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View Full Version : Could Insects Be Secretly Plotting To Take Control of The Earth?



Tycho
12-15-2006, 10:52 AM
This is not a joke thread. I recently considered the movies "Ants," and "A Bug's Life," and came away from them with startling conclusions.

The earliest dominant life on this planet was the dinosaurs, right? But insects existed back then, too.

A mass extinction occured and the new dominant life on this planet became mammals, of which we belong to that group. Insects are still around however.

Both the dinosaurs and humans are temperature sensitive. But insects are not as prone to be.

Furthermore, if there is some sort of natural disaster, a meteor collision with the earth, even an alien invasion and the enslavement or destruction of mankind, do you honestly think things will change in an ant colony or a bee hive?

The truth is that we don't know what those little guys are really up to. We could be the next dinosaurs and they're just waiting for our extinction. When we die, they're going to eat us of course!

But I've started to notice insects more often now - they're spying on us everywhere, patiently prepared for when they are to take over.

There's probably a spider in the corner somewhere along your walls right now. Silverfish and earwigs go on patrol. Cockroaches are much more rarer (one would hope) but they are the heavy artillery for the invasion and they'll appear on patrol at one point or another.

I know that insects provide a valuable staffing role in our ecosystem's personnel roster, but mind you: they are patiently waiting to enact a coup de tat and neither reptile nor mammal life will be able to deny them.

Furthermore, if advanced life on other planets could have followed our own evolutionary model, it would be wise to consider that the alien life we might encounter would be smaller than us, more adaptable, and insectoid!

This means that alien insects could invade our planet and completely alter our eco-systems yet survive on earth in complete comfort themselves.

Insects might be a superior form of life. You're striking a blow for all of us primatives when you step on a bug today!

Slicker
12-15-2006, 11:09 AM
*sigh*


*shakes head* I...wow...

Rogue II
12-15-2006, 11:29 AM
Tycho, I found an old message for you:


Just say no to drugs.

mtriv73
12-15-2006, 11:54 AM
The exoskeleton of insects limits the size they can grow to as does the fact that they don't have lungs. They rely on their exoskeleton to keep from crushing under their own weight and rely on diffusion to get oxygen to their tissues and take CO2 away. The last time there were really big bugs (in the dinosaur days) on earth the oxygen levels were much higher than today. And even those weren't exactly huge.

Since their is some coorelation between brain size and intelligence, I don't think we need to worry about the bugs becoming big and smart and taking over. (Unless they evolve lungs and a skeleton, then I'm buying a ton of Raid and locking the door.)

JimJamBonds
12-15-2006, 11:54 AM
Lay off the cold medication Tycho.

figrin bran
12-15-2006, 11:55 AM
or in his case, "just say no to mouse droids". and stay away from gentle giant bust ups which pack an even greater hit than the mouse droids.

i'll say this without any scientific data to back me up, insects probably outnumber not only humans but probably every other species on earth as well. they're just waiting for massive nuclear explosions or for a huge meteor to crash into us and then they'll have the whole planet to themselves ;)

lastly, i'll bet that the original thread title Tycho had was "i had a dream where i had to pick among 5 raw insects to eat"

mabudonicus
12-15-2006, 12:23 PM
Tycho- bugs already "rule", they go where they wish and do what they like, they are super efficient, even use us as hosts in some instances, just cos they're not huge and bipedal english speaking things doesn't mean they dont already have what they want- besides, we help them out putting all sorts of crap everywheres, I wouldn't worry too much about it

And if you're REAL worried, I grow bug-eating plants, TONS of them and I can help you to join the fight :beard:Isobaws&

Kidhuman
12-15-2006, 12:40 PM
*sigh*


*shakes head* I...wow...

Ditto *shrugs*

Tycho
12-15-2006, 03:29 PM
The exoskeleton of insects limits the size they can grow to as does the fact that they don't have lungs. They rely on their exoskeleton to keep from crushing under their own weight and rely on diffusion to get oxygen to their tissues and take CO2 away. The last time there were really big bugs (in the dinosaur days) on earth the oxygen levels were much higher than today. And even those weren't exactly huge.

Since their is some coorelation between brain size and intelligence, I don't think we need to worry about the bugs becoming big and smart and taking over. (Unless they evolve lungs and a skeleton, then I'm buying a ton of Raid and locking the door.)

Oh, I didn't say that bugs were going to become bigger. I suggested that sustainable life on earth would gradually be limited to smaller and smaller forms - just as we are smaller than the dinosaurs.

They won't necessessarily need to become smarter lifeforms either. Bugs are already organized into absolute heirarchical social structures, usually led by monarchies - Queens in effect. They could have their own Ant Elizabeth, Regent Roach, Heir Apparent Earwig, etc. And we know that their societies are already organized for war. It happens and there are Army Ants, and so forth.

Furthermore, they don't need to develop advanced technology like airplanes - those that need to fly, already do.

What we can worry about is our own extinction, and bugs, exactly the way they are today, inheriting the earth.


and stay away from gentle giant bust ups which pack an even greater hit than the mouse droids. - Really? I've never purchased those. Maybe I should start a collection.


i'll say this without any scientific data to back me up, insects probably outnumber not only humans but probably every other species on earth as well. they're just waiting for massive nuclear explosions or for a huge meteor to crash into us and then they'll have the whole planet to themselves

Exactly!


Tycho- bugs already "rule", they go where they wish and do what they like, they are super efficient, even use us as hosts in some instances, just cos they're not huge and bipedal english speaking things doesn't mean they dont already have what they want- besides, we help them out putting all sorts of crap everywheres,

So you've seen through their conspiracy and that we're even help bring about our own civilization's downfall!


And if you're REAL worried, I grow bug-eating plants, TONS of them and I can help you to join the fight

I think maybe we should do business. But then what if human life eventually dies out, insect life takes over, and then the remaining plant life is carniverous and eats all the insects? We could be looking at the end of all animal life on earth! If you think about it, this is logical. Mtriv73 already noted that oxygen levels were higher in the dinosaur days. Plants that were larger and a food source for Brachiosauruses have also died out and given way to smaller plants. Deforestization for construction, farming, and even paper manufacturing has significantly reduced plant life on earth. Carniverous plants are considerably smaller and not used nor grow in many of the affected areas - and more importantly, they get their nutrician from the insects they eat. Thus they don't rely on photosynthesis and oxygen / carbon dioxide balances like other plants. They could eventually propogate more over other plantlife, eat all the insects, and wind up ruling the earth!

Aliens may wind up coming to visit us some millenium down the road and finding the ruins of our civilization, with dinosaur bones in the remnants of our museums, and the planet occupied by carniverous plants which might feed on each other the way weeds attack a garden. They might conclude that the plants ate all the animals and took over the world!

But the plants won't win either! I've just recalled a theory that the universe is expanding outward from the big bang, but this will only carry on for so long. Because of entropy (I think), the universe will collapse back in on itself and all the organization or randomization we will have discovered about it will be destroyed as the massive gravitational shift collapses planets into other stars and more planets, and so forth - like the universe itself is inhaling. And then it will exhale all over again!. We may be the bacterial equivalent of life on one of the universe's oxygen molecules, comparatively speaking!

Dar' Argol
12-15-2006, 04:30 PM
The exoskeleton of insects limits the size they can grow to as does the fact that they don't have lungs. They rely on their exoskeleton to keep from crushing under their own weight and rely on diffusion to get oxygen to their tissues and take CO2 away. The last time there were really big bugs (in the dinosaur days) on earth the oxygen levels were much higher than today. And even those weren't exactly huge.

Since their is some coorelation between brain size and intelligence, I don't think we need to worry about the bugs becoming big and smart and taking over. (Unless they evolve lungs and a skeleton, then I'm buying a ton of Raid and locking the door.)

Obviously you have never seen Starship Troopers. Just wait until they evolve the Brain Bug . . . then we are in real trouble. And no amount of mouse droid sniffing can help us then!

CaptainSolo1138
12-15-2006, 07:46 PM
Seriously? There was a thread made for this?

2-1B
12-15-2006, 08:42 PM
It's all about the movie Meet the Applegates...
Eg Begley, Jr. is a fierce motherf***er.

JediTricks
12-15-2006, 10:51 PM
The insect's body is not made up for "thinking" which is a key portion of making decisions like "take over the world".


The exoskeleton of insects limits the size they can grow to as does the fact that they don't have lungs. They rely on their exoskeleton to keep from crushing under their own weight and rely on diffusion to get oxygen to their tissues and take CO2 away. The last time there were really big bugs (in the dinosaur days) on earth the oxygen levels were much higher than today. And even those weren't exactly huge.

Since their is some coorelation between brain size and intelligence, I don't think we need to worry about the bugs becoming big and smart and taking over. (Unless they evolve lungs and a skeleton, then I'm buying a ton of Raid and locking the door.)What about undersea insects like crabs and lobsters? They're significantly bigger than their above-water cousins yet have almost no brains at all, right?

2-1B
12-15-2006, 11:20 PM
The insect's body is not made up for "thinking" which is a key portion of making decisions like "take over the world".

Uhhhh, I better not comment...no politics in this area, right ? lol lol


What about undersea insects like crabs and lobsters? They're significantly bigger than their above-water cousins yet have almost no brains at all, right?

What about them ? Well, for starters, they taste better. :grin:

Tycho
12-16-2006, 01:47 AM
Well, JediTricks' post made me concerned that lobsters could crawl out of the ocean and help insect life take over the earth. So for the safety of the SSG membership from being overran by lobsters, I've done some research on lobsters on wikipedia.org.

I don't think they can survive out of water, but crabs can - I've seen them do it at the boat docks! Anyway, I came up with this report http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lobsters which is very interesting because I once wanted to free all the lobsters in my local grocery store so they wouldn't be boiled alive. The latter end of the wikipedia report discusses very modern technology that's been created to spare lobsters any pain of being cooked - but it doesn't sound like this "cattle prod" type of device is cheap. If a restaurant bought one for example, they might want to advertise: "Fresh Lobster, killed humanely" so that members of PETA might still dine there if they aren't all vegetarians.

I've rethought whether or not we should eat lobsters and crabs though. I mean other insects are going to eat us. And if you're vegetarian, you generally eat the fruit of the plants and not the plants themselves (which will evolve to eat the bugs, which in turn ate us).

So I had some confusion here about formulating a strategy but then I saw the light: eat everything! We must reassert our dominance on this planet or the bugs and plants will take over. But once you're gorged, a heart attack will probably kill you. :rolleyes:

Then again, vegetarian dishes and sea food have a lot less cholesterol, right?

JimJamBonds
12-16-2006, 01:47 AM
Seriously? There was a thread made for this?

And sadly its reached its second page. :rolleyes:

2-1B
12-16-2006, 06:50 PM
If anyone knows about Crabs...it's Tycho.

Tycho
12-16-2006, 07:33 PM
From Wikipedia.org:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Crabs

Crabs are decapod crustaceans of the infraorder Brachyura, which typically have a very short "tail" (Greek: brachy = short, ura = tail), or where the abdomen is entirely hidden under the thorax. They are generally covered with a thick exoskeleton, and are armed with a single pair of chelae (claws). Crabs are found in all of the world's oceans; there are also many freshwater and terrestrial crabs, particularly in tropical regions. Crabs vary in size from the pea crab, only a few millimetres wide, to the Japanese spider crab, with a leg span of up to 4 m.

Anatomy
True crabs [they mention True Crabs!] have five pairs of legs, the first of which is modified into a pair of claws and is not used for locomotion. In all but a few crabs (for example, Raninoida), the abdomen is folded under the cephalothorax. The mouthparts of crabs are covered by flattened maxillipeds, and the front of the carapace does not form a long rostrum. The gills of crabs are formed of flattened plates ("phyllobranchiate"), resembling those of shrimp, but of a different structure. [Dip them in True Cocktail Sauce then! Stop the invasion!]

Most crabs show clear sexual dimorphism and so can be easily sexed. The abdomen, which is held recurved under the thorax, is narrow in males. In females, however, the abdomen retains a greater number of pleopods and is considerably wider. [But what about False Gay Crabs? It doesn't seem like they exist.] This relates to the carrying of the fertilised eggs by the female crabs (as seen in all pleocyemates). In those species in which no such dimorphism is found, the position of the gonopores must be used instead. In females, these are on the third pereiopod, or nearby on the sternum in higher crabs; in males, the gonopores are at the base of the fifth pereiopods or, in higher crabs, on the sternum nearby.


Diet
Crabs are omnivores, feeding primarily on algae, and taking any other food, including molluscs, worms, other crustaceans, fungi, bacteria and detritus, depending on their availability and the crab species. For many crabs, a mixed diet of plant and animal matter results in the fastest growth and greatest fitness.


Crab fishery

Edible crabs being sorted by fishermen at Fionnphort, ScotlandCrabs make up 20% of all marine crustaceans caught and farmed worldwide, with over 1 million tonnes being consumed annually. Of that total, one species accounts for one fifth: Portunus trituberculatus [Why can't they just say 'crab salad.' That's the species we're eating right? Crabacious Saladitous.] Other important taxa include Portunus pelagicus, several species in the genus Chionoecetes, the blue crab (Callinectes sapidus), Charybdis spp., Cancer pagurus, the Dungeness crab (Cancer magister) and Scylla serrata, each of which provides more than 20,000 tonnes annually.


Evolution and classification
The infraclass Brachyura contains about 70 families, as many as the remainder of the Decapoda. The evolution of crabs is characterised by an increasing robustness of the body, and a reduction in the abdomen. Although other groups have also undergone similar processes of carcinisation, it is most advanced in crabs. The telson is no longer functional in crabs, and the uropods are absent, having probably evolved into small devices for holding the reduced abdomen tight against the sternum.

In most decapods, the gonopores (sexual openings) are found on the legs. However, since crabs use the first two pairs of pleopods (abdominal appendages) for sperm transfer, this arrangement has changed. As the male abdomen evolved into a narower shape, the gonopores have moved towards the midline, away from the legs, and onto the sternum. [I bet you never guessed this thread would reveal to you how crabs "do it." :D ] A similar change occurred, independently, with the female gonopores. The movement of the female gonopore to the sternum defines the clade Eubrachyura, and the later change in the position of the male gonopore defines the Thoracotremata. It is still a subject of debate whether those crabs where the female, but not male, gonopores are situated on the sternum form a monophyletic group.

The earliest unambiguous crab fossils date from the Jurassic, although the Carboniferous Imocaris, known only from its carapace is thought to be a primitive crab. [Hey, great news for the casting in Jurassic Park IV! The T-Rex will take on Crab Salad! Who will win?] The radiation of crabs in the Cretaceous and afterwards may be linked either to the break-up of Gondwana or to the concurrent radiation of bony fish, the main predators of crabs.

About 850 species of crab are freshwater or (semi-)terrestrial species; they are found throughout the world's tropical and semi-tropical regions. They were previously thought to be a closely related group, but are now believed to represent at least two distinct lineages, one in the Old World and one in the New World. [The Renaissance Crabs? So that's what really happened to Michaelangelo's ear? Or was it Leonardo? I don't remember, but they were both Ninja Turtles, so the Crabs would have access to them! See - proof the war is on!]

Similar animals
Several other groups of animals are either called crabs or have the term "crab" in their names. These include hermit crabs, porcelain crabs and king crabs, which, despite superficial similarities to true crabs, belong to the Anomura. [So there are False-Crabs! I knew it.] The UK Food Standards Agency allows king crabs to be sold as "crab", [more hypocrisy surrounds me :rolleyes: ] but this practice is not followed outside the food industry. Others, such as horseshoe crabs are much more distantly related. Anomuran "crabs" can be distinguished from true crabs by counting the legs. In Anomura, the last pair of pereiopods (walking legs) is hidden inside the carapace, so only four pairs are visible (counting the claws), whereas uninjured true crabs generally have five visible pairs (in the family Hexapodidae, the last pair of pereiopods is vestigial).

2-1B
12-16-2006, 08:34 PM
Most crabs show clear sexual dimorphism and so can be easily sexed.

I told you that Tycho knew about Crabs. :grin:

Phantom-like Menace
12-16-2006, 11:55 PM
Obviously you have never seen Starship Troopers. Just wait until they evolve the Brain Bug . . . then we are in real trouble. And no amount of mouse droid sniffing can help us then!

Ah, but you can't sniff mouse droids when you have a cold. And is it any coincidence that cold viruses are referred to as bugs? I doubt it.

El Chuxter
12-17-2006, 03:10 PM
Not Earth.

Just Rtglx.

JediTricks
12-18-2006, 04:38 PM
What about them ? Well, for starters, they taste better. :grin:How do you know, have you done a taste-test? :p