PDA

View Full Version : Who's Running Windows Vista



sith_killer_99
02-05-2007, 07:10 PM
I am I am!

I love the new OS!

The upgrade went smoothly and I have only had one real problem...iTunes. I had to download a repair tool to get iTunes to work right, but other than that everything has gone well.

The new OS runs well and allows for much better multi-tasking as opposed to the slow performance I had when running multiple programs on XP including the lock-ups and restarts, Vista runs much better.

For those of you who plan on upgrading there are a lot of new and fun features including Media Center in the Home Premium and Ultimate editions. Also, if you decide to buy a lower end version on the OS you can easily upgrade to a higher end version, as all discs come with the full version (Ultimate) all you have to do is contact Microsoft and purchase a new Registration key and you can "unlock" the additional features.

Great new functions in Vista Home Premium include:

Windows Media Center
Drive Back-up with scheduled back-ups
Aero
Flip 3-D
DVD Authoring/Burning
More stable OS
Multi-tasking efficiency
Improved Search function
Better Organization for files
Built-in photo editing
Windows Calendar
Virtual Curator (Photo Gallery Manager)
Windows Media Player 11


I love Windows Vista!

Is Vista right for you? It's hard to say for sure. You can go to the microsoft website and download a program to analyze your system to see how well Vista will run on your computer.

I installed Vista Home Premium on my Toshiba Laptop, I upgrade my laptop to 2GB of DDR2 RAM. Also Vista has a program that allows you to install a flash USB drive and use it to improve performance. I currently have a 1GB Imation USB drive that Vista uses as a "scratch pad" when the drive is detected by Vista it asks if you want to use it for "Speed Boost" and it seems to work very well.

During the installation I had backed up all my files before I installed Vista, but to my amazement Vista saved all my settings, bookmarks (even in Firefox) music, photos, documents...everything without so much as a hiccup! It was hands down the best OS install/Upgrade I have ever experienced!

There were a couple of programs (Norton Firewall & Antivirus) that had to be deinstalled before the upgrade, but Vista scanned my system during the upgrade and told me what I had to de-install before upgrading. Norton can be re-installed after upgrades are complete.

I was also one of the first people to upgrade to XP when it first came out. It was a horrible experience! So why did I risk it this time with Vista. Well, I am leaving in less than a month for Afghanistan and wanted to get the new OS before I left. I have to say I was VERY pleased with the entire process!

So who's upgraded, or planning to upgrade? Which version will you get?

bobafrett
02-05-2007, 07:14 PM
So you can do this without buying the product from the store? Yes, I'm not computer savvy.

El Chuxter
02-05-2007, 07:16 PM
How long until Microsoft works out all the inevitable major security flaws? They love their flaws, y'know.

Jargo
02-05-2007, 07:28 PM
I'm waiting this one out. I don't know anyone running Vista who isn't having problems. There again that may be because a lot of people over here are using the newly cracked download bootleg because it costs so freakin much! grrrrrrr

UKWildcat
02-05-2007, 08:14 PM
I'm waiting too. It's good to hear that the Home Premium version comes with Media Center though; thought I'd have to spring for the Ultimate to keep that feature.

DarthQuack
02-05-2007, 08:20 PM
Yea, I saw a news flash on the bottom line of G4 earlier saying if you had iTunes to hold off for a little while until a patch is made.

Darth Jax
02-05-2007, 08:38 PM
maybe someday bill gates will get the guys at apple to design him an operating system and then pc users will get a chance to see how easy to use and secure a computer could be.

Jargo
02-05-2007, 09:02 PM
grrr apple. seekers of world dominance by lawsuit. considering how they just won that court battle with the beatles apple company and now control the use of the word 'apple' I'm surprised they're attempting to gain control over the name of the fruit too. though that wouldn't surprise me at all.

El Chuxter
02-05-2007, 11:32 PM
While that's true, keep in mind that Bill Gates did first rip off MS-DOS from another company, then ripped off Windows from Apple.

Pretty much everything Microsoft's done is a total infringement upon someone's patent or trademark. That's why he's doing so much charity, hoping maybe God will forget what a lying, cheating SOB he is.

JimJamBonds
02-05-2007, 11:59 PM
I've heard some pretty iffy things about Vista, personally I'm not going to bother at this time.

LusiferSam
02-06-2007, 12:27 AM
While that's true, keep in mind that Bill Gates did first rip off MS-DOS from another company, then ripped off Windows from Apple.

True, but that's because Gates bought from Seattle Software (or what ever the name was). Bought, stole, borrowed, it's all the same to Gates and Ballmer.

sith_killer_99
02-06-2007, 01:34 AM
Bill bought DOS from it'd creator then "licensed" the software to other users.

I believe it was Xerox who developed the GUI, then Bill took the idea and helped develop a GUI for Apple, while developing his own version (Windows) which he then leased to.....oh never mind it's all so convoluted.

Yeah, I've heard all the bad press...Vista is just a PC version of the Mac OS X...security holes...problems with upgrading...blah blah blah.

I am an early adopter and all I can say is Microsoft did a good job with this one.

Security is much better than any previous version of Windows, the entire OS has been redesigned with security in mind. The only issue I have had so far has been iTunes, which was easily fixed with the download tool from iTunes, and a new "Vista Friendly" version of iTunes is coming shortly. Other software programs I had on XP, the one's that required activation keys (like 123 Copy DVD Gold) did ask me to re-register my software on-line. I though "oh great" but when I clicked to re-register and the product key was saved like a password management program! So I didn't have to go hunting for the old software to find the key!

Like I said, I have had no problems upgrading (iTunes aside). The system runs faster, smoother, has better multi-tasking abilities and just generally kicks butt.


So you can do this without buying the product from the store?

No, you still need to buy some version of the OS from the store.

OOoooops, I stand corrected, according to Wikipedia, you can in fact purchase and download the new OS from the Microsoft website!

But let's say you decide to buy Vista Home Basic, then later decide you want Vista Ultimate, you just call up Microsoft and they will sell you a new product key for your OS and that key will "unlock" the other features.

Here are the different flavors of Vista:

Home Basic - Upgrade $99.99 (199.99)
Home Basic isn't worth the disc it's burned onto, it doesn't have Media Center, which should be enough for any user to say WTF, in addition it does not have "Aero" which is the fancy graphics (glass) for the new OS. Vista Home Basic is a waste of money.

Home Premium - Upgrade $159.99 (Full $239.99)
Home Premium is the best bet for your money. The only major features missing from Home Premium are "Drive Encryption" and "Domain Networking". Home Premium comes with Media Center, Aero, Mobility Center and connects to your XBox 360.

Business - Upgrade $199.99 (Full $299.99)
Business is just that Business, no Media Center and no XBox connection, but it does have Drive Encryption and Domain Networking, which are much more important for Business applications, it also comes with Aero and Mobility Center.

Ultimate - Upgrade $259.99 (Full $399.99)
Ultimate is the works...Media Center, Aero, Mobility Center, XBox, Drive Encryption and Domain Networking.

My recommendation for average users is to go with Home Premium and for the paranoid go with Ultimate if you like the idea of Drive Encryption.

Microsoft has said that they really concentrated on security for the new OS, they claim that the kernel is protected by thick layers of security that should protect against any attempts at a full system takeover.

However, if your still worried about security there are about 50 different ways to protect your system(s) from worms, viruses, Trojan horses, etc.

Norton Security is still top dog and the new security suite comes with a firewall and anti-virus, it costs the same as previous versions but now it allows you to use the programs on up to 3 PC's! That's right one copy now comes with 3 user licenses!

Dual Operating Systems. You can also partition your hard drive to allow you to run either Windows XP or Windows Vista. This is sort of a "try it and see" or "try it for now and fully adopt it later" solution. The partition will also allow you to keep the XP OS safe and sound if anything happens to the Vista OS.

Back it up! This allows you to make a complete copy of your OS for re-install later if problems arise. If you back up to an external drive with encryption you are completely safe. Better yet, back up your system to DVD's and you will always have your data in case of emergencies.

Norton Security and routine back ups have become standard practice for me, and I really like that Microsoft included system back ups as part of the new OS. I just hook up my external drive and set the schedule for backing up my data...no worries!:D

sith_killer_99
02-06-2007, 01:58 AM
A little info on the "similarities" between Mac OS 10 and Vista.


This has led some to perceive that Aero is an imitation of Aqua. Apple was keen to highlight the similarities during the keynote presentation at the Worldwide Developers Conference in August 2006, with Bertrand Serlet showing screenshots of Vista and OS X side-by-side. However, many features including the Windows Sidebar, Windows Calendar, and Search features were included and/or introduced in early alpha versions of Vista before Apple released the features in Mac OS 10.4..
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Criticism_of_Windows_Vista

bigbarada
02-06-2007, 03:09 AM
I'm a loyal Macintosh user, so from my perspective this is just Microsoft's attempts to catch up with Apple.

darthvyn
02-06-2007, 09:03 AM
maybe someday bill gates will get the guys at apple to design him an operating system and then pc users will get a chance to see how easy to use and secure a computer could be.

or maybe everyone will just start using Linux since it's nearly an identical cousin to the new apple OS - since they're both based on Unix.


I am an early adopter and all I can say is Microsoft did a good job with this one.

just a "good job"? not a "great job"? not a huge endorsement...


Security is much better than any previous version of Windows, the entire OS has been redesigned with security in mind.

how? what have you seen that's better? more annoying pop-ups saying that you could be at risk, until you're so fed up with the pop-ups that you disable the security settings? that's what i've seen from IE7... if that's an example, i'm not impressed...


Home Basic - Upgrade $99.99 (199.99)
Home Basic isn't worth the disc it's burned onto, it doesn't have Media Center, which should be enough for any user to say WTF, in addition it does not have "Aero" which is the fancy graphics (glass) for the new OS. Vista Home Basic is a waste of money.

basically XP with a new name.


Home Premium - Upgrade $159.99 (Full $239.99)
Home Premium is the best bet for your money. The only major features missing from Home Premium are "Drive Encryption" and "Domain Networking". Home Premium comes with Media Center, Aero, Mobility Center and connects to your XBox 360.

interesting that it stresses that it doesn't have domain networking - which is a MAJOR security enhancement...

http://www.microsoft.com/windowsxp/using/networking/expert/crawford_december24.mspx


Business - Upgrade $199.99 (Full $299.99)
Business is just that Business, no Media Center and no XBox connection, but it does have Drive Encryption and Domain Networking, which are much more important for Business applications, it also comes with Aero and Mobility Center.

counterpart to windows xp pro - but with less stuff to make it usable at home... interesting...


Ultimate - Upgrade $259.99 (Full $399.99)
Ultimate is the works...Media Center, Aero, Mobility Center, XBox, Drive Encryption and Domain Networking.

well, i guess that's why... they want to make you pay through the nose to get the stuff you really want. each of those things could be a separate module that you could pay for and create your own version of the OS, but instead they're relegated to certain packages. let's say i don't need drive encryption, x-box connectivity (because i don't have one) or mobility center because i'm not installing it on a laptop - but i want domain networking and media center... i STILL have to buy "ultimate" for a crap-ton of money instead of picking and choosing the modules i want to incorporate. dumb move, because in the long run i think they'd get a lot more money that way...


Microsoft has said that they really concentrated on security for the new OS, they claim that the kernel is protected by thick layers of security that should protect against any attempts at a full system takeover.

that's what they said about XP, too. but even if the OS is secure, there are plenty of programs that give you a back-door entrance. it's too soon to tell, but is IE7 just as vulnerable as IE6 was? and what about the reference to a "full system takeover"? how many hackattacks are "full-system" takeovers? most are just hijacks of certain aspects of the machine that lay dormant for the most part until you use the program most affected. i'm not convinced.


However, if your still worried about security there are about 50 different ways to protect your system(s) from worms, viruses, Trojan horses, etc.

true, but the creator of the OS has an obligation to make the strongest product they can, and i haven't yet seen that from M$.


Dual Operating Systems. You can also partition your hard drive to allow you to run either Windows XP or Windows Vista. This is sort of a "try it and see" or "try it for now and fully adopt it later" solution. The partition will also allow you to keep the XP OS safe and sound if anything happens to the Vista OS.

this is nothing new. i have a Mac running OS 10.4 and Ubuntu Linux, and i've had boxes running win 2k and XP... but at $250 for an upgrade to the "ultimate" i wouldn't bet on many people "trying it and seeing"...


Back it up! This allows you to make a complete copy of your OS for re-install later if problems arise. If you back up to an external drive with encryption you are completely safe. Better yet, back up your system to DVD's and you will always have your data in case of emergencies.

does vista offer a way to do this? because creating ghosts of an XP drive has always been notoriously difficult, due to the copyright protection XP has built-in. unless you're talking about backing up all other data, not the OS itself - then yes, that's a good move. but you should do that anyway (even though i don't...)


Norton Security and routine back ups have become standard practice for me, and I really like that Microsoft included system back ups as part of the new OS. I just hook up my external drive and set the schedule for backing up my data...no worries!:D

system backups have been around since windows 2k/ME, and to some extent even in win 98se... not impressive... it might have a fancier interface that rotates or gets sucked into some corner of your screen now (a la macintosh aqua...) but it doesn't seem like "new" technology to me... just bells and whistles...

sith_killer_99
02-06-2007, 02:07 PM
just a "good job"? not a "great job"? not a huge endorsement...

Well, I also had said...


I love the new OS!


I love Windows Vista!


to my amazement Vista saved all my settings, bookmarks (even in Firefox) music, photos, documents...everything without so much as a hiccup! It was hands down the best OS install/Upgrade I have ever experienced!


Like I said, I have had no problems upgrading (iTunes aside). The system runs faster, smoother, has better multi-tasking abilities and just generally kicks butt.

Ringing endorsements all.

As far as price goes, here's the way I look at it. The extra time and re-working of the code that went into Vista was a long time in development. Microsoft has a lot of overhead and 5 years of work went into this new OS. Sure they could have released a weaker OS 2-3 years ago for $100-$150 and then released Vista with a price tag of $100-$150...but everyone would have HATED whatever they put out 2-3 years ago.


Microsoft started work on their plans for "Longhorn" in May 2001, prior to the release of Windows XP. It was originally expected to ship sometime late in 2003 as a minor step between Windows XP (codenamed "Whistler") and "Blackcomb" (now known as Windows "Vienna"). Gradually, "Longhorn" assimilated many of the important new features and technologies slated for "Blackcomb," resulting in the release date being pushed back a few times. Many of Microsoft's developers were also re-tasked with improving the security of Windows XP.[6] Faced with ongoing delays and concerns about feature creep, Microsoft announced on August 27, 2004 that it was making significant changes. "Longhorn" development basically started afresh, building on the Windows Server 2003 codebase, and re-incorporating only the features that would be intended for an actual operating system release.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Windows_Vista

As for security, Microsoft re-wrote a LOT of code for the OS and they have come under a lot of fire for security. But let's take a serious look at who is criticizing them and why.


Companies that produce security software such as McAfee and Symantec have also lodged complaints


McAfee has also said that Vista will be even less secure than previous versions of Windows.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Criticism_of_Windows_Vista

Companies that make their money from Microsoft's security vulnerabilities are heavily involved in attacks against Microsoft's security features. With Microsoft's pushing "One Care" offering more competition for companies like McAfee and Symantec it's no wonder they want the new OS to have security flaws. The EU has also lodged complaints against Microsoft for offering One Care.

But here's the flip side, and it's a doozy IMO. Microsoft competes against McAfee and Symantec, offering One Care for $50.00 with 3 User Licenses. Now Symantec is offering a bundled Internet security suite with firewall and anti-virus for the same cost as previous versions...the kicker is that they now have to compete with One Care so they also include 3 User Licenses.

Now for a home with multiple computer users like mine that's a good savings, competition drives down prices and believe it or not we have Microsoft to thank for that little diddy.


how? what have you seen that's better? more annoying pop-ups saying that you could be at risk, until you're so fed up with the pop-ups that you disable the security settings? that's what i've seen from IE7... if that's an example, i'm not impressed...


Improved security was a primary design goal for Vista. Microsoft's Trustworthy Computing initiative, which aims to improve public trust in its products, has had a direct effect on its development. This effort has resulted in a number of new security and safety features.

Microsoft's anti-spyware product, Windows Defender, has been incorporated into Windows, providing protection against malware and other threats. Changes to various system configuration settings (such as new auto-starting applications) are blocked unless the user gives consent.

A variety of other privilege-restriction techniques are also built into Vista. An example is the concept of "integrity levels" in user processes, whereby a process with a lower integrity level cannot interact with processes of a higher integrity level. The security restrictions of Windows service is more fine-grained than formerly, so system services (especially those listening on the network) have no ability to interact with parts of the operating sytem they do not need to. Obfuscation techniques such as address space layout randomization and Kernel Patch Protection are used to increase the amount of effort required of malware before successful infiltration of a system.

As part of the redesign of the network stack, Windows Firewall has been upgraded, with new support for filtering both incoming and outgoing traffic. Advanced packet filter rules can be created which can grant or deny communications to specific services. Vista also adds new SSL and TLS cryptographic extensions, which enable support for both AES and some of the new ECC cipher suites.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Windows_Vista

Not to mention all the beta testing that went into the new OS, the most ever in the history of Windows.


After "Longhorn" was named Windows Vista, an unprecedented beta-test program was started, which involved hundreds of thousands of volunteers and companies. In September 2005, Microsoft started releasing regular Community Technology Previews (CTP) to beta testers. The first of these was distributed among 2005 Microsoft Professional Developers Conference attendees, and was subsequently released to Microsoft Beta testers and Microsoft Developer Network subscribers. The builds that followed incorporated most of the planned features for the final product, as well as a number of changes to the user interface, based largely on feedback from beta testers. Windows Vista was deemed feature-complete with the release of the "February CTP," released on February 22, 2006, and much of the remainder of work between that build and the final release of the product focused on stability, performance, application and driver compatibility, and documentation. Beta 2, released in late May, was the first build to be made available to the general public through Microsoft's Customer Preview Program. It was downloaded by over five million people. Two release candidates followed in September and October, both of which were made available to a large number of users.

As for IE7, I can't give you much feedback there. I use Firefox 2.0 as I have never really cared much for IE in general.


does vista offer a way to do this? because creating ghosts of an XP drive has always been notoriously difficult, due to the copyright protection XP has built-in. unless you're talking about backing up all other data, not the OS itself - then yes, that's a good move. but you should do that anyway (even though i don't...)

Yep, and it's easier than 1-2-3.:D

darthvyn
02-06-2007, 02:33 PM
well, you bring good facts to the table, i'll give you that... sounds more solid than XP (which one SHOULD expect, but not necessarily get..)

a lot of the security features sound an AWFUL lot like the permissions levels in linux... i really have a hard time believeing that they were smart enough to copy that AND make it work well, but time will tell...

however, the contention that longhorn was renamed vista is dubious. longhorn is almost a totally different system that was abandoned because the project was apparently too ambitious - the result was scaled back effort and vista was born. there are people out there trying to augment the truncated longhorn versions that were released as betas... not sure as to the legality of those projects...

LusiferSam
02-06-2007, 04:13 PM
I'm a loyal Macintosh user, so from my perspective this is just Microsoft's attempts to catch up with Apple.

I'll second that comment. I thought about making a snide comment about how running Vista for over a year now, but liked the original name Tiger better. But in a thread for MS monkeys I thought I'd restrain myself.

sith_killer_99
02-06-2007, 04:37 PM
however, the contention that longhorn was renamed vista is dubious. longhorn is almost a totally different system that was abandoned because the project was apparently too ambitious - the result was scaled back effort and vista was born. there are people out there trying to augment the truncated longhorn versions that were released as betas... not sure as to the legality of those projects...

That wasn't really my contention, it's sort of convoluted. Originally "Longhorn" was planned for a 2003 release. "Vienna" (or "Blackcomb") was going to be a later release. In 2004 Microsoft scrapped the early attempts at "Longhorn" for a variety of reasons, security and feature creep. They started fresh using the much more secure and reliable Windows Server 2003 codebase. This is another reason Vista is more secure than previous OS's and contrary to the belief that Vista's code remains unproven the code base has been in use, refined and proven for more than 3 years now. In any event it seems that Longhorn and Vienna were sort of combined into a single "Vista" OS, though I could be wrong. Either way "Longhorn" existed in two different states, the less secure XP codebase and the more secure Windows Server 2003 codebase. Microsoft decided to go with the more secure codebase.


Microsoft started work on their plans for "Longhorn" in May 2001, prior to the release of Windows XP. It was originally expected to ship sometime late in 2003 as a minor step between Windows XP (codenamed "Whistler") and "Blackcomb" (now known as Windows "Vienna"). Gradually, "Longhorn" assimilated many of the important new features and technologies slated for "Blackcomb," resulting in the release date being pushed back a few times. Many of Microsoft's developers were also re-tasked with improving the security of Windows XP. Faced with ongoing delays and concerns about feature creep, Microsoft announced on August 27, 2004 that it was making significant changes. "Longhorn" development basically started afresh, building on the Windows Server 2003 codebase, and re-incorporating only the features that would be intended for an actual operating system release.

As for the reviews on Vista's security PC World lists Security as one of the top 5 things they love about Vista. The Firewall has been improved with outbound filtering now included as opposed to the inbound only filtering in XP, plus lots of other features under the hood including Anti-Spyware. The firewall is as easily configured as any third party firewall. You can determine which programs you want to allow to access the internet and configure them so as not to pop-up every time they attempt to access the net.

DarthBrandon
02-06-2007, 06:26 PM
Not sure if I'm going to purchase this as the NSA has designed two major components of this O.S. (security related) & I don't feel comfortable about it right now.:lipsrsealed::D

darthvyn
02-06-2007, 09:52 PM
That wasn't really my contention, it's sort of convoluted. Originally "Longhorn" was planned for a 2003 release. "Vienna" (or "Blackcomb") was going to be a later release. In 2004 Microsoft scrapped the early attempts at "Longhorn" for a variety of reasons, security and feature creep. They started fresh using the much more secure and reliable Windows Server 2003 codebase. This is another reason Vista is more secure than previous OS's and contrary to the belief that Vista's code remains unproven the code base has been in use, refined and proven for more than 3 years now. In any event it seems that Longhorn and Vienna were sort of combined into a single "Vista" OS, though I could be wrong. Either way "Longhorn" existed in two different states, the less secure XP codebase and the more secure Windows Server 2003 codebase. Microsoft decided to go with the more secure codebase.

i wasn't saying that it was your contention - it was from the wikipedia blurb you quoted... i just thought it was funny that they believed longhorn just turned into vista. basically i think you got it right that vista is based on server 2003, but i don't think it ever melded with anything from longhorn other than the glossy UI - that's about it from longhorn...


As for the reviews on Vista's security PC World lists Security as one of the top 5 things they love about Vista. The Firewall has been improved with outbound filtering now included as opposed to the inbound only filtering in XP, plus lots of other features under the hood including Anti-Spyware. The firewall is as easily configured as any third party firewall. You can determine which programs you want to allow to access the internet and configure them so as not to pop-up every time they attempt to access the net.

still, the best firewall is an external firewall. no software firewall can do it's job as efficiently.

Slicker
02-06-2007, 11:13 PM
Not sure if I'm going to purchase this as the NSA has designed two major components of this O.S. (security related) & I don't feel comfortable about it right now.:lipsrsealed::DBut you're in Canada. The "security measures" were only put there to "protect" Americans. You'll be fine.;)

JediTricks
02-07-2007, 06:21 PM
Steve hit me up with a bench test comparison between XP and Vista (http://www.tomshardware.com/2007/01/29/xp-vs-vista/index.html), and I was shocked how poorly Vista actually performed. In most normal areas, Vista performed at similar levels as XP so nothing was sped up - except stuff with 3D modeling, such as CADCAM.

However, in one crucial area, Vista performed significantly WORSE than XP and should be ashamed of itself there - any example where it has to compress or encode, it is slower:
- ripping CDs into MP3s: 2% slower
- photoshop image rendering: 5% slower
- encoding videos: 21% slower
- compressing files into a RAR: 22% slower

That's an embarrassment.

Considering how much more system resources this OS requires, Microsoft should be ashamed of themselves for putting this thing out. All the money and time spent trying to get another license fee out of every XP user could have been spent fixing XP's security issues instead of making a whole set of new ones, and MS would still have probably 80% of the money they spent at the end of the day.

DarthBrandon
02-07-2007, 06:35 PM
But you're in Canada. The "security measures" were only put there to "protect" Americans. You'll be fine.;)

1.) Do not underestimate the powers of the NSA
2.) I find your lack of faith in the NSA disturbing.:D
3.) S%*t, there's a nock at the door:eek:......................................... .................................................. .

This post is being deleted by the NSA, please ignore.:ninja:

sith_killer_99
02-07-2007, 07:18 PM
Windows Vista clearly is not a great new performer when it comes to executing single applications at maximum speed.
http://www.tomshardware.com/2007/01/29/xp-vs-vista/page11.html

Here is part of the problem with the testing that they ran, and something that I have noticed in my real world application of Windows Vista.

1. I have been burning DVD's to my hard drive to take with me to Afghanistan and the DVD's went from running 1 1/2 to 2 hours down to 1-1 1/2 hours (MAX). None of them have taken as long to encode and compress with the new OS. The bench marks may say differently, but I have seen a great improvement.

2. This system uses a lot of additional resources but the big pay off, that I have noticed, is a complete....yes COMPLETE lack of hang time when running multiple applications. In Windows XP, if I were burning a DVD to my external drive I could forget about using my computer for anything else. Just opening a window, could take forever. Now I can run my DVD program and burn to the external drive while surfing the net or working on a word document and not see a single hiccup, no hang time, waiting for the windows to pop up or letters to scroll out long after I have finished typing....no problems at all. In Windows XP, this was unheard of!

This is where the new OS really performs, it's smooth and multi-tasking is a breeze. In addition, I have not encountered a single lock-up. In Windows XP I frequently had to pull up the Task Manager and close out programs that had stopped running, no such problems with Vista, despite the additional heavy usage with multi-tasking.:D