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View Full Version : oh crap! my tru is closing :( along with others!!!



TheDarthVader
01-06-2006, 05:23 PM
Yes. My friend who works at TRU let me know today that his location is closing. He said that the excecutives told him the real estate is worth more than what that particular location makes. He also said that they told him that 73 stores across the US would either be closing or become strickly Babies R Us stores. Oh man! Now I only have three stores to rely on for toys...target and 2 wal marts. My kmart never has anything. This is indeed crappy news.

B.
TDV

El Chuxter
01-06-2006, 05:30 PM
Jeez. Is there a list anywhere of the closures? The only one near me closed a few years ago, so it's at least a 30-minute drive to get to one now. Only thing is, the only ones within an hour always seem to be doing poorly. I wouldn't mind, since TRU's been overpriced and lacking on selection for a few years, but they still get an awful lot of exclusives.

timmae
01-06-2006, 08:50 PM
i hope the one across the street from my office doesn't close(it is a fairly new one) the other one is at least 45 min out of my way.:hurt:

Kidhuman
01-06-2006, 10:19 PM
I havent stepped foot into a TRU in months. I cant stand them. Everytime I pass one, I keep going.

James Boba Fettfield
01-06-2006, 10:25 PM
I havent stepped foot into a TRU in months. I cant stand them. Everytime I pass one, I keep going.

Right on, man, right on.

Exhaust Port
01-06-2006, 10:36 PM
More victims of internet shopping. Why shop in a brick and mortar store when you can get everything (and more) online. I'll admit that I love to walk around a store and look at all the wares especially for casual gifts. Everything else I don't like to screw around with all the driving and hunting and just buy it online. A lot of these online stores are becoming pretty user friendly.

plasticfetish
01-07-2006, 03:08 AM
About a year ago the story started going around that a nearly bankrupt Toys "R" Us was going to be bought out by a group of investors that included a real estate holding company (KKR Group) that made it's money by investing in struggling retailers, and then selling off their valuable property. If I remember correctly, the word was that about 1/3 of the TRU stores would probably close -- mostly older stores in need of renovation and stores with really bad sales.

Babies "R" Us has been a big money maker for the company, so it's no surprise that many TRUs will change over. I'd be surprised if only 73 stores close...

It's not all bad though. Having the company trim the dead wood and then pay off their debts, will hopefully be followed by some serious reinvention -- what TRU should have done over a decade ago anyway.

El Chuxter
01-07-2006, 03:11 AM
I'd prefer if they "un-reinvented" themselves, meaning going back to standard aisles that are easily navigable, don't waste half the space in the building, and can hold enough product to satisfy customers.

decadentdave
01-07-2006, 03:44 AM
I'd prefer if they "un-reinvented" themselves, meaning going back to standard aisles that are easily navigable, don't waste half the space in the building, and can hold enough product to satisfy customers.

When was the last time TRU ever had any product let alone enough to satisfy anybody?!?!?! My TRU has not had a single new case of Star Wars figures since April 2, 2005. I go in there every week out of old habit just to see if by some miracle they would get something new and it is the same stuff nobody wants every time. They have the same two Jedi Council packs and Skirmish at Carkoon saga battle pack from 2004.

The reason why TRU is going out of business is because of Wal-Mart and Target. I do 99.999% of all of my shopping there. If my TRU closes down, I will shed one tear out of nostagia for the old days... then jump in the car and go to Target because they get in new stuff every week and celebrate.

Remember when being a Toys 'R Us kid actually meant something?!?!?

plasticfetish
01-07-2006, 06:03 AM
I'd prefer if they "un-reinvented" themselves, meaning going back to standard aisles that are easily navigable, don't waste half the space in the building, and can hold enough product to satisfy customers.Well, restructuring the store layout the way they did was a seriously half-a**ed way to try and solve their problems. A true re-invention of their stores would mean a lot more.

It's funny, driving back and forth between Portland and LA a few times, I've been in a few TRUs that still had the "old" layout. (There's one in Redding CA.) It was really kind of nice, but the old layout didn't make the trashy store with a weak selection of merchandise seem any better.


When was the last time TRU ever had any product let alone enough to satisfy anybody?!?!?!Shopping around this holiday season, it seemed that NONE of the stores really had any decent merchandise out, but for sure TRU -- a company that is supposed to focus on toys for kids, comes up the shortest by doing nothing special to try and bring customers in.

You're right though, it's a year round problem.


The reason why TRU is going out of business is because of Wal-Mart and Target.Oh, oh... I feel a rant coming...

No, the reason why TRU is failing, is because TRU doesn't know how to compete with Target and Wal*Mart. Target and Wal*Mart are winning because TRU is weak and it's frankly no fun to shop there. It's a "specialty" store, so... it should be a "special" place to visit. Remember how fun FAO Schwarz was (I'm thinking about big city stores like the one in San Francisco that I used to go to -- or New York) before they fell apart? Going to a toy store should be an adventure.

The place should be at the very least clean and organized, and at the very best a visually hypnotic kid lure that's so much fun their parents will have to drag them out every time they visit.

The stores should be well stocked with the basics, as well as a wide variety of really cool and unusual items. They should be known for their selection of merchandise. I'd turn the big stores into huge showrooms for merchandise of all kinds, specialty stuff, that they could even mostly sell online. Imagine if Toys "R" Us had say... a Master Replicas section that you could visit, and then get a close-up look at a variety of things that you could then order online. Pick it up at the store, or have it delivered. Hire a special sales rep. to handle the section (heck, all of the sales staff should be "special" and should actually know how to sell merchandise.)

The stores should be well staffed with people that like their jobs, care about the store and company, and that love and know about toys. They need to have crews that do more than stand around looking like abused animals -- and they need to do this by actually paying "real" money to have those people around. Most seriously, they need brilliant store managers. Ditch the middle-management BS and invest in good store managers that understand the company goals, and that intelligently and creatively accomplish those goals.

The company needs much better buyers. These people need to really understand what's going on out there, and they need to be able find the merchandise that will recapture this "lost" kid market that's looking for more and more "sophisticated" forms of entertainment. (I honestly think that's BS BTW. Kids still play with toys -- they just need to find those toys in the stores when they go looking for them.) They need to have buyers who know and buy for all aspects of the toy market. What's the old slogan... "Kids of all ages." Well, they need to shop for toy buyers (collectors) of all ages, and need to understand what's popular and why... and by region.

The company needs to be dead smart when it comes to merchandising. This comes back to how the store is designed and what it looks like. It has everything to do with the store manager and how well they understand merchandising, and it needs to be something that is consistent company wide -- all the time. Each store needs to have a dedicated "visuals" person (or staff) that is guided by someone at the top -- not just some half-a**ed regional manager. That store "merchandising manager" works with the floor staff, with the stock staff, maintenance (if necessary), specific toy company merch. reps and with the buyers to make sure the store looks its best.

...and then marketing. Once Toys "R" Us has repaired it's good name, they need to focus on selling their name. Building that brand and pushing that brand with great advertising is key. Know why Target does so well in spite of Wal*Mart's market domination? Because they know how to market themselves, and they have really smart ads that reach out to that section of the market that isn't really fond of Wal*Mart. (I'd bet that they actually spend some decent money on their branding campaigns -- but it's money well spent.)

So, if Toys "R" Us fails, they have only their own lack of ability and imagination to blame. It'll be interesting to see just what happens over the next year or two.

decadentdave
01-07-2006, 10:09 AM
No, the reason why TRU is failing, is because TRU doesn't know how to compete with Target and Wal*Mart. Target and Wal*Mart are winning because TRU is weak and it's frankly no fun to shop there. It's a "specialty" store, so... it should be a "special" place to visit. Remember how fun FAO Schwarz was (I'm thinking about big city stores like the one in San Francisco that I used to go to -- or New York) before they fell apart? Going to a toy store should be an adventure.
The reason they can't compete is
A. The cannot compete with wholesale prices against Walmart.
B. They cannot provide a selection of fresh new product that their customers are looking for.

THAT is why it TRU has not been a fun place to shop since... since... gee, I can't remember when.




The stores should be well stocked with the basics, as well as a wide variety of really cool and unusual items. They should be known for their selection of merchandise. I'd turn the big stores into huge showrooms for merchandise of all kinds, specialty stuff, that they could even mostly sell online. Imagine if Toys "R" Us had say... a Master Replicas section that you could visit, and then get a close-up look at a variety of things that you could then order online. Pick it up at the store, or have it delivered. Hire a special sales rep. to handle the section (heck, all of the sales staff should be "special" and should actually know how to sell merchandise.)

The stores should be well staffed with people that like their jobs, care about the store and company, and that love and know about toys. They need to have crews that do more than stand around looking like abused animals -- and they need to do this by actually paying "real" money to have those people around. Most seriously, they need brilliant store managers. Ditch the middle-management BS and invest in good store managers that understand the company goals, and that intelligently and creatively accomplish those goals.

You have a very altruistic vision of how the company should run, and I definitely agree with all of your points, however, here's the problem with it:

I used to work for TRU and they just cannot afford to pay their staff more than minimum wage. So, the kinds of people they hire to fill those positions are mostly high school and college kids who just don't care about their jobs. Occassionally you get a cool kid who actually knows something about the products, but to hire a specialist would mean that they would have to raise the prices of their products and then you would have over-inflated prices which is what killed FAO Schwarz and Kay Bee Toys. For years now, TRU has been doing everything it can just to get by and hang on with the bare minimum of staff and product. They simply cannot compete with the bulk of inventory and selection that the two mass retailers provide on a weekly basis. Most of the merchandising is done by reps from Hasbro but I never see them in the store anymore and the reason why is because they just are not ordering any new replenishment product because they cannot afford it. The only time I see merchandising reps from Hasbro is at Target on a weekly basis. If TRU could afford to buy more inventory, let alone afford to actually keep their stores staffed with knowledgeable sales associates, they might have a chance.

Sith Lord 0498
01-07-2006, 11:09 AM
You have a very altruistic vision of how the company should run, and I definitely agree with all of your points, however, here's the problem with it:

I used to work for TRU and they just cannot afford to pay their staff more than minimum wage. So, the kinds of people they hire to fill those positions are mostly high school and college kids who just don't care about their jobs. Occassionally you get a cool kid who actually knows something about the products, but to hire a specialist would mean that they would have to raise the prices of their products and then you would have over-inflated prices which is what killed FAO Schwarz and Kay Bee Toys. For years now, TRU has been doing everything it can just to get by and hang on with the bare minimum of staff and product. They simply cannot compete with the bulk of inventory and selection that the two mass retailers provide on a weekly basis. Most of the merchandising is done by reps from Hasbro but I never see them in the store anymore and the reason why is because they just are not ordering any new replenishment product because they cannot afford it. The only time I see merchandising reps from Hasbro is at Target on a weekly basis. If TRU could afford to buy more inventory, let alone afford to actually keep their stores staffed with knowledgeable sales associates, they might have a chance.

Hopefully, they will have the financial resources to jump start such a reorganization of their company after they finish trimming the fat (outdated stores, low-selling stores, etc.). Once they have done that, they won't be spending their money on keeping those stores open, and it will allow them to spread more money to fewer stores, thereby improving those stores. They'll be able to offer better wages, expand their selections, hire more specialized personnel or better train the ones they have, etc.

Honestly, I don't know if I'd really mind slightly inflated prices ($2 extra on a basic figure, maybe $5 more on a vehicle) if they can keep the supply coming in regularly because I'd be spending that much extra money or more on gasoline that I'd use on pointless toy runs.

I also like the idea of expanding their selection to include items such as Master Replicas. With the toy market now including more adults and people looking for more sophisticated items, I think it'd be a good idea to make quite a few if not most or all TRUs into toy and collector stores. Devote 25-30% of their space to higher-end collectible merchandise similar to what you'd find in a good collectibles/comic store. Expand the "R"-Zone a little bit as well with interesting consumer electronics pieces. That could serve to attract parents as well as kids.

Granted, TRU is so far in its own grave that most of this may not happen. However, if they start shaping up a little bit at a time, they just might be able to recover some of their former glory that I remember from being a kid in the late '80s and early '90s.

El Chuxter
01-07-2006, 11:44 AM
TRU would be in much better shape than they are had they not suddenly decided several years ago that adult collectors are scum. Like it or not, they have to recognize that the toy buying public today is different from the toy buying public twenty years ago. There are more kids buying (and receiving) toys than adults, but those adults have more money to spend on toys than the kids do. They need to, without alienating kids and parents, find a way to make adult collectors happy.

If TRU were to have a dedicated collectible action figure section and actually got worthwhile exclusives, wouldn't you be more willing to go? Imagine if TRU started carrying higher-end action figures, like maybe the Sideshow 12" line. Or what if TRU agreed to carry an exclusive Twin-Pod Cloud Car or Sith Infiltrator? I'd be more willing to drop money on something like that than on another recolored Starfighter, especially if they made a commitment to get enough to satisfy demand.

Imagine for a moment, using the Sith Infiltrator as an example, if TRU agreed to work with Hasbro to finance the mold, then the two embarked on a print and TV advertising campaign. I'm not kidding. Put a kick-arse commercial for something like that during Family Guy, and you've got buyers. Then have some sort of ticket redemption (TRU loves their tickets) and actually limit it to one per person, with you getting your shiny new MIB Sith Infiltrator from the pickup counter. Would you be willing to pay $50 (or $60, if they offered it online, too) for what would normally be a $25 vehicle under those circumstances? I know I would.

Since I mentioned online sales, they really need to break with amazon.com. That works fine for a small retailer, but TRU is really too big for that sort of arrangement.

Target does well because it markets itself as higher-class than Wal-Mart. If TRU cleaned up its act, turned its image around, and made everyone see them as "higher class than department stores, but not as ridiculously overpriced as FAO," they could do fairly well.

Won't happen though, sadly enough.

plasticfetish
01-07-2006, 02:13 PM
Since I mentioned online sales, they really need to break with amazon.com.Funny that you'd mention that, because they're in the process of suing Amazon.com (and being counter sued) so I'm pretty sure that relationship is in big trouble... if not over.

edit...

I used to work for TRU and they just cannot afford to pay their staff more than minimum wage. So, the kinds of people they hire to fill those positions are mostly high school and college kids who just don't care about their jobs. Occassionally you get a cool kid who actually knows something about the products, but to hire a specialist would mean that they would have to raise the prices of their products and then you would have over-inflated prices which is what killed FAO Schwarz and Kay Bee Toys.I used to be a college kid that worked in a department store, so I know very well what that's like. But I also know that decent management can inspire anyone to exhibit a good work ethic. I also know that a few bucks an hour more goes a long way -- not to mention a commission for specialty sales, plus the occassional perk or bonus from the manufacturer. What if TRU sold Sideshow products (as an example) in a "specialty" section... "Hi, sales person. Here's a special 12" figure just for our top sellers. Thanks!" -- "Gee, Sideshow marketing guy... thanks a bunch! Maybe I wont ditch this fun job for some crappy job that only pays 50 cents more." If that person (and the store) sells more... the company can afford to pay them more.

Overinflated prices didn't kill FAO Schwarz... they overextended themselves, lost sight of their original vision, and bit the dust because most of those crummy shopping mall stores were such a bummer to visit. (I always remember the one in Glendale, California smelling like mold and pee.)

KB Toys is dead? Undead more likely. :) Most of their stores deserved a bullet in the head a long time ago. Another great example of a company with no vision -- I'm not a big fan of KB Toys. Wouldn't much miss them if they vanished... might open things up for smallish independent stores at the malls.

rich_of_the_dead
01-07-2006, 03:51 PM
my brothers toys r us isnt closing he asked the regional mgr he said the store makes too much money.they out sell walmart and target in star wars stuff they all ways have all of the latest figure from sw,batman,macfarlane,gi joe transformers,they even have wavw 2 of the saga figures the hoth wave..nobody here likes walmart or target.they are considered lower class stores.ya know poor peoples stores,working class blue collar (shudder).

TheDarthVader
01-08-2006, 09:47 PM
Yeah, during Christmas the shelves at my local TRU looked bare. I MEAN BARE! I was surprised to learn that they were closing the store.

B.
TDV

Kidhuman
01-08-2006, 10:21 PM
Hence why they were bare, no new stock for the closing stores.

InsaneJediGirl
01-08-2006, 11:38 PM
I loved the way the old TRUs were,rows of neat tall shelves with a clean look. It was awe inspiring for me to see a ton of toys and all those shelves.

I havent been to a TRU in 3 years and havent missed a thing. There are none close by now,but even if there was one it wouldnt be worth going to. They just werent keeping up with their products.

mastermatt24
01-09-2006, 01:13 AM
Just found out today that my Brea TRU is closing. Went there and they had the big store closing banner and stuff was a HUGE 10-30% off.. gimme a break.. I wont miss that one. I have NEVER found anything "wow" there in 16 years! :rolleyes:

bobafrett
01-10-2006, 12:08 AM
Found this today, sounds like someone said earlier.


"Monday January 9, 5:50 PM EST


NEW YORK (Reuters) - Toy retailer Toys R Us Inc. on Monday said it will close 75 Toys "R" Us stores in the United States and convert 12 others into Babies "R" Us stores, eliminating about 3,000 jobs.

The company said in a regulatory filing that it will record restructuring and other charges of about $155 million, with about $99 million taken in the fourth quarter of fiscal 2005 and the remaining $56 million in the first quarter of 2006.

Most of the stores will close in the spring of 2006, Toys "R" Us said.


2005 Reuters Limited. "

Kidhuman
01-10-2006, 12:17 AM
Have they released the stores yet that will be closing?

decadentdave
01-10-2006, 12:22 AM
And the day has finally come. My TRU in Littleton, CO is closing.

Like I said earlier, I will shed one tear. It is an end of an era.

I went to my local Suncoast Video immediately afterward and guess what? They are closing as well. I picked up the Neca Crow Rooftop Battle set for ten bucks.

Also Media Play is closing as well. This is a tell-tale sign about how bad the economy is right now. It's starting to look like a ghost town around here. The only rounds left to make are Target and Walmart.

plasticfetish
01-10-2006, 01:25 AM
I went to my local Suncoast Video immediately afterward and guess what? They are closing as well. Also Media Play is closing as well.A company called "Sun Capital Partners" bought Sam Goody, Suncoast Video and Media Play from Best Buy a while ago. Paid nothing, but took over their debt. They'll be closing all of the Media Play stores this month, all 61 of them, to focus on Sam Goody and Suncoast.

I can't find anything about Suncoasts closing, so it might just be an isolated thing.

decadentdave
01-10-2006, 01:30 AM
Mervin's of California is also closing and they are right next to my Media Play. I figured Suncoast was closing because they are owned by the same company as Sam Goody/Media Play. I think Super Target and Super Walmart is driving out the competition.

plasticfetish
01-10-2006, 02:53 AM
You know, the honest truth is that things suck right now for just about every retail chain/store/whatever. The economy sucks. (Even Wal*Mart had been in a slump over the last few years.) So we're bound to see a lot of companies tighten their belts and restructure. In the case of Sam Goody, from what I've read they intend to focus more specifically on the "teen market," which is their way of picking a specialty niche. Their way of emphasizing what they have to offer as a retail "destination" as opposed to the convenience factor of Wal*Mart.

So yeah, Wal*Mart and to a lesser degree Target are pushing these places under, but most of them were barely treading water to begin with.

As for Mervyns, they are... or were, owned by Target and It's the same story. They just sold all of their Marshall Field's stores and some Mervyn's stores to May Dept. Stores Co. The rest of the Mervyn's Stores were sold off to a group of companies, including one called "Sun Capital Partners"...

Oh my gosh!!! They're the same guys that bought Sam Goody, Suncoast Video and Media Play. ;)

Welcome to the future.

El Chuxter
01-10-2006, 09:34 AM
In the case of Sam Goody, from what I've read they intend to focus more specifically on the "teen market," which is their way of picking a specialty niche.

Funny, given that I can never find any CD from three years ago or more in an actual store, I'd say all record stores already focus on the teen market.

When a store that purports to sell music doesn't have in stock Music from Big Pink or Layla and Other Assorted Love Songs, but has 4,856,927 copies of Lindsey Lohan Meets Elmo, how much more kiddie can you get? :confused:

Kidhuman
01-10-2006, 09:43 AM
Sam Goody has alays been wack when it comes to buying CD's. I stopped going there around 9 years ago. The last thing I actually bought there was a the Paul figure from Yellow Submarine Line

bobafrett
01-10-2006, 10:57 AM
The only thing I ever liked to look at while visiting a Sam Goody was the figures they had. I almost bought the 3 pack 12" Spinal Tap figures. I wanted them, but just couldn't see paying what they were asking for them. I did buy a U2 DVD from there for a girlfriend I had, and they signed me up for 4 free issues of entertainment weekly, which I then ended up getting for the next two years, and finally cancelled.

CaptainSolo1138
01-10-2006, 11:41 AM
Toys R Us, Suncoast, Mediaplay....now where am I supposed to buy good toys?:cry:

plasticfetish
01-10-2006, 12:52 PM
Funny, given that I can never find any CD from three years ago or more in an actual store, I'd say all record stores already focus on the teen market.From what I read, Sam Goody is looking to push the whole thing even further. I've never really understood that store to be honest, and I'm sure that whatever they're planning is pretty lame.

There are other music stores out there you know. I know it must suck for people who don't live in more metropolitan areas, but there are still plenty of smaller independent shops that stock a more unique variety of music.

Toys R Us, Suncoast, Mediaplay....now where am I supposed to buy good toys?"Good" toys? That makes it even harder. ;) I wouldn't panic yet. Most places know that there's a market out there for whatever you're looking for.

There's always the internet...

El Chuxter
01-10-2006, 01:07 PM
Funny thing is, there were more (and better) music stores in SW Virginia than in the suburbs of LA. . . at least where I am.

Rocketboy
01-10-2006, 01:10 PM
Wow, this is almost a thread of nostalgia.

My Sam Goody closed a few years ago, with Suncoast shortly after.
Media play is closing at the end of the month.
K-mart in the most heavily trafficed area will be closing soon.
And yeasterday, I find out that my TRU is closing.

The store I worked at, Marshall Field's, started out as Hudsons, then, along with Daytons, were changed to Marshall Field's in spring 2001 by Target. Then they were all sold to the May company last year, and now May has merged with Federated and will change all Marshall Field's to Macys stores sometime this year. What does all this mean? I'm not sure, but I do know I'll really want to slap the old ladies that still call it Hudsons.

And all these stores are/were all less than a 1/4 mile area.

CaptainSolo1138
01-10-2006, 02:57 PM
And yeasterday, I find out that my TRU is closing.Damn, dude. That's a shame. I didn't know that until now. With that and KB gone, Galaxy Comics and the scalper market they seem to have cornered is gonna flourish.


What does all this mean?You'll get a new pastel shirt?:p

jedi master sal
01-10-2006, 04:45 PM
MAn this really sicks, and yet again bolsters my opinion that Wal*Mart is an evil empire. They are squeezing out the life's blood of retail. We NEED to have all of these different stores for diversity. Can you imagine when it's going to be just Wal*Marts and Targets?

It really sucks about Suncoast and Media Play too. I've been a long standing member in the rewards program and have saved quite a bit of money over the long run. That and they actually sell the mid-ranged collectibles (Gentle Giant Busts and Bust-Ups, MR Mini Sabers). It's really going to suck.

I can see that this is leading us towards either shopping at WM or Target, or shopping online (thereby making us more a closed in society that doesn't interact with their neighbors).

This is bad, REAL bad...

Mr. JabbaJohnL
01-10-2006, 06:27 PM
I still don't know if my TRU (Westminster, CO) is closing. I hope not, since decadentdave said the Littleton one is closing, so maybe they want to keep at least one in the general area? I also hope that my Suncoast isn't closing, as they always have cool shirts and things and the occasional (very occasional) new SW item.

Mad Slanted Powers
01-10-2006, 08:16 PM
Wow, this is almost a thread of nostalgia.

My Sam Goody closed a few years ago, with Suncoast shortly after.
Media play is closing at the end of the month.
K-mart in the most heavily trafficed area will be closing soon.
And yeasterday, I find out that my TRU is closing.

The store I worked at, Marshall Field's, started out as Hudsons, then, along with Daytons, were changed to Marshall Field's in spring 2001 by Target. Then they were all sold to the May company last year, and now May has merged with Federated and will change all Marshall Field's to Macys stores sometime this year. What does all this mean? I'm not sure, but I do know I'll really want to slap the old ladies that still call it Hudsons.

Just don't slap me for still wanting to call the Macy's in the mall here The Bon.

I just saw the story in the paper this morning about all the TRU stores closing, including the one here in Bellingham, WA. I've not found much there this year anyway. KB closed a couple years ago or more. Suncoast was still open the last time I was there, but the Sam Goody closed a year or two ago. Nothing has taken its spot at the mall yet either.

Another interesting thing about the TRU closing here, is that it is one of three stores that shared this large parking lot. All three are now closed - Home Base, Good Guys and TRU. Home Base closed after Home Depot opened right next to it. Circuit City is right there too, so that helped do in Good Guys, in addition to Best Buy opening up a couple years ago.

I rarely bought anything at Sam Goody. CD prices are way too much there. Fye is still in the mall. I'll sometimes buy a CD there, but I'll usually pay no more than $13.99 if I do.

I may have bought one Star Wars figure at Suncoast. I have bought a lot of LOTR items there though. I usually preferred not to buy movies at a place like Suncoast because of the prices. However, before DVD's became prevalent, I finally started buying some things there because it was unlikely that I would find widescreen versions at the discount retailers. Then, when I switched to DVD's I still bought there because I was able to find TV series there. However, I see those at other stores now. My Replay membership may not be saving me enough to make up the difference. I'm not sure.

I don't necessarily think that the economy is doing bad. It all depends on what sector you are in. The company I work for has been seen steady growth in the seven years I've been there. I have some shares of Apple Computer stock and it's more than made up for what I've lost on Microsoft stock. With so much competition at retail, a lot of specialty stores are unable to compete. They need to offer something that people can't find at other stores, or if they do have something similar (like Star Wars figures), they need to either have a competitive price or make the trip there worthwhile if you are going to pay more.

The bright side for this closure will be one less stop to make. I still have Wal-Mart, Target and a couple of Fred Meyer stores. Oh, and K-Mart, if they ever start getting figures. It's like they forgot there was a Star Wars movie this year.

mastermatt24
01-11-2006, 12:32 AM
It's like they forgot there was a Star Wars movie this year.
Looks like you did too! ;)

Mad Slanted Powers
01-11-2006, 07:22 PM
Looks like you did too! ;)
No, it seems I have remembered one that doesn't exist.:)

plasticfetish
01-11-2006, 10:56 PM
The store I worked at, Marshall Field's, started out as Hudsons, then, along with Daytons, were changed to Marshall Field's in spring 2001 by Target. Then they were all sold to the May company last year, and now May has merged with Federated and will change all Marshall Field's to Macys stores sometime this year.It's even more confusing than that really...

Marshall Fields was founded in 1881. In 1903 Goodfellows becomes The Dayton Company, who opened their first Target store in 1962. In '67 Dayton goes public. In '69 they merge with the J.L. Hudson Company to form the Dayton Hudson Corporation. In 1978 Dayton Hudson buys Mervyn's. In 1990 Dayton Hudson buys old Marshall Field's (and the first Target Greatland opens.) In 2000 the Dayton Hudson Corporation changes its name to Target Corporation. In 2004 Marshall Field's and Mervyn's are sold to May Company, who then merge with Federated in 2005 to form the May Department Stores Company.

In 1877 the first May Department store opens, later renamed "May Company" in 1898 after buying up The Famous Clothing Stores in St. Louis and Cleveland. In 1912 May buys the M. O'Neil department store in Akron, Ohio. In '23 they gobble up A. Hamburger & Sons department store in California. In '27 they consume the Bernheim-Leader department store in Baltimore. In '46 it's Kaufmann's in Pittsburgh. In '57 it's the Daniels & Fisher Stores in Denver and then In '59 May absorbs Hecht's in Baltimore and Washington D.C. In '65 it's the G. Fox department store company in Hartford, Conn., and in '66 it's the Meier & Frank department store here in Portland, Ore. -- after that the beast rests 'til '86 when they buy and consolidate with a bunch of other stores including J.W. Robinson's in Los Angeles. In '88 May acquires Foley's in Houston and Filene's in Boston. In '89 it's O'Neil's in Akron, followed by Thalhimers of Richmond, Va. in 1990. Throughout the '90s they buy up Hess's in Pennsylvania and NY state, Wanamaker's stores in Philadelphia, Woodward & Lothrop stores in D.C., Strawbridge & Clothier stores in Philadelphia -- all the while consolidating and merging these stores together and splitting their stock a million different ways. In 2001 they buy stores from from Saks Incorporated, a few Wards stores, and two Bradlees stores. In 2004 they get those Marshall Field's stores, and then merge with Federated in 2005.

Federated Department Stores started in 1929 when a bunch of family-owned department stores, including Abraham & Straus (started 1865/1893 which includes R.H. Macy Co., started 1858), F&R Lazarus (1851), Shillito's (1830) and Filene's of Boston. In 1930 Bloomingdale's joins Federated. In '45 Macy's buys O'Connor Moffat & Company of San Francisco. In '56 Burdines of Miami becomes a division of Federated. In '64 Federated buys up Los Angeles' Bullock's and I. Magnin. In '76 Federated acquires Atlanta-based Rich's. Throughout the '80s most of these consolidate and merge, and then in 1990 Federated files bankruptcy to later rebirth as the all powerful Federated Department Stores, Inc. In '94 the I. Magnin chain is killed off. In '95 Federated buys up Broadway Stores in Los Angeles, also giving them Emporium and Weinstock's. (I worked at the Broadway in Long Beach BTW, and I quit in '94. I saw the end coming...) The Broadway, Emporium and Weinstock's stores are to be turned into Macy's or Bloomingdale's, though many are closed (including the one I worked at a year after I quit.) In '96 Bullock's stores in S. California, already part of Macy's are renamed Macy's. In 1999 Federated buys Fingerhut Companies, Inc. In 2001 Federated buys Liberty House of Hawaii turning it into Macy's. In 2005 all stores are turned into Macy's or Bloomingdale's, as Federated enters into an agreement to acquire The May Department Stores Company.

Anyway... fast forward a few centuries, and they've all merged under the name Weyland-Yutani, who we know for their mining, global terraforming, consumer goods, spacecraft and biological weapons.

Weyland-Utani Corp - "Building Better Worlds"

(That's a looooong way to go for a punchline really.)


What does all this mean? I'm not sure, but I do know I'll really want to slap the old ladies that still call it Hudsons.

Precisely why we need that xenomorph DNA from Ripley! So that we can create the perfect weapon to fight with those old biddies.

Rocketboy
01-11-2006, 11:15 PM
It's even more confusing than that really... And since I've been with the store since 2000, that was pretty much what I said, but you know, without all the long, boring history.

decadentdave
01-12-2006, 12:51 AM
I still don't know if my TRU (Westminster, CO) is closing. I hope not, since decadentdave said the Littleton one is closing, so maybe they want to keep at least one in the general area? I also hope that my Suncoast isn't closing, as they always have cool shirts and things and the occasional (very occasional) new SW item.

Not to worry JJ. I asked the manager at the Park Meadows store and she says that only Littleton is closing. Westminster and Aurora will stay open.... at least for now.

That makes 4 TRU closures in the Metro area in the last few years and only 3 remaining. They closed the one next to my house in Lakewood a few years ago and the one on Colorado and Mexico that is now a Best Buy and the one in Boulder was turned into a Marshalls.

Remember Children's Palace? I remember when they closed down back in like '91, they still had vintage ROTJ figures for like $.50! The Good Old Days are leaving us behind. :(

plasticfetish
01-12-2006, 02:10 AM
but you know, without all the long, boring history.Hah!
I know. I've been sitting here reformatting and loading software on an old computer... so I've had time to kill.

The thing about all of it that is really amazing, is how in a matter of a hundred years we've gone from having all of these different department stores in just about every major city in the country, to a situation where there are now just a few big companies running the show.

I suppose if there's any point to it, it's just that these "poor little companies" that are fighting off big bad Wal*Mart, aren't exactly as poor and little as all that.

JediTricks
01-13-2006, 03:39 PM
In the future, all restaurants will be Taco Bell, so sayeth Demolition Man.

Rocketboy
01-13-2006, 04:02 PM
In the future, all restaurants will be Taco Bell, so sayeth Demolition Man.Well, they did predict that Scott Peterson would be in prison.

decadentdave
01-13-2006, 06:41 PM
In the future, all restaurants will be Taco Bell, so sayeth Demolition Man.

And that Arnold Schwarzenegger would be President! :thumbsup:

JediTricks
01-13-2006, 06:49 PM
Yeah, but that blends into that thing about Sylvester Stallone playing the Terminator and the golden ticket and such.

plasticfetish
01-18-2006, 03:27 AM
http://collectdolls.about.com/od/moderndolls1980snow/a/toysrusclosings.htm

Looks like this person's been making a list from various reports.

-------------------------------------------------

California, Fairfield (converting to Babies R Us)
California, Redding
California, Signal Hill
California, Vallejo
California, San Diego, San Francisco, Merced, Orange (1 location each; unconfirmed)
Colorado, Grand Junction
Colorado, Littleton
Colorado, Pueblo
DC area, Wheaton
DC area, Laurel
Florida, Coral Springs
Florida, Sarasota
Florida, Tampa (Dale Mabry Highway) Florida, Vero Beach
Florida, Westchester
Georgia, Macon
Illinois, Borbonnais
Indiana, West Side, Indianapolis
Iowa, Cedar Rapids
Iowa, Dubuque
Iowa, Sioux City
Kansas, Wichita (converting to Babies R Us)
Kentucky, Owensboro
Kentucky, Springdale
Louisiana, New Orleans East
Massachusetts, Medford
Massachusetts, Cambridge
Massachusetts, Dorchester
Massachusetts, Holoyoke (converting to Babies R Us)
Michigan, Battle Creek
Michigan, Lansing
Michigan, Madison (converting to Babies R Us)
Michigan, Midland
Minnesota, Duluth
Minnesota, Woodbury
Mississippi, Biloxi
Mississippi, Jackson
Montana, Bridgeton
New Jersey, Parsippany (Troy Hills Center)
New Mexico, Las Cruces
New York, Commack
New York, Freeport
New York, Levittown
New York, Niagra Falls (Williams Road)
New York, Wheatfield (Summit Mall)
North Carolina, Raleigh
Ohio, Columbus (West Broad St.)
Ohio, Springfield
Oregon, Albany
South Carolina, Columbia (Two Notch)
South Carolina, West Ashley
Tennessee, Antioch/Hickory Hollow
Texas, Brownsville
Texas, Houston (North Freeway)
Texas, Sherman
Texas, Texarkana
Virginia, Harrisonburg
Virginia, Tysons Corner
Washington, Bellingham
Washington, Federal Way
Wisconsin, Fond du Lac

Kidhuman
01-18-2006, 08:19 AM
At least the Roanoke one is still open. The only thing thta place has going is it is still the old skool lay-out.

El Chuxter
01-18-2006, 09:17 AM
They had some TC-14s about six or seven years ago. They're probably not still there, though. ;)

Rocketboy
01-18-2006, 10:29 AM
Michigan, MidlandBeen closed for over a year now. And my TRU (Saginaw, MI) isn't on the list.

CaptainSolo1138
01-18-2006, 10:31 AM
Been closed for over a year now
I noticed it on the list this morning and it didn't sound right. I guess I know why now!

plasticfetish
01-18-2006, 10:54 AM
Been closed for over a year now. And my TRU (Saginaw, MI) isn't on the list.Maybe they're gonna open and then re-close that Midland store just to make sure it's dead. ;) She mentions that it's not a complete list... I think by counting I can see that that there's less than 73 stores on there. It's something though...

I'll say this, I've been in at least three of the stores on that list -- California (Redding), California (Signal Hill) and Oregon (Albany) -- and I'm not exactly surprised that they're closing. (I think I mentioned going into the Redding store earlier in the thread.)

Just glad to see that the haunted TRU in Sunnyvale, CA isn't on the list. You don't want to mess with them ghosts. :sur:

Phantom-like Menace
01-22-2006, 03:58 AM
I've always found it amusing that I can go through pages and pages of adult collectors making the case that Hasbro has to change the way they do things, because we are the driving force behind their success. These people have themselves convinced that they are powerful enough to force this change. Then, when Toys R Us is closing, these same collectors cry bucketfulls of what have you done for me lately and make the case that there is nothing they can or want to do. If you have to complain, pick one or the other; hearing the two of them from the same people is ****ing me off.

Toys R Us isn't doing poorly because they changed; Toys R Us changed because they were doing poorly. The average consumer decided he could get his toy for a dollar less at Wal Mart and then that same consumer studiously put that dollar into savings for a rainy day. . . . I'm sorry, I didn't realize what I was typing. That same consumer blew the dollar saved on more crap he or she didn't need. Score: Walmart one, Toys R Us zero, Consumer zero.

Has it dawned on some of these people how Wal Mart can sell things for so little compared to other stores? They artificially devalue the product from the manufacturers! Yes, Wal Mart is running all of these other stores out of business, and when they are the only game in town, they're going to run the manufacturers out of business. I'm psyched; let's shop at Wal Mart right now! I'm sometimes confused why the federal government wants to file anti-trust suits against Microsoft but ignores the fact that Wal Mart's bottom line is so large as to have a noticeable effect on the US economy.

I think if we lazy, cheap consumers don't want to help Toys R Us, manufacturers should step up to the plate. It hasn't gotten so bad that manufacturers are willing to suffer Wal Mart's wrath to actively support a competitor, but it will. And by that time there may not be too many options. I want to say I remember some manufacturers paying for commercials for Toys R Us, and I know it has dawned on them that Wal Mart is bad for their business. For one, I'd like to see manufacturers give Toys R Us exclusives without charging the extra fee for exclusivity. I'm sure more things can be done, but I'm hardly a business man.

The closing of Toys R Us stores is a bad thing. Oh it's bad. You might think you're entitled to so much more based on the good old days twenty years ago, but twenty years from now you'll give up your carded original Boba Fett to go back to what it was like today. Actually, you'll probably feel more entitled crying more bucketfulls of what have you done for me lately.

JediTricks
01-22-2006, 04:50 AM
A lot of that is true, but to be fair, ever since Ep 1 came out, they've been in general a lot nastier to collectors who do help keep them in business (kids are the major driving force, but collectors keep coming back and have more disposable income), it's cyclical the way they're nastier and collectors are nastier to them but since they are the business end they should be the bigger man. Also, they switched to their newer "concept 3000" floorplan which creates huge horrible dead spots in a lot more of the display space, minimizes flexibility, creates bottlenecks in traffic, confuses parents who can no longer be pointed to "aisle 7" for what they want, IMO that alone was the biggest mistake they could have made.

And some toy manufacturers (Hasbro notably *not* among them, though #1 Mattel was) did pass over WM for TRU in '04 and '05 by paying for TV ads and creating more TRU-exclusives and even sending out product to TRU months before WM.

Phantom-like Menace
01-22-2006, 08:44 AM
I was unaware of that, but I wonder how much these manufacturers really contributed. Surely they realize that if Toys R Us goes under they're largely going to be in the business of making movie of the week toys. When you get to the plate, swing for the fences guys. We count runs not hits.

As far as customer service, I appear to be that one strange customer who walks into a store with half a clue what he's looking for, finds it and all but checks out without interacting with employees. If Toys R Us had self check out, I would never need to speak to employees. Plus I can't imagine Toys R Us is any worse than any retail establishment, but again I more or less avoid employees.

El Chuxter
01-22-2006, 10:46 AM
Yousa points well seen, but my point is that TRU needs to evolve further or it will die. They simply cannot match Target and WM in the price game, so they need to focus on both their audiences by A) making the store fun for kids, and B) making it more collector-friendly.

The new layout was an attempt to fix a problem with their performance, but it was a step in the wrong direction. Merchandise is tougher to find now, and there's less usable space for product. And is the store more navigable, entertaining, organized by the increase in unused floor space? No.

Perhaps hiring employees who actually gave a crap about keeping kids happy instead of minimum wage lackeys who would more likely cuss out someone in front of kids than actually try to help someone could make them unique, too. But, again, that's not going to happen.

People stopped going to TRU because of the prices. They've stayed away because of the store.

plasticfetish
01-22-2006, 02:03 PM
Exactamundo!

JediTricks
01-22-2006, 11:09 PM
TRU needs to get tough on anti-hoarding/-scalping issues, right now that is one of the biggest problems they face for keeping their collector customer base. Managers have to set the right tone and stop letting scalpers buy full cases of Hot Wheels, this is a sucker's bet because sure it looks like you're getting rid of a lot of product at once, but the truth is you're losing collectors who come hoping to find rare cars, and the scalpers are simply going to return those cars back to your store in 6 months when they're not popular anymore and you'll be stuck with a glut of 'em.

Also, another problem with the Concept 3000 floorplan is large displays like Star Wars aren't really large enough anymore 'cause there just isn't space, so when large shipments come in they get dumped in the bins which is death for the product - collectors and kids alike avoid the bins because they're just there to ruin the packaging and product within.

The floorplan also needs to reprioritize space, the flowthrough is bad enough right now but they also need to make sure up-front sections when folks come in the door are meeting customers with popular new products, not just seasonals, Animal Alley was the biggest mistake they could have made by selling out such large real-estate. And speaking of large real-estate, most TRUs now have a huge seasonals area to the left of where everybody comes in, and stores put a lot of hopes into this area, but it's a dead zone, nearly the entire store is off to the RIGHT of the entrance so only those heading to baby toys and bathrooms end up seeing this area, it's a massive blunder.

Making the center of the store about educational-themed toys and board games has a noble goal, but ultimately it too is wasting massive amounts of prime real-estate, the entire thing needs to be dismantled and put board games back on the walls where they make the most sense - even Target knows this!

Lighting needs to be changed, drastically. It's something small but it greatly affects the mood of the customers, and the current lighting is just all wrong, lots of dim spots, the light feels unnatural and doesn't display the products well.

Exclusives need to be kicked up a notch, the Hot Wheels flex-track thing whatever bombed out because it wasn't exciting enough and didn't work with regular hot wheels and in displays it was un-fun. Get more unique toys that parents see on TV and say "I have got to get that!" and make sure they're not crap once they *do* get 'em. Most toys I got that I didn't ask for as a kid were stuff my parents wanted to play with, parents are the power, get their attention again.

Sentinel18725
01-22-2006, 11:16 PM
I actually don't enjoy going to TRU anymore. It is being flooded with the Kid's clothing and never have anything new. The new "Starburst" floor plan is impossible to find anything and you find Star Wars stuff in about four different places. it was so nice to go to one aisle and find everything that you need from one endcap to the middle of the aisle. So, hopefully, TRU will change things with a much needed shakeup with management.

Mad Slanted Powers
01-22-2006, 11:26 PM
How new is this floorplan change? It doesn't seem to describe the store here, but it is closing so they probably didn't bother to change it.

Kidhuman
01-23-2006, 03:48 AM
That floor plan is at least 5 years old.

Phantom-like Menace
01-23-2006, 11:09 AM
Toys R Us is changing to survive. It's becoming Babies R Us, slowly but inexorably. I propose that if Toys R Us has to change for us, it's going to become Wal Mart. They're going to have to differentiate their product line to the point where the battle is lost. If we change for Toys R Us, it can stay a toy store. That's slightly exaggerating both ways but it's the way things are going.

In blaming it all on Toys R Us, we're ignoring the fact that FAO Schwartz, Lionel's Playworld, Childrens' Palace, KB Toys, all of these major toys stores have been closed or severly crippled in the last sixteen years. All of these stores either had terrible customer service or changed their floorplans? No, they lost our money to cheaper alternatives. My hometown once had five toy stores and an awesome Mom and Pop toy store, and it's not a very big city. Now all that remains is a Toys R Us.

If anyone could allow me to tilt at windmills, we have a Dear Hasbro section, what about a Dear Toys R Us section. Sirtevesguide.com has a relationship--if distant--with Hasbro. Is there any possibility of closer relationships with retailers? I see a list of etailers to the right of this thread, so what about brick and mortar? We do have a vested interest in buying these items.

El Chuxter
01-23-2006, 12:04 PM
I remember as a little kid, seeing two or three whole aisles devoted to SW at Lionel.

A few years later, I remember an entire aisle devoted to Transformers at TRU.

As a younger adult, there was an entire 1/2 aisle devoted to SW at most TRU's, and some had more.

And now, you're lucky if you can find six pegs of any product line.

Hasbro and other manufacturers aren't blameless in this, either. Stores want less of product lines that don't sell. So when Slave Leia sells out in five minutes, but they're stuck with a few thousand Malakilis, they see it as a loss, since they have to sell more of the figures from a case at a loss (clearance) after they take up valuable space for months than they can justify as making up for the one or two figures in the case who sold well.

More recently, stores moved Shocktroopers and Holo Aayla in record time, but were stuck with Neimoidian Commanders and Warriors.

WM and Target have such high volume sales that they can blow things out on clearance, and justify doing so because they're clearing the space for new product that will sell. Smaller or specialty stores have a tougher time doing that, because they will take a loss that's a higher percentage of their profit margin.

So had Hasbro (and every other company, too) been shipping decent assortments of characters that kids and collectors wanted, we probably wouldn't be seeing the stores close in massive numbers.

I don't like it, but unless they change and become a true specialty store that has serious clout with suppliers, rather than a knockoff Target with higher prices and minus all the other departments, they're doomed.

JediTricks
01-23-2006, 05:03 PM
posty, the Concept 3000 floorplan (that's the one where the aisles are gone and replaced by large and small X-shaped islands) is about 5 years old, it came in after the Ep 1 toyline.



Toys R Us is changing to survive. It's becoming Babies R Us, slowly but inexorably.You're mistaken, Babies R Us was the division that was making money so the company split Babies R Us off into its own separate company, then TRU proper got bought out by a different firm.

Phantom-like Menace
01-23-2006, 06:18 PM
You're mistaken, Babies R Us was the division that was making money so the company split Babies R Us off into its own separate company, then TRU proper got bought out by a different firm.

I concede the fact (which was actually used merely as a convenient label for a store with a new concept). My point still stands. Toys R Us evolving means becoming a new concept, either the tried and true baby store by another name or Wal Mart-like or Big Lots-like. I won't say there is no way to convince me, but there is certainly no easy way to convince me that a store that sells only toys can survive in today's economy without a change on the part of consumers. It would have to change too drastically to be considered Toys R Us.

Mad Slanted Powers
01-23-2006, 07:19 PM
posty, the Concept 3000 floorplan (that's the one where the aisles are gone and replaced by large and small X-shaped islands) is about 5 years old, it came in after the Ep 1 toyline.

Okay, I guess the TRU here never switched to that format. It's basic aisles, so the new format isn't what killed it. I've been to one in Springfield, MO and I think it had the format you describe, at least in part. I've also been to one in Muncy, PA. I can't recall for certain, but I think it was still old style. I'll be traveling there in June, so if it isn't one of the closing stores, I'll take another look. I'll be in Springfield in July.

James Boba Fettfield
01-23-2006, 07:24 PM
Don't believe the Eastgate TRU I visit will be closing...oh well.

I used to like the store before the floor change. First time I experienced their new design was during the Christmas season. So many people, so much confusion, so little patience. My already high blood pressure was probably at a stroke level after that experience. I thought it was the holiday crowds that made the experience bad, but that was not the case. Most times I won't even bother looking at their toys; instead I visit their game corner thing to cash in on the deals.

I swear I knew it was gonna be a bad experience when they handed out a spool of thread at the entrance and told me about the minotaur at the center of store next to some WWE figures.

Lord Malakite
01-23-2006, 07:43 PM
Don't believe the Eastgate TRU I visit will be closing...oh well.
The only TRU closing in the Cincinnati area I heard is in Tri-County.

JediTricks
01-24-2006, 08:42 PM
IMO, TRU doesn't need to change what they sell, they just need to change HOW they do business. WM is not a working business model for most retailers, it works for WM because they built an empire from the bottom up, but TRU has a totally different business model, Kmart can't survive doing it the WM way for example. And Big Lots is a disaster, KB is already trying to be the in-between TRU and Big Lots.

Phantom-like Menace
01-25-2006, 01:03 AM
I've always thought myself that it would be nice if Toys R Us allowed customers to preorder specific figures as someone else here mentioned. The biggest problem with that is that Toys R Us would be inundated with the crap figures in the rest of the cases. It would be a type of awesome that is very if Hasbro allowed them to order custom cases. Again, though, that would be a case of manufacturers forming special relationships with the store.

I'm not sure how that would work though. It seems like a win for everyone involved, but I suppose Hasbro would have extra cost in having to custom fill cases, though it doesn't seem like it should be (based on my extremely limited understanding) too cost prohibitive for Hasbro to fill whole cases with individual figures (I.e. whole Cody cases or whole Darth Vader cases) up to a number preordered by all of the Toys R Us stores to be handled by their distribution apparatus to individual stores based on the orders filled at those stores. I wouldn't mind for a moment if some cost was passed on to us for the benefit of having preorder figures, but I am sure quite a few consumers would start crying that the cost has gone up.

I'm really not sure how this type of arrangement would affect Hasbro's relationship with other sales outlets, since they may bristle at the special treatment.

This, though, sounds like Dear Hasbro material. No thoughts on the possibility of a Dear Toys R Us section? And I ask this question fully ignorant of how the Dear Hasbro section came to be.

JediTricks
01-25-2006, 03:46 PM
TRU tried to do toy preorders during Ep 1, it was an unmitigated disaster in part because Hasbro sent out cases of product late, cases that weren't the ratio they said they'd be, and product that wasn't as interesting as expected. The Naboo Royal Starship and the first Cinema Scenes were all done this way, as were a few other things, and it went extrodinarily badly.

Kidhuman
01-26-2006, 01:43 AM
The Naboo Starfighter was a horrid display as it kept getting pushed back further and further.