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View Full Version : Got your education where? America? *slaps forehead with hand*



JEDIpartner
06-12-2008, 02:04 PM
I was looking at a story on MSNBC and the caption underneath the photo made me stop dead in my tracks. It never fails to amaze me what a bunch of illiterate people many Americans are. It could be a typo, for sure, but the fact that an "s" was struck as opposed to a "c" when typing out the word "city" (and it was spelt correctly the first time), which I think might be a first grade level word, brings my mind to an absolute halt! This person is working for a news agency and it slipped through! Did no one run it through the spell checker? YIKES!!!!!

Apparently, a co-worker of mine saw a word spelt correctly AND incorrectly in the same sentence in a magazine she was reading the other day. Oh, the shame!! :whip:

El Chuxter
06-12-2008, 02:52 PM
That's nothing.

Watch the news crawls on any of the major news networks. The abuse of the English language is insulting to anyone who finished third grade.

JEDIpartner
06-12-2008, 03:55 PM
I know! I've seen some of those errors as well. This one, however, I could do a screen cap on and post! LOL

JediTricks
06-12-2008, 05:16 PM
Many people find typing regularly on the internet to turn their language centers from "written" to "verbal" mode, they start thinking in how they say things rather than how they spell things as they get more and more used to applying the internet as an expressive communications medium. That's what gets you a lot of "to" instead of "too", "there" or "their" instead of "they're", and "teh" & "pnwd" instead of... wait, that last one's just idiots.

I wouldn't fault the educational system for this, but rather in the changing nature of human interaction in relation to the technology. And let's be fair, while we can take issue with the incorrect spelling, we know exactly what the author meant; phonetically, the concept has been properly communicated.

Also, in defense of that author, it's clear he wasn't using spellcheck, so look at all the words he DID get right. :p News moves very fast, it's difficult to keep up when typing. I make about a dozen typing mistakes a minute, and while I currently have the luxury of time to correct them, ask Tycho and the gang who saw me in action at SDCC last year how much of a beast it was for me to type up Hasbro's lightning-fast SW panel.

So suck it, word snobs! ;)

El Chuxter
06-12-2008, 05:33 PM
I don't have a problem with the guy typing this out. Like you said, it's a rapid-turnaround profession, and people make misteaks al the tiem.

However, I think that these news sources, to maintain credibility, should hire copy editors, because they clearly don't have them now. Spelling something wrong on a discussion forum is one thing. Spelling something wrong on anything that is professionally released (news story, advertisement, product packaging, etc) is nigh unforgiveable, since it can destroy your credibility with more highly-educated or picky customers.

jedi master sal
06-12-2008, 06:08 PM
I don't have a problem with the guy typing this out. Like you said, it's a rapid-turnaround profession, and people make misteaks al the tiem.

However, I think that these news sources, to maintain credibility, should hire copy editors, because they clearly don't have them now. Spelling something wrong on a discussion forum is one thing. Spelling something wrong on anything that is professionally released (news story, advertisement, product packaging, etc) is nigh unforgiveable, since it can destroy your credibility with more highly-educated or picky customers.

Typically there are proofreaders for this stuff. But even they can miss things from time to time. So while the author may have been the originator of the error, if he has a proofreader, then the mistake falls on that person for not catching it.

Heck, I'm in printing and sometimes have to go through 3 or 4 rounds of "proofing" before the job is ready to be sent to the client for approval. It's either a case of me missing something the proofreader intended for me to fix, or something new the proofreader caught.

I don't worry about it too much. As long as you get the drift of it.

InsaneJediGirl
06-12-2008, 09:57 PM
I can understand some errors in online articles, especially during breaking news or recent events. Whoever is typing is probably trying to spit it out as fast as she/he can in order to keep ahead of the other networks.

What drives me nuts is errors in newspapers though. The AJC is chock full of them, but I dont find that suprising living in Georgia. Its hard to find someone who has completed elementary school ;)

Old Fossil
06-12-2008, 09:59 PM
What does "pnwd" mean, please?

UKWildcat
06-12-2008, 10:21 PM
It's actually "pwned (http://www.urbandictionary.com/define.php?term=pwned)" or "pwnd (http://www.urbandictionary.com/define.php?term=pwnd)"

Darth Jax
06-13-2008, 12:02 AM
America may not always be the home of the brightest, but it's still where those who can afford it seek health care and higher education.

Maradona
06-13-2008, 12:47 AM
English, like every other language, is in constant flux. We don't speak like Shakespeare, who didn't speak like Chaucer, who didn't speak like whoever wrote Beowulf (please forgive the syntactical sin of multiple negatives in the same sentence). With the advent of texting and instant messaging, the modern language is being reduced to shorthand. If you're a high school English teacher, you see this battle from the front lines on a daily basis.

Everything will be Newspeak before you know it...

JediTricks
06-13-2008, 02:35 AM
English, like every other language, is in constant flux. We don't speak like Shakespeare, who didn't speak like Chaucer, who didn't speak like whoever wrote Beowulf (please forgive the syntactical sin of multiple negatives in the same sentence). With the advent of texting and instant messaging, the modern language is being reduced to shorthand. If you're a high school English teacher, you see this battle from the front lines on a daily basis.

Everything will be Newspeak before you know it...
"whomever". ;)


Leet (or 133t as the idiots call it, short for "elite" ironically enough) is unacceptable language, there is absolutely no excuse for it beyond informal text conversation. I find it galling that young people are actually trying to shoehorn this garbage into their schoolwork (I read an article about this a while back, which is how I can have such outrage now :p). My 10-year-old niece can barely read at 5th grade level (which she's graduating next week, thanks "No Child Left Behind" for lowering educational quality and standards until it's impossible to fail because it's there's no expectations of advancing knowledge) but of course knows what "lolz" said phonetically means, and even she thankfully doesn't try to pass off that garbage in her schoolwork.

Sorry 133t, u just got PWN'D by teh mastr,,, bIg TiMe!!!!!!!!!111

plasticfetish
06-13-2008, 05:49 AM
...thanks "No Child Left Behind" for lowering educational quality and standards until it's impossible to fail because...I wouldn't blame "No Child Left Behind" for that. Though I'd blame it for a huge list of other things, the one thing it does do is force the schools to narrow their teaching focus to those subjects that they'll be tested on. This teaching to test scores (reading and math) has done a lot to push things like art, science and history to the wayside, but for sure the schools focus on reading comprehension.

If anything, the misery of having to be tested and retested, and the stress that's pushed upon the kids as a result, does nothing to build enthusiasm for reading.

...but anyway, damn... I need to give my aunt who lives in Iowa a call in the morning! Hope her sity ;) isn't flooded.

CaptainSolo1138
06-13-2008, 01:33 PM
It's actually "pwned (http://www.urbandictionary.com/define.php?term=pwned)" or "pwnd (http://www.urbandictionary.com/define.php?term=pwnd)"
I saw a license plate yesterday that was IPWNJOO.

I freakin' lalwed mightily.

JediTricks
06-13-2008, 05:57 PM
I saw a license plate yesterday that was IPWNJOO.

I freakin' lalwed mightily.
Anti-semitic pwnage, that's so wrong!


And isn't it "lawled"?

CaptainSolo1138
06-13-2008, 09:44 PM
Anti-semitic pwnage, that's so wrong!
Also, it was on a Volkswagen. No, not really.


And isn't it "lawled"?Speaking of joo, grammar Nazi...;)

I didn't even notice that, since spell check isn't a fan of the "properly" spelled version, either.

bigbarada
06-14-2008, 01:57 AM
When I was in the Army, we would frequently see a sentence like this one on the Company whiteboard:

0900 PLT LDR MTG BN CONF RM

Which translates as: "There will be a Platoon Leader meeting at 9:00 AM in the Battalion Conference Room."

So it's not necessarily a lack of education, just the result of people learning to communicate faster and more concisely.

Not saying it's necessarily a good thing, but nobody should be expecting to find Shakespeare in any sort of day to day communication.

plasticfetish
06-14-2008, 04:44 AM
Not saying it's necessarily a good thing, but nobody should be expecting to find Shakespeare in any sort of day to day communication.You know it's funny, but I've always thought that there was something interesting about the way slang develops. I've a slang dictionary from the '20s or '30s around somewhere, that's very cool. And yeah, like you said, not exactly Shakespeare, but just the same there is something clever about how these things develop and evolve.

CaptainSolo1138
06-14-2008, 09:29 AM
So it's not necessarily a lack of education, just the result of people learning to communicate faster and more concisely.That's actually a fine point. While "pwnd" is certainly no formal replacement for "owned", I'm not sure there is anyone under the age of, say, 30 who doesn't now what it means.

As far as military efficieny goes in terms of this, I'm reading Dick Winters' memoirs right now and it actually kind of bothers me that something like "2nd" is written out as "2d". Is that extra "n" too much to ask for?

Maradona
06-14-2008, 10:09 AM
You know it's funny, but I've always thought that there was something interesting about the way slang develops. I've a slang dictionary from the '20s or '30s around somewhere, that's very cool. And yeah, like you said, not exactly Shakespeare, but just the same there is something clever about how these things develop and evolve.

Often, when people think of proper English, or worse when some erroneously cite Old English, they think Shakespeare, who was decidedly Middle English. Actually, half of the dialogue used by Shakespeare was slang for the day. He had the uncanny ability to write for queens and bar maids in a dialect that had appeal to both. This is central to the point of how language evolves. Slang is probably one of the most important factors in the development of language.

Maradona
06-14-2008, 10:11 AM
"whomever". ;)



Though the period should go inside the quotation marks, I sit gratefully corrected. :)

bigbarada
06-14-2008, 11:04 AM
Often, when people think of proper English, or worse when some erroneously cite Old English, they think Shakespeare, who was decidedly Middle English. Actually, half of the dialogue used by Shakespeare was slang for the day. He had the uncanny ability to write for queens and bar maids in a dialect that had appeal to both. This is central to the point of how language evolves. Slang is probably one of the most important factors in the development of language.

The term "Shakespeare" has become a figure of speech for "fancy, proper English" and isn't necessarily a reference to the writings of William Shakespeare anymore. Just like saying something "weighs a ton" when the object most likely weighs considerably less than a ton. Or telling someone to "answer the door" when the door never asked them a question.:)

Darth Jax
06-14-2008, 11:53 AM
Or telling someone to "answer the door" when the door never asked them a question.:)

The doors ask questions on the heart of gold and the Doors want to know your name, won't you tell me your name.

JediTricks
06-14-2008, 05:25 PM
Though the period should go inside the quotation marks, I sit gratefully corrected. :)I actually knew it went inside, but I refuse to subscribe to the "inside the quotation marks punctuation" for sentences, it makes no sense to me to have punctuation regarding the external sentence's structure inside a quotation. You'll find that I rarely use it, maybe once or twice out of 24,000+ posts, because I believe in its use not properly conveying the concept to the reader. Then again, I use too many commas. But I properly use the "s-apostrophe" for ownership, so you see "Lucas'" where most folks write "Lucas's" (which is generally regarded as acceptable these days, but looks silly to me, even if Lucas is an *** ;)).



The doors ask questions on the heart of gold and the Doors want to know your name, won't you tell me your name.Nice Hitchhiker's Guide ref!

Maradona
06-14-2008, 09:23 PM
Then again, I use too many commas.

We can never use enough commas!!! Or exclamation points. Or fragmented sentences. Or sentences incorrectly beginning with conjunctions. Or repetition of said incorrect sentences.


Gone, sadly, are the days when grammar was taught in between episodes of Mighty Orbots or Superfriends on channel 7...

bigbarada
06-15-2008, 12:07 AM
I; think; I; use; too; many; semicolons.