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View Full Version : The Music Industry is Crying.



sith_killer_99
12-16-2005, 08:10 PM
Like a bunch of little babies the "Music Industry" is crying their little heads off. Sales are down and retailers are reporting significant drops in sales compared to last years big Christmas push.

I heard an interview today where the head of one of these big companies blamed "illegal internet downloading" for the drop in sales. How long are they going to keep that up as their excuse for falling CD sales? What a joke, if this nutball actually thinks that illegal internet downloading is more prevelant now than it has been in the past then someone needs to fire his butt! Then this guy goes on to say that the "evidence" of this problem is the explosion of sales for iPods and other music players.

The truth is that CD sales have taken a nose dive because of online music sales, companies like Napster, iTunes, Rhapsody and others have been reporting record profits. It only stands to reason that the CD sales would take a hit. Besides, many people now have the flexability to go out and buy a single song without having to purchase the whole CD, this way they can get what they want and save $$$.

The boost in iPod sales and other players only goes to prove my point here. It is a little more difficult to download illegal tracks to an iPod, this guy obviously did not know that, otherwise he probably wouldn't have opened his big mouth and pointed his finger at "illegal downloads". What's more is that his apparent ignorance of his top competitor (iPod/iTunes) only goes to show how out of touch the Music Studios are with current technology.

For just $8.99 a month (I get my Napster subscription through AAFES) I can listen to all the music I want. That's less than the cost of one CD and I have almost unlimited access to a massive library! So why should I buy a CD? I don't even own a home stereo, I play all my music on my computer, my MP3 player or my car stereo, which now has Sirius. Satelite radio is probably taking a bite out of CD sales as well, though a much smaller one.

So we have all these new options for music and we just don't need CD's as much as we used to.

So now I'm spending $22.00 per month on "music" services, more than I have ever spent on music in my life. You better believe I have to have a DARN good reason to pay for a CD at some retail store.

Then there is the DVD factor. Every month I buy a new DVD or two or three, movies are just a much bigger part of my perfered entertainment than "music".

So there you have it. Napster + Sirius + DVD's = No CD sales here!

I predict that CD sales will continue to fall. The industry will not die, per say, but it will be significantly "downsized" over the next 5-10 years until it reaches an equalibrium. It's the law of supply and demand. They just don't understand that the demand is drying up and they need to cut back on the number of CD's they produce. Perhaps in the next year or two some young hotshot who understand all this will come on board with the music industry and open their eyes to the horrible truth, CD's just aren't in demand any more.:D

Reefer Shark
12-16-2005, 08:53 PM
Nice post killer! I agree with everything you said here.

These companies shot themselves in the foot in the begining by fighting new technology instead of embracing it. If they would've been on board with it then, they would be making more money now.

I say screw 'em. They got what they deserve for gouging us on CD prices. C'mon... $18.99 for a CD? You gotta be kidding me..

Kidhuman
12-16-2005, 10:07 PM
Great post SK99. Like Reefer I wholeheartedly agree with you. I just got an Ipod, been downloading music for awhile(I still have 6 gigs of mp3's which I burned years ago). I dont do it illegally anymore because:

1. There isnt anything new that I like.

2. If I like the band, I will buy the CD. I have bought 1 CD in the last year and it was LIVE's greatest hits. The next one I will buy is their next album

3. I have resorted to going to pawn shops for used CD's. I am nt going to pay fullprice for 3 songs on a CD. I pay them 3-4 bucks and I am golden.

4. At home I listen to stuff on my computer or on my Sat. system.

The music industry has been gouging the public for a long time. Its about timt they got what they deserve.

Blue2th
12-16-2005, 10:09 PM
If the record companies and musicians want more CD sales start doing whole CD's of good material. Not just one or two hits. Like the old days of LP's where you not only got a full album of good songs, but posters, cool artwork etc. a whole concept. Maybe even a ten minute song. Nah those days are gone. Till they give me a reason to buy a whole CD I would rather pick the one good song or two pay $2 and download them it's a no-brainer. They just don't get it.

Jedi_Master_Guyute
12-16-2005, 11:58 PM
I'm not going lie, i've had folks burn CD's for me all the time, but if i dig the CD, once i get income enough to blow 15 bucks on it, i'll happily buy it. Plus, let's face it Music Reps: the music you're putting out there is CRAP. Of course you're not going to have a huge week in sales when your newest releases are Lindsay lohan, Ashlee simpson, and Live (just kidding, KH :crazed: ). The only CD's i purchased this year that come to mind were David Gray, Sigur Ros, Dane Cook, Sufjan Stevens, Coldplay, and Gorillaz. I buy these because in my eyes (and many critics/fans) these bands (and comedian) are fabulous and constantly put out quality that is fantastic and respectable. Sorry music industry. Until you give the average listener quality music, your sales will suck. :whip:

Rocketboy
12-17-2005, 12:22 AM
The truth is that CD sales have taken a nose dive because of online music sales, companies like Napster, iTunes, Rhapsody and others have been reporting record profits.Don't forget the fact that 99.999% of everything released lately flat out sucks.

El Chuxter
12-17-2005, 12:38 AM
I think that's a lot of it.

Record companies are looking at their dwindling sales and not acting logically. Ever notice that you can go into any store, and most of what you find are talentless blonde girls who may or may not have been on the Mickey Mouse Club? Um, the kind of people who buy that swill are less likely to want CDs. It's the older generations (around my age and older) who are more likely to want the physical CD. But music people who've graduated from high school would actually like is tougher to find (often it's necessary to order it), and a disturbing amount of it goes out of print within a couple of years.

Meanwhile, the same companies are churning out remakes ad nauseum (after the dismal performance of the last several, you think they'd know not to bother with swill like the upcoming ChIPS remake) and charging $10 a person to see them, then wondering why theater attendance is down.

At some point, it's going to completely blow up in their faces. And then the independent companies will rise and become the mainstream, only to have something else blow up in their faces. It's a vicious cycle. :)

Slicker
12-17-2005, 01:28 AM
Don't forget the fact that 99.999% of everything released lately flat out sucks.I'll second that. The last CD I bought was Hefty Fine in September (I think it was September) and the last one before that was whenever Toxicity came out by SoaD. I frequently download from a :Pirate:ing site and I never think twice about it. If they'd actually put music instead of little skits on the CD's then maybe I'd buy em'. Take Hefty Fine by the Bloodhound Gang. It's 12 tracks long and I think 3 or 4 of them are just 10 second long skits.

mabudonicus
12-17-2005, 07:12 AM
As to what Chux said, very true as well- how many copies of The Eagles Greatest Hits can anyone actually "need" ??

I still buy CDs all the time, at least one a month, but they are always semi-obscure heavy metal stuff from the past 25 years, I figure if I buy enough of ONLY the "good stuff", sooner or later maybe more of the "good stuff" may be available, somehow- with european heavy metal, at least, that philosphy seems to have been working for the past 10 years or so
:beard:

scruffziller
12-17-2005, 10:08 AM
Yea, the same goes for the phone companies that did not embrace the coming cell phone wave several years ago. They spent alot of money laying wire for a future in phone service that did not include cell phones. And they are crying. Oh the arrogance of these companies, and then to watch them fall flat on their face is so delightful.:thumbsup: Adapt or die, it is the oldest rule of survival.


I heard an interview today where the head of one of these big companies blamed "illegal internet downloading" for the drop in sales. How long are they going to keep that up as their excuse for falling CD sales?

There was a study done some time ago that proved that so-called "illegal downloading", actually helped improve CD sales. And also concluded in that fact, that people who downloaded free music of an album would not have bought the CD anyway.

Blue2th
12-17-2005, 11:07 AM
Let's face it people are in love with the image of these so called musicians not how well they play their instruments or sing or both. This all started with MTV. When someone who really knows their music puts out a good CD we are blown away because it's such a rare thing now. You have to search real hard to find such music. Meanwhile the mainstream music industry keeps cranking out the same bland stuff and are in charge of the monopolized airwaves. In my town the same company (Clear Channel) owns 80% of the radio stations. I remember when FM used to be a place you could hear a whole album side with no commercials. It was sort of an underground scene. Now it's mainstream and they promote the same crud the music industry thinks we want to hear.

Bacta Beast
12-17-2005, 01:03 PM
The music industry sucks! I know I haven't downloaded a whole lot myself since WinMX shut down.

I agree with the sentiment that sales are poor due to crappy music also. Like some of the others here I have downloaded albums (sometimes before they're available in the states, sometimes because I can't find a radio station that's playing it, and sometimes because I can't find a store that carries it) and then gone on to buy the actual album when I a. know I like the disc, or b. it becomes available.

My biggest gripe, besides price, is the lack of promotion of the kind of music I want to hear. Personally I'm sick to death of Lindsay Lohan, and Jessica & Ashley. I want to hear new material from older artists that I like when it comes out. And I like to hear new material from new artists in the same vain. It's out there but it gets ignored by MTV and radio. I guess if I was into hip hop I'd be pretty happy, but I can't even find a lowsy single from my favorite artist when it's released!:tired:

All I know is, if the records want my money they better pay more attention to me as a demographic!

El Chuxter
12-17-2005, 01:05 PM
There is new material from "older" artists, but with a few exceptions (U2), it gets swept under the rug. I've found several times that bands or performers I love have a new album. . . two months after it's released!


There was a study done some time ago that proved that so-called "illegal downloading", actually helped improve CD sales. And also concluded in that fact, that people who downloaded free music of an album would not have bought the CD anyway.

It makes perfect sense. You download a track or two and find something you don't know but like, and you didn't have to pay for it. It's the role radio used to serve before Clearchannel completely took over and there's no chance of actually hearing new, interesting stuff.

They should've embraced digital delivery six or seven years ago. I'm a CD junkie, probably always will be, and I think that. If nothing else, this material that's not cost effective to produce anymore could still make money.

Example in point: I've always loved an old album by T-Rex called The Slider. My tape recently wore out, and I'm finding that (though it was remastered less than six years ago), it's out of print. Supposedly it's a collector's item now. I'm not willing to pay several times retail for a used copy. So I don't have the album anymore. I, the fan, lose. Eventually someone with more money to throw around will buy the copy I didn't, and the scalper will make a killing, none of which will go to the record company or (in this case, the estate of) the artist, so they both lose, too!

I know it costs an awful lot to actually publish a CD and keep it available. But, hello? Is it just me, or would it be totally logical to put that album online for legal download, maybe at $8 for the entire album, and offer the artwork as a PDF? The space to store it would cost them, what, a one-time cost of maybe a penny or two?

Instead, they'd rather keep it unavailable and slap copy-protection on new CDs that will completely screw up my PC if I ever try to play the original on a PC. . . but is useless against a Mac. (Every CD I've purchased with such copy-protection I've transferred to an unprotected CD using a Mac at work. So they've actually encouraged me to copy CDs I normally wouldn't have copied by putting the copy protection on them!!)

Stupid. Really stupid.

Slicker
12-17-2005, 01:13 PM
The music industry sucks! I know I haven't downloaded a whole lot myself since WinMX shut down.

*cough*trythislink (http://limewire.com/)*cough*

Tycho
12-17-2005, 02:34 PM
Thanks Slicker. That was just what I my criminal mind was seeking when I started reading this thread.:D

Meanwhile, does anyone like "Saliva?" That band rocks! I like real hard rock or metal, not this whimpy crap most of you listen to - but bands with serious anger management issues I can relate to!

JON9000
12-17-2005, 02:53 PM
Music labels can die for all I care.

http://forums.sirstevesguide.com/showthread.php?t=27313&highlight=music+industry

Companies don't like shrinking profits, but any industry that has a product that can be digitized is in serious trouble. Many companies have crashed upon the shoals of the internet. Look at what happened to Polaroid after the internet.

The market has changed. Live in it or die. but please don't expect anyone to feel sorry for you, record labels, because Karma is a real Bizzy!

Rocketboy
12-17-2005, 08:12 PM
I'll second that. The last CD I bought was Hefty Fine in September (I think it was September) and the last one before that was whenever Toxicity came out by SoaD. I frequently download from a :Pirate:ing site and I never think twice about it. If they'd actually put music instead of little skits on the CD's then maybe I'd buy em'. Take Hefty Fine by the Bloodhound Gang. It's 12 tracks long and I think 3 or 4 of them are just 10 second long skits.That's another thing - even the bands that I like (and would buy their albums without thinking twice about it) are releasing garbage.
The new Bloodhound Gang - crap.
The new Foo Fighters - crap.
The new Weezer - crap.

I'm getting nervous about the next Velvet Revolver...

El Chuxter
12-17-2005, 11:34 PM
Thanks for telling me the new Foo sucks. . . after I ordered it and got the shipping confirmation. :) I passed on it when it came out until I heard the track with Norah Jones. Man, if Dave Grohl had a baby with Norah Jones, that kid would rule the world.

However, this is another to take to work and copy on the Mac.

Speaking of which, Sony BMG has issued a recall for the CDs with XCP technology, since it royally screws up your PC. Costco has gone a step beyond that and given me a coupon for a free replacement for the Neil Diamond 12 Songs* I got a month ago. . . without requiring a return of the other copy.

*--Dude, it's produced by Rick Rubin. I'd buy a CD of Ashlee Simpson making armpit farts if Rubin produced it. And, yes, it kicks as much arse as I'd expect any Rubin-produced CD to kick. And besides, the dude freakin' wrote "I'm a Believer." He just needed a figurative kick in the crotch to remind him there was more to life than having old ladies throw their underwear at you.

scruffziller
12-18-2005, 01:51 AM
It makes perfect sense. You download a track or two and find something you don't know but like, and you didn't have to pay for it.

Yes, and it may encourage you to actually like the new group alot to the point where you would like to actually OWN the CDs. And go see them in concert. Stupid record companies.




Example in point: I've always loved an old album by T-Rex called The Slider. My tape recently wore out, and I'm finding that (though it was remastered less than six years ago), it's out of print.
Here you go dude......

http://music.allofmp3.com/r2/T_Rex/The_Slider/group_5391/album_12/mcatalog.shtml?albref=14

Rocketboy
12-18-2005, 02:45 PM
Thanks for telling me the new Foo sucks. . . after I ordered it and got the shipping confirmation. :) I passed on it when it came out until I heard the track with Norah Jones. Man, if Dave Grohl had a baby with Norah Jones, that kid would rule the world.Well, this is actually my first Foo Fighters cd since the first one. They are a band I've always liked, especially most of the singles, but just haven't bought any other of their albums.
I picked up the new one on a whim (and an $8.99 first week price), even though I wasn't a fan of the first single. When they advertised it as "One loud, one not so loud" my interest was grabbed, because the Foos really can rock when they want to. But the Norah Jones cameo was the real clincher.

The "loud" album is typical bland radio-friendly "rock" and the "not so loud" album is mostly forgettable (with the Norah track being the exception - She could sing the ABCs and I'd buy it).
I think maybe I expected too much.

JediTricks
12-18-2005, 02:55 PM
I cannot believe Chux just admitted to buying a Neil Diamond album. I don't give a crap about who produced it, it's NEIL F***ING DIAMOND!!! There is NOTHING cool about that! :p

El Chuxter
12-18-2005, 09:49 PM
Before the guy completely sold out to the Barry Manilow crowd, he was a damn cool songwriter. If nothing else, his greatness is assured by "Forever in Blue Jeans."

I cannot believe I've now praised both Neil Diamond and Ice Cube on the same forum within 24 hours. That has to be a first in recorded history. :D

Kidhuman
12-18-2005, 11:51 PM
I dig early Neil stuff. I like it. That whole lounge singer act has got to go though.

Jargo
12-19-2005, 05:15 AM
I know a guy who works For Universal music publishing. He was telling me that independent of the music industry a study proved that it's actually likely people download music either illegally or legally and then go on to buy the CD's anyway. the reason the music industry is doing so badly is because they employ worthless lazy freeloaders who do buggar all work and sign up crappy acts who are only expected to be worth a years worth of music before fading into obscurity.
Acts aren't nurtured anymore, they aren't encouraged to be original, record companies sign a sound not an artist and they just want more of the same old same old because they think if people like the first album they'll love more of the same. Take the darkeness. that mock glam rock outfit that hit last year with 'I believe'. signed by Universal Music. one year on and they're sinking into obscurity faster than a lead balloon. Universal got an album and a few singles out of them and now don't care. Yet still whinge because they signed the band and blame internet downloads as the cause for the lack of album and single sales. Truth is the Darkness suck. They're a novelty tribute band. Artists like that can't be expected to have longevity. Nor can the public be expected to keep digging the vibe. So Universal wasted time and money on a group who should have stayed performing in bars and probably passed over countless actually talented acts. They went for the fast buck and now that's dried up they're crying.
Lets not forget also that CD's scratch. they have to be stored. they take up room. Technology is moving on and the need for a format that is smaller and less fragile has arisen. For my money I feel that something akin to flash drives would be the best option. They're sturdy, they hold a lot and similarly to the net way of downloading, it should be possible to set up stores with computer stations where you take your flash drive in and simply drop your music from the stores computer onto the drive and do away with crappy CD's completely.

darthvyn
12-19-2005, 08:45 AM
yeah, but they've had a cushy thing for a long time, and now that it's time to evolve or die, they're going out like whiny babies instead of just rolling with the punches.

it's interesting about that study, jargo. it just supports the suspicions i've had about the situation for along time.

yeah, the record industry is burying themselves under all their own crap: bad records, frivolous lawsuits, and their ostentatious lifestyles.

CaptainSolo1138
12-19-2005, 10:22 AM
"Forever in Blue Jeans."
Yeah, I thought the words were "Reverend Blue Jeans" until about two years ago. What are you loooking at me like that for? Perhaps it's casual Sunday!

And then there's KH's favorite Neil Diamond song, "Sweet Caroline". I know how much that guy loves the Sox!:beard:

Kidhuman
12-19-2005, 12:14 PM
I actually prefer Cracklin Rose

sith_killer_99
12-19-2005, 05:11 PM
Technology is moving on and the need for a format that is smaller and less fragile has arisen. For my money I feel that something akin to flash drives would be the best option. They're sturdy, they hold a lot and similarly to the net way of downloading, it should be possible to set up stores with computer stations where you take your flash drive in and simply drop your music from the stores computer onto the drive and do away with crappy CD's completely.

Actually, I pretty much do this already. My MP3 player is a flash thumb drive that plugs into a USB port. I drag and drop the music into the drive then I can carry it with me, plug it into other computers or plug it into the player and listen to my music as a portable player. I love it, I can use the drive to store any kind of file I want or use it to listen to music! The music I "purchase for downloading into the drive" is purchased on Napster.

Here's a link to see what MP3 player I am talking about:

This is the first one I bought:
http://www.creative.com/products/product.asp?category=213&subcategory=215&product=10919

This is the second one I bought:
http://www.creative.com/products/product.asp?category=213&subcategory=215&product=4884

:D

JON9000
12-20-2005, 05:59 PM
the reason the music industry is doing so badly is because they employ worthless lazy freeloaders who do buggar all work and sign up crappy acts who are only expected to be worth a years worth of music before fading into obscurity.
I believe that. The labels are no longer owned by music people. they are owned by huge conglomerates who are obsessed with marketing.

If you want a prime example of where the money goes, find out what an independent record promoter is. These bozos are ex-program directors who are paid to get current program directors to play a certain single on the radio. There is a law against paying program directors (payola), so these guys are paid to simply get the record played, which usually involves clandestine sleaze. anyway, these bozos make up to $300,000 a year.

no wonder artists usually end up owing the label money.

2-1B
12-27-2007, 09:28 PM
I'm with Chux, Neil Diamond is the balls.

Lotta great tunes from that guy, but I think my fave might be Holly Holy ?

Mad Slanted Powers
12-27-2007, 10:18 PM
If you want a prime example of where the money goes, find out what an independent record promoter is. These bozos are ex-program directors who are paid to get current program directors to play a certain single on the radio. There is a law against paying program directors (payola), so these guys are paid to simply get the record played, which usually involves clandestine sleaze. anyway, these bozos make up to $300,000 a year.They are willing to pay money to get people to play the music, yet they are demanding more and more royalties from internet stations that will play the music for free. In fact, I am paying about $27.95 a month just to be able to broadcast on Live365.com. That's a pretty good deal compared to what I would have to go through to do it all myself, and I wouldn't be able to afford to pay all the royalties. Somafm.com had so shut down for a few months a few years ago when rates were going to go up. They were able to return when the rates didn't go up as high as originally planned. It would be a sad day if stations like that were silenced, because you just don't hear that music played on regular radio. We'd be going back to the old days where college stations were the only place you could hear underground music.

Blue2th
12-27-2007, 10:23 PM
Reading these old threads, I can't believe my inability to punctuate properly just three or so years ago.







Good thing I learned how to use a compewter.

JediTricks
12-29-2007, 01:19 AM
As if the music biz didn't already look like a bunch of idiots, now they're suing someone for making copies of albums he bought LEGALLY FOR PERSONAL USE!!!

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2007/12/28/AR2007122800693_pf.html

You have got to be kidding me! I am really doubting this violates the DCMA, if it does, then the DCMA needs to be struck down immediately and rewritten from the bolts up. This is a blatant abuse of individual rights, and reeks of a greedy corporate entity sinking under its own weight trying to wring every last penny out of its remaining customers through underhanded and questionable tactics. They can kiss my *** if they think I'm going to buy 1 more ****ing new album if I can't listen to it on the medium of my choosing.

jjreason
12-29-2007, 06:00 AM
Horrible, horrible decision (to go after this guy). They're going way overboard in alienating customers just for a relatively small sum of money. I don't want my Christmas CDs anymore, someone rip them for me so I can take them back. :D

Blue2th
12-29-2007, 09:44 AM
I don't get it. These guys are getting desperate now.
What's the difference between buying a CD and storing it on your computer so you can edit the song list (of crappy tunes) to download onto your Ipod, and going to ITunes and purchasing tunes then downloading them onto your Ipod.
You are still initially buying the tunes.
They are grabbing at straws now. I don't think they can win this one.
I'm suprised that BMI/Sony would endorse this way of thinking also.

These companies need to get a clue.
They are dying because of their lack of vision. They are not in it for the long haul anymore. Instead of nurturing good talent as Mr. DP alluded to in an earlier post they are in it for the flavor of the month.
Why don't they take some of their tax deductible money and re-invest it into providing money for cut school programs, and music classes.
Where do they think the musical talent is going to come from?

Kids aren't going to learn how to play guitar on a Sony Playstation Rockstar III.
But then again they will learn how to pose for the camera, and that's really what it's all about.

Why don't they take some of that money they have to do a leveraged buyout-takeover of some of these monopolized radio stations, to get different talent and variety on the airwaves. Instead of the regurgetated payola playlist they think we want to hear?

El Chuxter
12-29-2007, 01:03 PM
Wow. Just wow.

All of these mega-conglomerates need to stop focusing on keeping their profits in the billions and be happy with just turning a profit. What, did they expect the guy to download songs he already had from iTunes at $1 each? Huh?

All they're getting is bad press. Given how badly they're doing as an industry, that can't be good.

What they need to do is drop the price of CDs, take a lower percentage of profits, ensure that kids wanting good classic music have more to choose from than just A Kind of Magic, and make their back-catalogs available for download.

It also doesn't help that nearly every CD released now is released in an expanded edition less than a year later. Hell, even the new Eagles album was expanded by two tracks in less than a month after the original release (with no prior information about this plan, of course) and sold for only $2 more. Do they expect us to go and re-buy them for a couple of songs? That's the same mentality that gave us decades of "Greatest Hits" albums with two new songs on them.

2-1B
12-29-2007, 01:51 PM
Also they should be trying to do a better job with marketing and promoting concerts.

Rocketboy
12-29-2007, 11:32 PM
When 98% of everything released is complete sh*t, and the remaining 2% goes ignored and ill-promoted, it is no surprise that the music industry is hurting.

El Chuxter
12-30-2007, 12:45 AM
Somewhat on that topic, I get to hear more cool new pop music (meaning "good non-classical music," not "dispensable Britney Spears garbage") by listening to NPR. About once a week, I hear a news article or review of an album by some artist I've never heard of that makes me go, "Damn! I must get that!!" in a way I hardly ever say while listening to the interchangeable tripe of Clearchannel and Jack FM.

Mad Slanted Powers
12-30-2007, 12:56 AM
When 98% of everything released is complete sh*t, and the remaining 2% goes ignored and ill-promoted, it is no surprise that the music industry is hurting.It is that 2% non-carp stuff that will be hurt the most by their tactics. If the internet stations that play that stuff disappear, then it will be even harder to discover new music. I can hear the mainstream stuff all the time, so it will get plenty of exposure. Plus, those acts will have bigger tours and higher ticket prices and bring in plenty of money that way. Meanwhile, the obscure acts will play smaller venues and won't bring in as much money.

I have no problem with them going after illegal downloaders, at least the bigger offenders anyway. However, ripping a song from a CD you legally purchased so that you can listen on your computer or iPod is no different than when we made tapes of our LPs so that we could listen in our car. That is not stealing. However, threatening to prosecute you if you don't buy both the LP and the tape, or both the CD and the mp3, that is like extortion.

Mad Slanted Powers
12-30-2007, 01:09 AM
Somewhat on that topic, I get to hear more cool new pop music (meaning "good non-classical music," not "dispensable Britney Spears garbage") by listening to NPR. About once a week, I hear a news article or review of an album by some artist I've never heard of that makes me go, "Damn! I must get that!!" in a way I hardly ever say while listening to the interchangeable tripe of Clearchannel and Jack FM.I don't know if the local NPR station plays anything other than classical, except on Sunday night when they have Echoes and Hearts of Space. The college station plays some alternative stuff, but I think the only NPR stuff they have is news. I think I can get some Seattle NPR stations on my Comcast cable TV now, but I've not listened. CBC radio is like Canada's version of NPR and I think they still play some alt-rock/underground stuff sometime. Brave New Waves finally went off the air early in 2007 I think. I used to listen to that sometimes back in my college and early post-college days.

El Chuxter
12-30-2007, 12:29 PM
MSP, it's mostly reviews and news features during All Things Considered, Morning Edition, and Weekend Edition. They don't play much, but they have streaming audio on the NPR site, so you can check out more from artists you hear about.

Mr. JabbaJohnL
12-30-2007, 02:22 PM
What they need to do is drop the price of CDs, take a lower percentage of profits, ensure that kids wanting good classic music have more to choose from than just A Kind of Magic, and make their back-catalogs available for download.
Hear, hear!

I just listened to it for the first and likely last time. What a waste. It's not that it's terrible (it sure isn't great), but it's just kind of "there."

Mad Slanted Powers
12-30-2007, 02:52 PM
Some CD's you can get for a good price. I just saw that Radiohead's new disc will be available this week and one place had is or $9.99 and Target had it for $7.98. I see a lot of older discs and greatest hits listed in the weekly ads for $10 or less.

JediTricks
12-30-2007, 05:14 PM
However, ripping a song from a CD you legally purchased so that you can listen on your computer or iPod is no different than when we made tapes of our LPs so that we could listen in our car. That is not stealing. However, threatening to prosecute you if you don't buy both the LP and the tape, or both the CD and the mp3, that is like extortion.That's what I don't get, how is this supposed to be a law? How is it a law of the people that applies to everyone equally with the best interests of justice? It seems more like this industry demanding government-enforced sales.


Some CD's you can get for a good price. I just saw that Radiohead's new disc will be available this week and one place had is or $9.99 and Target had it for $7.98. I see a lot of older discs and greatest hits listed in the weekly ads for $10 or less.Except that music you bought can only be listened to directly, you can't put it on your PC or MP3 player or make a mix-CD for your car, apparently. Which makes it not so great a deal anymore because CDs are basically just storage medium for most of us now, not an active play medium. I can't wait till the music industry starts suing buyers of legal CDs for using shuffle mode on their CD players.

Mad Slanted Powers
12-30-2007, 05:22 PM
Except that music you bought can only be listened to directly, you can't put it on your PC or MP3 player or make a mix-CD for your car, apparently. Which makes it not so great a deal anymore because CDs are basically just storage medium for most of us now, not an active play medium. I can't wait till the music industry starts suing buyers of legal CDs for using shuffle mode on their CD players.If it is illegal to rip songs from your CD to your computer, then there are thousands of people they could prosecute on Live365.com. Most of the mp3's that people upload for use on their internet radio stations are probably ones they ripped from CDs. I guess they figure they can just jack up the royalty fees on them rather than bother with taking them all to court.

JON9000
01-15-2008, 09:54 AM
If it is illegal to rip songs from your CD to your computer

We may be giving too much credit to the reporting of the Washington Post. If something seems completely nuts, it's a good idea to take a closer look:

http://www.news.com/8301-10784_3-9839897-7.html?tag=nefd.pulse

Mad Slanted Powers
01-15-2008, 05:26 PM
I think I heard something about this briefly someplace, but didn't get around to looking into it or posting about it here. The article did say this though:


Here was an opportunity for Sherman to declare once and for all that copying CDs for personal use is lawful. He stopped short of that, saying that copyright law is too complex to make such sweeping statements. He did state that there is one foolproof way of discovering the RIAA's policy on personal use: check the record.

"Not a single (legal) case has ever been brought (by the RIAA against someone for copying music for personal use)," Sherman said. "Not a single claim has ever been made."So he stopped short of saying copying CDs for personal use is lawful, but pointed out no one has ever been sued for it.

JediTricks
01-16-2008, 05:41 PM
I think I heard something about this briefly someplace, but didn't get around to looking into it or posting about it here. The article did say this though:

So he stopped short of saying copying CDs for personal use is lawful, but pointed out no one has ever been sued for it.
And, error or not, there is legal testimony on his industry's part saying it's illegal. Until that is clarified in court, this is still too up in the air. That said, yeah, the article should have mentioned he was ripping them to his sharing folder.