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OC47150
11-11-2007, 09:48 PM
How long before your favorite show is into reruns?

I think it's interesting that Lost and 24 may not happen this year.

I came across this interesting paragraph that CBS is preparing to ramp up Big Brother to help plug the schedule.

2-1B
11-12-2007, 08:16 PM
One more episode of The Office in 3 days and I'm not sure on Curb Your Enthusiasm but I assume that whole season was already shot.

The only other show on HBO that I watch (now that The Sopranos, Deadwood, Six Feet Under, and Carnivale are all done) is Real Time with Bill Maher but he did the show last week without any writers so that will be on for awhile.

I suppose Big Love and The Wire might be delayed more but they are between seasons anyway.

General_Grievous
11-13-2007, 11:23 AM
How long before your favorite show is into reruns?

I think it's interesting that Lost and 24 may not happen this year.

I came across this interesting paragraph that CBS is preparing to ramp up Big Brother to help plug the schedule.

Well, Lost will air 8 episodes, which is half of their planned season, so who knows? They may end up airing the other 8 episodes in the fall.

El Chuxter
11-13-2007, 11:39 AM
The Daily Show went dark last Monday. So did Colbert. Curb's whole season was done. I'm not sure if Good Eats falls under the WGA or not (and new episodes are pretty sporadic, anyway). Jeopardy will be affected, but is filmed well in advance, so it may not be visible for several months. Pushing Daisies may be going bye-bye after two or three more episodes (putting a friend of mine out of work for the duration). BBC News is obviously not affected at all by an American union.

Everything else on TV is crap.

mabudonicus
11-13-2007, 12:50 PM
Ahh this hearkens back to the golden age of Letterman, when he actualy went on without writers after a week or two. He had the toast cannon rocking and basically just did weird dumb (but somehow hilarious) crap, mostly sending Biff out to watch folks do laundry or hang out at highway rest stations asking weird questions. I wonder if Colbert of Stewart might do something similar??
:beard: Iso & Baws

Who knows eh?

Jedi_Master_Guyute
11-13-2007, 01:00 PM
Cae said: One more episode of The Office in 3 days and I'm not sure on Curb Your Enthusiasm but I assume that whole season was already shot.


Curb aired its finale last night, so they're good to go. I still need to finish seasons 3-5 so I can watch season 6 on my folks DVR over Christmas break! :thumbsup:

I am really irked that THE OFFICE is done this week and in a few weeks, HEROES is finished. And i'm really going to be PO'd about no more PUSHING DAISIES for a while as I love that show. With 24 delayed and LOST up in the air, the network execs need to get their crap together so this winter won't suck on the tele.

UKWildcat
11-13-2007, 01:16 PM
Maybe now I will be able to get through some of this TV on DVD that I have backlogged... :rolleyes:

OC47150
11-13-2007, 08:39 PM
Everything you want to know about strike but was afraid to ask.

http://www.zap2it.com/tv/news/zap-writersstrike-2007,0,933616.htmlstory

Fox said '24' won't air this season. Only 8 episodes (a work day for the normal Joe!) were filmed, and Keifer has to go to the pokey for a stay, so that screws up filming.

Scripts for the final season of the Shield are written!!

A buddy said NBC may run Battlestar Galactica on the main network. I could see NBC doing this on some of the other shows that air on USA, like Burn Notice (highly underrated) and Law and Order CI.

Kidhuman
11-13-2007, 10:38 PM
Thank the good maker its black friday next week and season sets go on sale and DD is having the big sale. Gonna get me some stuff next week.

JimJamBonds
11-13-2007, 11:40 PM
Those writers.... they make me madder then a Yak in heat.

Lord Malakite
11-14-2007, 04:20 AM
Power Rangers: Jungle Fury (Season 16) doesn't start airing on cable till late February or early March and I think they've got the scripts done for the first 8 to 12 episodes (if not more), so unless the strike goes longer than the last one I remain optimistic that at "worst case scenario" the new episodes might be spread out to every other week or so (which actually isn't bad considering they usually run short of new episodes come September and have to space new episodes 3 to 4 weeks apart to last till the season finale in November). In the meantime though, as I don't have cable, I still have 6 episodes of Season 15 (Power Rangers: Operation Overdrive) to catch on ABC before i can worry about Jungle Fury.

Its kind of funny to think about this strike in terms of Power Rangers actually. The first 10 seasons produced by Saban's team in California had SAG actors, but I'm pretty certain most of the writers were non-union. Come season 11 to present day Disney begins producing the show in New Zealand with non-union actors, but brings in WGA writers. :rolleyes:

Well, at least I won't have to worry further delays when SAG goes on strike after their contract is up later this year (which is likely if the studios decide to do the same "song and dance" with them and/or the WGA gets their way).

OC47150
11-16-2007, 09:08 PM
During Survivor, CBS advertised that they're taking applicants for the next Big Brother. The new series could roll by February.

And we still have 7 episodes of Jericho in the wings!!!!

Bel-Cam Jos
01-06-2008, 09:56 AM
This could turn out to be great for me! With the free time I have from ignoring anything on TV (due my hatred of "reality" shows and less football games on), I can go back to reading more). Yay! Stupid writers, keep on killing your medium (pun intended, with that being the name of a show) and increasing the intelligence of the country, thereby pushing us past other nations in geography, mathematics, science, and other creative arts! :thumbsup:

But I do miss Scrubs and House a bit. :( One can only handle their reruns for so long (unlike The Simpsons, Futurama, or Night Court :D ).

2-1B
01-06-2008, 10:56 AM
Somebody just needs to cave on this because it's gotten really old.

El Chuxter
01-06-2008, 11:32 AM
Really. I'm surprised it's still going on. In '88 (?), the companies lost a lot of money. And there was no competition for movies and TV! Given how their audiences are shrinking exponentially anyway, the studios should never have let a strike happen. There's a good chunk of audience they won't get back.

Like BCJ, I'm getting more reading done. And, with less bad TV to distract my wife, I'm watching a lot of DVDs.

stillakid
01-06-2008, 11:48 AM
Really. I'm surprised it's still going on. In '88 (?), the companies lost a lot of money. And there was no competition for movies and TV! Given how their audiences are shrinking exponentially anyway, the studios should never have let a strike happen. There's a good chunk of audience they won't get back.

Like BCJ, I'm getting more reading done. And, with less bad TV to distract my wife, I'm watching a lot of DVDs.


The business has changed quite a lot since then. One of the biggest influences is that most studios are owned by multinational corporations that don't depend on their entertainment divisions for income. They have the financial reserves to wait it out.

2-1B
01-06-2008, 11:50 AM
Then why is the Guild holding on anyway, to prove they can take a beating ?

UKWildcat
01-06-2008, 12:26 PM
But I do miss Scrubs and House a bit.

Glad I'm not the only one that is missing House. :(

stillakid
01-06-2008, 12:31 PM
Then why is the Guild holding on anyway, to prove they can take a beating ?


The whole thing is complicated, but essentially it's about setting precedents. If you "give up" something in a contract negotiation, you never get it back in future contracts.

So, one of the issues has to do with new technologies. Currently, members of WGA, DGA, and SAG get direct residuals from the sale and distribution of work they do (IATSE members get indirect revenue as money is paid into a general Health and Welfare fund). That current contract does not cover new technologies like Internet distribution or cel phones or anything else that may come along. The studios claim that the new technologies are still to new and they don't really make money from them yet so they don't see it as worthwhile to give anyone any money from them at this time. The Guilds know that but based on past experience with VHS distribution, they know that they have to get a foothold on new forms of distribution early or they wind up losing in the long run. Essentially, the studios know that new technologies will be profitable or else they wouldn't be putting up such a fight. So it's a war of attrition... who can hold out longer.

Other issues involve representing Writers who work for reality shows. It gets a little complicated because the traditional definition of Writer doesn't apply entirely, but there is writing involved during production and during post-production (as "story" is created out of the footage) so currently, those involved get paid a pittance and work a lot of hours all without representation or benefits that are afforded other Writers in the industry.

It all comes down to money. Revenues are up overall for film and television, but the studios always claim that they are losing money (Titanic lost money according to the studio :rolleyes: ) That's the reason Actors and Directors have learned to cut such lucrative deals upfront instead of taking more from the profits. "Creative bookkeeping" by the studios ensures that the profits are kept to a minimum therefore those in charge would walk away with an unfair piece of the pie. So, everyone knows to get the money upfront and hope for some on the back end. Studios can't get around paying A list stars their huge fees so they have gone overseas to find cheaper labor to help offset their "loses" on their profits. They can get 40% off of their overall costs by just going to Canada (via tax incentives and the dollar exchange rate). Toss in cheaper labor by those working on set and suddenly the studio is producing a $100 million dollar movie for up to half that cost... but still taking in more profits from audiences in theaters and soon, new technologies. Those in a position to get residuals from those profits are trying to lock in that profit sharing while they can.

That's more or less the WGA strike. The DGA is up next and SAG at the end of June. We'll have an upsurge in production during the first few months of '08 as studios stockpile product in anticipation of a SAG strike. So no matter what happens with the WGA or the DGA, just about everyone else (the crews and ancillary businesses) will have the Summer off which isn't necessarily a good thing for anyone.

El Chuxter
01-06-2008, 12:31 PM
Yeah, stilla, but these are the same corporations that project 50% growth and then consider an endeavor a miserable failure if it only achieves 49% growth. Why aren't they unloading their entertainment divisions? Someone else could probably handle them better, anyway.

I'm glad to say it hasn't hurt the economy of the area as badly as I'd feared, though I have several friends who are out of work for the duration.

(Edit: this was in response to your previous post. It looks like you posted again while I was writing this.)

stillakid
01-06-2008, 12:41 PM
Yeah, stilla, but these are the same corporations that project 50% growth and then consider an endeavor a miserable failure if it only achieves 49% growth. Why aren't they unloading their entertainment divisions? Someone else could probably handle them better, anyway.

That's not really for me to answer, but offhand, I'd say that no matter what their definition of success is, entertainment is still a money maker and has proven to be fairly bulletproof no matter what else is going on with the economy. Corporations also work hard to get the most mileage out of a project. It's rarely just a movie anymore... they try to get video games out of it and comic books and toys and theme parks if possible. Whatever they can do to capitalize on the success of something that will make consumers spend more money on it is game.

Movies are "art" but are also just a commodity. Lucas was one of the first to seriously capitalize on this idea. Walt Disney could probably be considered the first. I'd say that Bruckheimer is likely the most recent. And you've got Universal and Warner Bros. both setting up theme parks in the States and around the world (WB and Universal in the UAE).

It's all huge money and if those who actually create it don't fight to get their fair share, that money doesn't just vanish. It goes into somebody else's pocket and the creative and technical people would like to be compensated for the work that earns that kind of revenue instead of just giving it all away to executives who sit in offices all day long.

El Chuxter
01-06-2008, 12:50 PM
I totally agree with you about executives. I'm of the mind that any company that pays its CEO several million per year, while any employees or contractors aren't making a living wage and don't get benefits, is unjustifiably wrong. Unfortunately, that describes a majority of them.

2-1B
01-06-2008, 01:35 PM
The whole thing is complicated, but essentially it's about setting precedents. If you "give up" something in a contract negotiation, you never get it back in future contracts.

I get that, I just mean that if the studios can wait it out and it's clear for all to see, then the WGA is in a lose/lose situation and when they eventually cave (which they will) it's not gonna be a very rewarding precedent.

You don't have to sell me on the reasons for the strike, believe me I side with the WGA, it just sucks that they appear to be in a losing situation since, as you pointed out, the conglomerates can afford to wait it out. The writers can't afford to hold out as long, so they're gonna lose out either way. It's just a matter of how much ???

stillakid
01-06-2008, 11:44 PM
I get that, I just mean that if the studios can wait it out and it's clear for all to see, then the WGA is in a lose/lose situation and when they eventually cave (which they will) it's not gonna be a very rewarding precedent.

You don't have to sell me on the reasons for the strike, believe me I side with the WGA, it just sucks that they appear to be in a losing situation since, as you pointed out, the conglomerates can afford to wait it out. The writers can't afford to hold out as long, so they're gonna lose out either way. It's just a matter of how much ???

Well, as they say "principles are for people with money and no responsibilities." There are writers now going back to work, either in secret or by declaring "financial core" which basically means that the studios get writers to write and the writer gets covered under a union contract, but the writer loses some rights within the Guild. Make sense? Bottom line, you're correct, those with the money have the ability to hold out longer. It's a war of principle.

I had one of those a couple of months ago with a company that wanted me to go to South Africa to shoot. I wanted more money in addition to other benefits. They whined for about a week until they found someone else who would go for their lower offer... but they had to compromise on a few things too. I lost the job but they didn't get what they wanted either, beyond someone who would go for lower money.

It comes down to fighting for what you're worth or giving in just to be happy making any money at all. Every individual has his/her own limits and that's for every person to decide. If you have to go back to work to pay bills, then you have to work. But that person may lose his union card and thus lose out in the long run. It's a gamble that some people aren't able to take. The problem ultimately is that there are people in charge who make a lot of money and aren't happy with that...they always want more and more and aren't willing to share fairly. Trust me, there is plenty of money floating around in the movie business...more than enough to go around so that everyone would be happy. But there are a few at the top who don't really give a sh** if the writers or crew can pay their rent, much less be "rich." There are always more naive hungry kids out there who are just happy to get a chance. In the meantime, there are very talented and experienced people who are trying to have a career and a semi-normal life being undercut by greedy executives and undercut by ambitious kids who don't see the big picture.

This is not an easy business by any stretch.

Mad Slanted Powers
01-07-2008, 02:27 AM
The thing is, with these new technologies, the writers and creators of a show should be able to take more ownership of their work. That's what a lot of punk/alternative/underground music acts did. They signed to indie labels or created their own label. They had more control over their work and could get a higher percentage of the profit. Most of them probably didn't get rich at it, but those that got exposure could continue playing and maybe could get a lucrative deal from the major labels.

With all sorts of online opportunities where a viral video can become a pop-culture phenomenon, someone could create something and put it out there. If it gets attention, then it might be something the big networks might come bidding on. The artist then can make their demands and see who will give them the best deal.

I guess to me, if a writer is concerned that they aren't getting their share, then they should state that case before they start producing work for someone else. Maybe a young writer trying to make a name for him or herself doesn't have the clout to bargain. Once they get their foot in the door and have something to show for their efforts, they might be more in demand and thus be in a better position to get what they want.

If there is one thing anyone should learn from shows like Behind the Music, it's that you have to be on top of things to make sure execs and your accountants aren't screwing you out of the money you deserve or squandering the money you've earned.

stillakid
01-07-2008, 10:19 AM
The thing is, with these new technologies, the writers and creators of a show should be able to take more ownership of their work. That's what a lot of punk/alternative/underground music acts did. They signed to indie labels or created their own label. They had more control over their work and could get a higher percentage of the profit. Most of them probably didn't get rich at it, but those that got exposure could continue playing and maybe could get a lucrative deal from the major labels.

With all sorts of online opportunities where a viral video can become a pop-culture phenomenon, someone could create something and put it out there. If it gets attention, then it might be something the big networks might come bidding on. The artist then can make their demands and see who will give them the best deal.

I guess to me, if a writer is concerned that they aren't getting their share, then they should state that case before they start producing work for someone else. Maybe a young writer trying to make a name for him or herself doesn't have the clout to bargain. Once they get their foot in the door and have something to show for their efforts, they might be more in demand and thus be in a better position to get what they want.

If there is one thing anyone should learn from shows like Behind the Music, it's that you have to be on top of things to make sure execs and your accountants aren't screwing you out of the money you deserve or squandering the money you've earned.

That's more or less what the indie market and the reality markets are right now. Sort of. Just about all indie movies are made from scripts written by new people. Reality programming uses non-star actors and pretty much mostly relatively new crew, all who are eager and anxious to work in the business. They all have the same goals, that being to work their a**es off for too little money in hopes that the experience and/or project will be enough to get them to the "big leagues."

The difference is that reality television is created for and by established distribution outlets (television networks) and those shows are very profitable. So they in effect are willingly taking advantage of young inexperienced people in order to make a lot of money.

Apart from just kind of hitting the jackpot, writers and filmmakers don't have it quite as easy as those making music. It doesn't require quite the initial financial investment to lay down a few tracks in a garage as it does to complete a short or feature film. Although, a few writers are indeed making inroads into forming their own defacto studios in partnership with some established internet entities. Sort of the United Artists model, more or less. But the fact remains that the established studios are the ones with the inroads and clout to package, market, and distribute the highest end products so in order to make their efforts even a little profitable, creators still almost always have to get their work picked up by an established studio at some point.

stillakid
01-13-2008, 05:50 PM
Directors, Producers to Begin Talks Saturday


The DGA and the Alliance of Motion Picture and Television Producers agreed to enter into formal contract negotiations starting Saturday.

The talks will be held at AMPTP headquarters in Encino, the studios and the guild said Friday in a two-paragraph statement. The DGA and the AMPTP said they won't discuss details of their talks "until negotiations have concluded."

The DGA is under contract through June 30.

New-media residuals -- or how writers should be compensated when their work is reused over the Internet or mobile platforms -- represent the central issue of the current disagreement between the WGA and AMPTP. New media is similarly expected to be the central topic in the DGA negotiations, and the guild has already gathered exhaustive research in this subject.

Some suggest that the directors will prove more interested in jurisdictional rights over new-media content than in residual minimums, which often are covered in the personal contracts of top directors.

WGA leaders are concerned that whatever deal the DGA cuts will be forced upon writers as a template. They intend to resist any such effort. The writers have been on strike since Nov. 5 and have not been engaged in talks with the studios since Dec. 7.

Gil Cates, one of the DGA's lead negotiators, is producing this year's Oscar show.

The DGA has hired veteran attorney and Hollywood dealmaker Ken Ziffrin to conduct much of its new-media research. Word is that the study largely supports the AMPTP's claim that new-media businesses are still works in progress, a finding that could shape the directors' approach to negotiations with the studio group.

Kidhuman
01-13-2008, 05:54 PM
opefully they can settle this sh*t by Sunday ans start writing on Monday.

stillakid
01-13-2008, 06:01 PM
opefully they can settle this sh*t by Sunday ans start writing on Monday.


No one has value until they demonstrate their worth by not doing the job. Hopefully the DGA won't just bend over just to be the good guys. The Writers have legitimate issues which ultimately effect the DGA, SAG and IATSE. Everyone is hoping for an end to this soon, but it shouldn't be at the expense of a fair deal for the workers.

El Chuxter
01-14-2008, 12:50 PM
I think The Daily Show proved how necessary writers are last week.

Jedi_Master_Guyute
02-02-2008, 10:06 PM
http://news.yahoo.com/s/nm/20080202/tv_nm/screenwriters_strike_dc

Hope?? This could be over by the end of next week?!!?! Lawdy, let this happen!! :thumbsup:

OC47150
02-03-2008, 11:54 AM
If it does pan out, I guess we could see a few new shows on by May.

Personally, this season is scrapped. Just focus on giving us quality programming for fall.

Jedi_Master_Guyute
02-09-2008, 11:25 AM
Looks like it's over. http://www.comingsoon.net/news/movienews.php?id=41798 :thumbsup::thumbsup:

And if you're wondering when your favorite shows could return, head here: http://community.tvguide.com/blog-entry/TVGuide-Editors-Blog/Ausiello-Report/Wga-Strike-Favorite/800032698 for some info. This is subject to change of course. :thumbsup:

Kidhuman
02-09-2008, 11:40 AM
Scrubs
Four pre-strike episodes remain. Four additional episodes will likely be shot; unclear whether they'll air on NBC or go straight to DVD.

They better air those 4 episodes.


Heroes
TBD.

I can see this waiting until fall.


Bionic Woman
No new episodes expected. Ever.

Sad, but I saw it coming


24
Expected to return this fall or January '09.

Saw that coming

General_Grievous
02-09-2008, 01:46 PM
Finally! TV is saved (sort of, but at least they don't have to wait until fall)! This should have happened three months ago.

OC47150
02-09-2008, 08:00 PM
I'm glad that some shows (CSI, for example) will be able to wrap up storylines.

The Bionic Woman not coming back is not a huge shock. It had potential but...

I'm a fan of Chuck and would like to see more episodes this season, but it the quality of writing can be guaranteed for next season I can wait.

Mad Slanted Powers
02-09-2008, 08:12 PM
The Bionic Woman not coming back is not a huge shock. It had potential but...

I'm a fan of Chuck and would like to see more episodes this season, but it the quality of writing can be guaranteed for next season I can wait.I concur. Of the shows I watch, Bionic Woman is the only one not returning. Some shows will have new episodes, others will wait until fall.

2-1B
02-10-2008, 10:55 AM
It's about time.

El Chuxter
02-11-2008, 12:15 AM
No new Pushing Daisies until fall?

Son of a Slicker's Mom. :mad:

Mad Slanted Powers
02-11-2008, 12:20 AM
That's better than the show actually pushing daisies. At least it will be back.

El Chuxter
02-12-2008, 10:37 PM
It's over!!!! (http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/hollywood_labor;_ylt=Aov3pnBtEAYifY8RQEKJuaKs0NUE)

Exhaust Port
02-12-2008, 10:58 PM
Alright! Bring on The Office!

El Chuxter
02-13-2008, 04:52 PM
Any word on when we can expect THE Daily Show and The Colbert Report (with correct pronunciation) to return?

I can't find much of anything. Even the official TDS site still has "The" crossed out and replaced with "A."

stillakid
02-13-2008, 05:02 PM
Any word on when we can expect THE Daily Show and The Colbert Report (with correct pronunciation) to return?

I can't find much of anything. Even the official TDS site still has "The" crossed out and replaced with "A."


On last night's show, Jon alluded to the writer's coming back today (Wednesday) or he would "kill them." So maybe today? :sur: The contract still has to be voted on by the membership and the votes counted. Not sure how long that takes.

El Chuxter
02-13-2008, 05:07 PM
Cool. I missed it last night, so I didn't see that.

Now we can actually see some of the presidential candidates (although, unfortunately, more than half have backed out by now). McCain is a regular on TDS, and Obama has apparently expressed interest in appearing on one or both. Only Huckabee has been crossing the picket lines (quite often, and it seems to be working, though he still has zero chance).

2-1B
02-13-2008, 08:11 PM
It's over!!!! (http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/hollywood_labor;_ylt=Aov3pnBtEAYifY8RQEKJuaKs0NUE)

the Gungan Army was a diversion.

Bel-Cam Jos
02-13-2008, 08:59 PM
the Gungan Army was a diversion.Wot? Wot did you say?

Now I can figure out why my life has had no meaning for the last three months or so. Or wait, I mean more meaning.

OC47150
02-13-2008, 09:14 PM
Saturday Night Live is hoping to be back on the air next Saturday, Feb. 23, if anyone (other than me) still watches.

Bel-Cam Jos
02-18-2008, 01:51 PM
What kinds of commercials do you think they'll run for returning shows?

Funny? Sarcastic? Remorseful? Ignoring the issue? Pandering? Thankful? Stupid?

OC47150
02-18-2008, 07:52 PM
I think ignoring the strike and saying something like 'they're back.'

And supposedly, Tina Fey is hosting SNL this weekend. I might have to skip it.

OC47150
03-06-2008, 09:02 PM
CBS has been running commericals with happy-looking actors going back to work.

sith_killer_99
08-16-2008, 07:52 PM
Ah, but they did not all return! Let us take some time to mourn the passing of such greats as:

The 4400
Bionic Woman
Journeyman
Jericho

Not to mention all the other shows people enjoyed. Thanks Writers Strike! You sucked!

I get it, they wanted their royalties, it's how they make their bread and butter, blah blah blah...

How many people lost their jobs because their shows got canceled as a direct result of the strike. The writers didn't seem to give a darn about those people, so why should we care about their little royalty dispute?

BLUF, it's bad enough to lose good television because the Networks make stupid decisions, but this whole thing just adds insult to injury.

Mad Slanted Powers
08-16-2008, 08:04 PM
At least they were able to wrap up Jericho. Bionic Woman was all right but I won't miss it too much. I was beginning to wonder what was up with The 4400 until I saw recently that it was cancelled. I often don't realize when those USA shows come back. Journeyman was getting really interesting. I'll miss that the most out of those four.

sith_killer_99
08-16-2008, 08:29 PM
I was seriously addicted to the 4400! I was with it from the start and have been a faithful fan for years. IMO, it was the best thing going on USA!

I wish they could have wrapped it up somehow.:cry:

Mad Slanted Powers
08-16-2008, 09:22 PM
I was seriously addicted to the 4400! I was with it from the start and have been a faithful fan for years. IMO, it was the best thing going on USA!

I wish they could have wrapped it up somehow.:cry:The guy who played Tom Baldwin actually appeared on Journeyman as Dan's father.

sith_killer_99
08-16-2008, 09:54 PM
The guy who played Tom Baldwin actually appeared on Journeyman as Dan's father.

Joel Gretsch - He also played Owen Crawford in the hit mini series "Taken". He has done a lot of work on various TV shows (Silk Stockings, Married with Childen, CSI: Miami, CSI: NY, Pacific Blue, Navy NCIS, Law & Order: Criminal Intent, JAG, Friends, and as you mentioned Journeyman.

He is also married to Melanie Shatner, daughter of William Shatner.

OC47150
08-17-2008, 12:30 PM
Ah, but they did not all return! Let us take some time to mourn the passing of such greats as:

The 4400
Bionic Woman
Journeyman
Jericho


CBS screwed Jericho during its '06 - '07 mid-winter break. It was building ratings before the break. After the break, the episodes were better but the ratings weren't there.

Bionic Woman was in trouble from the very start. Too many behind-the-scene changes. The biggest problem was, the show didn't know what it wanted to be. The last aired episode (Jamie delivering a package and then going to the spa) was the only episode that reminiscent of the 70s show.

Journeyman never had a chance.

There's another NBC show, Life, that had low ratings but given a second season. I taped a few episodes but didn't get around to watching them. I want to give this show a try.

Mad Slanted Powers
08-17-2008, 12:41 PM
Journeyman never had a chance.
I don't know. I thought that was a good Monday lineup with Chuck, Heroes and Journeyman. At least the other two are back.

OC47150
08-17-2008, 08:59 PM
I don't know. I thought that was a good Monday lineup with Chuck, Heroes and Journeyman. At least the other two are back.

It was a good lineup but Journeyman was just different enough where it wouldn't attract viewers.

Mad Slanted Powers
08-17-2008, 09:14 PM
I think maybe the time slot and the continued nature of it might have hurt it. People probably didn't want yet another show that they would have to keep track of what was going on from week to week, especially late at night on a Monday. Otherwise, it was a lot like Quantum Leap, but not quite as goofy.

UKWildcat
08-18-2008, 11:30 AM
I really enjoyed Chuck; looking forward to it's return. :thumbsup:

Jedi_Master_Guyute
08-18-2008, 11:43 AM
I really enjoyed Chuck; looking forward to it's return. :thumbsup:

I also enjoyed CHUCK, but I enjoyed his hot blonde lady pal even more. :thumbsup:

and I would argue that JERICHO was FAAAAAAAR from wrapped up as we were on the verge of another American Civil War; just how awesome would that have been to see?!!? But alas, I am happy we got SOME kind of closure. Effin' CBS. I have yet to watch their network since that cancellation as I said I would boycott anything they put on the air in primtime and i'm still going strong on that one. :whip:

JimJamBonds
08-19-2008, 05:15 PM
I really enjoyed Chuck; looking forward to it's return. :thumbsup:


I also enjoyed CHUCK, but I enjoyed his hot blonde lady pal even more. :thumbsup:

Ditto for me boys!