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Mad Slanted Powers
03-28-2007, 01:57 AM
This thread could go on a long time because I have a lot of CDs, and have started to accumulate some iTunes downloads. It seems that my musical tastes differ a bit from much of what is discussed in this section, though there are some overlaps. So, I thought I would start a thread about the music that is the soundtrack to my life.

Here is how it will work. I'll bring up an artist to discuss and then you can do one of the following:

1) Heap praise upon the artist and tell me how cool I am.

2) Mock me for liking something so lame.

3) Choose your own path somewhere in between.

4) Ignore the thread.

There will be some structure. I'll probably go mostly in alphabetical order, but I think I will begin with the band that was probably my first "favorite" band. The Cars.

I recall hearing "My Best Friend's Girl" on the radio when it was popular. I also recall riding in my brother-in-law's Trans-Am one day while visiting my sister in Seattle, and The Cars was the only tape he had in the car, so I heard it a couple times that day. Then one day in 1978 or 1979, my mom and brother come home from town. My brother had got his first two vinyl LP's. One was Blondie's Parallel Lines, the other was The Cars. We listened to that album a lot. Until 1986, they were far and away my favorite group.

As far as I'm concerned, their first two albums (self-titled and Candy-O are a couple of the best albums of all time. Panorama had a different feel to it and wasn't as successful, but I still enjoy it a lot. At this point, those three and Complete Greatest Hits are the only ones I have on CD, though I have the others on vinyl or taped from my brother's LPs. Shake It Up and Heartbeat City don't seem quite as awesome to me as they did back then, but they are still good albums with some songs that I really like. Their last album doesn't quite hold up as well, and was kind of an anti-climactic finale for them. Unfortunately, Ben Orr died of pancreatic cancer on October 3, 2000. The New Cars thing hasn't really got me excited. It has guitarist Elliot Easton and keyboard player Greg Hawkes with Todd Rundgren on vocals.

One other note. As popular as The Cars became, I sort of considered them alternative, though I didn't have that term in my mind back then. I recall when I was still in grade school, I would ask others in my class what their favorite band was. When I would say that my favorite was The Cars, they'd usually think of the song by Gary Numan. With Heartbeat City though, the Cars became more popular than they had ever been, while most people will know Gary Numan by that one song.

plasticfetish
03-28-2007, 03:55 AM
I've always liked The Cars. I'd bought their first five albums as they came out. Can't say that I give them much thought these days, but I still enjoy hearing the odd song when it comes on the radio.

That anthology that they did a while ago ("Just What I Needed") was really good.

Funny that you mention Gary Numan, because I do still listen to the older Tubeway Army albums every now and then.

2-1B
03-28-2007, 11:09 PM
I like the music I've heard from The Cars, good band. I can't say I get the whole New Cars thing with Rundgren, though.

Mad Slanted Powers
03-29-2007, 09:01 PM
Here's another story about my Cars experience. One day, I was listening to Panorama on the record player in our living room. During the song "Gimme Some Slack", my mom asks me if I know what the song is about. I said "not really", and she said "well, it isn't good." She didn't elaborate, so I wasn't sure what the problem was. The song used some terms I wasn't familiar with at the time: "I want to shake like Laguardia", "I wanna float like Euripides", and "I'm all right with Fellini fiends". Those weren't the problem, because those were a NYC mayor, an ancient Greek playwright, and an Italian film director.

A couple years later, I'm listening to the song in my room and my mom comes in and complains about the song again. This time she explains. She thought the song was saying "suck".

plasticfetish
03-29-2007, 10:12 PM
Naughty mommy. lol

JON9000
03-30-2007, 10:23 AM
I liked the Cars because Ric Ocasek was ugly as all get out and still a rock star. And on top of that, he got himself Paulina Porizkova. They were sort of the quintessential early 80's "rock" band, really synth driven, but somehow still rockier than Duran Duran. I don't listen to a whole lot from that era, it simply doesn't have a very "full" sound, in spite of being studio driven.

Mad Slanted Powers
04-02-2007, 12:51 AM
Well, I guess I'll move on to another artist. AC/DC.

I'm not sure when I first heard AC/DC. Probably not until after Back in Black was released. I seem to recall hearing my brother and sister talking about the singer and how he died. For a while, I was confused as to which singer was Bon Scott and which was Brian Johnson. I think Dirty Deeds Done Dirt Cheap wasn't released in the U.S. until after Back in Black, so that probably was the source of the confusion. Eventually, my brother had all the albums through Blow Up Your Video. I have memories of riding in my brother's car with Back in Black blasting really loud. We lived at the end of a dead end road, and you could hear his car coming from a ways down the road.

Back in Black and For Those About To Rock We Salute You were the albums I heard a lot to begin with, but eventually I got to hear the Bon Scott era ones more. I'd have to say Powerage is my favorite, "Down Payment Blues" in particular. Flick of the Switch is also an often overlooked and underrated album.

In recent years, I finally bought some of the CDs for myself. I have High Voltage, Powerage, Let There Be Rock, Back in Black and Flick of the Switch. I'll probably get For Those About to Rock next.

JON9000
04-02-2007, 04:49 PM
I never really appreciated AC/DC. Of all the AC/DC songs out there, my least favorite is "You Shook Me All Night Long". I don't understand why I m not a fan... perhaps I am not a fan of gravelly vocals. But I liked Cinderella when I was a kid. Oh, well.

Mad Slanted Powers
04-02-2007, 08:02 PM
I never really appreciated AC/DC. Of all the AC/DC songs out there, my least favorite is "You Shook Me All Night Long". I don't understand why I m not a fan... perhaps I am not a fan of gravelly vocals. But I liked Cinderella when I was a kid. Oh, well.That song's okay, but I have a bit of an aversion to it. The song was on Back in Black in 1980. Then it shows up on Who Made Who in 1986. I recall them playing the song sometimes at high school pep rallies, and noticing some girls being all excited that the song was playing. I'm thinking, "What is the big deal? This song is six years old, and not even the best song on the album."

My favorite song on the album would probably be "Shake A Leg". "Givin the Dog a Bone" is pretty good too, and "Rock and Roll Ain't Noise Pollution" makes a great rock & roll anthem. The opening of "Hells Bells" with the gong and evil sounding guitar riff almost makes me afraid I'm gonna go to hell just for listening. I probably didn't think much about "Shoot to Thrill" when it was new, but when I hear it now, it is the sound that reminds me of riding in my brother's car. In particular, the quiet part after guitar solo and repeat of the chorus when it is just drums and one guitar.

As far as gravelly voice goes, the first few albums with Brian Johnson his voice didn't seem to bad. However, it seemed like something changed with The Razor's Edge. It sounded like he was straining more. Maybe it was more of a gradual process starting with Fly on the Wall, but "Thunderstruck" was probably when I first noticed it. Great song though.

Mr. JabbaJohnL
04-02-2007, 10:15 PM
Someone gave me part of a live AC/DC album, and you can actually hear the singer's (not sure which one it is) voice getting crappier and crappier throughout the album . . . at the end, I thought I was listening to Meatwad, for God's sake.

Other than that, I do like some of their stuff, but usually the vocals get on my nerves pretty quickly.

El Chuxter
04-03-2007, 12:35 AM
JJL, was it Bon or Bryan handling lead vocals? They sound vastly different. Bon was better overall, but Bryan did do the honors on "You Shook Me All Night Long," one of the best songs ever.

I've had AC/DC in my collection for quite some time. They never get old.

The Cars I've always liked, but until recently only had the 2-disc hits album from about ten years ago. Thanks to the otherwise stupid "Essential 200" list that just came out, though, Costco had The Cars for a great price, and now I have it, too. (Though there's only like two songs that weren't on Just What I Needed already.)

Mr. JabbaJohnL
04-03-2007, 05:38 PM
After looking it up, I guess it was Brian, and here (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Live:_2_CD_Collector%27s_Edition) is the album (I only got the second disc). From what I've heard of Bon's stuff, I do like his vocals better overall. Brian's stuff hurts my throat just listening to it.

El Chuxter
04-03-2007, 05:58 PM
Yeah, that's not a bad live set, but Brian isn't at the top of his game on that one.

Check out Back in Black and let me know what you think then. :mabs:

Mr. JabbaJohnL
04-03-2007, 06:08 PM
I also have Back in Black (pretty much the only other album of theirs that I have, in addition to the songs Dirty Deeds Done Dirt Cheap and Big Balls). I haven't listened to it since last summer but I do remember it being pretty good. Not really enough to warrant calling them one of my "favorite bands," though. From what I recall, most of the songs sound alike, but I'll likely give it a re-listen within the next few days.

El Chuxter
04-03-2007, 06:20 PM
Even so, if all the songs sound alike, but they all sound like "You Shook Me All Night Long," that isn't necessarily a bad thing.

High Voltage is a really good Bon Scott AC/DC album, and includes the only heavy metal bagpipe solo that I'm aware of.

Mad Slanted Powers
04-03-2007, 08:16 PM
Even so, if all the songs sound alike, but they all sound like "You Shook Me All Night Long," that isn't necessarily a bad thing.I'd rather they all sounded like "Let There Be Rock".


High Voltage is a really good Bon Scott AC/DC album, and includes the only heavy metal bagpipe solo that I'm aware of.Yes, "It's a Long Way to the Top if You Wanna Rock and Roll", is an excellent tune.

This was part of the review of the Live album on allmusic.com


By and large, AC/DC on a bad night are still usually better than most bands on a good one, but Live feels more like a greatest-hits album with crowd noise than a true live album. Still, a better buy than the edited, single-disc version.

2-1B
04-04-2007, 06:57 AM
AC/DC is one of my favorite bands. I like that Live album for the alternate lyrics they use on The Jack.

Mad Slanted Powers
04-06-2007, 12:27 AM
I think I posted this in another thread. This was in the liner notes for the remastered version of Let There Be Rock:
Angus set the tone and led the sessions by example during the recording of the rock 'n' roll history lesson that is the album's title track. His amplifier caught fire midway through but under frantic instructions from George he continued playing. By song's end the amp head was a smoldering puddle of wiring and valves and Angus' guitar had absorbed part of his tiny body weight in sweat.

That's what rock and roll is all about. However, if you want to go in a different direction, listen to Mark Kozelek's What's Next To The Moon. An entire album of AC/DC covers that aren't recognizable as AC/DC songs. I heard one of the songs while listening to Indie Pop Rocks on somafm.com. I think it was "Riff Raff." Something seemed familiar about it, but then I heard the chorus and realized what I was listening to. Pretty much slow acoustic folksy bluesy tunes.

Mad Slanted Powers
04-09-2007, 08:28 PM
Well, next up is Alice in Chains. Not Allison Chains, Alice in Chains.

I recall hearing "Man in the Box" on the radio when it was new. Then I saw the video on MTV and thought it was kind of cool that a Seattle band was getting some national exposure. This was all a year before Nirvana's breakthrough.

Early 1992 brought their Sap EP and I recall hearing some of the songs on the radio. These songs were more acoustic, and they had a little help from some friends. "Brother" and "Am I Inside" had Ann Wilson providing some backing vocals. "Right Turn" is listed as being performed by Alice Mudgarden, since Mark Arm of Mudhoney and Chris Cornell of Soundgarden provided some vocals.

Later in 1992, Dirt was released. That means I'm older than Dirt. :D Several good tunes on there, but half of them were about being a junkie.

Early 1994 brought Jar of Flies, another EP that was more acoustic than their heavier full length releases. It's been a while since I listened to this one. That was also the last AIC release I bought (though I may have actually purchased their first release, Facelift, after that). I didn't really keep up with them after that. I recall hearing the Unplugged version of "Over Now" on the radio, so I totally missed their self-titled album that came out before that.

Alice in Chains was lumped in with the Seattle grunge scene, but they, along with Soundgarden, seemed to fit more of a heavy metal style, whereas Nirvana was closer to punk. So, AIC = grungy metal, Nirvana = grungy punk.

2-1B
04-09-2007, 08:44 PM
I liked Dirt and Jar of Flies, I had them both back in the day.

Them Bones was a good jam

Mad Slanted Powers
04-15-2007, 12:03 AM
Well, to wrap up Alice in Chains, here are my favorite tunes:

Facelift - "We Die Young", "Man in the Box", "Sea of Sorrow", "Bleed the Freak", and "It Ain't Like That". "It Ain't Like That" was one of the songs they performed in the movie Singles.

Sap - "Brother", "Got Me Wrong", "Right Turn", and "Am I Inside", which is the entire EP except for an odd track at the end.

Dirt - "Down in a Hole" is my favorite. "Rain When I Die" and "Rooster" are also very good.

Next up is Tori Amos. I think I first heard her in August of 1992. I was visiting my sister, who lived in Omaha at the time. I was in a record store and I realized that this song that I was hearing was Nirvana's "Smells Like Teen Spirit" being performed by a woman and her piano. There was also a cover of The Rolling Stones' "Angie" and Led Zeppelin's "Thank You". I didn't know who it was until much later. Later that year or early in 1993, a college roommate bought the "Winter" EP, so that was when I first heard her name. I don't know when I realized she was the one that did the Nirvana cover.

Early 1994 saw the release of Under the Pink. I recall the video for "God", and I think I saw "Crucify" on an episode of Beavis & Butt-Head. Shortly thereafter, I purchased Under the Pink. I didn't remember which song I had seen on Beavis & Butt-Head, so it was much later that I realized that it was "Crucify" and that it was from her previous album, Little Earthquakes.

I eventually would get all of her albums up through Scarlet's Walk, but did not get her last one, The Beekeeper (or as I like to say, The Beak Eeper). However, I usually was a bit behind on getting the CDs. I think I got Boys For Pele when it was fairly new. I remember hearing the song "Caught A Light Sneeze" on the radio, and I saw her perform it on SNL. From The Choirgirl Hotel was one I got by forgetting to respond to my Columbia House mailing. I didn't mind though, since it was Tori Amos. I didn't get into that album as much at the time, but it does have some good tunes on it.

She has a new album due out May 1. The song "Big Wheel" is available on iTunes now. I heard the whole song on her website, and it sounds pretty good. I'll have to give the rest of the album a sample when it is released. Maybe I'll get this one.

Mad Slanted Powers
04-19-2007, 09:56 PM
What? No love here for Myra Ellen?

There's another song available for preview on her site called "Bouncing off Clouds." I like the sound of it. There is also a clip for "Teenage Hustling" which sounds all right as well. Perhaps I will pick up American Doll Posse when it is released. The promo for it is kind of interesting. There are several different personas that she takes on, and there are blogs from each character scattered across the net. Each week, she introduces a new member of the posse on her website.

El Chuxter
04-20-2007, 12:48 AM
Yeesh, give everyone time. Nothing we do is good enough for you; should we crucify ourselves?

I had no idea who "Myra Ellen" was until I looked it up. I always thought her real name was Tori.

I really like most of her stuff, the more toned-down and confessional, the better. It always irks me when I see these "Best [number] Albums of [All Time/The 90s/The Last 20 Years]" and Little Earthquakes isn't on there. Damn, that album is great.

When she remixes stuff, or does techno, it's not nearly as interesting. I can't stand most of Strange Little Girls for this reason. It's impossible to hear what she did to, say, "Happiness Is a Warm Gun" and not think, "Man, this would be great if it were just her and a piano."

Despite my tastes for her lower-key stuff, both From the Choirgirl Hotel and The Beekeeper were excellent albums. You should really check out Beekeeper. Personally, it's my favorite since Under the Pink (though Boys for Pele grows on me every time I hear it).

A couple of months ago, I went in on a weekend to help my wife with schoolwork. Some of her yearbook students, all girls, were there, and I put in the Crucify single. Unanimously, they asked what the hell it was and said it sucked. My wife, who's not nearly as into music as I am, figured it was "That 90s chick who's a ripoff of Kate Bush" (as if--Kate only had one great song!).

I was dumbfounded. I mean, 18-ish nerdy girls who don't like Tori? What the hell is the world coming to?

And, for the record, most metalheads I've known love Tori, too, and not because of that infamous first album.

Mad Slanted Powers
04-20-2007, 02:02 AM
Yeesh, give everyone time. Nothing we do is good enough for you; should we crucify ourselves?Well, it had been five days and my heart was sick of being in chains. :)


I really like most of her stuff, the more toned-down and confessional, the better. It always irks me when I see these "Best [number] Albums of [All Time/The 90s/The Last 20 Years]" and Little Earthquakes isn't on there. Damn, that album is great.That's a good album and it did get a lot of praise, but I don't like it as much as Under the Pink. I like about every track on that one. From Little Earthquakes, I like "Winter", "Crucify", and "Precious Things" the best, and "Girl" and "Silent All These Years" are pretty good too.


When she remixes stuff, or does techno, it's not nearly as interesting. I can't stand most of Strange Little Girls for this reason. It's impossible to hear what she did to, say, "Happiness Is a Warm Gun" and not think, "Man, this would be great if it were just her and a piano."I didn't get into that album either. I do like the title track though.


Despite my tastes for her lower-key stuff, both From the Choirgirl Hotel and The Beekeeper were excellent albums. You should really check out Beekeeper. Personally, it's my favorite since Under the Pink (though Boys for Pele grows on me every time I hear it).From the Choirgirl Hotel I think was the one I got when I forgot to respond to the Columbia House mailing. I think at first I didn't get into it much either. Listening to tracks more recently, I realize I actually like quite a few. "Spark", "Cruel", "Raspberry Swirl", and "Black-Dove (January)" are my favorites. Boys for Pele has some good tunes as well, but there are a lot of tracks so I haven't listened to the whole thing in a long time. I'll have to listen closer to the clips on iTunes again to see about The Beekeeper. I'm definitely interested in getting the new album though.


My wife, who's not nearly as into music as I am, figured it was "That 90s chick who's a ripoff of Kate Bush" (as if--Kate only had one great song!).I never heard of Kate Bush until "Running Up That Hill". Later I learned that Pat Benatar's "Wuthering Heights" was a Kate Bush tune. I listened to a few clips recently of some other tunes.


And, for the record, most metalheads I've known love Tori, too, and not because of that infamous first album.I'd still be interesting in hearing Y Kant Tori Read.

El Chuxter
04-20-2007, 02:18 AM
I'd still be interesting in hearing Y Kant Tori Read.

I've been searching for a copy of it, or for the MP3's, for a long time. It'd be interesting to hear, but from the little they played on her Behind the Music special, definitely not worth what copies sell for. Even bootlegs of it sell for a pretty penny.

I'd actually be just as interested in hearing it to hear what Matt Sorum was up to prior to the Cult.

plasticfetish
04-21-2007, 01:34 AM
AC/DC = Great. Love AC/DC. They never get old. I have to say, I even like (and bought) that last album, Stiff Upper Lip.

Alice in Chains = No opinion. Just not my thing.

Tori Amos = No opinon. Same thing... not my thing.


That 90s chick who's a ripoff of Kate BushThat's a really funny observation. :)

Mad Slanted Powers
04-27-2007, 02:19 AM
Entertainment Weekly has reviewed Tori's new album and only gave it a C+.

Now I shall move on to the rest of the A's in my collection, since these are artists I only have one CD of each.

First is Aldo Nova's self-titled debut. Actually, I guess this should be filed under N, but I had him filed under A on my CD list. Anyway, I recall either my brother or sister playing this tape a lot when it was new. Of course, "Fantasy" was and still is a great track. I seem to recall my sister liking the ballad "Ball and Chain". Overall, a pretty decent album, though it sort of was the template for a lot of stuff that came later that didn't appeal to me as much. As the Allmusic.com review put it,
Aldo Nova doesn't get enough credit (some cynics would say blame) for helping invent the 1980s pop-metal genre, which focused equally on hard rocking anthems and soaring power ballads. Aldo Nova appeared in 1982 complete with irresistible melodies and choruses, explosive guitar licks, and huge-sounding drums. It was a full year or more before Def Leppard, Night Ranger, Bon Jovi, and others would latch on to this formula and rocket to stardom. Nova wrote, produced, arranged, and performed his double-platinum debut album by himself, except for drums and some bass guitar and piano parts..

American Analog Set - The Fun Of Watching Fireworks - Back in 2002, I upgraded to Mac OS X, and with it came iTunes. Before that, I hadn't listened to a lot of internet radio, but this made it a bit easier. Among some of the preset stations on iTunes was somafm.com's Indie Pop Rocks. Most of the bands I heard there were new to me, or if I was familiar with the name, I wasn't familiar with the music. I would hear a song, and then go look up the artist on allmusic.com. There are several CD's that I bought because I had heard them on Indie Pop Rocks. This was one of them, though it took me a while to get around to buying this one. The song I had heard on the station was "Gone To Earth". Allmusic.com's description of them is drone-pop. That seems like an accurate description.

Leah Andreone - Veiled - I bought this based on the single "It's All Right, It's OK". I guess I wasn't impressed with the rest of the album. I've not listened to it in a long time. Apparently she was on the inaugural Lilith Fair Tour, but she only put out one other album after that. She does have a newer EP on iTunes and some other places.

Angel City - Face To Face - This is an album that my brother had. This was an Australian band that was originally called The Angels. They were discovered by AC/DC in 1976 and later toured with them. They had to change their name to Angel City in the Northern Hemisphere to avoid confusion with another band. I believe that this album is actually an American release that compiled songs from prior releases, including a different Face to Face album with different tracks. I know I looked them up on Allmusic.com a few years ago and the track listing was totally different, and some of the songs that I remember were listed on other albums. Now Allmusic.com shows the track listing for this version, and I bought it a few months ago after noticing that. In 1990, I recall hearing a new song called "Dogs Are Talking", and they were being called the Angels again. Looking on Allmusic.com now, I see that they were actually being called "The Angels from Angel City", which confused things more. No matter, this version of Face to Face is still a great album. Great that I finally got it on CD. I hadn't listened to my taped copy in a long time.

A Produce - White Sands - An A Produce Anthology 1988-1994 - When I got into internet radio in 2002, another station I discovered was Astreaux World. It plays ambient, electronic, new age and space music. There were a couple songs from A Produce that I liked, and one of them, "This Heat", is on this disc.

El Chuxter
04-27-2007, 11:54 AM
Not familiar with the new stuff you listed, but I can count the number of times I've agreed with EW on one hand while making a fist.

Mad Slanted Powers
04-27-2007, 08:43 PM
Not familiar with the new stuff you listed, but I can count the number of times I've agreed with EW on one hand while making a fist.Sometimes I agree, sometimes I don't. It's the same with any critic. If I like the sound of something, that's all that matters.

Certainly you must have at least heard of Aldo Nova. After posting that, I was thinking of posting "Fantasy" in the most recognizable openings thread. I think my brother gave me the CD for Christmas one year. I also have his second LP Subject on vinyl, which was also a Christmas gift from my brother.

Mad Slanted Powers
05-05-2007, 07:50 PM
Here are some more A artists. These are songs I've purchased through iTunes. First up are a couple of early 80's hits


A Flock of Seagulls - "I Ran" & After The Fire - "Der Kommissar"
After The Fire was pretty much a one hit wonder with that song. Falco recorded a German version of it around the same time, a couple years before his more famous "Rock Me Amadeus". A Flock of Seagulls did a little better than just the one hit. "Space Age Love Song" and "Photograph" were also popular, but that was about it for them. Several years later when I was in college, they played a show at a local club. I didn't go, but they didn't get a good review in the college newspaper.

AFI - "Miss Murder" - I first heard of them when I heard "Silver and Cold". While I like that song, they are not really a band that I am into. However, I do like some of their singles, including this one from their latest album

Air - "Sexy Boy" & "Cherry Blossom Girl" - I heard "Sexy Boy" one day when the song was fairly new, so probably 1998 or 1999. I think I was in the truck listening to the college radio station while my mom was in the grocery store shopping. Years later when I move into my house, I hear "Cherry Blossom Girl" on the Music Choice Alternative station quite often. The vocals on both of these songs sound like a female voice, but I believe they are both just a guy's voice made to sound that way.

All - "Nobody's" - A college roommate had this on CD. I put it on a mix tape. Now I have a digital version.

Lily Allen - "Smile" (Radio Edit) - This was an iTunes single of the week. Not something I ordinarily listen to, but it was a catchy song and it was free.

Ambrosia - "Holdin' On to Yesterday" - Soft rock hit of the 70's. I first heard of this band when they had a couple hits from their album One Eighty. A friend of mine liked it and had the album. Didn't really interest me much, but "Biggest Part of Me" was a decent song. Years later, I hear "Holdin' On to Yesterday" used in an episode of Touched By An Angel. The song was familiar, but I didn't realize it was Ambrosia until I looked it up. Now that I have iTunes, I've been going through and picking a couple songs from each year, and eventually when I have enough songs, I be able to burn a disc for each year.

James Asher - "Earth Song" - Another song I heard on the ambient station Astreaux World. I very pleasant, relaxing tune.

At the Drive-In - "One Armed Scissor" - I had heard people in AOL chatrooms talking about At the Drive-In and Mars Volta, a band formed by former members of ATDI. However, I wasn't familiar with their music. One day, I hear this song on Music Choice Alternative, and I thought it rocked. I later saw a video on Comcast On-Demand, which mostly featured the band performing. They performance style certainly matched the music. High energy and chaotic.

El Chuxter
05-10-2007, 04:50 PM
No Argent? America? The Allmans?

Mad Slanted Powers
05-10-2007, 08:04 PM
Not really a fan of the Allmans. I've often considered getting America's greatest hits, but have yet to do it. Argent's "Hold Your Head Up" is in my iTunes shopping cart, so next time I buy some tunes, it will be one of the songs I buy.

Mad Slanted Powers
05-27-2007, 08:58 PM
Well, I was away for a week. Time to move onto the B's. First up is The B-52's.

Their second album, Wild Planet, was one of the first albums my brother bought. I had never heard of them. I'm not sure where he had heard of them. Still, it was a cool album. Kind of odd, but a great album. I still enjoy it quite a bit.

It was years later before I heard anything else by them. Eventually I heard stuff from their first album, like "Rock Lobster", "52 Girls" and "Dance This Mess Around". Eventually, my brother had that on CD, and now I have both their debut and Wild Planet on CD as well.

About the time Cosmic Thing was released, I recall hearing a profile on the group on Brave New Waves. This is a late night radio program on CBC radio. They always play the alternative and underground stuff. I guess B-52's qualified at the time since this was before the album became a mainstream hit. Next thing I know, "Love Shack" and "Roam" are all over the radio. There were some good tunes on that album, but it didn't appeal to me as much as the sound of their first two. Something about the sound of the guitar.

I like the following lines from the first song on their debut, "Planet Claire".

Planet Claire has pink air
All the trees are red
No one ever dies there
No one has a head

JON9000
06-05-2007, 04:22 PM
"Love Shack". Now there's a thread killer. I detest Love Shack. I do not know why, except perhaps that it gets completely stuck in my head and sets up shop for days on end. I cannot tell if it is deliberately trying for kitsch or being sincere because the vocal tracks are so exhuberant.

Mad Slanted Powers
06-05-2007, 08:22 PM
"Love Shack". Now there's a thread killer. I detest Love Shack. I do not know why, except perhaps that it gets completely stuck in my head and sets up shop for days on end. I cannot tell if it is deliberately trying for kitsch or being sincere because the vocal tracks are so exhuberant.The B-52's whole thing was all about kitsch. This is part of the review of their debut album on Allmusic.com

Even in the weird, quirky world of new wave and post-punk in the late '70s, the B-52's' eponymous debut stood out as an original. Unabashed kitsch mavens at a time when their peers were either vulgar or stylish, the Athens quintet celebrated all the silliest aspects of pre-Beatles pop culture -- bad hairdos, sci-fi nightmares, dance crazes, pastels, and anything else that sprung into their minds -- to a skewed fusion of pop, surf, avant-garde, amateurish punk, and white funk. On paper, it sounds like a cerebral exercise, but it played like a party. The jerky, angular funk was irresistibly danceable, winning over listeners dubious of Kate Pierson and Cindy Wilson's high-pitched, shrill close harmonies and Fred Schneider's campy, flamboyant vocalizing, pitched halfway between singing and speaking.

My favorite songs from that album were "Planet Claire", "52 Girls", "Rock Lobster" and "Dance This Mess Around". My favorites from Wild Planet are "Private Idaho", "Running Around" and "Dirty Back Road".

JON9000
06-07-2007, 03:05 PM
I will give them credit for having a unique sound, which in this day and age is hard to come by.

Mad Slanted Powers
06-07-2007, 10:18 PM
When I was in college at Western Washington University, they had this thing in the Spring called "Western Jam". It was sort of an "air band"/lip synch contest. My roommate and some others represented our dorm in the competition, and they did "Love Shack". My roommate knew how to play drums, so he looked convincing. However, as it turned out, it wasn't an airband or lip synch contest. It became a dance contest. The winners I think were a group from off campus that were probably cheerleaders, and they performed a dance routine to that "Gonna Make You Sweat (Everybody Dance Now)" song by C & C Music Factory. I was so sick of that song. I guess the dance routine was probably well choreographed and took some talent, but it didn't seem to be what I thought the event was supposed to be.

So, next on the list is Bachman-Turner Overdrive. One of the defining bands of my youth in the 70's. My oldest brother was into them, so I recall hearing them a lot. I think it was 1978, I got to choose a couple of tapes to get from Columbia House, and I got E.L.O's Out of the Blue and [The Best of B.T.O. (So Far)[/i] Not long ago, I finally got an updated version of that on CD.

For a while, Randy Bachman had a large house in the north part of the county just this side of the Canadian border. At one point after he sold it, I think it was a rehab center for a while. Not sure who has it now though. A couple years ago, I think I saw a check from a company of his come through where I work. I can't recall exactly what it was called, but it had his name in it.

Mad Slanted Powers
07-01-2007, 01:58 AM
Moving on from B.T.O, next is the Beastie Boys. If I recall correctly, I think I first heard them when "Fight For Your Right To Party" was played on a "Metal Shop" program late one night. I think it was probably the Canadian station CFOX, which led me to think that they were saying B.C. Boys instead of Beastie Boys. I eventually heard the song again and got the name right. My brother even got the album eventually, but I don't think he cared for it as he only bought it for that song.

In college, a roommate my sophomore year had Paul's Boutique, which was quite different from Licensed to Ill. I didn't really follow them too close after that, but I recall a teammate on the cross country team having Check Your Head. I recall seeing them perform "Sure Shot" and "Heart Attack Man" on SNL. "Sabotage" was a great song as well. Beavis & Butt-Head had some good commentary on that video. Even better was when they were talking about "So What'cha Want". I think they said something about how it would be cool to jump around in the forest like they were in the video.

I only have Paul's Boutique and Ill Communication on CD. I made a tape of Licensed to Ill from my brother's copy of the LP, but it's been a long time since I listened to it. Paul's Boutique would be difficult to make these days, what with all the samples they used. http://paulsboutique.info has a pretty extensive list of the samples used and references made in the lyrics.

Mad Slanted Powers
07-22-2007, 05:35 PM
Well, next on the list is the Beatles. What's to say about them that hasn't already been said? I guess I'll just relate what I can remember of learning about them.

I suppose I was familiar with some of their work when I was a child, but I probably only heard the early stuff. In the late 70's I recall seeing a couple things on TV. One was a history of rock documentary which might have been The Heroes of Rock and Roll (http://imdb.com/title/tt0248084/). The other might have been the movie The Birth of the Beatles (http://imdb.com/title/tt0078865/). I recall my brother had a tape with the Beatles and Steppenwolf on it. However, I think this may have been a tape my sister made. I don't think he really liked the Beatles, and he recorded over it.

Over the years, I gradually learned more about them. A college roommate was a big fan of both The Beatles and Rolling Stones and had just about everything both as a group and solo. It was finally just a few years ago when I got the Red and Blue compilations 1962-1966 and 1967-1970. I recall seeing those in stores in the late 70's/early 80's when they were on vinyl.

I doubt we'll ever see a band have the kind of impact they had. At one point, they had the top five songs on the Billboard charts. The Monkees were an attempt to create A Hard Day's Night on American TV. A lot of people were inspired to start a band because of them. Their experimentation in the latter half of the 60's showed that a band didn't have to follow the same formula all the time.

Sometimes I think I am "The Fool on the Hill", or the "Nowhere Man", and I wonder if I'll end up like a character in "Eleanor Rigby".

Blue2th
07-22-2007, 07:13 PM
I remember always liking the Beatles from even an early age. Though I think
I always liked the later stuff from the White album on. They were expanding their minds then, and you could tell by the music. Though they alway had a commercial single on every album no matter how left-field they went.

I love to se the Birth of the Beatles, where when they are interviewed, they can finish each others sentences, and are so in snyc with each other.

I recently gained a new appreciation of their music by learning a few of their songs for a Beatles tribute set. Even the early ones can be more challenging than one might think.

The more you listen to the Beatles, the more you catch their riffs in other famous musicians songs. That's not necessarily a bad thing, but you realize what an influnce they had on other song writers.

On a side note, the singer in my band collects Beatles stuff. He has these 12 inch Hamilton Beatles figures in their early Grey suits. Whith their instuments on stage. It is really nice, and being an action-figure collector already I covet them. One of these days I will buy a set on eBay even though a set is quite pricey.

Hey I just realized that I became a "Dark Master" with this post. hmmm

Mad Slanted Powers
08-12-2007, 06:36 PM
One other thing about that Beatles movie I referenced above - It was directed by Richard Marquand, director of Return of the Jedi.

On to some more music.

Beck - Odelay - It has been a while since I have listened to the whole thing. I know I like "Where It's At", "Devil's Haircut", "The New Pollution" and "Novacane". I don't remember the rest of the songs. Some of his newer stuff is pretty good, but I didn't want to get the whole album. So I also have the following songs that I bought from iTunes:

"Loser" from Mellow Gold
"E-Pro" from Guero
"Heaven Hammer" from Guerolito, which is a remix of the song "Missing" from Guero.

I was familiar with "Loser" when it was new. I think it was near the end of my last year of college. When I heard the name Beck, I was thinking Jeff Beck. Not knowing what Jeff Beck looked like, I wasn't sure if it was him, but he did seem too young to be the same person. The latter two songs I heard a lot on Music Choice when they were new a couple years ago. "Nausea" and "I Think I'm In Love" are on my list of songs to get.

His most recent performance on SNL was pretty cool. They had marionettes off to the side some place that were emulating what the band was doing on stage.

El Chuxter
08-12-2007, 07:11 PM
Beck is very hit-and-miss. Sea Change is the only album I have by him that's good from start to finish, though I hear Mutations is supposed to be just as good.

I'm not sure if they're on iTunes, but "Rowboat" and "A**hole" (later covered by Johnny Cash and Tom Petty, respectively) are worth tracking down. (The covers are better, though.)

Mad Slanted Powers
08-12-2007, 07:47 PM
It seems as if what I heard of Seachange didn't interest me. I think that was just whatever he performed from it on SNL, though. I'll have to check the samples on iTunes sometime.

El Chuxter
08-12-2007, 08:23 PM
"Lost Cause" is pretty indicative of the album. It's possibly my favorite Beck song ever.

Kidhuman
08-12-2007, 08:35 PM
ple of other good songs by Beck is Tropicalia and Jacka55(which is set to Its all over now Baby Blue by Van Morrison)

El Chuxter
08-12-2007, 09:03 PM
(which is set to Its all over now Baby Blue by Van Morrison)

Is that like "It's All Over Now Baby Blue" by Dylan? :p

Mad Slanted Powers
08-12-2007, 11:17 PM
"Lost Cause" is pretty indicative of the album. It's possibly my favorite Beck song ever.

Just listened to the clips. The first two tracks, "The Golden Age" and "Paper Tiger" sound all right. Most of the rest didn't seem to be my thing.

It's possible the SNL appearance I am recalling could have been songs from Mutations. The tracks he performed from that album don't seem to appeal to me either, but I think it was Seachange because I recall the songs sounding kind of country. "Lost Cause" and "Guess I'm Doing Fine" have a bit of that feel.

The iTunes review of Seachange makes a comparison to Mark Kozelek of Red House Painters. You should check out his solo album of AC/DC covers, What's Next To The Moon. They are almost unrecognizable until you realize you recognize the lyrics and wonder where you heard them before.

figrin bran
08-13-2007, 02:03 AM
Golden Age is the only Beck song I like.

Kidhuman
08-13-2007, 07:32 AM
Is that like "It's All Over Now Baby Blue" by Dylan? :p

Yes, but he usues the ruffs from Morrison's version as the music.

Mad Slanted Powers
08-31-2007, 01:51 AM
I guess it's time for another entry, Pat Benatar. Her first two albums were among the first albums my brother had circa 1980.

In the Heat of the Night was her debut. Most of the songs are written by others, including the powerful opening track "Heartbreaker" (not the Rolling Stones or Led Zeppelin songs). The next song is John Cougar Mellencamp's "I Need A Lover". This was before he was famous. I have heard his version and I don't think I like it as well, but Pat's version is not one of my favorites on this album. Mike Chapman was one of the producers on the album, so that is probably why there are three Chapman/Chinn tunes, including "No You Don't", which had been previously done by the band Sweet. There was also a cover of the Alan Parsons song "Don't Let It Show", and cover of Nick Gilder's "Rated X". Pat co-wrote "My Clone Sleeps Alone" and "So Sincere" with the bassist, and her guitarist and eventual husband Neil Geraldo wrote "We Live For Love". Overall, a great album that takes me back to that time.


Crimes of Passion was her second album. This time, she co-wrote four songs and two others were also written by other band members. Among the material written by others was a cover of Kate Bush's "Wuthering Heights" and the Young Rascal's "You Better Run". Her big hit "Hit Me With Your Best Shot" was written by Eddie Schwartz.

She had some other hits after that such as "Fire and Ice", "Love is a Battlefield" and "We Belong", but I didn't really get into it as much. Partly because I didn't get the repeated listening I had with the first two albums. I know my brother had the Get Nervous album, but my initial impression of it wasn't that great so I didn't listen to it again. Still, she was a talented singer. She was also one of the early stars of MTV. When VH1 Classic showed the first day of MTV for it's 25th anniversary, her videos were in heavy rotation.

Blue2th
08-31-2007, 04:34 AM
I always thought "Hit me with your best shot" was kinda funny because of the words "real tough cookie" and "put another notch in my lipstick case"
So a guy named Eddie Schwartz wrote it. Hmm. I did not know that.
Alot of girls liked Pat Benatar's tough but feminine attitude.
I hadn't listened to her debut album, else I would have caught that "No you don't" song by Sweet.
Sweet "Desolation Boulevard" is one of my favorite albums of all time. Every song kicks butt on it. Way ahead of it's time.

Mad Slanted Powers
09-18-2007, 02:16 AM
Well, since you mentioned Sweet, I'll talk about them now. I recall hearing "Ballroom Blitz" on the radio back around 1975 and I really liked that song. I also recall my oldest brother having a Sweet album that had "Little Willy", "Wig-Wam Bam" and "Blockbuster". It must have been this one (http://www.amazon.com/Sweet/dp/B00000HZTE/ref=m_art_pr_16/002-3515706-1075244) because I recall that the cover reminded me a bit of a Hershey wrapper. Funny how sometimes they were called "The Sweet" and other times just "Sweet".

The band and those songs kind of disappeared from my radar for a few years. Then I recall one year when traveling to Seattle to pick up my dad from the airport. My mom and I would go down early to avoid traffic, and would stop at one of the malls down there before heading to the airport. We didn't have a big mall in Bellingham at the time so it was kind of cool to go into Waldenbooks and Musicland. I was in Musicland when I heard them playing the Krokus version of "Ballroom Blitz" and it brought back memories of the Sweet version. My brother eventually got that album. It also renewed my interest in Sweet. A couple years later, I bought Desolation Boulevard on vinyl while on our cross country team's annual trip to Vancouver, B.C. Great album. Years later I would eventually get The Best of Sweet on CD.

plasticfetish
09-18-2007, 05:51 AM
Years later I would eventually get The Best of Sweet on CD.I think I have that CD around some place. Hmmm... time to burn it into iTunes. :thumbsup:

(They were "The Sweet" on older albums. Early '70s late '60s stuff.)


which is set to Its all over now, Baby Blue by Van MorrisonActually "Them" on the "Them Again" album... but same thing. (Love that version BTW.) It's also on the Basquiat soundtrack. ;)

Blue2th
09-18-2007, 09:20 AM
I don't know, when my ex and I split up, unbeknownst to me she took Desolation Blvd. and left Best of Sweet. I was totally bummed out when finding this out a few years later. Best of Sweet is what it is, but it's the b-sides that really make Desolation Blvd. rock.
"Set me free" is like a heavy metal tune way before HM was common. Later covered by Dime-Bag Darrell and Co.
"I want to be commited" is my favorite.
I still like "Fox on the run" though not a b-side.

I don't know who in the band is singing that ultra-high, ball-squeezing harmony -background vocals, but it is one of the highest male vocals I've ever heard to this day.

Wasn't "Ballroom Blitz" covered by Shondra in Wayne's World II? :rolleyes:

Mad Slanted Powers
09-18-2007, 09:42 AM
Tia Carrere performed it on the first Wayne's World soundtrack. Been a long time since I've seen the movie, and I never saw the sequel.

El Chuxter
09-18-2007, 12:23 PM
The sequel is actually not bad. There's a Village People spoof worth the price of admission.

plasticfetish
09-18-2007, 04:12 PM
Best of Sweet is what it is, but it's the b-sides that really make Desolation Blvd. rock.There's always something to be said for owning the original album vs. a "best of" disk.

Hmmm... now I'm wishing I hadn't just used my download allowance (oh yeah! I had to set a monthly limit for myself) on something else. :yes:

Mad Slanted Powers
10-07-2007, 01:17 AM
Well, time for another artist, or perhaps more than one. A few "B" artists in my collection have a connection.

Belly was a band formed by Tonya Donelly. She had been in the Throwing Muses, but left the band. One of my college roommates my first year of grad school had Belly's debut album Star. I enjoyed the songs "Angel", "Dusted", "Slow Dog", "Gepetto" and "Feed the Tree". I recall seeing at least one of their videos on MTV at the time. Their second album was one I never heard and it didn't do well. The band broke up after that.

Another band that Tonya Donelly was in before forming Belly was The Breeders. This was a group she formed with Kim Deal of the Pixies. She only appeared on the first album Pod. The same college roommate had this album, but I don't remember much about it. I don't think I liked it at the time. She was not on the second album Last Splash. Perhaps my memory is failing me because I thought I recall hearing something from this album that same school year while living with that roommate, but Allmusic.com says it the album was released in August. I suppose the singles could have been out and getting airplay on MTV, but maybe I was elsewhere when I saw them.

The final artist in this equation is Frank Black, who was in the Pixies with Kim Deal. At that time, he went by Black Francis. His actual name is Charles Thompson (Charles Michael Kittridge Thompson IV to be exact, according to wiki). I'll talk more about his work and the Pixies in another post.

JON9000
10-12-2007, 06:43 AM
Ugh, early-nineties "alternative" music. So "authentic". I was the only person who recognized instantly that the Spin Doctors were crap. Chick rockers from that era (Belly, Liz Phair, Veruca Salt) were almost universally devoid of talent, although I did have a soft spot for some of the Breeders' stuff.

El Chuxter
10-12-2007, 12:04 PM
The Spin Doctors were not crap.

Guitarist Eric Schenkman had all the talent and took it with him when he left, is all.

MSP, have you heard Belly's take on "Are You Experienced" from the Stone Free tribute album? (Remember the days when every week meant a new tribute album?)

Blue2th
10-12-2007, 12:26 PM
The Spin Doctors guitarist was pretty good.

Alot of the "Alternative" that came out during that time was crap. Though some of it was really good.
Some good bands like The Grays, DaDa, Jellyfish, etc. didn't get a whole lot of airplay.

I think the potency of the Heroin or the lack there of at the time had alot to do with the suckiness of some Alternative and Grunge bands.

Mad Slanted Powers
10-12-2007, 08:53 PM
The Spin Doctors were not crap.

Guitarist Eric Schenkman had all the talent and took it with him when he left, is all.I liked the three hits that I recall, "Two Princes", "Little Miss Can't Be Wrong" and "Jimmy Olsen's Blues".


MSP, have you heard Belly's take on "Are You Experienced" from the Stone Free tribute album? (Remember the days when every week meant a new tribute album?)I just looked it up on allmusic.com and heard a clip. It sounded all right. Spin Doctors have a song on there too. The allmusic review isn't very long, but it mentions Belly's contribution as being surprisingly good. It also says most of the album is cringe-inducing, specifically mentioning the Spin Doctors.


Ugh, early-nineties "alternative" music. So "authentic". I was the only person who recognized instantly that the Spin Doctors were crap. Chick rockers from that era (Belly, Liz Phair, Veruca Salt) were almost universally devoid of talent, although I did have a soft spot for some of the Breeders' stuff.That was a good time for me. I was in college here in NW Washington at the time, the whole Nirvana/grunge/alternative thing was big, so it was kind of cool to have the spotlight on Seattle. I saw many shows on campus or in the local bars. Some friends of mine started a band and I enjoyed listening to their stuff. As far as talent goes, I quote the song "Get Up and Go" by the Teen Idles, the first release on Dischord Records.

You keep talking about talent
Talent? What do you know?
Instead of studying theory
We're going to get up and go

That's what rock, especially punk rock, is all about. Just doing it. Maybe that's why Nike tried to use a Minor Threat album cover in an ad. Pick up a guitar, start a band, play a show. If no one wants to release your record, start your own label.