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Old Fossil
08-30-2008, 11:46 PM
Well guys, things round here in the Deep South are gonna get pretty scary over the next couple of days. Hurricane Gustav is looking to wipe New Orleans (and south Louisiana generally) off the map.

It may just sputter and fade out, dumping a lot of rain and blowing down a few trees between Mobile and Galveston. Hard to tell with these things. Nobody around here (about 150 miles inland from the MS Gulf Coast) is taking any chances, though. Store shelves are wiped clean of canned goods, water, gas cans. You'd probably have to go to Memphis to buy a generator. Local hotel parking lots are full of cars with Louisiana and MS Gulf Coast license plates. New Orleans will begin mandatory evacuations tomorrow.

We at my house have done all that we can do -- stocking up on groceries, bottled water, ice, snacks. Filled up both vehicles, and filled up 4 cans of gasoline for the generator. My in-laws, who live in Pascagoula, are staying with us for the next few days (at least) (Joy!:tired:).

I'm alternately exhausted and panicked. Three years after Katrina, and now it looks like it's going to happen all over again, maybe to even greater and worse effect. Three years afterward, and I still have dreams from time to time about trees falling down and tornadoes.

Manitoba is looking better and better...:rolleyes:

Anyway... I don't expect I'll get to post much after tomorrow. I expect power to be out for days, if not weeks. I just ask that y'all all just keep us in your thoughts. To all those other forumites here at SSG who live in Gustav's path: Good luck, and keep your head down!

Neuroleptic
08-31-2008, 12:31 AM
It's a conspiracy by the government to jump start the economy I say!

Though, seriously I wish you all well and I hope it gose . . . maybe to mexico or somehow manages to hit a relatively low populated reagion of the gulf coast.

When ever a huricain heads for New Orliens I worry about the few family I have that still live there. I also have nightmares about my mom's coffin being washed out of her grave and going on a journy through the french quarter. I know she's dead and all, but it never has sat well with me that it will probably eventualy happen.

TeeEye7
08-31-2008, 01:26 AM
My thoughts are with you, Old Fossil.

I have family in Lafayette, Louisiana and worry every hurricane season. Some of the weather computer models have Gustav's path heading that way, so it gives me pause for concern.

My dad was in the oil biz and we were transferred to New Orleans (from California) during my senior year of high school. I'm well aware of the mindset in the Gulf Coast during hurricane season. I went through one a few months after we resided there. It was a wimpy category 1 and quickly diminished once it came on shore. We were scared, though, listening to the reports and not knowing what to expect. I'm used to earthquakes, not driving wind and rain!

I'm hoping all goes well for you. Gustav has the potential to become a category 5. That doesn't bode well.

As for Manitoba....well, maybe you should consider Ontario, instead. You've got several SSG connections there! ;)

Be safe! My thoughts are with you and your family!

TI7

bobafrett
08-31-2008, 09:24 AM
By the title of the thread, I thought we had another wedding announcement. But this is not good news. May the storm miss you.

pegger
08-31-2008, 09:33 PM
Manitoba is looking better and better...:rolleyes:



Hey! I'm originally from Manitoba.

It's a great province....to be from.

ps - stay safe. - we're praying for ya.

Jargo
08-31-2008, 09:42 PM
I'll be thinking of you O.F. Hope things hold together and if you end up in Oz, bring us back a flying monkey.

seriously, hang in there dude. hope none of you guys get hurt.

TeeEye7
09-01-2008, 04:11 PM
As I type this, the eye of Gustav is traveling over Lafayette, Louisiana, where my aunt lives. I'll be anxious to see what happens. Three years ago, when Rita blasted through, my aunt only had damage to a few trees.

Thankfully, Gustav is losing his punch. He's been downgraded to a category 1.

Jargo
09-01-2008, 05:24 PM
Just saw that Hannah is following Gustav. Man that's so freakish.


seriously, seriously hope all you guys out that way are ok.

Old Fossil
09-02-2008, 09:03 PM
Thanks for the well-wishes, everyone. We made it through okay, mostly some large branches and numerous smaller limbs down in our yard, and some flooding locally in my small town.

TeeEye, have you heard from your aunt in Lafayette? Louisiana got some heavy rains. Hope she's okay.

Neuroleptic, I saw where the levees in New Orleans held up fine. Interesting to know your mom's resting place is there. Does your family have much history in N.O.?

TeeEye7
09-03-2008, 11:50 AM
TeeEye, have you heard from your aunt in Lafayette? Louisiana got some heavy rains. Hope she's okay.


Haven't heard from her yet, but I believe all is well judging from some reports I watched on the 'net from the local TV stations. It seems the city fared well in spite of Gustav. Thanks for your concern, OF.

Speaking of concern: you may want to keep an eye on Ike, the next visitor from the east. Hannah looks to affect the east coast, but some early computer models have Ike making landfall between Mobile and Pensacola. That's close enough to cause you some problems, for sure!

Jargo
09-03-2008, 02:13 PM
OMG! who names these hurricanes? massive destructive winds and they're given names of cuddly grandparents.

i'm not very clued up about hurricanes as we don't really get that kind of weather here but is it normal to have a series of twisters following one another like this? I mean so closely. I know ocean twisters can appear in groups very close together but i figured they were smaller and fizzled out before they hit land. or am i being completely dumb and clueless here.

Neuroleptic
09-03-2008, 04:01 PM
Tornados can form very close together. And they can move over water (called Water Spouts because they toss water in a streem kinda like when you use a water fountan only on a much larger scale) and they can move from water to land (then calling them tornados).

They can appear in groups, and be very close together. Matter of fact, there is one theory that large tornados are several small tornados spinning around a centeral axis. I'v also seen pictures of two or three thin tornados twisted around eachother like DNA strands. There can also be many of them in the same storm, though individual ones are more common.

Strong tornados can even travel up and down hills and into valleys.

Manhattan Kansas found this out this year when a EF4 tornado went all the way through the center of town in a nice big diagonal pattern. I found it rather ammusing how many people where like "OMG! I can't belive we got hit by a tornado because we live in a vally!

My reply to them was, "Dude, we live in Kansas. What did you expect?"

And Hurricanse spawn them like crazy.

Neuroleptic
09-03-2008, 04:04 PM
Neuroleptic, I saw where the levees in New Orleans held up fine. Interesting to know your mom's resting place is there. Does your family have much history in N.O.?

Yes. My mom and dads families are both from there and have lived in the area since before the civil war. But after Katrina MOST of them moved away. There are still a few die hards though, who refuse to leave (even temporarily for hurricanes like Katrina).

Jargo
09-03-2008, 04:40 PM
forgive my ignorance. like i said we rarely get any here and when we do they're usually tiny ones that zip down a street only damaging one side and barely damaging stuff at that. we tend to just get mega wind gusts the fiercest at about 100mph.
my house is right in the path of a wind channel so during the winter we get battered and the house shakes. with all the weird weather fronts we've had in recent years though that can happen during the summer too. it's damn scarey and i guess I'd find twisters pretty traumatic.
the wind is the only element that tuly bothers me.
you guys over there have earthquakes and flash fires and twisters to contend with so it's a bit humbling for me.

TeeEye7
09-03-2008, 08:26 PM
;) Here's some info I think an emperor could use:

http://www.nhc.noaa.gov/aboutnames.shtml

bobafrett
09-04-2008, 07:00 AM
Sweet, in 2013, there is already a Hurricane with my name on it!

Jargo
09-04-2008, 09:03 AM
thanks TI. I guess the names are inoccuous to downplay the danger and not cause panic. 'Mighty destroyer of worlds' wouldn't be the best name for one.

can i just ask, to those of you that face hurricanes every year, how do you deal with it? does it play on your mind, are there people who literally barricade themselves inside impenetrable fortress like homes or is there a sort of "meh, sith happens" attitude?

TeeEye7
09-04-2008, 11:45 AM
thanks TI. I guess the names are inoccuous to downplay the danger and not cause panic. 'Mighty destroyer of worlds' wouldn't be the best name for one.

You're very welcome, sir!

I think "Slicker's Mom" would incite mass hysteria, too!


Sweet, in 2013, there is already a Hurricane with my name on it!

Interesting. Although spelled a bit differently, mabs and I are both on the list for 2010. Must have something to do with the fact that we share birthdays, too!

Oh, and I've look really hard, you'll find 2-1B's name in 2012!

Old Fossil
09-04-2008, 07:26 PM
thanks TI. I guess the names are inoccuous to downplay the danger and not cause panic. 'Mighty destroyer of worlds' wouldn't be the best name for one.

can i just ask, to those of you that face hurricanes every year, how do you deal with it? does it play on your mind, are there people who literally barricade themselves inside impenetrable fortress like homes or is there a sort of "meh, sith happens" attitude?

I for one can't wait for Hurricane Hannibal.:cross-eye

Anyway... Jargo, I've dealt with hurricane threats since Katrina with a mixture of anxiety, panic, and some terror. I have dreams from time to time of tornadoes, and of trees falling down around me, and those dreams seem to come more often when there is a tropical storm or hurricane threat.

I live about 150 miles inland. Our area is what is called locally "The Pine Belt," which includes extensive longleaf and shortleaf pines; it stretches intermittently from east Texas all the way to the Carolinas. Our pines grow very quickly: a 30-year old pine tree is usually too big for me to put my arms around. And our house, though within the city limits, is pretty much inside this forest. When it storms, the pines and other trees are whipping around, and there is usually a lot of limbs and pine cones for me to clean up afterwards.

Many homeowners in our area had their pines cut down after Katrina, for their own peace of mind. I understand their concern, but I love our trees, despite the anxiety they give me in storms (especially hurricanes). They are great for wildlife and help shade our house from the hot Southern summer sun.

The most we can do when a hurricane threatens is to keep the generator ready, stock up on gasoline, canned goods, bottled water, batteries, and candles. But there are some fools here who simply go on about their daily life with little or no preparation when a hurrican threatens, and their mindset (denial, or whatever) almost makes me angry.

I suppose living with that threat is the price we here pay for living so close to the tropics.