Star by Chris Claremont and George Lucas. Hoe hum. The book actually had a decent conclusion, but this series was just dull, predictable (or far too unlikely), and non-engaging. Least interesting story I've read in a while.

The Green Mile: The Complete Serial Novel by some hack writer. :p I really liked this, and I'm starting to catch Stephen King fever lately. I suspect there will be more of his novels that'll make my list now.

El Chuxter
08-08-2006, 11:38 AM
You've never read The Green Mile? :eek: That is a masterpiece. King is either absolutely horrid or a true god among men, depending upon the novel. And that's one of his best.

Definitely add The Stand (Uncut Version), Eyes of the Dragon, Salem's Lot, and The Dark Tower series (even with the weak conclusion) to the list. (Keep in mind that the other three tie in closely with The Dark Tower.

Bel-Cam Jos
08-08-2006, 11:51 AM
You've never read The Green Mile? :eek: That is a masterpiece. King is either absolutely horrid or a true god among men, depending upon the novel. And that's one of his best.

Definitely add The Stand (Uncut Version), Eyes of the Dragon, Salem's Lot, and The Dark Tower series (even with the weak conclusion) to the list. (Keep in mind that the other three tie in closely with The Dark Tower.I don't want to get addicted to King, just a passing virus. :D I also have read only these:

The Running Man
Eyes of the Dragon
Different Seasons (awful and wretched, IMO)

I am seeking out Four Past Midnight to read "The Langoliers." (sp?) My book-reading choices are based upon how much time I have to read (did you know that he writes long books? :rolleyes: ) and trying to get varieties of genres and authors. It will be over a long period of time that I gain more King titles.

Ji'dai
08-08-2006, 12:48 PM
Completed The Story of America : Freedom and Crisis from Settlement to Superpower the other day. A survey of American history from discovery through 9/11. Originally only got it to review colonial/revolution period but ended up reading the whole damn thing.

plus some comics:

Joss Whedon's Fray. Future vampire slayer Melaka Fray battles blood-suckers in a blighted urban landscape populated with mutant humans and other scum and riff-raff. Dark Horse, graphic novel, full color.

The dead walk and live to devour human flesh once again in The Walking Dead. Concentrates on the group dynamic of a small band of survivors searching for refuge in a world turned upside down. Image comics, trade paperback volumes 1-3 (collecting issues 1-18), B&W.

An anthology about the undead wreak havoc in Tales Of The Vampires, which often loosely touch upon Buffy the Vampire Slayer characters. Dark Horse, trade paperback, full color.

A young man (and his monkey) are the sole survivors of a plague that kills all other animals on earth with a Y chromosome in Y: The Last Man. The resulting female dominant society is about as ****** up as as the current male one. Interesting story though, but constantly raises the question why this guy isn't getting laid more often?! Vertigo Comics, trade paperback volumes 1-5 (collecting issues 1-31), full color.

mastermatt24
08-08-2006, 02:11 PM
Finished Pride and Pejudice (finally got around to reading this one, it was slllllllloooooooowwwwww getting started, but by the 2/3 mark it was pretty good).
UUgh.. Im gonna finish this one today. Im like 40 pages from the end and I still dont like it. I just dont like that romantic/victorean era. (I have to read it and '84 for summer assignments)

Bel-Cam Jos
08-08-2006, 05:46 PM
(I have to read it and '84 for summer assignments)Oh, you will love the chamberpot scene in 1584. Hilarious! Unless you're talking about reading 1854 because that's a sad tale of life in Peru.

:lipsrsealed:

mastermatt24
08-08-2006, 07:34 PM
Sry- I meant Orwell's 1984.

As for P&P.. I was like eh. It couldve been a lot more focused and shorter.

JimJamBonds
08-09-2006, 10:01 AM
I watched Enigma last night, its based on the Robert Harris book we talked about a few pages ago. If you have yet to see it DON'T BOTHER! It butchers the book. Two thumbs down from JJB. :upset:

Bel-Cam Jos
08-10-2006, 07:31 PM
Sry- I meant Orwell's 1984.

As for P&P.. I was like eh. It couldve been a lot more focused and shorter.I was j/k-ing... if there are other '84 books, I wasn't aware of them. And I agree about the Pride and P. comment, too.

Read another Louis L'Amour: The Lonely Men. I have really enjoyed the 2 I've read so far. It's back to the end-of-the-book-wraps-it-up style, sometimes on the last couple of pages even.

Bel-Cam Jos
08-15-2006, 04:58 PM
Finished Black Hawk Down by Mark Bowden. Well-researched, detailed description of a sad moment... I had a hard time getting through the field medic parts (graphic and empathetic) and you just wanted to grab some people (they're not "characters" in a non-fiction account) and tell them "do something!" Then, you want to shake some of their hands and say "thank you." A good book; there's now a "war" book on my list.

Rocketboy
08-15-2006, 08:03 PM
Finished Black Hawk Down by Mark Bowden. Well-researched, detailed description of a sad moment... I had a hard time getting through the field medic parts (graphic and empathetic) and you just wanted to grab some people (they're not "characters" in a non-fiction account) and tell them "do something!" Then, you want to shake some of their hands and say "thank you." A good book; there's now a "war" book on my list.Agreed.
I love BHD.
Incredible book, but almost too detailed in some parts.

DarthQuack
08-15-2006, 08:05 PM
Currently reading Marvel Masterworks Amazing Spider-Man Volume 6.

OC47150
08-16-2006, 07:19 AM
Bowden has a book called Killing Pablo, the hunt for Colombian drug lord Pablo Escobar. Same detail used in BHD is in Killing Pablo. , and gives an insight as to what the government is capable of when it comes to spying on people.

Rocketboy
08-16-2006, 10:01 AM
I've had Pilling Pablo in my hands many, many times at the bookstore, but have yet to buy it.

OC47150
08-16-2006, 10:10 AM
I've had Pilling Pablo in my hands many, many times at the bookstore, but have yet to buy it.

I thought it was a faster read than BHD.

Reading Night of the Fox by Jack Higgins right now. After it, my Higgins fix should be okay for a while.

Daz
08-26-2006, 07:25 PM
I just recently finished Freedom Next time by John Pilger which made facinating reading, the book takes a look at various injustices across the globe.

One chapter is entitled Stealing a Nation and deals with the dispossesed Chagossians of Chogo(or as it is now called Diego Garcia), who were evicted from there homes when their Island was sold out from under them by the british (who had inherited it from france in 1815) to the americans(its A military base now.).Successive Government on either side of the Atlantic refused to Awknowledge there was ever a permenant settlment on the Island prior to it being sold and reparations of any meaningfull sort have never been made.

Another The Last Taboo covers the whole the Israel/Palestine Issue (The last Taboo being able to question Israels Actions without being called an Anti-semite)

The Book ends with a chapter entitled Liberating Afghanistan and mainly deals with the aftermath of the war(ie. Warlords everywhere pilliging left right and center ,and a resurgent opium business)

Slicker
08-26-2006, 07:31 PM
I've been in heaven the past week. I went home and raided my storage garage and grabbed a ton of books about WWI out. I don't even know where to start, therefore I've been reading a little bit from about 10 different books.

I'm lovin' it.

Rocketboy
08-26-2006, 09:07 PM
After seeing that great trailer, I picked up "Flags of Our Fathers."
Only 50-55 pages in, but so far it's pretty good.

mastermatt24
08-26-2006, 11:32 PM
Finished 1984 like two weeks ago- what a crazy good book. Definitly my favorite required reading book, even though I was kinda like huh? at the end. ( I wanted the proles to revolt too!)

Bel-Cam Jos
08-27-2006, 10:07 AM
Finished 1984 like two weeks ago- what a crazy good book. Definitly my favorite required reading book, even though I was kinda like huh? at the end.I liked it as well. Think the famous line from Smashing Pumpkins' song "Zero"

"Despite all my rage, I am still just a rat in a
C AGE!!! "

And I'm sure his "new math" has helped many an elementary school child with simple addition, too (+ 2).

Bel-Cam Jos
08-27-2006, 06:24 PM
Well, my summer officially ends tomorrow, and since the 2 books I have left to finish add up to 1000 pages, I don't think I'll get to 'em by Monday.

My last two completed books were both SW-related:

- The Journey of Luke Skywalker Stephen Galipeau (it started out kinda weak, with lots of scene-specific terminology being connected to the psychology of the book [frozen, barren, probe, message, swamp, etc.] in cheesy ways, but it improved quite well by the time ROJ was analyzed; it made me appreciate Episode VI more).
- A Galaxy Not So Far Away edited by Glenn Kenny (Kenny, G.! :D with several essays by other writers/experts... this was hilarious at times! Anyone who hates the Prequels, or likes them, should read it to get some interesting points of view, and anyone who saw the OT back-in-tha-day will get a nice kick out of the flashbacks).

So, my final summer reading list statistics:
25 books, about 7100 pages, for about 284 pages per book (where 7 were related to Star Wars, one titled Lando but set in Arizona and Mexico, 3 listed George Lucas as a co-writer, 9 were over 400 pages long, 4 considered humor, and from 20 different authors).

I now have Joyce's Finnegans Wake and Joseph Campbell's Skeleton Key to FW to get through. It'll be a while before that's a final.

JimJamBonds
08-27-2006, 06:58 PM
I'm working on V for Vendetta and The Art of War after that its Homer.

JimJamBonds
09-08-2006, 01:02 PM
I finally finished V for Vendetta yesterday... I'm sorry for those that like it but it didn't really do all that much for me.

El Chuxter
09-08-2006, 05:17 PM
I will kick you in the nards. . . . as soon as I finish Making Comics, Scott McCloud's (brand spanking new) third exhaustive graphic novel tome on comics as an art form.

El Chuxter
09-13-2006, 12:05 AM
Started the one-volume edition of Bone last night. I can't imagine ever having lived without reading this masterpiece. The one-volume is out of print, but Scholastic is reprinting the entire epic in B&W paperback form. (Not sure how long until the entire series is out, though.)

Rocketboy
09-13-2006, 12:07 AM
I thought Bone was B&W from the beginning?

EDIT: The Jeff Smith comic book Bone, right?

El Chuxter
09-13-2006, 01:22 AM
Yeah, it's all B&W. It was originally single issues, then the massive one-volume edition (I think around 1500 pages). It's being reprinted in digest form now, with I think 3-5 issues per book.

Bel-Cam Jos
10-08-2006, 11:08 PM
It has been over a month since I last read a book cover-to-cover, and it's a SW one.

Bloodlines by Karen Traviss. This started off quite poorly, except for the Fett storyline. But by the end, I really liked it; Traviss is moving up on my list of great SW writers now. I won't spoilerize it, but let's just say that I am eagerly awaiting Book 3 Tempest, in hey! another month from now.

I temporarily gave up on Wake and Skeleton Key until I finish a few things on my schedule. No new books on the horizon yet (until The End, the final in the Unfortunate Events series this Friday... the 13th! :eek: ).

JimJamBonds
10-17-2006, 12:29 AM
Its been out for sometime but I just finished Game of Shadows, its about BALCO, Barry Bonds and steroids in sports. WOW!!! Its an eye opener for sure.

Ji'dai
10-17-2006, 01:15 PM
I enjoyed Pete Dexter's Deadwood, a 1986 novel about life in the raucous mining town. The story begins in 1876 and is largely told from Charley Utter's point of view, but switches occasionally to other denizens such as Seth Bullock, Bill Hickock, Al Swearengen, and Calamity Jane.

Dexter's Charley Utter is an entirely fascinating character and resembles his HBO counterpart in many ways, including his acerbic wit and observational humor. I really liked the potrayal of the man and often found myself laughing out loud at Dexter's dialogue - Utter knows that a trenchant remark can cut a man down just as effectively as a pistol or knife.

Although the author wasn't involved (http://www.usatoday.com/life/television/news/2004-05-02-deadwood-cursing_x.htm) with the HBO series, his novel did form the basis (in part) for 1995's Wild Bill with Jeff Bridges in the title role. Since both book and HBO series share the same historical source material, fans will find a lot of similarities between the two, but Dexter's take is sufficiently different from the TV show to make it worth a read. :thumbsup: :thumbsup: :thumbsup: :thumbsup:

---

Max Brooks' World War Z: An Oral History of the Zombie War is also fun to read if you like living dead or apocalyptic end-of-the-world fare. I felt the story suffered from a kind of historical detachment - it's been several years or so since the war ended in victory - so I think the suspense and thrill of following the collapse of society was a bit dulled. I think Stephen King's The Stand did an excellent job on that point, so if Brooks takes another bite at the living dead with a new book, a novel told in linear fashion would be cool as hell. Brooks' historical accounts are still pretty interesting, although he spends a lot of time covering the changes in military tactics and weaponry that combating this new enemy required. :thumbsup: :thumbsup:

El Chuxter
10-17-2006, 01:23 PM
Any book told (even in part) from Calamity Jane's perspective must be cool.

Rocketboy
10-19-2006, 11:39 PM
Finally finished "Flags of our Fathers" just in time for the movie tomorrow.
Amazing book. Simply amazing.

I know very little of the war in the Pacific in WWII. Overall, I find the European war much more interesting, so I had little knowledge of how important Iwo Jimo was. I find it stunning how 1/400th of a second of one unimportant moment (well, unimportant at the time the picture was snapped) could end up meaning so much to so many, even to this day.

Bel-Cam Jos
10-21-2006, 05:39 PM
I had some free time away from rehearsals last weekend so I finished...

The End by Lemony Snicket. I was expecting more, but I suppose I should've expected how the book did turn out. Funny in parts, serious in others, with the usual grammatical and expression explanations in between.

I don't know what'll be next on my reading list (whenever the Darth Bane SW novel arrives at my local library, I may try for that), but it will definitely have to wait until I'm done as Joe Stoddard, undertaker of Grover's Corners, next week.

Slicker
10-21-2006, 06:47 PM
I just finished a WWI day by day book. It's a very good source of instant facts.

I'm also in the process of reading "The Second World War" by Winston Churchill. It's a big 'ol book and I doubt I'll be able to finish it.

JimJamBonds
10-22-2006, 12:31 AM
I just started a book about the US forces that used deception in WWII, rubber tanks, sound projection etc. so far its very interesting.

Bel-Cam Jos
10-23-2006, 12:41 AM
After months as a coffee table-type book, I just finished the New Essential Guide to Droids. Not bad, not as good as the Chronology or Characters, but overall okay. I like the switch to CG artwork for droids, but I still prefer the comic drawings for characters.

OC47150
10-23-2006, 02:06 PM
I've been on a WWII kick for a while, but decided to take a break when I finished a book over the weekend.

Read an excellent book about Omaha Beach, called Omaha Beach. Detailed account of the planning and the D-Day invasion, including the airborne landings. It's a little slow and meticulous in some parts but interesting.

Finished Inside Hitler's Bunker by Fest. This book doesn't get bogged down with too many details or theories on what happened during the final days in April 1945. A real straight-forward account. It was a fast read.

Dominic Guglieme
10-24-2006, 08:49 PM
I am currently shambling through "Guns, Germs and Steel", and I just read:


Hawkworld 1-3
I picked these up and the comic store a while back.
Like most of DC Comic's offerings from the mid-80s,
this is a "new-start" for the character. In this
case, Hawkman is a young cadet in his world's police
force. The story starts off strongly, if a bit too
politically, but quickly degenerates into some of the
worst cliches of the genre, and concludes with an
ending so contrived that I did not see it coming
because it was such a tranparently stupid idea.
Grade: C/D Do not bother.

Dominic Guglieme
10-25-2006, 04:09 PM
Superman/Batman Annual 1
Ugh......This was the first Post-Neo-Crisis appearance of the Crime Syndicate. Ugh......... Any comic with that band of reject characters has problems to begin with. That this is also the PNC "Batman and Superman learn each-other's identitities" story makes it even worse. The whole thing comes off as a bad sitcom, complete with a resolution that gives DC a way to ignore this story, and *undefine* the comic even more, if they decide to. (Of course, deciding to ignore this story means DC has to make a decision at all.....) Oh, and note to DC's Editorial staff: Cheap gimmick swipes at other company's characters got old with "Kingdom Come", now grow up. Grade: D

Dom
-notes that Nightwing may be a title to watch with the upcoming issue

Bel-Cam Jos
11-26-2006, 09:54 AM
"It's been awhile
Since I could say,
That I [read a whole book] and..."

... it was a weird one. You know how The Simpsons keeps poking fun at the fact that Thomas Pynchon is a reclusive author? (Forumites nod heads in agreement) He's the guy with the bag with the question mark on his head, who always is a shill for publicity. Anyhow, due to that pop culture reference and a colleague's recommendation, I read one of his novels: The Crying of Lot 49. Uh, let's just say, since it was written in the 1960s that I'm fairly certain there were some "influences" involved. Whoa! and huh? all together. Keep that bag on, dude! :rolleyes:

And during this long vacation I read the SW comics I had piled up for a couple months (some Marvel Ewoks and Droids, Q-G & O-B on Auorient Exp, QA: Episode I, trade paperbacks of BF: Enemy of Empire, SW: Visionaries, Leviathan and T & B Were Here). Now I'm starting Dean Koontz's Twilight Eyes, another recommendation from another friend. We'll see how long that takes to finish (I'm only 5 chapters in).

El Chuxter
11-26-2006, 02:01 PM
The Crying of Lot 49 I don't remember too well, but I remember liking it. I picked up one of his more recent novels (Mason & Dixon) a few years ago, though, and it was absolutely unreadable.

JimJamBonds
11-26-2006, 02:20 PM
Finished a book on the sinking of the Edmund Fitzgerald which went down in November of 1975 and is one of the most famous ships to sink in the Great Lakes.

Bel-Cam Jos
11-26-2006, 11:09 PM
Finished a book on the sinking of the Edmund Fitzgerald which went down in November of 1975 and is one of the most famous ships to sink in the Great Lakes.You could've saved some time and just listened to Gordon Lightfoot's song. :D

Chux, when I get more time (probably around school winter break) I plan to try either Vineland, V, or the Rainbow one.

JimJamBonds
11-27-2006, 12:47 AM
You could've saved some time and just listened to Gordon Lightfoot's song. :D

I'm one step ahead of you BCJ, I've long since put the words to The Wreck of the Edmund Fitzgerald to memory however there are errors with the song... plus you can get a touch more in depth in a 200 page book compared to a 6 minute folk song. :D

OC47150
11-27-2006, 09:37 AM
Picked up Darth Bane from the library. Only 30 pages into it. Good so far.

Saw an interesting documentary on the Edmund Fitzgerald on the Discovery Channel years ago.

Bel-Cam Jos
12-29-2006, 12:10 AM
Having some free time rocks! I was able to finish...

Twilight Eyes by Dean Koontz. This summer, I'd planned on reading 30 books (I failed, and only got to 25 I believe), including some popular authors I have had yet to read. A friend recommended this one, and it wasn't too bad; I have no other Koontz books with which to compare. Not as scary as the cover comments said, however.

Darth Bane: Path of Destruction by Drew Karpyshyn. I'd actually had this book on my shelf for some time. sw.com had a poll about the best SW novels of '06, and I selected Hard Contact: Triple Zero because I had not yet read this one; I stand by my poll choice. This does not get the dreaded "eh" rating, in fact, it was pretty good. I'd give it a 7.8 on no particular scale. The ending was predictable, but that's to be expected since the readers know the end results.

The Shepherd, the Angel, and Walter the Christmas Miracle Dog by Dave Barry. I noticed this book in the half-off bin at the store, and since I think I've read everything Mr. Barry's written in book form, I had to have it. It was funny, of course, but he's changing his style to be less gross-out and more nostalgic. Ah, nostalgia again... :rolleyes:

I am about 1/3 through Tempest, the next "eh" book in the SW Legacy series. So far, it's still "eh."

Bel-Cam Jos
12-31-2006, 11:30 PM
Tempest turned from "eh" to pretty decent. I actually am interested in how the storylines turn out now. And I can vote for what the new Darth name is!

El Chuxter
01-01-2007, 12:23 AM
Secrets of the Samurai: The Martial Arts of Feudal Japan by Oscar Ratti and Adele Westbrook. Research for a project I'm finally getting underway after a fifteen-year delay. Very dense, a little dry, but quite informative.

I've not been able to pick up any of the Legacy books to try reading them again. Every time I think of it, I get cold chills and think "Darth Jacen--what a bunch of &^%$ing morons!" Then I want to vomit and burn my entire collection of SW books. I'm not sure I'll ever bother picking them up again. A bit sad that I pre-ordered and received Book II before realizing I didn't care enough to read Book I.

Bel-Cam Jos
01-01-2007, 02:11 PM
I've not been able to pick up any of the Legacy books to try reading them again. Every time I think of it, I get cold chills and think "Darth Jacen--what a bunch of &^%$ing morons!" Then I want to vomit and burn my entire collection of SW books. I'm not sure I'll ever bother picking them up again. A bit sad that I pre-ordered and received Book II before realizing I didn't care enough to read Book I.I had been of the same mindset, Chux, but the last 2 books, Bloodlines and Tempest, have been pretty decent, especially since the non-Darth Kid storylines have held my interest well. Appearances by Boba Fett, Aurra Sing (maybe), Tenel Ka (as a strong, non-whiny character for a change), etc. have been nice touches. BUT WHERE THE M@#$% F&%#$@ SNAKES ON A SPACE FREIGHTER IS LANDO, PEOPLE?!? :mad: Ahem. :rolleyes:

OC47150
01-17-2007, 09:11 AM
Read a couple of books in the last month. Read Jude Watson's Legacy of the Jedi/Secrets of the Jedi and Last Jedi #4. The Legacy/Secrets book was very good. The first story dealt with Dooku as a padawan and up to before ROTS. As SW fans, we haven't been offered much into Dooku's background, his early days, etc..., so it was interesting to read.

Also read Fredrick Forsyth's The Afghan, a modern day thriller. Some of the main characters were first introduced in The Fist of God, set during the first Gulf War. The Afghan was a fast read; Fist of God is a little more detailed, but still enjoyable.

Just waiting for the new Zahn novel to come out.

El Chuxter
01-17-2007, 10:48 AM
I just started Hawking's A Brief History of Time: 10th Anniversary Edition. I've always wanted to read it, but was afraid it would be way over my head. Surprisingly, it's quite accessible.

I was impressed that this is the guy who came up with the Big Bang theory, but tells you early on that the Big Bang does not negate the possibility of a higher power. Not the stance I was expecting at all.

Slicker
01-17-2007, 12:30 PM
I got done reading Band of Brothers for the first time.

That was one of the best books I've ever read and it kept me up hours past my bed time more than once.:thumbsup:

Bel-Cam Jos
01-18-2007, 07:05 PM
I just started Hawking's A Brief History of Time: 10th Anniversary Edition. I've always wanted to read it, but was afraid it would be way over my head. Surprisingly, it's quite accessible.

I was impressed that this is the guy who came up with the Big Bang theory, but tells you early on that the Big Bang does not negate the possibility of a higher power. Not the stance I was expecting at all.I read ABHoT a few years back, and while I didn't think it would be too dense (it's a "brief" history, remember :D ), I did find it almost more storybook than textbook at times.

Slick, BoB was a good one, too. I'm still laboring to find enough time to finish Vineland. We're reading good books here, people! Join us! JOIN US!!! BTW, that was an attempt to yell across cyberspaced-out.

Rocketboy
01-19-2007, 01:18 AM
Band of Brothers has been on my to read list for quite some time (along with a few others).

I recently got a handful of Michael Chabon books I need to read through.

JimJamBonds
01-20-2007, 01:15 AM
I got done reading Band of Brothers for the first time.

That was one of the best books I've ever read and it kept me up hours past my bed time more than once.:thumbsup:

If you liked BoB then I'd suggest checking out one (or both) of the autobio's on Major Winters both are good and they each go into more detail then BoB does.

Rocketboy
01-20-2007, 01:20 AM
If you liked BoB then I'd suggest checking out one (or both) of the autobio's on Major Winters both are good and they each go into more detail then BoB does.Wait a sec, how do you write two autobiographies? Didn't he cover it all in the first one?
Or was the second a rebuttle of the first, to clear up all the mistakes and lies he wrote about himself in the first one?
:p

JimJamBonds
01-20-2007, 11:27 AM
Yeah later after posting I couldn't remember if I made that mistake or not of calling them both autobiography's. One is called Biggest Brothers: The Life of Major Dick Winters, The Man Who Led The Band Of Brothers which is by Larry Alexander. The other is Beyond Band Of Brothers: The War Memoirs Of Major Dick Winters by Major Dick Wintes with Colonel Cole C. Kingseed.

OC47150
01-22-2007, 08:30 AM
If you liked BoB, try reading Ambrose's Pegasus Bridge. It's about the Brits who captured the first piece of French territory on D-Day. Interesting read.

Ji'dai
01-23-2007, 02:36 PM
I've discovered the local libraries stash of trade paperbacks and graphic novels, so that's what I've been reading lately:

BONE Vol. 1-9 – I read this based on the recommendation from another forum member. I’ve never been big fan of fantasy, pooh-pooing Lord of the Rings practically forever until I finally gave in and watched FOTR on DVD shortly before TTT was released. I didn’t care for Chronicles of Narnia though, so I’m still not a fantasy convert yet. Jeff Smiths’ BONE draws inspiration from both epic adventures, has an interesting story with likeable characters, and is quite the page-turner. I didn’t care for the ‘prequel’ Stupid, Stupid Rat-Tails: The Adventures of Big Johnson Bone, however.

John Constantine: Hellblazer Vol. 1-14 (or whatever). John Constantine is a working-class conjurer, magician, dark arts enthusiast, liar, manipulator, hard-drinking chain-smoking sonuva*****. Constantine tangles with demons on both sides of the Atlantic while battling his own personal ones, sacrifices friends along the way, and constantly learns that the greatest evil is often committed by other human beings. Sometimes interesting, other times boring, this series is definitely light-years away from the Keanu Reeves movie. No wonder creator Alan Moore had his name removed from the credits.

Superman Returns - Sucky adaptation of the movie plus a few other tales. “Walking Midnight” is probably the best of the bunch, featuring Superman celebrating New Year’s Eve in each time zone by fulfilling requests to his letter-writing fans.

Superman: For all Seasons - Clark Kent as the “Big Lug,” a small-town farm boy that grows up to be Superman. Lots of classic imagery here that includes many a homage to illustrator Norman Rockwell.

Superman: Wrath of Gog - Superman faces off with Gog, who injects the Man of Steel with liquid Kryptonite, killing him. He comes back to life of course, but his powers are unreliable. Clark learns that Lana watched over him during his convalescence; while Lois is off on assignment, too busy to trouble with her husband. Hard to follow this one since I’m not all that familiar with the back story.

Superman For Tomorrow Vol. 1 - The Man of Steel develops a rapport with a dying Catholic priest to get things off his chest. Interfering in a nation's civil war, Superman incurs the wrath of the JLA, tangles with Equus, gigantic Earth Elementals, and discovers the device that caused the "Vanishing" - mass human disappearances around the world, including wife Lois Lane. Disappointing since it leaves you hanging for Vol. 2.

Batman: The Dark Night Returns - Bruce Wayne comes out of retirement to battle the Mutants, a gang wreaking havoc on Gotham. Batman returns just in time to see the release of Harvey Dent (Two-Face) and The Joker from Arkham. Finally Batman takes on Superman, who is sent in by the government to bring the vigilante to justice. First time read for me though I was collecting comics when this one was published. Frank Miller’s story about the aging Batman returning to vigilantism is fascinating and very fulfilling.

War Stories Vol. 1 - Anthology of some great WWII tales: German tank commander deserts the Eastern Front and heads west to surrender to advancing Americans in order to save his crew; British soldiers face criticism from home for being “D-Day Dodgers” and mount a suicidal daylight attack in Italy in 1944; an Easy Company squad commandeer a large estate in Austria where they find lots of booze and friendly female company and decide to take some much-need R&R; and British naval officers deal with German subs while trying to protect convoy ships in the Arctic and Mediterranean.

Loveless: A Kin of Homecoming - Former Confederate Wes Cutter returns home after the Civil War to find the US Army occupying his home and land, a bunch of unfriendly townsfolk, and a roving armed band of Southern sympathizers still fighting a lost cause. Also returning home is a freeman who took part in the officially sanctioned rape of Cutter’s wife while serving with a Union detachment. In this powder keg waiting to blow Cutter accepts a Union Army appointment as town sheriff.

Marvel 1602 – I liked this story about the Marvel Universe set in the Elizabethan period. Due to a temporal anomaly, the FF, X-Men, Von Doom, Magneto, Peter Parker, Bruce Banner, Nick Fury, and Dr. Strange all appear hundreds of years before their original modern origins. I’ve never been a fan of Dr. Strange, but I think he works well here as Queen Elizabeth I’s court “physician.”

Ji'dai
01-27-2007, 01:57 PM
More comics for me:

Superman: Infinite City - After Superman captures a small-time crook packing some out-of-this-world weaponry, Clark Kent and Lois Lane track down the manufacturer's location - which turns out to be a deserted country store in the middle of nowhere. Once inside, Lois & Clark pass through a portal to another dimension containing a teeming metropolis with gateways to an infinite number of worlds. In this "Infinite City," Superman is surprised to find the inhabitants not only speak Kryptonian; but he also reunites with a long-lost relative and meets a new one. Interesting story here, although I wasn't too crazy about Carlos Meglia's art style at first.

Ultimate X-Men Vol. 1-2; 13 - All-new all-different X-Men as teenagers and twenty-somethings. The stories were okay, but nothing to write home about.

Ultimate Fantastic Four Vol. 1-4 - I admit I've never been a big FF fan and I didn't really care for this series. One of the volumes had the FF visit another dimension where they battled a giant grasshopper and his army - which looked like a cross between Jawas & Sandpeople. They even carried gaffi sticks!

Astonishing X-Men: Gifted - Great tale by Joss Whedon about the X-Men dealing with news of the mutant "cure." Loved the part where scantily-clad Head Mistress Emma Frost scolds Kitty Pryde for being late during student orientation and Miss Pryde’s excuse: "I was just remembering to put all my clothes on." I don't think I've ever seen bad girls drawn so nicely. Mm-mm.

G.I. JOE Frontline: The Mission That Never Was - With the Pit closed down and the Joes disbanded, the Pentagon sends the remaining force on one last mission against Cobra. Featuring most of the fan-favorite characters, cameos by the "original" Joe and his assistant Jane, and a script by none other than the man himself, Larry Hama, this book wasn't all that great. Maybe it was Scarlet picking out curtains for Snake-Eyes' mountain cabin. Maybe it was just me.

Captain America: Cap Lives - America’s hero is thawed once again and discovers that Germany won the Second World War and has taken over the world in this retelling of Captain America’s post-Golden Age origin. His Nazi Nemesis, Red Skull, is now in command, but Cap’s return has re-inspired the American Resistance.

Batman: Hush Vol. 1 & 2 - The Dark Knight finds himself embroiled in a complex conspiracy whose sole purpose is his death. This great detective story involves nearly every major villain, ally, and erstwhile sidekick in the Batman pantheon. Once again we see that the Master Detective is more than capable of taking on Superman (with the right gadgetry). I didn’t realize Wayne now owns the Daily Planet; it was fun to see him pop in and surprise Lois Lane with flowers while Clark scowls over the cubicle wall.

Ji'dai
02-06-2007, 01:10 PM
Spider-Man: The Other | Evolve or Die - Peter Parker, now a member of the Avengers, is finally succumbing to the radiation poisoning he received from that infamous spider bite. Nearly comatose after a savage beating from Morlun, Parker draws upon his last reserves to fight back - discovering a host of arachnid abilities in the process. This crossover story arc involves multiple Spider-Man titles, so the artwork styles vary from book to book. I’m not sure who the artist is on Marvel Knights Spider-Man, but I can’t stand his style.

Superman | Batman: Vengeance - Boom tubes. Multiple Universes. A power greater than Darkseid. ‘Nuff said. The Man of Steel and the Dark Knight team up to fight their alternate universe alter egos in this convoluted tale. Features both Bizarro #1 and Batzarro, so take some aspirin prior to reading to prevent headaches.

Kingdom Come – Set in the near future, humanity has allowed itself to atrophy as the next generation of apathetic superheroes wage never-ending battles in the streets. After a cataclysmic fight leaves Kansas and most of the Midwest in apocalyptic ruin, Superman, Wonder Woman, and Green Lantern come out of their self-imposed retirement (exile) to restore order and bring the new heroes into line. Interesting story here with just about every hero and villain in the DC universe, and then some.

Slicker
02-06-2007, 01:22 PM
Right now I'm reading Panzerkrieg: The Rise and Fall of Hitler's Panzer Divisions.

I've read the book many times but still a good book.:thumbsup:

OC47150
02-09-2007, 01:36 PM
The library had SW: Allegiance, so I picked it up and am currently reading it. Needed a break from the Forsyth novel.

I'm enjoying it so far.

DarthQuack
02-09-2007, 01:49 PM
Still reading Slave Ship from the Bounty Hunter Wars....decent so far.

CaptainSolo1138
02-09-2007, 02:16 PM
If you liked BoB, try reading Ambrose's Pegasus Bridge. It's about the Brits who captured the first piece of French territory on D-Day. Interesting read.
I got that for Christmas and haven't gotten to it yet. Its always good to hear a positive review of a book before you start reading it. Thanks! I'm still reading "Citizen Soldiers" by Ambrose. Its freaking brilliant

JimJamBonds
02-10-2007, 01:03 AM
I'm not a big Ambrose fan but BoB and Undaunted Courage are both good reads.

Bel-Cam Jos
02-10-2007, 11:42 AM
The library had SW: Allegiance, so I picked it up and am currently reading it. Needed a break from the Forsyth novel.

I'm enjoying it so far. I can almost repeat that verbatum...


The library had SW: Allegiance, so I picked it up and am currently reading it. Needed a break from the Pynchon novel.

I'm enjoying it so far.

Jedi_Master_Guyute
02-10-2007, 11:13 PM
Just got a bunch of comics from my store back in Athens.

Ultimate spider-Man- they handled the Clone Saga MUCH better than the original debacle. Yikes, that was horrific.

Walking Dead- I love this book, no question about it.

Astonishing X-Men- i'm up to about, issue, 18 or so, and frankly, i'm gettin' confused and bored. If it doesn't pick up soon, i'm dropping it.

Ult. X-Men- Battle with Cable was pretty intense and we'll have to wait and see if _____________ is really dead or not. I doubt it.

Still gotta read the Planet Hulk issues! :thumbsup:

JetsAndHeels
02-17-2007, 08:50 PM
Besides my regular comics, i just finished up the Smallville novel "Shadows". After a trip to the local bookstore today I got the next installment called "Sparks", and a Superman and JLA novel.

JimJamBonds
02-18-2007, 07:49 PM
I recently finished The Tao of War along with a book on wine and also a reread of The Art of War (a strange mix I know).

El Chuxter
02-18-2007, 09:52 PM
I've not read them yet, but I recently picked them up, along with Military Methods of the Art of War.

B&N exclusive bargain books perchance, JJB2?

JimJamBonds
02-19-2007, 01:16 AM
B&N exclusive bargain books perchance, JJB2?

Not exactly, Tao of War was on a bargin table by the checkout so I figured what the heck but the Art of War was a regular priced purchase. I picked up Tao of War when I picked up a super huge mack daddy U.S. Army Atlas of the ETO in World War II. This thing is awesome and at $9.95 I think its a steal! If I ever see a similar atlas for the PTO I'll pick it up as well.

I'll also let it be known that I picked up an Art of War quote a day type calender for 2007.... yeah I like military history. :p

DarthQuack
02-19-2007, 11:54 AM
Picked up Allegiance and Darth Bane last night....used two 30% off coupons so got each one for around 18 bucks.

Bel-Cam Jos
02-19-2007, 05:42 PM
Ugh. Let me repeat that, in a larger font, in bold, adding an appropriate smiley. Ugh. :sleeping:

I just finished Vineland, by Thomas Pynch............. :zzz: Sorry, I must've fallen asleep again. I may need to dig up the older thread here about books read that I didn't like, 'cause this'n has gots to be there. Ugh. Dull, uninteresting, purposely dense and multi-layered, with weak social commentary. Terrible.

Am starting a "prequel" to Romeo and Juliet, by a young adult author. So far, not bad. BTW, The Art of War is somewhere on my list to get to, as well.

El Chuxter
02-19-2007, 11:28 PM
I picked Art of War up at a used bookstore several years ago, and was surprised by how short it was. It was a thin paperback, and most was intro and afterward about Mao Zedong (or Tse-Tung, as he still spelled his name then). I think the actual Art of War was like 20 pages long.

I recently realized that, though it tries to pass itself off as complete, this was far from the complete work, and picked it up along with The Tao of War and Military Methods of the Art of War at a B&N sale a few weeks ago. Still looking for The Japanese Art of War to round out the collection, but I'm not in a major hurry.

JimJamBonds
02-20-2007, 12:41 AM
Still looking for The Japanese Art of War to round out the collection, but I'm not in a major hurry.

Don't forget Napolean's Art of War as well, its quite short with something like 65 maxim's. There is also Frederick The Great On The Art Of War and Clausewitz On War (yeah I have all of those in my tactics collection). I also would like to pick The Art Of War up by Niccolo Machiavelli which deals with the Middle Ages.

El Chuxter
02-20-2007, 01:43 AM
I'm actually doing more research on the eastern philosophies of war, though those certainly sound like they'd be worth reading in the future. I wasn't aware that Machiavelli had written a work on war. Course, that may be because that other book he's so famous for totally overshadows everything else on his resume. :)

JimJamBonds
02-20-2007, 10:25 AM
I'm not sure if the Art of War was the actual title by Machiavelli or if it was added later down the road so people think of it with Sun Tzu. I did a quick check on Amazon and there are tons of books with the title of Art of War that span a huge timeframe, Viking, Roman - Civil War. And lets not forget the various adaptions: The Art of War for Sales, The Art of War for Executives etc.

Ji'dai
02-20-2007, 02:22 PM
Countdown to Infinite Crisis: Villains United – After the JLA lobotomizes arch-villain Dr. Light, Lex Luthor begins organizing costumed, criminal superhumans worldwide into a confederation that will exact revenge on the superhero community and eventually overthrow them. A rival faction to Luthor’s Society quickly develops, however, and the two groups battle for supremacy.

Wonder Woman: Land of the Dead – Although blinded after a battle with Medousa, Wonder Woman and the Flash nevertheless track down Cheetah, who has freed Hunter Zolomon, or Zoom, from prison. Although the two criminals escape, the blind Wonder Woman returns to battling crime in the city when Athena orders her to enter the Land of the Dead and free the god Hermes from the clutches of Hades himself.

Batman: The Long Halloween – Police Commissioner Gordon, DA Harvey Dent, and Batman all agree to work together to take down Gotham’s largest organized crime family, the Falcones, but only within the scope of the law. The emergence of a serial killer that preys upon mob family members complicates things for all three crime fighters, and the psychological problems plaguing Harvey Dent make him a prime suspect. Writer Jeph Loeb and artist Tim Sale pool their talent to make some cool comic noir in this crime drama.

Star Wars Infinities: The Empire Strikes Back – When Luke dies from exposure on Hoth, Princess Leia travels to Dagobah to begin her Jedi training. After capturing his old protocol droid, 3PO, Vader learns the true fate of young Skywalker and also the location of the princess. Landing on Dagobah, Vader battles Master Yoda, Leia, and the Jedi Spirits of prequels past.

The Amazing Spider-Man: Coming Home – Peter Parker, down on his luck as usual, meets a mysterious older gentlemen who knows Parker’s secret – and has similar powers to everyone’s favorite web-slinger. “Ezekiel” has used his spider ability to become the wealthy head of multinational conglomerate and wants to give something back to society - by helping it’s hero, Spidey, hide from Morlun, a vampyric entity who “eats” superheroes to remain immortal. But Spider-Man was never one to back down from a fight, and Parker falls back on his scientific mind when brute force isn’t enough to defeat this unstoppable force.

Bel-Cam Jos
02-20-2007, 08:07 PM
And don't forget The Wart of Arrr! where the ugliness of being a pirate is exposed! :D

Bel-Cam Jos
02-24-2007, 09:59 AM
Finished Romeo's Ex: Rosaline's Story by Lisa Fiedler. It started out well, got bad, then it picked up, got weird, and by that time fell flat. Therefore, I give it an 8.2, a 6, a 7.3, a 6.4, and a 6.1, respectively. :p

All I have now are my table-top books I've been working on for some time (New Essential Guide to Alien Species, Sculpting a Galaxy, and a local history one called Sleeping Giant on the history of the Inland Empire of southern CA).

Rocketboy
02-24-2007, 10:24 PM
Just started Summerland by Michael Chabon. Fun book so far. I can see this getting the Eragon, Terabithia, Harry Potter kid friendly epic movie treatment.
Damn, I love the way he writes.

El Chuxter
02-24-2007, 10:40 PM
I have that, but haven't read it yet. I've loved everything else from Mr Chabon, Spider-Man 2 included.

OC47150
02-25-2007, 12:39 PM
Finished Allegiance the other night. It was enjoyable and I do recommend it.

I won't reveal any plot spoilers but I will say this: Mara is more skilled/powerful in the Force than I thought she was, or was hinted in the Thrawn trilogy. At least in my opinion.

Bel-Cam Jos
02-26-2007, 10:02 PM
I won't reveal any plot spoilers but I will say this: Mara is more skilled/powerful in the Force than I thought she was, or was hinted in the Thrawn trilogy. At least in my opinion.I noticed that, too. She comes across as virtually a Jedi in ability (yeah, Zahn puts some limits on her), but I always thought she was supposed to be a raw Force user. And at 18 years or so? Hmm.

OC47150
02-27-2007, 07:56 AM
You have to wonder if something event between now and when we're introduced to Mara in Heir happens where she loses some of her Force ability. I could see Zahn writing another book, revisiting this subject in the OT realm.

I used by Borders Rewards Points and bought a '24' novel. Separate story from the TV show. The book I bought is the fourth in the series, and it's pre-season one. It involves the G8 summit in LA. It's pretty good so far. The chapters are set up like the show, in one-hour increments.

El Chuxter
03-03-2007, 01:41 AM
I, Louie the Lilac, greatest archfoe of Gotham City, am spending the time reading The Color Purple while I wait to either receive my purple armada from the denizens of SSG, or to feed El Chuxter to the violet venus flytrap and crush your site beneath a giant grape!

It's my 42nd time reading it. It just gets more purple every time!

Mwa-ha-ha-ha-HA!!

THIS I COMMAND!!

JimJamBonds
03-04-2007, 11:26 PM
I've been working on The Illiad off and on for months now, in college I read a shortened version but this is the whole shabangabang I'm working on now. One of these days I'm going to finish that sucker. After that I'd like to read more works from Greece/Roman times.

Jedi_Master_Guyute
03-09-2007, 10:50 PM
Picked up "Marvel Zombies Vs. the Army of Darkness" #1 today. Decent start although I wasn't sure what the sequences of Ash going "into the light" and then somehow seeing Hawkeye as a zombie meant. Maybe he was dying, but sent back by Angels to fight off the zombies?!?! I hope they clear this up. But very good issue, not great, but very good start. :thumbsup:

kool-aid killer
03-11-2007, 11:56 PM
I went to my favorite comic book shop on Friday looking for the Marvel Zombies vs Army of Darkness book but the guy said it was sold out. I tend to learn about this stuff a little too late, is there any website where i can see whats due up a week or so before it hits?

Rocketboy
03-12-2007, 03:55 PM
http://www.diamondcomics.com/public/default.asp?t=2&m=1&c=3&s=7

You can see the current week and next week's listings.

Bel-Cam Jos
03-12-2007, 10:03 PM
Finished Dating Hamlet: Ophelia's Story by Lisa Fiedler. She's written two young adult Shakespeare What If-? type stories that I've read (plus Romeo's Ex: Rosaline's Story). They have good premises, but tend to fall flat by the end; this one was no different. Less characters die in it.

kool-aid killer
03-14-2007, 11:58 AM
http://www.diamondcomics.com/public/default.asp?t=2&m=1&c=3&s=7

You can see the current week and next week's listings.

Sweet. Thats what i need. Now i wont go into the comic book store wondering whats new and if i missed something cool. Thanks.

Bel-Cam Jos
03-26-2007, 12:19 PM
Finished Freakonomics by Two Guys Named Steven/Stephen. It had it moments, but mainly it was a lot of hot air blown through an Econ 202 beaker. Now am starting Exile, the next Legacy of the Farce (er, Force) SW novel.

Ji'dai
03-27-2007, 12:38 PM
Preacher Vol 1-9: Texan preacher Jesse Custer is endowed with the Word of God, giving him the power to compel others to action simply by verbal command. Partnered with his ex-girlfriend turned would-be hitwoman and a 100-year old self-absorbed Irish vampire, Custer takes on a global religious organization, faces off against an immortal Old West gunslinger, and fights injustice along the way while searching for God, who has left heaven to go into hiding among humanity. I thought this was a pretty good series. The good thing is Preacher doesn't rely on his superpower, often resorting to plain-old ***-kicking to get the job done.

DC Showcase Presents: The House of Mystery - 500+ page collection of DC's horror anthology series. Issues were originally published in the late 60s to early 70s, but aside from some of the 60's slang and psychadelic artwork, it's not too dated. Also features some great cartoons by Sergio Aragones, best known for his "drawn-out-dramas" in the margins of Mad Magazine.

Batman: The Ring, the Arrow, and the Bat - Collection of mediocre Green Arrow cross-overs featuring guest-spots by the Green Lantern and the Dark Knight.

Also zipped through Timothy Zahn's Allegiance. Fairly enjoyable read.

El Chuxter
03-27-2007, 05:15 PM
Reading the Hagakure. Luckily it's an abridged version. It's rather silly. It's the document most responsible for the West's perception of bushido, but it was written after the samurai class had been stagnant for two centuries, and by a guy who had plenty of time to think of this stuff while sitting on his butt in a monastery for 40 years.

Yeah, it's a bit inaccurate when compared to the historical record, but sorta interesting nonetheless.

DarthQuack
03-28-2007, 11:12 AM
Currently reading Night Shift by Stephen King.

Bel-Cam Jos
03-28-2007, 11:31 AM
About 1/3 through Exile. Best part? Lando is in the story! Acting, moving around, speaking; the whole shehbang! And... he CARRIES A CANE IN SOME SCENES! :smooth: You gotta read how he pronounces the ship he flies, too. Worth the cover price just for those aspects.

Bel-Cam Jos
03-30-2007, 11:30 AM
Finished Exile by Aaron Allston (who is an underrated SW author IMHO). It leaves some plotlines open (duh...) for the upcoming books. There are some wide possible options (from killing off fairly major characters, starting yet ANOTHER galaxy-wide war) to subtle ones (love stories, new planets intro'd) for the next novel Sacrifice, written by another underrated SW writer (only because Karen Traviss is new to it). I hope she starts to bring things together (there are "only" 3 more books left in the Legacy series).

OC47150
03-30-2007, 11:44 AM
Been reading Republic Commando: Triple Zero. This is a different book than the first Republic Commando. It's not as tightly written as the first one, and, IMO, too many characters. I have to keep checking which clone belongs to which squad.

Still enjoying it.

A third Republic Commando book is slated for October. I'll be getting that.

Bel-Cam Jos
04-28-2007, 09:53 AM
I finished a non-Star Wars book. In less than two weeks. :inconceivable: :Idonotthinkitmeanswhatyouthinkitmeans:
Another posthumously-published JRR Tolkien, The Children of Hurin. I had forgotten just how much I like Tolkien's style and writing, even if it's his 80-year old son compiling his notes. It's sad, exciting, deep; just like most of JRRRT's stuff.

Will try to get to Making of SW, and maybe finish that New Essential Guide to Alien Species, too.

OC47150
05-29-2007, 04:09 PM
I've read several books since I last posted here. I will mention the highlights.

* Roberts Ridge. It's about a battle in Afghanistan where a Navy SEAL fell out of a helicopter and the rescue efforts to retrieve him. Very good.

* Finished the sixth or seventh book in the Last of the Jedi series. Read it over the holiday weekend. A good, fast read. A nice change of pace from what I've been reading.

I have the latest one in the series. Going on a trip this weekend, so I'm planning to read it then.

* Reading Sahara by Clive Cussler at the gym. Very interesting book. I put off watching the movie version until now. Boy, the book is totally different from the movie. The book's main plot is the movie's subplot, and a lot is cut out. I know it's hard to translate a 500-page novel into a 2-hour movie.

* Jackdaws, by Ken Follett. A WWII pre-D-Day spy novel which focuses on female agents of the SOE.

CaptainSolo1138
05-29-2007, 04:26 PM
Good dig, OC. I forgot about this thread.

I finished Pegasus Bridge by Stephen Ambrose a few weeks ago and am just about done with his book D-Day: June 6th, 1944. While narrow in scope, Pegasus Bridge was a good, quick read (<200 pages) about the British Airborne in the hours leading up to the full-on invasion of France. The work of the Brits is so overshadowed that of the U.S. 101st that it was really fun to read about their exploits for a change.

D-Day is absolutely phenomenal. I've got only about fifty or so pages left and will be sad when I'm done with it!:D

On deck: I lost Ambrose's Citizen Soldiers when I was about halfway through it and now that I found it (it was in the closet for some weird reason) I'm anxious to finish it. After that are a couple I picked up at Barnes and Noble on clearance. One is about how Hitler blew the war and the other is about German paratroopers of WWII.

DarthQuack
05-29-2007, 04:26 PM
Finally finished Night Shift. Now I need to find my Hard Merchandise and finish that one off...been buying up all the gaps of my SW books at Borders lately, 3 for 2 deal they've got going.

Rocketboy
05-29-2007, 05:10 PM
I read Shadows of the Empire yet again about a month ago.
How, I'm about a quarter of the way into War and Genocide: A Concise History of the Holocaust.
After that, it'll Tom Brokaw's The Greatest Generation.

OC47150
06-06-2007, 10:02 AM
I finished the latest Last of the Jedi book. Can't wait for the next one to come out.

I enjoy Jude Watson's writing style. I started the young Boba Fett series; I might have to pick those up again, as well as some of her other stories.

I picked up Making of Star Wars at a local sci-fi convention. The price was just too hard to pass up. Glad I bought it. It's great!!

Finished Sahara and am going to start reading The Trail of the Fox, about Rommel at the gym tonight.

DarthQuack
06-08-2007, 11:40 AM
Finished Hard Merchandise....now onto Timothy Zahn's Allegiance.

Bel-Cam Jos
06-09-2007, 10:48 AM
Finished Hard Merchandise....now onto Timothy Zahn's Allegiance.You'll like it. Back to the Zahn we all know and love (after the tepid "Hand of Thrawn" duology, IMHO).


I finished the latest Last of the Jedi book. Can't wait for the next one to come out.

I enjoy Jude Watson's writing style. I started the young Boba Fett series; I might have to pick those up again, as well as some of her other stories.I thought I read on a pre-order site that the next LotJ book had a different author listed. :eek: Hope that's not true.

BTW, I'm reading Jules Verne's Paris in the 20th Century, called a "lost book." Slowly... should speed up the pace when school ends next week.

Rocketboy
06-10-2007, 12:38 AM
I thought I read on a pre-order site that the next LotJ book had a different author listed. :eek: Hope that's not true.Amazon (http://www.amazon.com/Against-Empire-Star-Wars-Last/dp/0439681413/ref=pd_bbs_1/002-9287192-7512859?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1181449969&sr=1-1) has book 8 ("Against the Empire") listed with Jude Watson as the author.

Bel-Cam Jos
06-14-2007, 06:35 PM
Finished Jules Verne's Paris in the 20th Century. Not bad, very much like Orwell's 1984, written around 60-80 years prior, predicting pretty close to reality how the "future" in 1960 would be, technology-wise, and thinking-wise.

Will begin the new SW Sacrifice soon, but from the sounds of it, I don't think I'm gonna like it much. :(

OC47150
06-17-2007, 02:53 PM
Amazon (http://www.amazon.com/Against-Empire-Star-Wars-Last/dp/0439681413/ref=pd_bbs_1/002-9287192-7512859?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1181449969&sr=1-1) has book 8 ("Against the Empire") listed with Jude Watson as the author.

I saw that. That's great. Release date is Aug. 1. A quick read for the Labor Day weekend holiday.

Reading Trail of the Fox, about Rommel, at the gym, and Ken Follett's Hornet Flight at home. The Follett is another WWII thriller, set in Denmark.

The Rommel book is very interesting. It's an older book, published in the mid-70s, and the author interviewed several people who worked beside or knew Rommel. Rommel had a bit more of an ego than I was aware of.

Bel-Cam Jos
06-19-2007, 01:34 PM
I was actually starting to compile a list ( :drool: :D) of books read as mentioned in this thread, but it got long and I quit. :o

Almost done with Sacrifice. I am just waiting to find out what the sort-of-known info ends up being.

Bel-Cam Jos
06-20-2007, 11:46 AM
I finally finished The Making of SW. It was a long read, taking over a month in little parts at a time, but very informative. Also got to the end of Sacrifice. Not too surprising, but actually it's been the best Legacy book so far, IMO (which might not say too much, considering how I have disliked the series so far, but it's not bad).

DarthQuack
06-20-2007, 02:08 PM
Finished Allegiance and now onto The Truce at Bakura!

Bel-Cam Jos
06-22-2007, 12:19 PM
My summer reading quest is on! For the past 3 summers, I've set a goal to read 30 books (haven't reached it yet: '04 - 28, '05 - 29, '06 - 25), so here goes...

Finished Digging for the Truth, a behind-the-scenes book from Josh Bernstein, the host of the History Channel TV show of the same name. Kind of Indiana Jones meets Rachel Rae. :confused: But not bad; written a little below the level of most books I read but still enjoyable.

The Secret Garden by Frances Hodgsen Burnett. Yeah, this might seem to be "below the level of most books I read," but 19th century British writers have a history of being harder to follow. A good story full of positivity; need more of those today.

I plan to follow a "secret" motif this summer: The Secret Garden, The Secret, The Secret Life of Bees. Will begin Secrets by Danielle Steel soon (I also try to branch out and choose genres I don't normally read).

Bel-Cam Jos
06-24-2007, 06:18 PM
Finished three more:

Secrets by romance novelist Danielle Steel. I am usually not into this genre, in fact, I only chose it because a) I hadn't read any of her stuff yet and b) it fit my "secret" motif. It was okay, again without having many romance books with which to compare it. Set in the mid-1980s amid the glamorous prime time TV dramas, I don't even know if I'd consider it a true romance story.

The Secret by Rhonda Byrne. First off, let me say that there are few books that actually make me angry, Mr. Magee. :hulksmash: I chose this one because a) I'd heard so much hype about it that I felt compelled to read it and b) it fit my "secret" motif. I will take a deep breath before I begin my review.

...

There. It's listed as a positive book, about self-help, success, and holding "the secret" to happiness. Yes, it is positive, but underneath (and not so hidden, I might add) it is selfish, materialistic, simplistic, misleading, and oozing with un-earned entitlement. There are blatant lies (misquoting a quote one paragraph before! :confused: :upset: ), misleading "evidence" based on generalities and weak assumptions, contradictory views, and appeals to emotions for all the wrong reasons. I tried to laugh at its assertions, but it frustrated me too much. It will make my new Top Ten Worst Books, when I revise such a list. :whip:

Talk to the Hand by Lynne Truss. This disappointing book was my own fault. Her first book was a humorous view of grammar-gone-wrong, and I expected more of the same. However, I missed all the cover summaries and introduction that showed it would be more realistically depressing about how poor manners have become in society today. It was honest and at times gave a chuckle, but overall it left me feeling depressed at today's people.

Starting The Lovely Bones, another downer (based on how it's begun so far). That puts me at six books now, around 1500 pages after a week of vacation. :thumbsup:

Bel-Cam Jos
06-28-2007, 04:43 PM
Now up to 9 read, 2300 pages or so.

The Lovely Bones by Alice Sebold. Think Ghost meets The Sixth Sense meets Silence of the Lambs. This started out weird, creepy, and stale, but it quickly picked up, ends sort of the way one might expect, but has multiple messages. A good read, even if it's an Oprah's Book Club selection. :chickbook: (not really a "chick" book, j/k ).

Kon-Tiki by Thor Heyerdahl. I read a reference to this account and had never gotten around to reading it. I always enjoy travel/journey books, and this was no exception. Just wish the map in this edition was larger.

The Short Reign of Pippin IV by John Steinbeck. I hadn't read a Steinbeck story in a couple years, and this short satire was a good read, too. Funny at times, usually less-than-subtle in its messages, it reminded me of a play a colleague of mine recently wrote and performed.

I have used Don Quixote as a get-out-of-jury-duty book the last 4 years or so, but the edition I usually check out from the library was :eek: already checked out! Because of that, I only got my service delayed a month or so. :( :superstition:

Bel-Cam Jos
06-30-2007, 11:03 AM
My tenth book this summer (averaging 250 pages each) was Sun Tzu's The Art of War. The translators included some essays and commentaries on the chapters, and even suggested reading the essays first; I compromised and read a few chapters, then the essays. It worked better that way.

Am about halfway through my next "secret" book, The Secret Life of Bees.

Bel-Cam Jos
07-03-2007, 04:26 PM
Two more...

The Secret Life of Bees by Sue Monk Kidd. This one was kind of like Fried Green Tomatoes with a little "who am I?" mystery to it. It, as many books, was slow in building up, but by the middle, I wanted to know what came next. Another book that's on our school's list to teach in English classes.

To a God Unknown by Steinbeck. A weird, mystical story, ending sadly, but perhaps predictably. Set in a different part of central CA, and taking a different POV with different characters. I always like my favorite author's works, although this one's not up at my top of his books, IMHO.

I'm heading out on vacation soon, and while I'll keep on reading, there'll have to be a big recap of the books read in airport lines and on cross-country flights.

JimJamBonds
07-03-2007, 11:44 PM
My tenth book this summer was Sun Tzu's The Art of War.

Who translated your version? I have purchased/read a few different versions over the years.

UKWildcat
07-06-2007, 07:36 PM
Hello, new to this thread. Don't read all that often, but I usually do while on vacation. I actually need to read more.

Anyways, read Stephen King's short story The Gingerbread Girl which was published exclusively by Esquire magazine in one of their recent mags. Good story, fast read.

I also started and am half way through Cormac McCarthy's The Road. Great novel thus far, can't wait to see how it turns out. Never read any of his other work but I am now very interested.

Bel-Cam Jos
07-20-2007, 01:10 PM
Who translated your version? I have purchased/read a few different versions over the years.As Ringo Starr once voiced on a Simpsons episode: "P.S. Please excuse the lateness of my reply." The translation was by the Denma Group, that used many scholars and a found scroll that included some new parts. They mentioned that these were early "books" and were bound together at the "spine," meaning anyone could put it in whatver order you wished, as well as being harder to tell what the "first printing" version would be.

Back from vacation, and I only got to read three books (airport lines and then car repairs after returning home).

Alternate Generals II edited by Harry Turtledove (couldn't find the first book). This was a "revisionist history" fiction anthology, including some such as Napolean keeping Louisiana and losing to Britian in 1815's Battle of New Orleans, Germany winning the Battle of Britain, and a mythological account of a Korea vs. Japan "war" without fighting. Pretty cool.

'A' is for Alibi by Sue Grafton. I'd heard of this "series" that I think is up to letter T by now. Not a bad book, but REEEEEAAALLLY slow in its build up (especially for a 200-pager) and a REEEEEAAALLLY fast end (one of those last few pages stories).

The Devil Wears Prada by Lauren Weisberger. Now, I know I said I wanted to avoid movie tie-in books (and my current book violates that, too), but since this was my 666th book on my all-time read list, I thought I'd be appropriate. :evil: This was bad; the movie The Natural-ed it by making her more pathetic and pitiful, but the novel makes Miranda the boss really unforgivable. Few characters were truly likable. I realy didn't like this too much, and it wasn't really well constructed, either. Not terrible, but not great.

Currently reading One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest because it's short, and I can put it down to get to Harry and company tomorrow, if not yet finished with it. Fifteen read this summer so far, for about 4000 pages total.

Bel-Cam Jos
07-22-2007, 02:56 AM
So as to remain unaffected by spoilers from any medium, I bought Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows right when Costco opened this morning, and I got done reading it around 11-ish tonight. Read my comments in the thread for that book, but needless to say it was one of the best reads I've had in quite a while!

Back to the Cuckoo's Nest in a bit, but I am actually sore from reading all day! :toughlife: :rolleyes:

Bel-Cam Jos
07-25-2007, 12:56 PM
Add a couple more to the list:

Ken Kesey's One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest. I still haven't seen the film, but this was in a discount bin of books and thought it might be interesting, which it was. Sometimes weird (duh... it's set in a mental ward in the 1960s), often sad and pitiful. Very well written with excellent characterization.

Erich Krauss' Wall of Flame. This is an account of the southern CA wildfires of October 2003. I experienced them firsthand, but thankfully was not evacuated nor was my house immediately threatened. Reading this book gave me more insight into the difficulties firefighters face (follwing orders that seem foolish, physical exhaustion to do the job that must be done, media scrutiny from those who think they know better, etc.). The book has weak and stiff dialogue and is overly repetitive (must've counted 20+ times "wall of flame" was used... hmmm, I wonder if that might make a good title :rolleyes: , same descriptions using almost the exact wording). Not that great of a book style-wise, but very informative.

Over the last 4 summers, I've now read 100 books, totalling about 25,000 pages. And there's still time left to this summer! :thumbsup:

Bel-Cam Jos
07-27-2007, 07:07 PM
Each of the past few summers, I've set a goal (as yet unreached) of 30 books, with the assumption that 20 is a definite. Well, these two are #s 19 and 20, putting me around 5600 pages.

Someone on this site (I'll try to find who it was in a bit) suggested Shirley Jackson's The Haunting of Hill House as a horror genre book. Good call, _______* ! Not the slasher/gore horror, more of the gothic psychological/suspense fear. I made sure I read this one in the daytime, though. :chicken:

A book of questions, The Book of Totally Useless Information by Don Voorhees. Things like 'Why is Indiana called 'The Hoosier State?' or 'Why does the moon appear larger on the horizon?' Many I hadn't known before, others I'd already heard before. Overall, a nice easy read.

* = Ji'dai.

DarthQuack
07-28-2007, 10:19 AM
Read Harry Potter the night into day it came out, had it done by 10pm, will probably re-read the whole series soon. Currently on Bachman's BLAZE.

Bel-Cam Jos
08-01-2007, 04:14 PM
Still going...

Napoleon on the Art of War by Jay Luvaas. The editor pieced together letters, memoirs, and correspondences by Mssr. Bonaparte over the many years into a logically flowing text. I chose it because a poster here asked which Art of War I had read earlier, since I didn't know there were others besides the Sun-Tzu version. This same editor compiled one on Frederick the Great, too. One thing I'll say, Napoleon was very detail oriented and clear.

Sliding Scales by Alan Dean Foster. I found this book in a library sale, and I wanted to try some more non-SW sci-fi. I've read a little by ADF before (and he's written 2.9 Star Wars EU novels, also). I now know what it feels like to enter an established "universe" without knowing it well; apparently the Pip and Flinx series has quite a bit of detail to it that I don't know. ADF sure likes alliteration in his style.

Now I'm at 22 books and over 6K pages tallied.

Bel-Cam Jos
08-04-2007, 03:20 PM
Sandra Cisnero's Woman Hollering Creek was a sort of anthology of short stories set in Texas. I read this because it's a book in our school's teach-able library. It's still in her same style, which takes some getting used to to appreciate.

I stumbled upon Stan Lee and the Rise and Fall of the American Comic Book while in the library. This was a wonderful read, even if it Dumbledores the mythos of Stan the Man (meaning that the all-good guy view has a few smudges). I didn't realize what had gone on to "create" the Marvel Comics universe, and the troubles before, during, and since the 1961 origin. Well researched, fair in its treatement of most parties (except Jim Shooter is raked over the coals, then whipped and tarred-and-feathered as a bad dude), and funny sometimes but mainly insightful. You see how the Stan Lee of the WHtbaSH? television show is the way he is.

Bel-Cam Jos
08-06-2007, 01:56 PM
I noticed this book at the library, and was compelled, nay, required to read it. First off, I know that he felled the trees and pressed the wood into pulp to create the paper for the book, as well as inventing the type font (Type Kwon Do) for the publisher. He also delivered all the copies (a full week early) to all the distributors himself, on horseback. That said... The Justice Riders by Chuck Norris and three other writers was NOT filled with trite cituations and cliched dialogue and characters. It was NOT overly preachy and anachronistic. The characters' names and behaviors were NOT sterotypical. It was NOT usual that the group was seldom on horses, where a person would be considered a rider, and the use of martial arts in the 1860s America was NOT out of place. Therefore, I will NOT give this novel a poor rating, so as to avoid beign pummeled to death by Mr. Norris.

Mitch Albom's Tuesdays With Morrie was chosen because 1) I think I was subsciously influenced by its mention in a The Simpsons Movie scene, 2) I hadn't read an "A" author this summer, and 3) it was one of those "Oh, you haven't read that one yet?" type books. Yes I cried, no I didn't laugh out loud (as some reviews stated), yes I felt sadness and pity and confidence. It was short, easy to read, and worthwhile.

Getting closer to my goal of 30 books (at 26 now, 7000+ pages) for the summer, as I slowly run out of summer days...

pbarnard
08-06-2007, 07:31 PM
Alternating right now between Wheel of Time series (started with New Spring, Eye of the World and Great Hunt). Now taking a break and going to do a few Jack Ryan books from Tom Clancy, starting with Hunt for Red October (currently reading). Will go and read Inferno when it comes out and go back and read a few more Wheel of Time and than a few more Tom Clancy maybe even classic Bond books, before the next SW books.

JimJamBonds
08-08-2007, 01:53 PM
Napoleon on the Art of War by Jay Luvaas. The editor pieced together letters, memoirs, and correspondences by Mssr. Bonaparte over the many years into a logically flowing text. I chose it because a poster here asked which Art of War I had read earlier, since I didn't know there were others besides the Sun-Tzu version. This same editor compiled one on Frederick the Great, too.

Yup that was me that asked. I have a annodated version of Napoleon's Art of War, I think I'll have to look into getting Mr. Luvaas' version as well. As a side note BCJ besides Napoleon and Sun Tzu's I have: Frederick the Great's Art of War, Carl Von Clausewitz On War and also The Tao of War. I also have a number of books on light infantry tactics from the 1830's, General von Stubben's manual for troops, the attack and defense of fortified places etc.

As for my reading I finished the other day In At The Death the final book on Harry Turtledove's series where the South broke away from the North. Right now I'm working on a book called Onward We Charge, which is about Darby's Rangers in World War II.

Bel-Cam Jos
08-08-2007, 05:34 PM
Yup that was me that asked. I have a annodated version of Napoleon's Art of War, I think I'll have to look into getting Mr. Luvaas' version as well. As a side note BCJ besides Napoleon and Sun Tzu's I have: Frederick the Great's Art of War, Carl Von Clausewitz On War and also The Tao of War. I also have a number of books on light infantry tactics from the 1830's, General von Stubben's manual for troops, the attack and defense of fortified places etc.

As for my reading I finished the other day In At The Death the final book on Harry Turtledove's series where the South broke away from the North. Right now I'm working on a book called Onward We Charge, which is about Darby's Rangers in World War II.I think I'm tapped out on 'war' books this summer right now.

Does Mr. Turtledove mainly write "alternative history" novels? I saw one with Stalin, Hirohito, Churchill, and Hitler on the cover (I assume it's about them versus the USA in WWII). I read one of his this summer (on different world generals throughout history).

On a more odd note, I finished Game of Shadows by Mark Fainaru-Wada and Lance Williams, the newspaper reporters who covered the BALCO steroids trail, a couple innings before Bonds hit his 756th HR last night. That was surreal, watching him bat (doubling and singling, plus scoring 2 runs, like he used to in the past) while reading of what happened the previous 8 years or so. Hard to feel his record is legit after reading this book. :(

JimJamBonds
08-08-2007, 09:33 PM
Does Mr. Turtledove mainly write "alternative history" novels?

Yup, while he has written plenty of 'sci fiy' alt history type books I keep to the more 'pure' alt. history. The "Timeline 191" is what got me interested in Turtledove although I've read Ruled Britannia (Spanish invasion of Britian succeds) and the Infamy series (Japan after Dec. 7 invades and takes over Hawaii).


On a more odd note, I finished Game of Shadows by Mark Fainaru-Wada and Lance Williams, the newspaper reporters who covered the BALCO steroids trail, a couple innings before Bonds hit his 756th HR last night. That was surreal, watching him bat (doubling and singling, plus scoring 2 runs, like he used to in the past) while reading of what happened the previous 8 years or so. Hard to feel his record is legit after reading this book. :(

I read GoS about a year ago and there are some REALLY interesting things in there for sure.

Bel-Cam Jos
08-09-2007, 07:41 PM
I have now tied my "record" of books read in a summer with 29. I feel like Barry Bonds; now all I need is a head moderator to engage in a "Herculean effort" by waiting until I break this hallowed mark (steroids-free, too :thumbsup: ).

Like Water for Chocolate by Laura Esqivel. Another of the in-the-school's-teaching-library books, this was a "cookbook" of monthly recipes intertwined with a story that actually had me shocked at the end. Nothing earth-shattering, but still unexpected. I liked this one, even though I didn't think I would.

The End of Harry Potter? by David Langford. After finishing HPatDH, I thought it'd be fun to read about others' ideas after knowing whether they're off-base, dead-on, or just not right. Kind of funny, surprisingly well-researched (on Rowling's possible influences in literature), even includes a couple SW references.

Bel-Cam Jos
08-11-2007, 06:42 PM
History is made! Today, the 30th book read in the summer, broke the all-time record # of 29 books. It was The Souls of Black Folk by W.E.B. DuBois, a semi-biographical historical account of African-American experience through the beginning of the 20th century. He used logical and reasoned arguments on how to address some problems and issues; if only more people would listen to those points, maybe we'd have a better world in which to live.

So, here's the back-of-my-trading-card stats:

Bel-Cam Jos
Ht: 8 1/2. Wt: 11. Reads: L to R. Drafted: 1138th Rd., Pitt Pirates.
Year Books Pages Avg.Pgs.
2004 28 7200 257
2005 29 8800 303
2006 25 5900 236
2007 30 8000 267*
Total 112 29900 267

* = statistics still active
# = all-time for a certain hyphenated Forumite :rolleyes:

TeeEye7
08-12-2007, 11:49 AM
History is made! Today, the 30th book read in the summer, broke the all-time record # of 29 books. It was The Souls of Black Folk by W.E.B. DuBois, a semi-biographical historical account of African-American experience through the beginning of the 20th century. He used logical and reasoned arguments on how to address some problems and issues; if only more people would listen to those points, maybe we'd have a better world in which to live.

So, here's the back-of-my-trading-card stats:

Bel-Cam Jos
Ht: 8 1/2. Wt: 11. Reads: L to R. Drafted: 1138th Rd., Pitt Pirates.
Year Books Pages Avg.Pgs.
2004 28 7200 257
2005 29 8800 303
2006 25 5900 236
2007 30 8000 267*
Total 112 29900 267

* = statistics still active
# = all-time for a certain hyphenated Forumite :rolleyes:

And all done without the use of steroids! ;)
Job well done, BCJ!