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View Full Version : Judge in Mass. Settles Difference Between True-Sandwiches and False-Sandwiches!



Tycho
11-11-2006, 07:51 PM
My steady infuence over the world is growing! A superior court judge in Massachusettes is on the right track to rooting out hypocrisy.

A restaurant that wanted a True-Monopoly in its shopping mall sued to block the Mexican food offshoot of San Diego's Jack In The Box restaurants by trying to make the case that a burrito was a True-Sandwich when it is actually a False-Sandwich.

As you will see, the judge said a True-Sandwich uses (2) two pieces of bread, and one tortilla just doesn't count - thus tacos, enchilladas, burritos etc. are False-Sandwiches and no one should refer to them as sandwiches.

This other family restaurant, though it was only trying to protect itself, had entered into taking a nefarious position when it came up with a reason to lie and say Mexican sandwiches actually exist.

Skippy Brand Peanut Butter and Smuckers' Jelly ought to organize a P&J Pride Parade to show people that you can still eat traditional True-Sandwiches.

Meanwhile, amnesty will be granted to illegal tacos, enchilladas, and burritos that come forward now and confess that they are not True-Sandwiches by any English definition. They'll be fine so long as they learn English and are paid for by US greenbacks which stay in our own country.

Here's the article:

http://www.signonsandiego.com/news/business/20061110-1222-burritoorsandwich.html

Massachusetts judge settles food fight by ruling burrito is not a sandwich


ASSOCIATED PRESS

12:22 p.m. November 10, 2006

WORCESTER, Mass. – Is a burrito a sandwich?
The Panera Bread Co. bakery-and-cafe chain says yes. But a judge said no, ruling against Panera in its bid to prevent a Mexican restaurant from moving into the same shopping mall.


Panera has a clause in its lease that prevents the White City Shopping Center in Shrewsbury from renting to another sandwich shop. Panera tried to invoke that clause to stop the opening of an Qdoba Mexican Grill.
But Superior Court Judge Jeffrey Locke cited Webster's Dictionary as well as testimony from a chef and a former high-ranking federal agriculture official in ruling that Qdoba's burritos and other offerings are not sandwiches.

The difference, the judge ruled, comes down to two slices of bread versus one tortilla.

“A sandwich is not commonly understood to include burritos, tacos and quesadillas, which are typically made with a single tortilla and stuffed with a choice filling of meat, rice, and beans,” Locke wrote in a decision released last week.

In court papers, Panera, a St. Louis-based chain of more than 900 cafes, argued for a broad definition of a sandwich, saying that a flour tortilla is bread and that a food product with bread and a filling is a sandwich.

Qdoba, owned by San Diego-based Jack in the Box Inc., called food experts to testify on its behalf.

Among them was Cambridge chef Chris Schlesinger, who said in an affidavit: “I know of no chef or culinary historian who would call a burrito a sandwich. Indeed, the notion would be absurd to any credible chef or culinary historian.”

Jargo
11-11-2006, 08:02 PM
The birth of a sandwich is rooted in great british history. created for the Earl of Sandwich (a real title and a real place) it is two pieces of bread and a filling of choice.

one piece of bread with a filling is a butty. so called because it was popular among those who piloted butty barges or open topped barges. we're talking 17th century here. Industrial and agricultural revolution.

interestingly, miners of coal would often take either a pasty, (that's a pastry case around a fillling and completely enclosed. with a thick crust down one side for ease of holding. The crust wasn't eaten), or a sandwich of cheese with jam (jelly to you) which kept both the bread and cheese moist. it being hot down a mine.

I would imagine that PBJ sandwiches have a similar origin.

2-1B
11-12-2006, 01:47 AM
My steady infuence over the world is growing!

I did not notice a single instance in that article where the judge is quoted as using your goofy nomenclature of True- or False- anything.

Tycho
11-12-2006, 03:08 AM
I did not notice a single instance in that article where the judge is quoted as using your goofy nomenclature of True- or False- anything.

Well, it's hard to cite invisible telepathic waves that direct important people like judges and politicians to view my brilliant posts of my theories here on SirStevesGuidetoTruth. But someday I'll be recognized as the True-Genius that I am. :pleased:

In the meanwhile, please accept that True-Sandwiches, False-Sandwiches, True-Enchilladas, False-Burritos, etc. have all been identified and this feat will somehow better mankind. :p

JimJamBonds
11-12-2006, 11:52 AM
My steady infuence over the world is growing!


I did not notice a single instance in that article where the judge is quoted as using your goofy nomenclature of True- or False- anything.

Or mentioned by name/internet name.