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El Chuxter
11-20-2006, 10:09 AM
From Yahoo! News (http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20061120/ap_on_go_ca_st_pe/presidential_coins):

U.S. Mint to unveil presidential coins

WASHINGTON - Can George Washington and Thomas Jefferson succeed where Susan B. Anthony and Sacajawea failed? The U.S. Mint is hoping America's presidents will win acceptance, finally, for the maligned dollar coin.

The public will get the chance to decide starting in February when the first of the new coins, bearing the image of the first president, is introduced.

Washington, John Adams, Thomas Jefferson and James Madison are scheduled to grace the coin in 2007, with a different president appearing every three months.

The series will honor four different presidents per year, in the order they served in office. Each president will appear on only one coin, except for Grover Cleveland, who will be on two because he was the only president to serve nonconsecutive terms. To be depicted on a coin, a president must have been dead for at least two years.

What's with this, and the ridiculous number of "variant" quarters for the fifty states? When has anyone ever refused to take a quarter with an eagle on the back, and insisted the cashier go through the entire roll to find Minnesota to complete a collection?

And has the Mint ever considered that maybe the Sacajawea dollar had distribution problems, not problems with popularity? There was some incredibly strange deal where at first they were exclusive to Wal-Mart and the Post Office. Hmmm. Ever think that if you just release them like regular money and don't cancel them after a year (or was it two?), that maybe they can catch on?

It's just a little irritating that my tax dollars are going to fund not only designs for these new coins, but the stupidity that's driving the whole thing. :rolleyes:

Bel-Cam Jos
11-20-2006, 12:57 PM
And has the Mint ever considered that maybe the Sacajawea dollar had distribution problems, not problems with popularity? There was some incredibly strange deal where at first they were exclusive to Wal-Mart and the Post Office. Hmmm. Ever think that if you just release them like regular money and don't cancel them after a year (or was it two?), that maybe they can catch on?

It's just a little irritating that my tax dollars are going to fund not only designs for these new coins, but the stupidity that's driving the whole thing. :rolleyes:Try mailing in your income tax payment COD to the IRS and pay it all with these new dollar coins.

I think that much of the 1990s economic prosperity has affected the collectible market today, so the let's-make-multiple-comic-book-covers and let's-make-multiple-variants-of-action-figures ideas infect us to this day. :(

But, all that said, I'm going to still collect one of each (not from Denver AND Philly's mints, just a single coin) 'cause I've always been a simple coin collector (find them in cirrculation [sp?] and keep them).

JediTricks
11-20-2006, 06:36 PM
Those Sac dollar coins still get head-scratchings when I use them as actual money, clerks often still don't recognize them, they're an odd man out in the money department. And they tarnish like a mofo, I have one on my desk I just picked up, it looks surprisingly bad after only 6 years. Plus, they're just not big enough.

Those president coins seem kinda lame, nobody cares about most of the presidents between Jefferson and FDR these days (except Lincoln), and they're just not going to be big enough. Plus, it's going to be weird to have oversized portraits and text on the edge.

Darth Jax
11-20-2006, 07:24 PM
the presidents are just another ploy (like the state quarters) to get people interested in coin collecting once again.

LusiferSam
11-20-2006, 08:05 PM
I totally disagree with you one this Chux. I think the current US (not the State Quarters) coin designs are boring and dull. Pre WWI we had some of the best designs in the world. Post WWII, there's no comparison. I love what the State Quarters program has done. Quarters are exiting again. The nickel too. The Jefferson nickel is one of the most boring pieces out there. The Lewis and Clarke series really helped breath some life back in the nickel. If only the US Mint had the balls to keep improving it. In 2009 the penny is getting a much needed face lift. The dime and half dollar are also in need of help. I love the idea of a presidential dollar coin series.

The problem with the Sacajawea coin was not distribution. It was hording. People would not spend them. Most folk thought that it was going to be like the Susan B. Anthony coin. It would make a splash and become very hard to find. Most banks have fair amount of Sacajaweas and you can get them if you ask for them.

The other problem with people not spending them is vending machines. The only vending machine that I've seen that would take them is at the Post Office for stamps. This is a great idea, only the rest of the county won't follow suit. I've thought for a long time about this one. What the government needs to do is work with the casino industry and start making video poker machines that dollar coins. After 10 years or so kill the dollar bill. By then people should be use to a dollar coin, aren't hording them, and have no other chose.

Phantom-like Menace
11-20-2006, 11:50 PM
Those Sac dollar coins still get head-scratchings when I use them as actual money, clerks often still don't recognize them, they're an odd man out in the money department.

I used to give them to foreigners as change just for their priceless reactions. I didn't do it very often, since they're not something I usually have in the cash drawer, but everytime I did it, they would ask me if it is real money and all but accuse me of trying to rip them off. Ah, boredom. I should have realized the average American is dumb enough that I could have played that same game fairly often with them.

El Chuxter
11-21-2006, 08:32 AM
Why do coins that are worth very little need to be "exciting"? :confused:

Bel-Cam Jos
11-21-2006, 10:21 AM
Why do coins that are worth very little need to be "exciting"? :confused:Why was Borat called the funniest movie of all time? Why did Stan Lee call Amazing Spiderman #7 a classic comic, on the cover itself (so said the mini comic reprint in this week's newspaper ads)? Why was Independence Day called this generation's Star Wars? Why was the NFL regular season matchup between QBs Eli and Peyton Manning so heavily advertised? Why do Ugly Betty and New Adventures of Old Christine get acclaim? Answer?

Hype.

It's all about hype. With less people using actually hold-in-your-hand money and leaning towards the credit and debit card variety, the Mint wants people to care. That's all I think it is. I've always liked collecting coins and will continue to do so as long as there's hard cash out there. I like the different looks, like LusiferSam.

JediTricks
11-21-2006, 06:41 PM
Quarters are exiting again. The nickel too. The Jefferson nickel is one of the most boring pieces out there. The Lewis and Clarke series really helped breath some life back in the nickel.That's an interesting point, I have always been bored by the Jefferson nickel, and I downright HATE the new Jefferson in profile version, but the series in between were good.


The problem with the Sacajawea coin was not distribution. It was hording. People would not spend them. Most folk thought that it was going to be like the Susan B. Anthony coin. It would make a splash and become very hard to find. Most banks have fair amount of Sacajaweas and you can get them if you ask for them. All the folks I know hate the Susie B.s, always did, it's too easy to get them confused with quarters.


The other problem with people not spending them is vending machines. The only vending machine that I've seen that would take them is at the Post Office for stamps.Ironic since that's the only thing that gives them out here in my neighborhood.


Why did Stan Lee call Amazing Spiderman #7a classic comic, on the cover itself (so said the mini comic reprint in this week's newspaper ads)?Because Stan Lee is a shill. :p ASM #7 looks pretty lame, I just looked it up, Return of the Vulture - crappy "who cares" villain and the first time a villain returned, bfd. "Thanks for giving me your money, true believer! This very issue you hold in your hands is truly your No-Prize!"


Why was Independence Day called this generation's Star Wars?I thought that was "Titan A.E." :D (yes, they really said it about Titan AE)

CaptainSolo1138
11-21-2006, 08:04 PM
nobody cares about most of the presidents between Jefferson and FDR these days (except Lincoln)What?! Rutherford B. Hayes is my homeboy.

Kidhuman
11-21-2006, 08:38 PM
Those Sac dollar coins still get head-scratchings when I use them as actual money, clerks often still don't recognize them, they're an odd man out in the money department. And they tarnish like a mofo, I have one on my desk I just picked up, it looks surprisingly bad after only 6 years. Plus, they're just not big enough.


I have one in my wallet next to a NYC subway token and it tarnished like its nobody's business. I liked em and thought they were cool. Instead of wasting this money on quarters, I say bring back the $2 bill.

plasticfetish
11-21-2006, 09:41 PM
Why? I'm seeing this question on a site infested with collectors... you really don't get it? Coin collecting is a big business, and the US mint is able to generate a lot of income by boosting interest with these new coin designs.

From coincollector.org (http://coincollector.org/)...

Every new coin design means a whole list of new collector items the mint can market, including proof sets and rolls or bags of uncirculated coins. Add that to items that are produced only for the collector market, such as commemorative issues and gold coins, and it all makes for a lucrative business.

CaptainSolo1138
11-21-2006, 10:57 PM
I say bring back the $2 bill.That's queer.

LusiferSam
11-21-2006, 11:10 PM
That's queer.

Your thinking of a $3 bill.

El Chuxter
11-21-2006, 11:41 PM
Don't diss the Vulture.

JediTricks
11-22-2006, 01:44 PM
What?! Rutherford B. Hayes is my homeboy.He squandered his presidency the way Lucas squandered the opportunity to make more good Star Wars movies.


Don't diss the Vulture.Well, maybe if the Vulture didn't suck the big one, I wouldn't, but Vulture is an old geezer in a green feathered flight suit, so he deserves all the disrespect one can pile on him.

2-1B
11-22-2006, 09:45 PM
Don't diss Limp Biscuits.

2-1B
04-20-2008, 11:05 PM
Now they're gonna rock out the possessions of the US like Washington DC, Guam, Puerto Rico, American Samoa, and Virgin Islands (no chance of anyone's mom being on that coin).

I think it's cool that they make all these funky quarters, it's not a waste of money but rather an endeavor that makes money by having all these collectors taking coins out of circulation.

Plus, Guam is effing cool so I'm glad they're getting some love. :thumbsup:

JediTricks
04-21-2008, 04:18 PM
Lame! Nobody's gonna want a Northern Mariana Islands quarter (that's the only one you didn't mention), the state quarters were cool, these are not.

El Chuxter
04-21-2008, 04:19 PM
When's the Iraq quarter coming out?

Jargo
04-21-2008, 04:55 PM
haw haw BCJ is a numismatist. Loooooooooooooooooserrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrr! :p

bigbarada
04-21-2008, 07:23 PM
From Yahoo! News (http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20061120/ap_on_go_ca_st_pe/presidential_coins):


What's with this, and the ridiculous number of "variant" quarters for the fifty states? When has anyone ever refused to take a quarter with an eagle on the back, and insisted the cashier go through the entire roll to find Minnesota to complete a collection?

And has the Mint ever considered that maybe the Sacajawea dollar had distribution problems, not problems with popularity? There was some incredibly strange deal where at first they were exclusive to Wal-Mart and the Post Office. Hmmm. Ever think that if you just release them like regular money and don't cancel them after a year (or was it two?), that maybe they can catch on?

It's just a little irritating that my tax dollars are going to fund not only designs for these new coins, but the stupidity that's driving the whole thing. :rolleyes:

The problem is that there is no longer any intrinsic value to our coins. Pre-1965, all quarters and dimes were made of 90% silver. Between 1965 and 1970, quarters and dimes were made of 40% silver. Ever since 1970, there has been 0% silver in all quarters and dimes (with the possible exception of the 1976 bicentennial quarters).

Thus, since no American coin is really worth it's face value anymore, the government has to come up with ways to create perceived value for American money.

If you go on Ebay and do a search for "90% quarters" you will see that pre-1965 quarters are selling for way above face value, that's not ONLY collector speculation, it has to do with the worldwide silver shortage and the rising value of silver itself. The same with the "40% quarters."

So, before you throw your quarters into a vending machine, you might want to check the date on them. If they were made prior to 1970, then you will want to hold onto them. Because, even in the event of a complete economic collapse, they will still hold some value because of their silver content.

DarthQuack
04-21-2008, 09:13 PM
When's the Iraq quarter coming out?

:thumbsup:

Mad Slanted Powers
04-21-2008, 09:32 PM
When I'm out of quarters I think of the Led Zeppelin song, "No Quarter."

I like the state quarters. I've been collecting them. I've been a bit of a collector of coins. I don't keep up with the pennies and dimes, but I have books to put them into. When I was a kid my brother and I got some coin books to put pennies, nickels and dimes into. I recall my brother and I going through a large amount of pennies my dad had. My brother got first pick so he was able to fill up more his books. I think my older brother had even more complete sets including the old Indian head pennies.

LusiferSam
04-22-2008, 12:53 AM
The problem is that there is no longer any intrinsic value to our coins. Pre-1965, all quarters and dimes were made of 90% silver. Between 1965 and 1970, quarters and dimes were made of 40% silver. Ever since 1970, there has been 0% silver in all quarters and dimes (with the possible exception of the 1976 bicentennial quarters).

You're thinking of half dollars. All silver was removed from dimes and quarters in '65 because of price and comment usage. The final 40% was remove from the half dollar in '70 again because of price. And as far a I know only proof sets of the bicentennial coins had any silver. I think you can still buy silver proof sets. But like bullion sets they're not really intended as money.

Mad Slanted Powers
04-22-2008, 01:41 AM
What the government needs to do is work with the casino industry and start making video poker machines that dollar coins. After 10 years or so kill the dollar bill. By then people should be use to a dollar coin, aren't hording them, and have no other chose.When I was in Reno in 1995, they still had dollar slot machines. Of course, those were the Eisenhower dollars and are not the same size as the new ones

I disagree about getting rid of the dollar bill. If I spend a few twenties and get back a lot of ones in change, I'm gonna have a bulging pocket of coins pretty quickly. Coins < $1 are smaller and don't take up the same space. I've never been one to carry coins in my pocket. I've always had a wallet that had a pocket for coins. If I get too many in it then it is harder to close and I need to start spending the coins to get rid of them. I could take them out and put them in a drawer or a jar or something, but then they'd continue to sit there because I'd accumulate more coins in my wallet and wouldn't need to replenish them with the ones from the drawer. As it is right now, I have an SBA dollar and $4 in quarters in a drawer here that have been there for months.

I also don't agree with the idea that some have of getting rid of the penny. How am I going to pay cash for something that costs $11.38? It may be only a couple pennies, but it's not acceptable if I have pay $11.40. If they always round up, that will add up over time. Not to mention that it seems like it would be an accounting nightmare. Either you would have a lot more over and short cash registers, or new software would have to be written to automatically round off and put the difference into an over & short account.

El Chuxter
04-22-2008, 08:22 AM
The thing that bugs me about the possibility of getting rid of the penny:

It would still be legal tender. Say I go into a store and buy something for $11.38 (to use your number). I have exact change: a ten, a one, a quarter, a dime, and three pennies. The cash register would round it up to $11.40. Why should I be penalized for having exact change?

mtriv73
04-22-2008, 10:20 AM
The thing that bugs me about the possibility of getting rid of the penny:

It would still be legal tender. Say I go into a store and buy something for $11.38 (to use your number). I have exact change: a ten, a one, a quarter, a dime, and three pennies. The cash register would round it up to $11.40. Why should I be penalized for having exact change?


People probably made the same argument when the half cent was taken out of circulation in 1857 (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Half_cent_(United_States_coin)). We'll get used to it. Anyway, it should even out (or even be in our favor) if they round down anything that ends in .X1, .X2, or .X3 cents. (I know the math doesn't work for "rounding down" the 3 cent one, but we can always hope.)

Someone said earlier that none of our coins are worth their face value. That's true. The penny actually costs more (0.0167 cents) to produce and ship than it's worth even though it's 97.5% Zn 2.5% Cu.

jedi master sal
04-22-2008, 11:22 AM
I'd imagine if the penny were phased out, prices would then reflect in multiples of 5 cents. As well, tax on taxable items would then reflect 5 cent increments. Probably something to the affect of <50 cents gets a 5 cent tax conversely >50 cents gets 10 cents tax. Government would make a killing on tax that way though, so it would be a pretty unpopular way to round up or down. This statement was just conjecture and is not based on anything in particular.

I am Jedi Master Sal and I do NOT approve this message...

Mad Slanted Powers
04-22-2008, 11:37 AM
Nothing costs fractions of a cent except for the 9/10 they have on gas prices. Stocks are often listed in fractions that go beyond two decimal places, but those are usually dealt with in large lots which eliminate the fraction when multiplied out. Sales tax and interest can result in fractional amounts, but the difference is so small when rounding, and you are rounding to the nearest whole number of cents, not the nearest 5 cents. Even the rounding of pennies sometimes becomes an issue where I work. There are certain payments in the checkbook that have to be split amongst different GL accounts. They apply a formula that applies a certain percentage of the total to each. Sometimes this results in three amounts whose sum is a penny off from the original total due to rounding. I go to reconcile this to the bank statement and I catch the difference, so I have them fix the original entries.

LusiferSam
04-22-2008, 11:59 AM
If I get too many in it then it is harder to close and I need to start spending the coins to get rid of them.

What a novel idea. Spending coins as money. Brilliant!

When I've traveled, most other counties have large domination coins. Either you learn to spend these coins or you wined up with fists full of coins and no bills. Americans aren't that dumb. They would learn how to spend coins again if they had to.

Mad Slanted Powers
04-22-2008, 06:45 PM
What a novel idea. Spending coins as money. Brilliant! I'm just saying that normally it's more convenient to give a $20 bill and get change back rather than dig for correct change. When I start to get too many coins then I'll make the effort to give exact change. With dollar coins, those would build up quick and take up more space than the small coins. I may not get a chance to spend them right away.

Jargo
04-22-2008, 08:24 PM
I only ever carry plastic money. either my debit card or credit card. can't be doing with coins at all. they weigh too much and ruin pockets and they're really unhygenic. all the grubby hands the things pass through. *shudder* bacteria magnets they are.

Mad Slanted Powers
04-22-2008, 09:07 PM
I only ever carry plastic money. either my debit card or credit card. can't be doing with coins at all. they weigh too much and ruin pockets and they're really unhygenic. all the grubby hands the things pass through. *shudder* bacteria magnets they are.Indeed. I worked in the cash office at Wal-Mart for a couple years and I used to balance the cash drawers for my current employer. I still count drawers when we have our tent sales.

One advantage to counting the money is that I get to see the new quarters when they show up, so I can buy one out of the drawer. Sometimes I see some interesting things on the money. When I worked at Wal-Mart, someone had blacked out all of the letters in "FEDERAL RESERVE NOTE" except for " D E V O ". This may have also been the same bill that had George's hair colored red so that he looked like a clown. Then there was the bill that had George saying "I grew hemp." Of course there are also tons of bills that I see that have www.wheresgeorge.com on them.

LusiferSam
04-22-2008, 10:11 PM
I only ever carry plastic money. either my debit card or credit card. can't be doing with coins at all. they weigh too much and ruin pockets and they're really unhygenic. all the grubby hands the things pass through. *shudder* bacteria magnets they are.

Bacteria doesn't grow on metal you germophob. That's not to say coin can't be dirty. It's just not dirty from bacteria. Paper money is a whole different story. Bacteria, mold, and mildew easily grows on paper money.

2-1B
04-23-2008, 12:00 AM
Lame! Nobody's gonna want a Northern Mariana Islands quarter (that's the only one you didn't mention), the state quarters were cool, these are not.

Thanks for the update.

Plus, how are they gonna fit all the letters in NMI onto the coin ? :p
Are they gonna have the text replace whatever image they would use otherwise ? :p

bigbarada
04-23-2008, 12:09 AM
You're thinking of half dollars. All silver was removed from dimes and quarters in '65 because of price and comment usage. The final 40% was remove from the half dollar in '70 again because of price. And as far a I know only proof sets of the bicentennial coins had any silver. I think you can still buy silver proof sets. But like bullion sets they're not really intended as money.

No, I'm talking about quarters and dimes. I've been getting my information from monex.com, which is admittedly in the business of selling gold and silver, but I don't think they could legally get away with selling 40% silver quarters if they those quarters didn't actually have any silver in them.

LusiferSam
04-23-2008, 01:28 AM
No, I'm talking about quarters and dimes. I've been getting my information from monex.com, which is admittedly in the business of selling gold and silver, but I don't think they could legally get away with selling 40% silver quarters if they those quarters didn't actually have any silver in them.

Ok. 90% (http://www.monex.com/prods/silver_90.html) and 40% (http://www.monex.com/prods/silver_40.html) silver coins from Monex. Or from the horse's own mouth: Removal of silver from the half dollar (http://www.usmint.gov/historianscorner/index.cfm?action=DocDetail&id=219).

I couldn't find exactly what I was looking for but this explains thing (http://www.usmint.gov/faqs/circulating_coins/index.cfm?action=Body#anchor15) very well. 90% silver coins were struck in '65 and '66. But they are dated 1964 (I never knew before).

JediTricks
04-23-2008, 07:33 PM
Thanks for the update.

Plus, how are they gonna fit all the letters in NMI onto the coin ? :p
Are they gonna have the text replace whatever image they would use otherwise ? :pSince nobody gives a crap about them, they don't need an image, just the text of their giant stupid name and then a short paragraph explaining to us who the F they are.

I just realized how stupid it's going to be to have money that has the names of essentially OTHER COUNTRIES on it, that's going to work really badly except for "American Samoa" because it has "America" in the name, and DC for about 70% of the folks taking them (I suspect another 30% will forget what "DC" stands for and think it's Columbian money).

2-1B
04-23-2008, 09:05 PM
or possibly Superman / Batman fans.

I heard Jetz&Heelz is gonna load up on those DC coins.

BanthaPoodoo
04-25-2008, 01:21 PM
I say bring back the $2 bill.

The $2 never went anywhere.

lol

Old Fossil
04-25-2008, 11:55 PM
Ok. 90% (http://www.monex.com/prods/silver_90.html) and 40% (http://www.monex.com/prods/silver_40.html) silver coins from Monex. Or from the horse's own mouth: Removal of silver from the half dollar (http://www.usmint.gov/historianscorner/index.cfm?action=DocDetail&id=219).

I couldn't find exactly what I was looking for but this explains thing (http://www.usmint.gov/faqs/circulating_coins/index.cfm?action=Body#anchor15) very well. 90% silver coins were struck in '65 and '66. But they are dated 1964 (I never knew before).

You are correct, sir. I've collected coins (on the side) for the better part of twenty years. There has never been a regular issue U.S. quarter or dime that was not solely copper/nickel starting 1965 (they also moved the mintmark, I think, to help denote the change in composition). Silver issues for those denominations officially ended in 1964. It is possible some were struck later in silver in error, perhaps.

It's usually really easy to tell, looking at a quarter's or dime's edge, to see the copper core. True silver issues don't have that telltale copper tinge on the edge.

On a side note, there are silver nickels in circulation. They are wartime issues from 1943-45, I believe, and have a very small silver composition. I still find them sometimes in change. They have a large telltale mintmark above the dome of Monticello, whereas on other (non-silver) dates the mintmark is either beside Monticello or somewhere around Jefferson (on the obverse).

bigbarada
04-26-2008, 12:28 AM
Ok. 90% (http://www.monex.com/prods/silver_90.html) and 40% (http://www.monex.com/prods/silver_40.html) silver coins from Monex. Or from the horse's own mouth: Removal of silver from the half dollar (http://www.usmint.gov/historianscorner/index.cfm?action=DocDetail&id=219).

I couldn't find exactly what I was looking for but this explains thing (http://www.usmint.gov/faqs/circulating_coins/index.cfm?action=Body#anchor15) very well. 90% silver coins were struck in '65 and '66. But they are dated 1964 (I never knew before).

I don't see anything in your links that contradicts what I said earlier. Where is it stated that the 40% silver quarters don't exist?

LusiferSam
04-29-2008, 12:39 AM
I don't see anything in your links that contradicts what I said earlier. Where is it stated that the 40% silver quarters don't exist?
How many different people have to tell you and in how many different ways do you have to be told that you are wrong? You said you're getting your "information from monex.com." Problem is Monex doesn't seem to sell circulating 40% silver quarters or dimes (proof sets are different). If they do , provide the link. The Coinage Act of 1965 (Public Law 89-81, 79 Statutes at Large 254) says that 40% silver quarters and dimes do not exist. The US Mint (http://www.usmint.gov), coin dealers (http://www.monex.com), numismatic books (http://www.amazon.com/Guide-Coins-Redbook-United-States/dp/0794822673) and numismatists on and off this site say they do not exist. GDCCH


On a side note, there are silver nickels in circulation. They are wartime issues from 1943-45, I believe, and have a very small silver composition. I still find them sometimes in change. They have a large telltale mintmark above the dome of Monticello, whereas on other (non-silver) dates the mintmark is either beside Monticello or somewhere around Jefferson (on the obverse).

Silver nickels had about 35% silver I believe. The large mintmark were for easy identification for when they need to be pulled from circulation. They also easy to spot because they age like silver coins. I've never found any in circulation before. I'd have thought the Fed Reserve would have pluck they sucker from circulation long ago. I've never gotten any silver coins in my change before. My sister found a Mercury dime about 4 years ago. She didn't have a clue as to what it was and gave it to me.

Old Fossil
04-29-2008, 06:51 AM
Silver nickels had about 35% silver I believe. The large mintmark were for easy identification for when they need to be pulled from circulation. They also easy to spot because they age like silver coins. I've never found any in circulation before. I'd have thought the Fed Reserve would have pluck they sucker from circulation long ago. I've never gotten any silver coins in my change before. My sister found a Mercury dime about 4 years ago. She didn't have a clue as to what it was and gave it to me.

I used to find the silver nickels from time to time, but it's been several months since I've seen one. I did find a 1964 Roosevelt dime in change a couple of months back.

The only time I found silver quarters regularly was about 10 years ago, when I helped manage a bookstore. Every few nights for about a month I'd find several dollars' worth in the cash register drawers when counting them down. I assumed some kid had found his parents' or grandparents' stash of rolled silver coins somewhere and was using them to buy trading cards. Needless to say, most all of those silver quarters currently reside in my collection.:thumbsup:

I've never found a silver Kennedy half in change, or even a 40 percent silver one. I had to buy the ones I have.

Probably the coolest coin I ever found in change was a 1909 1/2 anna from British Imperial India. Very similar size and color to a U.S. penny. Probably not worth much more than one, too.:laugh:

bigbarada
04-29-2008, 10:56 PM
How many different people have to tell you and in how many different ways do you have to be told that you are wrong? You said you're getting your "information from monex.com." Problem is Monex doesn't seem to sell circulating 40% silver quarters or dimes (proof sets are different). If they do , provide the link. The Coinage Act of 1965 (Public Law 89-81, 79 Statutes at Large 254) says that 40% silver quarters and dimes do not exist. The US Mint (http://www.usmint.gov), coin dealers (http://www.monex.com), numismatic books (http://www.amazon.com/Guide-Coins-Redbook-United-States/dp/0794822673) and numismatists on and off this site say they do not exist. GDCCH


Maybe one more. ;) Anyways, I went back and double checked and I was mistaken. Monex never says anything about 40% silver quarters and dimes, that's what I get for doing my research at 2 in the morning.:stupid:

Thanks for straightening me out.:thumbsup: