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Tycho
04-18-2007, 09:32 PM
Does everyone you know collect Star Wars memorobilia? Does the large majority of women you know collect it?

Most likely you would answer "no." Sure we have over 100 of us regulars on this site and perhaps many more. But in every day life, do you feel misunderstood and into something that's "underground" for your age group?

Granted that some of you live near fellow SSGrs or you've invited your personal friends in real life onto the boards. Others of you, like myself, live close to nearly no one from this site.

So does one or more of your interests / hobbies isolate you or alienate you at least in that regard from the rest of society?

Do you prefer it that way (versus even more people standing outside Target in the morning)?

But is it difficult to explain yourself to others who are not into it as many of us on these boards are?

What else makes you comfortable or uncomfortable with being different? Do you wish society was different in that regard? Has your attitude changed over the years?

(I lived in the dorms when in 1995 I bought my first POTF2 Millennium Falcon. I had a single-room and thus others who didn't know me well, didn't know I had a spaceship in my dorm room. But at the time, I felt compelled to sneak it in out of my truck at 2am in the morning so as to not be too noticeable carrying a child's toy around with me or needing to make up excuses like "it's a present for someone else." Since then, I've beome much more comfortable (completley comfortable) with living in a Star Wars museum. But hey, that's part of growing up and developing your identity. As a Star Wars collector, I am no longer concerned if it is within the norm in society. However, I point out that it is a genre that glorified fictional violence.)

What is your opinion?

JetsAndHeels
04-18-2007, 09:40 PM
Anyone who knows me personally knows my interests. These are not just limited to Star Wars but to Superman, sports, collecting, etc. I never hide who I am...and for those who do not like or accept my interests, I really could not care any less. This goes for any males or females I know.
I think my interests can isolate me, but they also help me connect with others. When I am in a group of people who do not share the same interests, I am not going to discuss the latest wave of figures or what happened on Smallville the previous night. They aren't interested in it, so we have nothing to discuss. At the same time those who do share my interests will find I love to talk about these things and I am more than willing to talk about them to whoever that may be (I have found sports are the best way for me to spark up conversations with people I don't really know).
I am comfortable with what I love, who I am, and what I enjoy. Honestly I do not pay attention to how others see it because I do my own thing, so its not an issue.

Jargo
04-18-2007, 10:03 PM
I don't want to but feel compelled to wonder why on earth you didn't just leave the thing in your room and say it was a bit of nostalgia coolness that reminded you of your childhood. rather than behave like a freak with a dirty habit.


frankly i do what i want and don't give a flying fudge what anyone thinks. It's my money to spend how I see fit and it's my home (wherever I live) to suround myself with whatever I see fit to. If people sneer that's their problem for being so narrow minded. at least i have something to show for my money rather than going out every week getting blind drunk and having nothing but vomit and embarrassing infections in places you don't ever want them to remind me where the money went.

the only discomfort comes from being in a store and being stared at by security simply because you have a cropped hair style and stubble and you're in the toy aisles quite often. but too much of that and i simply stop shopping at the store for a while and spend my money in other stores. it's their loss not mine.

I have more money than I used to so I go after things I would have passed on a few years back. I save more and then splurge. buy a lot of product in one go and I'm not concerned about cost so much. I don't hoarde stuff I have no need of anymore. I give things away to kids who will appreciate it all. or charity stores. I've brought my partner round to an understanding of the toy industry and the nature of collecting. we're cool now. my collecting is more focused and selective. I've found someone else to share my joy of plastic effigies with, separate from my partner. we collect parts of different lines and buy stuff for each other when we see it. it's all kinda grown up and balanced. he's a Trek fan so I bought him the whole DS9 crew. he buys me Family Guy. We share a complete collection of Invader Zim.

but I still don't give two hoots what people think of my plastic trophies. it's my thing. I get enjoyment from it all. I'll be damned if anyone elses opinion is going to spoil it or take that away from me.

and to be honest because i have no shame about the toys or collecting any visitors who see it all get enjoyment from it too. my lodger has placed Lollipops in the hands of my LOTR figures instead of weapons. it's cool and funny. it got him involved in a small way. that's good. it was healthy. if peple want to pick toys up and play with them that's cool too. it's only plastic. cheap mass produced stuff. if one gets damaged or lost I buy another. no big deal. and none of it is hidden away. it's all down in the main room people congregate in. where we all eat. where you have to walk past to get to the downstairs lavatory. everyone sees it and gets used to the hge shelving unit covered in toys. everyone has their favourite shelf. or figure. I don't make a big deal of it so no-one else does. I don't have to justify it all to anyone so i don't. it all just exists in my house as part of the ambience. relaxed and comfortable and homely.

it all cool bro.

2-1B
04-18-2007, 10:21 PM
JimJam and I are flatmates but he doesn't collect and I don't collect much anymore myself.

At home I have a few items in my room, including Vader and Bossk mini Busts as well as a few framed Star Wars mini-posters but nothing too overboard. I also have a framed 8x10 of 2-1B.

At work I have a Chewie BustUp and Anakin ROTS Titanium at my desk but that's about it.

Other than that, all of my stuff is in storage right now. :(

Rocketboy
04-18-2007, 10:54 PM
I really don't give a flying f*ck what most anyone thinks about me, what I do, or what I enjoy.
If they don't like one of the above then it's their problem, not mine.

Tycho
04-18-2007, 11:01 PM
When I am in a group of people who do not share the same interests, I am not going to discuss the latest wave of figures or what happened on Smallville the previous night. They aren't interested in it, so we have nothing to discuss.

This is alienation. I've experienced it. It might be better described as indifference to either JetsAndHeels or myself, when we don't really care that much, but the point is it isn't "fellowship."


(I have found sports are the best way for me to spark up conversations with people I don't really know).

That's one outlet I do not have. Steretypical of nerds (I think) I do not know much about sports teams / players / standings. I played baseball for 10 years through getting my Varsity letter, but when I wasn't on the field, I watched Star Trek on TV versus the occasional live game I'd go to, the rare moment when I did watch the game on TV (usually with my grandpa), and when I scouted out other teams my own team expected to play (other high schools, Little League Teams, etc.)

I wasn't a fan who knew a favored pitcher's ERA or who memorized a professional team's lineup. The same goes for NFL, though I enjoy watching football games more than baseball, but felt I was too small to play in high school. But guys like Phillip Rivers became obvious to me from watching my hometown team last season, so I began to like him, as I liked John Elway back in the day. (not to turn this into a sports thread)


I am comfortable with what I love, who I am, and what I enjoy. Honestly I do not pay attention to how others see it because I do my own thing, so its not an issue.

I've changed a lot to become that way. I don't think when I was a teenager I was as comfortable at all.


I don't want to but feel compelled to wonder why on earth you didn't just leave the thing in your room and say it was a bit of nostalgia coolness that reminded you of your childhood. rather than behave like a freak with a dirty habit.

It felt like a dirty habit because it was unconventional to probably almost everyone in my dorm. See, that won't apply to the people on this website. But I was away at school when this SW thing re-started and I did not have another home (I was determined to never go back and live with my parents when they were alive. We had a dysfunctional family, to be sure.) I think you misunderstood me - I did leave the Falcon in my room - I just brought it in at 2am so almost no one would see me doing it. Back to Star Wars being my "dirty habit."


frankly i do what i want and don't give a flying fudge what anyone thinks. It's my money to spend how I see fit and it's my home (wherever I live) to suround myself with whatever I see fit to. If people sneer that's their problem for being so narrow minded. at least i have something to show for my money rather than going out every week getting blind drunk and having nothing but vomit and embarrassing infections in places you don't ever want them to remind me where the money went.

I totally agree with you and would have written exactly what you did. Well said! :thumbsup:


the only discomfort comes from being in a store and being stared at by security

For me that is when I walk in and then walk out without buying anything. Do they think I shoplifted? I'm simply noticeable when at 8am I'm the first and possibly only customer coming in, after having so anxiously waited outside the doors for them to open. Then I leave empty handed. I wonder if they wonder why? I bring a list for everyday items when I have some I need to purchase, like bread or juice or whatever. But that is not every day I need something, but you all know the nature of the hobby - every day you have to check to see if they stocked anything.


I don't hoarde stuff

I might. I haven't found Wave 2 yet. If I do, I want 6 Death Star Troopers. If I see that many and no one else there wants them as I'm shopping, darn right I'm buying all of them so I can sleep in the next morning and every morning after that until Wave 3.

Today the Galactic Heroes (new ones) hit and I called Darren on the phone. He and my buddy James wanted them, so I walked out with an armful of nearly everything they had on the racks, getting 3 complete sets, or 12 two-packs. I certainly looked as if I was set to become the king of eBay, but that is not the case. On Saturday, I'm meeting Darren and James and unloading 2 complete sets for cost. It is one less collection my friends will not have to worry about getting. I just wish they'll come up with wave 2 or some v-wings for me.


I've found someone else to share my joy of plastic effigies with, separate from my partner.

That's important. Very often significant others may not understand. Who said they have to? They obviously still like you for who you are - and they're perfect because you can live with them and they won't take your stormtroopers! ;)


but I still don't give two hoots what people think of my plastic trophies. it's my thing. I get enjoyment from it all. I'll be damned if anyone elses opinion is going to spoil it or take that away from me.

We're both older now and more comfortable with ourselves. Do you think the younger an alienated person is, the more severe their distance from reality can get with the situation?

figrin bran
04-18-2007, 11:22 PM
i don't really care either what any males or females i know might think of my interests. i'm sure it works the other way as well as there are plenty of things that interest my friends but not me.

however, i do have the great male equalizer that is sports

decadentdave
04-19-2007, 04:26 AM
Does everyone you know collect Star Wars memorobilia? Does the large majority of women you know collect it?

Most likely you would answer "no." Sure we have over 100 of us regulars on this site and perhaps many more. But in every day life, do you feel misunderstood and into something that's "underground" for your age group?

Granted that some of you live near fellow SSGrs or you've invited your personal friends in real life onto the boards. Others of you, like myself, live close to nearly no one from this site.

So does one or more of your interests / hobbies isolate you or alienate you at least in that regard from the rest of society?

Do you prefer it that way (versus even more people standing outside Target in the morning)?

But is it difficult to explain yourself to others who are not into it as many of us on these boards are?

What else makes you comfortable or uncomfortable with being different? Do you wish society was different in that regard? Has your attitude changed over the years?

(I lived in the dorms when in 1995 I bought my first POTF2 Millennium Falcon. I had a single-room and thus others who didn't know me well, didn't know I had a spaceship in my dorm room. But at the time, I felt compelled to sneak it in out of my truck at 2am in the morning so as to not be too noticeable carrying a child's toy around with me or needing to make up excuses like "it's a present for someone else." Since then, I've beome much more comfortable (completley comfortable) with living in a Star Wars museum. But hey, that's part of growing up and developing your identity. As a Star Wars collector, I am no longer concerned if it is within the norm in society. However, I point out that it is a genre that glorified fictional violence.)

What is your opinion?

I am single and live alone and I am an avid collector. I have many friends that share my passion and interests in collecting and almost all of my friends have settled down and gotten married and now have kids. At times I feel like life is passing me by but the truth is that I got burned in a relationship real bad many years ago and I have remained single ever since because of it. I am often chastised by coworkers and others that find out that I am into Star Wars or collecting and I have been compared to the "40 Year Old Virgin" on more than one occassion (which couldn't be farther from the truth since I was in a very intimate relationship for many years). Anyway, I am often embarrassed to open up to people about my interests which is one of the reasons why I don't put much effort in meeting new people and I rarely invite people over for fear of their reaction when they see my collection. I am convinced that most people don't understand it, regard it as the ultimate in nerdiness and alienate others because of it therefore I just live my life and collect my stuff and I don't give a damn what anybody else thinks because it makes me happy and it's all that I have. My parents often ask me why I collect and I tell them "What else am I going to do with my life?" but when people say things like "Get a life" they expect you to live a normal life that consists of getting married, raising kids, going to family barbecues and watching football on Sunday like any red-blooded American. To me, that is the worst form of social conformity I can think of and if that is what is considered living a "normal" life then I say to them "Get a life!" I have one and it is following my obsession for films and collecting and nothing gives me more satisfaction in this world. I can't imagine doing anything else with my life, really. I have been collecting since I was about 4 years old. I can't imagine changing my life now and becoming some kind of heathen that just wants to screw women, party and get drunk or do drugs or watch sports. That's not the kind of life for me. Anyway, I have always been alienated my whole life but I have revelled in it. People don't understand why I am such a loner but I absolutely love it. I really do feel like Obi-Wan living in the Dune Sea sometimes and it's kind of cool I think. Anyway, just my take on the subject. You are not alone Tycho.

TeeEye7
04-19-2007, 07:03 AM
I've never had problems with people's attitude about my hobby. At work, I have a Qui-Gon Hallmark ornament, Taco Bell Yoda figure, and large Yoda Pez dispenser (which plays the "Star Wars" theme when opened) on my desk. It rarely raises eyebrows. Everyone in the office is into "something" and we tend to respect whatever "it" is. Good nature teasing my result, but there's nothing malicious.

I guess I'm lucky.

Kidhuman
04-19-2007, 07:19 AM
i don't really care either what any males or females i know might think of my interests. i'm sure it works the other way as well as there are plenty of things that interest my friends but not me.

however, i do have the great male equalizer that is sports


Ditto.................

Jargo
04-19-2007, 09:04 AM
It felt like a dirty habit because it was unconventional to probably almost everyone in my dorm. See, that won't apply to the people on this website. But I was away at school when this SW thing re-started and I did not have another home (I was determined to never go back and live with my parents when they were alive. We had a dysfunctional family, to be sure.) I think you misunderstood me - I did leave the Falcon in my room - I just brought it in at 2am so almost no one would see me doing it. Back to Star Wars being my "dirty habit."



I totally agree with you and would have written exactly what you did. Well said! :thumbsup:

For me that is when I walk in and then walk out without buying anything. Do they think I shoplifted? I'm simply noticeable when at 8am I'm the first and possibly only customer coming in, after having so anxiously waited outside the doors for them to open. Then I leave empty handed. I wonder if they wonder why? I bring a list for everyday items when I have some I need to purchase, like bread or juice or whatever. But that is not every day I need something, but you all know the nature of the hobby - every day you have to check to see if they stocked anything.

That's important. Very often significant others may not understand. Who said they have to? They obviously still like you for who you are - and they're perfect because you can live with them and they won't take your stormtroopers! ;)

We're both older now and more comfortable with ourselves. Do you think the younger an alienated person is, the more severe their distance from reality can get with the situation?

i'll come back to this post later and type something better, got a mouth abcess and have taken meds and now need to sleep. damn drugs. catch ya later.:ninja:

DarthQuack
04-19-2007, 11:20 AM
For me....it's more about things I don't do....I don't buy expensive clothes, I don't have an expensive car(2003 Honda Civic), I don't drink my *** off every weekend and don't travel much, so what else do I do with my money, I buy stuff, I buy DVD's, I buy old baseball cards, old comics, and yes Star Wars figures. Some of my friends know about it, some do not. I will say I haven't told many people about it, just cause they just wouldn't understand I guess. I'm by no means ashamed of it, just don't feel the need to explain myself to them. Sorry about that beginning tangent lol.

Tycho
04-19-2007, 12:07 PM
DecadentDave made such a great post above! I want to send my compliments.

There's so much I can relate to:


I am single and live alone and I am an avid collector. I have many friends that share my passion and interests in collecting and almost all of my friends have settled down and gotten married and now have kids.


I am often chastised by coworkers and others that find out that I am into Star Wars or collecting and I have been compared to the "40 Year Old Virgin" on more than one occassion

That other people think that is such a wrong stereotype. To be sure there are some "40 Year Old Virgins" who've lived with mom and didn't ever stop going to the toy store (as we didn't stop going to the toy store), but it is the mass media who have perpetuated the stereotype that action figure collectors are socially inept. Wrong! There are all kinds. The world is gray.


Anyway, I am often embarrassed to open up to people about my interests which is one of the reasons why I don't put much effort in meeting new people and I rarely invite people over for fear of their reaction when they see my collection. I am convinced that most people don't understand it, regard it as the ultimate in nerdiness and alienate others because of it therefore I just live my life and collect my stuff and I don't give a damn what anybody else thinks because it makes me happy and it's all that I have.

We're slightly different in that regard, and similar as well. Before I was ill - and all of you knew me then, too - I pursued a very social, public life. But to my knowledge, neither of us has gone on a shooting rampage because our interests were a little alienating with others. This thread idea was inspired a little by Virginia Tech, but it is moreso about alientation and Star Wars is a relevant way we all are different from "everybody else."

I do not have sports "as an equalizer," as in spite of me playing baseball on a team for many years, I'm not really interested in following it on TV (though I'm getting an urge to wish some NFL was on to check out at this particular moment, thinking about it). So I can enjoy sports, but I don't obsess over it like being at the point where I can in recite Nyrat Agira's character bio. (Who??? Right.)


My parents often ask me why I collect and I tell them "What else am I going to do with my life?" but when people say things like "Get a life" they expect you to live a normal life that consists of getting married, raising kids, going to family barbecues and watching football on Sunday like any red-blooded American.

That's because they want you to be as miserable as they are. Now we differ in that I objectify women and no longer feel any guilt over it. But I see no logical reason (if you don't have kids) for marrying and being enslaved to another adult, to support her, house, feed, and clothe her, etc. She typically does not share your interests in Star Wars (for one example), pro-sports for another example (in many cases), and you're only interested in her because you're straight and you have sexual desires. A healthy-priced escort girl can be picked out online and cost so much less than a wife! I'm very serious. I know it's considered very immoral or tabboo - but if you stay disease free - and that is to say, stay away from hookers, you can have what you want for a heck of a lower price.

So who is pushing the morality question, the religion, etc? Women that want life-supporters (barring divorce in which case they sue for alimony anyway) and government and religious leaders who want stability of families for social control as well as economic growth reasons. They are not concerned with saving souls of individuals they've never even met or heard of. They are concerned with how much is invested into trust funds in the Dow Jones index and that you aren't breeding little criminals who will cause more misery and further overcrowd our jails.

Condoms and call-girls can totally lead to a better society. In the case of the Virginia Tech killer, it certainly would have been a benefit to him. He was mentally ill, but his ramblings did suggest he might have been stressed over immorality ("hedonistic obsessions") for which it would also imply that he was deeply concerned with honor, nobility, etc.

People are so busy being concerned with self-righteousness, morality as it's popularly defined, and trying to own each other. Marriage has a lot to do with sexual property rights. You don't want her sleeping around everywhere because if you were her husband, you'd be the one footing the bill. Well then, don't get married and don't worry about a girl sleeping around all over the place. Do that yourself.

In my experience, I have not had one disease (I protect myself) and I have never figured I made a darn bit of lasting difference the morning after with any girl I've been with. I'll carefully add the claim that I was not inadequate - I'm just saying that it didn't make the girl "mine." That is inclusive of my 5 year relationship in which we were mostly with each other, but not exclusively. I just spoke with that girl about an hour ago - we are still close. But I am so thankful that in my dumber youth, I did NOT marry her. Geeze I'm lucky.

And she thinks I'm self-absorbed in my Star Wars, as she reached me on my cell phone and sarcastically asked, "Are you at Target again?" Caught. Guilty as charged (no new toys though :cry: )



To me, that is the worst form of social conformity I can think of and if that is what is considered living a "normal" life then I say to them "Get a life!" I have one and it is following my obsession for films and collecting and nothing gives me more satisfaction in this world. I can't imagine doing anything else with my life, really. I have been collecting since I was about 4 years old. I can't imagine changing my life now

So well-put!


( I can't imagine ) ... becoming some kind of heathen that just wants to screw women, party and get drunk or do drugs or watch sports. That's not the kind of life for me.

Well skip the drinking and drugs, but the rest is fun. You too can try it and see if you like it. Who do you owe to see if you need to stand out as being "the better person" to? We're your friends on this site, and we care about you. But (and I don't mean to sound cruel) no one else cares - espcially whichever woman you might get with tomorrow that you haven't even met yet, today. I'm not saying be mean to people. Don't look at my philosophy as being all black and white. That's something it's definitely not. But just be a friend with benefits given and benefits received. If it's to be something more, it might go that way. But don't worry about it - and don't worry about being "the better man."

In an ethics class I took as a philosophy minor (imagine me in an ethics class :D ) but seriously, I was interested - the professor explained that there had to be a line for an unscrupulous other to take advantage of it and cut in the line. Remember at Episode Three when you or your friend held the spot and told the people after you that some friends were joining you later? Then 20 of your closest personal friends joined you an hour before the movie started? Hehe. (Well we had rotating shifts to hold the line for that movie while we lightsaber dueled, but whatever...)

I'd rather be the person that gets ahead of the line than the foundation that establishes it. You know when there's road construction, and the two lanes ahead are merging into one? There's always the jerks that try to rush up the closing lane and get ahead of you, right? It's actually my style (in that case) to drive in BOTH lanes, so no one can pass me in my large SUV. I get honked at but I just ignore the other drivers. They're mad because they wanted to race ahead in a closed lane and pass me. I don't want them swerving into me and causing an accident, and I drive somewhat fast anyway, so I'm not really slowing anyone down. But I'm aware of the other driver's stereotype and I actually enjoy doing that and it makes the road safer.


Anyway, I have always been alienated my whole life but I have revelled in it. People don't understand why I am such a loner but I absolutely love it.

So you're saying you have no reason to go on a shooting rampage? How come some other guys do and they just can't handle it? Yeah, I know Chu was mentally whacked. Dave, you have friends here, and likely in your regular life, too. And you are talking to all of us. I'm talking to all of you. I guess we are in a "minority niche hobby," but we're pretty "normal" afterall.


You are not alone Tycho.

I don't feel alone. I have many friends both in and out of the hobby - and from other interests that just don't understand (or even like to tolerate) my Star Wars obsession. One of my best friends wishes that he (and his wife of course) could hold a garage sale or make the biggest Toys For Tots donation ever, so I could "live like the rest of the world." As all of us here know: WE DON'T WANT TO! and WE DON'T HAVE TO!

Honestly, we're all getting into our 30's abouts here. We've had 2/3 of our lives spent in recurring childhood! 0-10 and 20-30 (averages) with "the Dark Years" being in our teens when we were busy with worrying about our high school image and getting our first cars anyway. Other people are just jealous. And Dave is also right in that many could have chosen to do what we did, but they spent the money we spent on wave after wave of action figures on drugs and alcohol instead. (For those that still don't know, my Mouse Droid sniffing thing is a now-classic parody comparing those addictions) We might not have much to show for our addiction (but dust covered obsession crowding our living quarters), but we have more to show for it than they do! :thumbsup:

So exactly why should we bother to conform with others who are actually more miserable than we are?

JON9000
04-19-2007, 12:39 PM
I do not run around telling everyone I collect Star Wars toys. Frankly, while it is an enjoyable hobby, people make certain assumptions about you:

1. You immerse yourself in this fictional world because you cannot find fellowship in the real world because you are weird (what forumites call "nonconformist", I have discovered).

2. You cannot cope with the stress of everyday life, hence you resort to regression (reversion to an earlier stage of development in the face of unacceptable impulses- sort of like sucking your thumb).

3. Your life has so little meaning that you seek to fill the holes in it with silly material possessions of little intrinsic value.

4. You are lazy- instead of devoting yourself to learning useful new skills or exposing yourself to new ideas, you spend your days hoarding objects made for children and memorizing the names of obscure characters to the point where you nearly speak an entirely different language (remember Elliot in ET insulting that kid in D&D speak?).

It's pretty easy to pick on (as Jim Rome has demonstrated). And be the above true or not, I let people on to my love of Star Wars after getting to know them first, so their impressions of me are more appropriate: I am a person of many interests and talents who happens to dig Star Wars. I won't obsess over you or stalk you or chop you up and hide you under the floorboards! :)

We can sit here and act all indignant or recognize people for their limitations and give them a chance to know more about us before divulging information that might lead them to make snap judgments!


[B]So exactly why should we bother to conform with others who are actually more miserable than we are?

Thou dost protesteth too much!

Mr. JabbaJohnL
04-19-2007, 06:59 PM
Honestly, we're all getting into our 30's abouts here.
Speak for yourself, you old fogey! :D

Luuuuuuke
04-19-2007, 11:03 PM
I honestly don't have friends into Star Wars. Those close to me know I'm into Star Wars(and also Lord of the Rings). But I don't volunteer the information to my co-workers. They don't care and I don't need to tell them.

I'm not that self-conscious about it when I go to stores. I don't think I really get much in terms of stares because I'm an adult looking at toys. I think that's become pretty much a normal thing now. Then again, I don't really advertise that I'm into Star Wars. I usually stop early in the morning before work or after work so I'm usually wearing a dress shirt and tie and I don't think anyone can or should begrudge a working dude from buying whatever the heck he wants.

And to be honest, I'm not that huge a Star Wars fanatic. I only collect the basic figures usually, and mostly clones and stormtroopers. I think the prequels suck, don't buy Galactic Heroes, lightsabers, blasters or wear shirts with Star Wars slogans. So I kind of just blend in.

BountyHunterScum
04-20-2007, 02:07 PM
I really don't give a flying f*ck what most anyone thinks about me, what I do, or what I enjoy.
If they don't like one of the above then it's their problem, not mine.

:thumbsup: Amen to that, my sentiments exactly or in the vernacular of twisted cowboy insults.....F-ck you and the wh-re you rode in on.

bobafrett
04-20-2007, 02:31 PM
I am proud to be a Star Wars collector. All of my co workers know it, and are often willing to let me know when a new shipment of toys comes in. Sure I get teased a little about my hobby, but most of the people I know are cool about it.

It's a little hard to hide being a Star Wars fan, when you have 2 Star Wars tattoo's, a couple Star Wars costumes, and are willing to spend money on a bunch of plastic figures without even giving it a second thought.

I also was a little frightened by going into a relationship with someone, especially if they did not understand the walls of Star Wars toys that surrounded me as I slept, nor the goosebumps whanever I hear the Star Wars theme music, or the giddiness that overcomes me seeing a Hallmark Star Wars commercial. So far it has worked out well. I have packed some of my collection up, but only to make room for my girlfriend who has moved in. he hasn't complained about the collection, and we have made compromises to make our home a place both of us can enjoy living in. Besides she likes to run her fingers over my Star Wars tat's, which is fine by me.

JEDIpartner
04-20-2007, 02:59 PM
"I'm a loner, Dottie... a REBEL!" :smoker:

JON9000
04-20-2007, 03:44 PM
"I'm a loner, Dottie... a REBEL!" :smoker:

Oh, man, that is perfect. :thumbsup:

Tycho
04-20-2007, 05:40 PM
Sure I get teased a little about my hobby, but most of the people I know are cool about it.

You shouldn't get teased at all, I think. Do the teasers have a hobby? Do they have a life? Do they sacrafice so they can afford things like you might have to do in order to collect? I'm sure they're not malicious towards you, Frett, but underneath it all they aren't treating you like others into this hobby would.

I mean what am I going to say: "Hahahaha - you have stormtroopers in your closet [while I close the doors to my own closet]" But that being said, if I knew a guy into another hobby - and I do - sports memorobilia collecting - I may not be interested in it, but I do not say anything negative about it.

And what's with the "get a life" comment anyway? To those you might say "get sober!"


I also was a little frightened by going into a relationship with someone, especially if they did not understand the walls of Star Wars toys that surrounded me as I slept, nor the goosebumps whanever I hear the Star Wars theme music, or the giddiness that overcomes me seeing a Hallmark Star Wars commercial. So far it has worked out well. I have packed some of my collection up, but only to make room for my girlfriend who has moved in. (S)he hasn't complained about the collection, and we have made compromises to make our home a place both of us can enjoy living in.

Well, you know I have my own conspiracy theories about that. But just tune in Tom Leykus on the radio. "The Professor" will take care of it. ;)

Bel-Cam Jos
04-20-2007, 09:10 PM
Saying that I collect SW items doesn't get me odd reactions, and I attribute that to the fact that many people realize that collectibles can bring boo-coo buck$. But spouting SW trivia or stories from EU do.

Tycho
04-20-2007, 10:56 PM
Ironically, we should know this bit of trivia: collecting Star Wars does not result in boo-coo buck$ - except that which we spend on our hobby.

Luuuuuuke
04-20-2007, 11:08 PM
I wouldn't mind being teased over collecting action figures, as long as it's good natured. I poke fun at myself. It is kind of funny to be hitting stores and looking for action figures when you're no longer a kid.

I don't like it when collectors who turn Star Wars into a kind of religion though. That was one of my reasons for being reluctant to join an online Star Wars community at first, cause I saw how seriously some people took this stuff. Plus, Star Wars collectors tend to blow off "newbies" and being cliquish more than, say, Lord of the Rings fans, who I think tend to be nicer. I can't tell you how many times I've felt like people were just "talking" around my posts, and those of other forum members, especially "newbies."

Tycho
04-20-2007, 11:18 PM
Luuuuke. I think Star Wars collectors have a long history of being scalper-wary. (By the way guys, what figures are hot right now on eBay? :lipsrsealed: )

So a newbie can be suspect (but shouldn't be - a scalper should be more likely a "lurker type" )

(Guys: Lushros Dofine is getting scarce in the stores - buy all of him that you can! And get that variation on Jerjerrod, too - you know - the one where he's wearing an Imperial Uniform. :lipsrsealed: )

Anyway, I think you should be able to do whatever you like, and you should keep doing it for as long as you enjoy it. People shouldn't tease you, but mind their own business if they don't share your hobby. (Hahaha! You play with a Luke Skywalker doll?! - It's not a doll, it's an action figure! There's a difference.)



I don't like it when collectors who turn Star Wars into a kind of religion though.

But if you're strong enough to, shouldn't you kill weaker people and take over the universe? Tell me there's really something wrong with that! :lipsrsealed:

Luuuuuuke
04-20-2007, 11:31 PM
Luuuuke. I think Star Wars collectors have a long history of being scalper-wary. (By the way guys, what figures are hot right now on eBay? :lipsrsealed: )

So a newbie can be suspect (but shouldn't be - a scalper should be more likely a "lurker type" )


I think you give those collectors too much credit Tycho. It's just rude what people do sometimes. This forum is better than others, but I've seen Star Wars collectors be total a-holes by either ignoring or reaming people who aren't established forum members. And I don't think it's because they thought they were scalpers in disguise.

By the way, I bet if those "newbies" started stashing crap for these guys, they'd stop blowing them off real fast.

And if Star Wars collectors have a long history of being that "scalper-wary," that's their problem. Welcome to the world of collecting. All collectibles have their scalpers. That's no reason for forgetting common courtesy.

That's one thing I really admire about the LOTR forums. There's just a nicer vibe about them. A newbie joins, and they're automatically welcomed. Good luck of that happening on a typical SW forum. Don't get me wrong though, I like SSG. I wouldn't post here as much as I do if I didn't.

InsaneJediGirl
04-26-2007, 09:09 PM
I was made fun of more as a kid in middle and high school than I am now. Either way, I could care less what anyone else thinks of me. I probably just 'scream' geek, considering the comic book/star wars shirts I wear lot(Superman tee is MIA currently) but it hasnt been an issue.

I enjoy being a geek and if someone has a problem with it, I dont really care :)

Lord Malakite
04-30-2007, 01:41 PM
I walked on foot 55 miles to and from Burger King and my dorm room to collect my SW Super-Deformed figures while in college. Some trips were during the middle of the afternoon for all to see, some were in the early hours before dawn to be first to buy the new shipment at 6 AM opening, and once it was even during a thunderstorm/tornado warning. And I would brag about it every chance I got. Aside from my RA (who thought it was kind of cool and funny) I do believe people thought I was nuts. Oh, and I would always talk about Power Rangers.:D

Tycho
04-30-2007, 04:01 PM
Lord Malakite, did they ever check your dorm room for weapons of mass destruction? :D

Lord Malakite
05-01-2007, 02:07 PM
Lord Malakite, did they ever check your dorm room for weapons of mass destruction? :D
Yes. Yes they did. Never found anything though.:lipsrsealed:

Tenric78
05-01-2007, 02:39 PM
I've been looking into these issues more and more on me blog. I hope nobody minds if I use some of this stuff for a post. It's really good. I really like thinking about some of these issues. Questions like, "why is it totally okay to be a total sports nut but people will look at you funny if you collect toys?" fascinate me.

Personally, I've found the fact that I write about toys makes it my hobby more socially acceptable than it would be. Or at least some people who might otherwise have a problem with it can justify it in their heads. "Well, at least he's trying to do something with it." I also think that it helps that I'm open and honest about what I do. If someone calls me a nerd, I'll say hell yeah I'm a nerd.

Lord Malakite
05-01-2007, 03:46 PM
I've been looking into these issues more and more on me blog. I hope nobody minds if I use some of this stuff for a post. It's really good.
You can use my stuff. Just so long as you emphasize the fact that I watch Power Rangers religously.:D

Tycho
05-01-2007, 04:17 PM
Questions like, "why is it totally okay to be a total sports nut but people will look at you funny if you collect toys?" fascinate me.

I wish we could answer that. It's a great question. Both fandoms worship "heroes that do things you normally can't do":

-exhibit atheletic prowess (or maybe you're past you prime at it)

- use the Force and fight intergalactic battles with technology that doesn't exist



Personally, I've found the fact that I write about toys makes it my hobby more socially acceptable than it would be. Or at least some people who might otherwise have a problem with it can justify it in their heads. "Well, at least he's trying to do something with it."

I've experienced that too. Why can't it just be enough that you like that, it's your thing? Why does it carry a stigma with it? Sure there are a few stereotypes personified by William Shatner (Kirk) in his "get a life skit" for SNL - a 40 year old virgin male who still lives with his mom and is waiting for the $#@#!! to invade earth so he can be a hero and then get some respect. In the meanwhile, he collects action figures that symbolize his fantasy and provide him with the only armies he can be assertive enough to control. I can see how that might be the best negative way to represent a stereotype. But what about the rest of us who are a bit more "mainstream," but just love this stuff? We can relate to the interests of the guy in his mom's basement, but so what? Can't we be nice to other people and find fellowship with them? Must we revert to their stereotype if we too spend $thousands on this stuff? (rhetorical question). Tying in with the thread's main subject: why wouldn't we get angry if we are being negatively type cast? It's not fair, though most of us wouldn't go on a shooting rampage over it. However, there are similarities to a nerd killing opressors in the classroom corridoors like a Rebel killing Stormtroopers in the Blockade Runner's corridoors - at least in a damaged mind. But that damage is caused externally by the environment fostered by society in which the nerd-individual is pained by reality and further retreats into the fantasy.



I also think that it helps that I'm open and honest about what I do. If someone calls me a nerd, I'll say hell yeah I'm a nerd.


Many of us are comfortable with ourselves. I include myself amongst them. I wasn't always, as when I snuck the Millennium Falcon into my dorm room in college during the middle of the night so I wouldn't have to explain myself and that I was still a 5 year old. That's changed. Today I'm proud to proclaim I AM still a 5 year old! I collect Galactic Heroes on top of everything else. :D

Tenric78
05-01-2007, 04:57 PM
Man, maybe you should guest post on my blog. You put a lot of stuff out there that I haven't thought of. hehe

I do get ****ed when people come down on collectors. I've decided to go on the attack and defend them. Yeah, there's some weirdos that collect, but maybe they can't "help" being weird. I'd rather have that odd ball out there collecting Yodas than making pipe bombs.

I too used to be a lot more nervous about my toy collecting habits. Now I buy whatever the heck I want, I don't care. I'll tell you though, when I have the fiancee with me I'm a lot more comfortable holding on to an armload of toys. It's like my nervous inner self feels like I have to point to her and say, "See, I can socialize with females!"

mtriv73
05-01-2007, 06:14 PM
More often than not, people think (or at least tell me they think) that it's really cool that I'm into this hobby and have a pretty complete collection of toys. Most friends who see my collection want to play with everything. No one has ever belittled me for it and if they did, they wouldn't be people I would want for friends anyway. At the very least they accept the fact that I am just being me. This is something I strive to do at work, in the Jaycees (an organization I belong to,) and in my personal life. It's not that I don't care what other people think, it's that they usually like me for me and accept my idiosyncrasies as part of the package. If all I ever did was obsess over SW toys then even I would make fun of me, but there is so much more to all of us (I hope) that any small part of what makes us up becomes irrelevant in the context of the whole person.

The only person who's negative opinion could get me to give up SW collecting is my wife. Fortunately, I picked a good one. The night we started dating my (then future) wife saw my collection (long story but needless to say, it was a good night for all.:lipsrsealed: ) That was 1999 however and it wasn't quite the size it is today (I'm talking about the SW collection, get your mind out of the gutter), but she knew what she was getting into and she accepts it. As long as I'm more passionate about her than the toys (very difficult to do when I was looking for an Arc-170 2 years ago) she's happy.

Tenric78
05-14-2007, 12:18 AM
You guys want to see some negative opinions about toy collectors? Holy crap, I got on the front page of digg.com with an article about collecting toys and some of the comments... wow... it's hard to believe that there are really people that find this hobby so offensive.

Tycho
05-14-2007, 02:00 AM
That was a good read Tenric. Thanks for sharing.

JON9000
05-14-2007, 12:28 PM
I will make this observation:

People are much more understanding of the old school vintage collection worth a couple of thousand dollars neatly displayed than they are of huge gobs of modern figures and toys all over the place. Those people are usually considered to be not toy collectors, but something more akin to pathological hoarders.

Perhaps there is something to that... I mean, I used to keep tons of carded action figures in boxes back home in the basement. I eventually realized that it was taking up a lot of space and dealt with it by selling most of it, and using the proceeds to buy loose vintage figures and the odd pair of shoes or other necessities.

I still have Star Wars stuff, I still love it, but I cannot let it take over my living space. To each his own, but I more than understand how outsiders could think it is very weird.

Tycho
05-14-2007, 03:13 PM
My housekeepers just left a few minutes ago, their task in my place complete.

As usual, I had to be in the room with them and make sure Masterpiece Megatron ($123) and SideShow Jabba the Hutt ($300, all things (creature pack, etc) included) amongst my other stuff was handled very carefully.

I pay $120 / month for housekeeping (every other week) and I gather their company pays them minimum wage or close to it. So the 2 girls might make $15 or thereabouts in the maybe 90 minutes they spend here doing the stuff I am just plainly too weak to do (kind of my health) and never was interested in doing (probably due to my Y-chromosome - cleaning is so not a guy-thing).

Megatron is a specialty item. Probably 100x more people clean their house (or hire someone to do it) than buy Megatron. Actually, it is probably 1000x or much higher. That is why Takara can charge $100+ for this 12" Transformer. And he is very rare to have in the US, unaltered (no orange plug in him because he turns into a replica handgun - eBay supposedly terminated USA auctions for him because he violates USA paternalism laws. I don't know the extent of the truth in that. I'm obviously not shopping for him with mine sitting right here).

But my housekeepers, no doubt Mexican immigrants, have no way to conceive of someone spending over $100 on an action figure, how valuable he might actually be, nor how delicate (it's great to own but the quality is NOT there!). In essence, they don't understand how this figure is worth more than they make all day.

Furthermore, their cultural values and families (one speaks English alright and I can talk to her easily enough) has them supporting children at home - food, clothes, school supplies, etc. Even if I was employed doing their job, if I really wanted Megatron, I'd have 1.2 days' worth of work (say at $80 per day?) to spend on him, with no other obligation (no kids, no wife, etc.) My tastes (and it is a question of tastes) being what they are - I'd probably still buy Megatron - and be just as protective over him.

So it takes someone being somewhat different to purchase these products.

But if one examines the fantasy this toy represents, I wouldn't want to be cleaning houses, I'd want to stand 40 feet tall and kill people in a murderous rampage with a cannon on my arm that destroys houses. The harder I'd have to work, the more "Virginia Tech anger" I'd harbor - and the more I'd indulge this fantasy.

I am of the Dark Side. My anger and hate give me power. I function well with negative energy. Kill! Destory! Obliterate! Demolish! Pulverize!

Granted, people unlike me are glad I CAN separate fantasy from reality. If I lost touch with that, I could have been Chu Seung-Hui or Trench Coat Mafia a long time ago.

I don't know how other people deal with life's challenges (i.e. positive energy people - though I've experienced a lot of positive energy, too if I think about it). But I think hatred and intolerance for cripples (I don't act on that though) got me out of that hospital and rehab, etc. I would walk and drive a car again and I would depend on no one! I got out of my hospital bed and succeeded at physcial therapy through hatred of even myself. Do not underestimate the power of the Dark Side!

El Chuxter
08-05-2010, 03:16 PM
Odd? You mean as in sniffing mouse droids and founding organizations about them? Or pretending to be kidnapped by Louie the Lilac, or waxing not-so-eloquent about Michael McDonald's beard?

Nope. No Star Wars collectors I know meet that criteria.

Bel-Cam Jos
08-05-2010, 04:10 PM
Or stating that "odd" is backwards for Stuttering Homer's catch phrase?