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View Full Version : I really hate fonts that won't allow PDF embedding



El Chuxter
01-23-2008, 02:32 AM
So a client wants an ad using some weirdo fonts, and none of them embed into PDF due to the permissions set by the creator. So I have to export the InDesign file to EPS, open it in Illustrator, convert all the text to images, then export it to PDF for approval. And, working with massive image files, this takes a damned long time for something that could be a five-minute process if the fonts acted like normal fonts.

I could've been in bed over an hour ago.

Just thought I'd share.

bigbarada
01-23-2008, 02:36 AM
What's the point of copywrighting a font, anyways? I mean has anyone ever actually been sued for using a font they weren't supposed to use?

El Chuxter
01-23-2008, 02:52 AM
I have no idea. No idea at all.

I always find it odd that Helvetica is one of the fonts that won't embed at all. However, everyone has Helvetica already, so I never worry about it.

darthvyn
01-23-2008, 08:40 AM
However, everyone has Helvetica already, so I never worry about it.

everyone using a mac, anyway. windows does NOT ship with helvetica installed because they felt it cost too much money, so they went for a cheaper, uglier clone/alternative (arial).

personally i like verdana and geneva better than the helvetica/arial family anyway.

CaptainSolo1138
01-23-2008, 09:01 AM
I like Kid Caps.

stillakid
01-23-2008, 09:20 AM
So a client wants an ad using some weirdo fonts, and none of them embed into PDF due to the permissions set by the creator. So I have to export the InDesign file to EPS, open it in Illustrator, convert all the text to images, then export it to PDF for approval. And, working with massive image files, this takes a damned long time for something that could be a five-minute process if the fonts acted like normal fonts.

I could've been in bed over an hour ago.

Just thought I'd share.


I discovered this by accident when I realized that my editor wasn't seeing the proper font that I had used in a Word document that I had turned into a .pdf. The entire point of creating the .pdf was so he could see the layout and fonts. I had to print pages and actually mail them. Very frustrating.

DarthQuack
01-23-2008, 09:42 AM
I like the M*A*S*H font.

El Chuxter
01-23-2008, 10:56 AM
I discovered this by accident when I realized that my editor wasn't seeing the proper font that I had used in a Word document that I had turned into a .pdf. The entire point of creating the .pdf was so he could see the layout and fonts. I had to print pages and actually mail them. Very frustrating.

Yeah, and Word is trickier, because Microsoft doesn't like its programs to place nicely with Adobe products. My previous boss wanted as much in Word as possible, and it's such an incredible pain to get tables and formatting to work properly on the PDF. At least I was using InDesign here, so I could export it to an EPS, then edit it so it could be an accurate PDF (though you lose the ability to select text). Like I said, it's a process that can tie up your computer for an hour or more, easy.

Mr. JabbaJohnL
01-23-2008, 08:26 PM
I use InDesign on the newspaper, and usually it works just fine, but I have spent many hours trying to fix inane s*** that shouldn't happen (mostly export problems). I love when it gets extremely near to the end of the exporting process and then just quits.

CaptainSolo1138
01-23-2008, 10:14 PM
I love when it gets extremely near to the end of the exporting process and then just quits.We're talking about the font conversion, not how long it takes you to do it. Let's keep it on topic here.:thumbsup:

JediTricks
01-24-2008, 10:59 PM
First off, I think both PDF and DOC formats suck, I am much happier putting stuff together in HTML where it's nearly always standardized and generally doesn't need a metric ton of formatting code or complication, plus anybody can f'ing read it and it's ridiculously easy to work with. That said, I use Open Office for my PDFs so I don't know what does or doesn't work with it, they're a little odd about PDFs.

Fonts are copyrighted artworks basically, someone actually designed those specific letters and wants to get paid for the time they put in through royalties, not to mention controlling how they're used. Then again, I don't buy fonts EVER, there's almost always something nearly as good for free, and unless it's a graphic I can't count on the end-user having the corresponding font to read it.

El Chuxter
01-25-2008, 12:34 AM
Yeah, but the printer wants PDF's, so I don't have a lot of say in that matter. :p

JediTricks
01-25-2008, 12:35 AM
Ugh, I hate printing. At least you don't have to do 4-color seps though.

El Chuxter
01-25-2008, 12:41 AM
No, thankfully they can do it, provided I give them a CMYK PDF. Color-match proofs are always a good thing, though. It'd be nice if someone could come up with a way to accurately represent CMYK colors on a monitor.

JediTricks
01-25-2008, 09:35 PM
What do you mean? I've never had any trouble viewing CMYK images on my computer, but I've never really thought about it either. Is there some issue with "real view" because monitors are RGB?

El Chuxter
01-25-2008, 09:53 PM
Since it's RGB, it's more subjective based on your monitor settings, which in turn depend on how far away you sit and the lighting. Sometimes they can come out not exactly right.

JediTricks
01-25-2008, 11:04 PM
Interesting, I had stopped thinking about such issues long ago but yeah, that's a good point. I think Adobe visual programs have systems for helping you set your settings and monitor to standard visual displays. I know Photoshop has had that for a while.