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View Full Version : Tesla...how about one for the rest of us?



sith_killer_99
09-25-2008, 11:52 PM
Have you all seen this new Tesla electric car?

http://www.teslamotors.com/

SWEET!

100% electric, 244 miles per charge, 0-60 in 3.9 seconds and super swwet styling. This thing shows a LOT of promise.

Now for the down side, $109,000!

Okay, I get it, new technology is always more expensive.

So here's what I would like to see. A toned down design with a MUCH lower sticker price. I'm picturing a Honda Del Sol type car for the regular crowd with a reasonable price range of $20,000 - $30,000. I say, give it about 4-5 years, build up the company, increase production and distribution capabilities and this could catch on like wildfire.

Of course, given the limited range, this would really be more of an "around town" or "back and forth to work" kind of car, but it still looks promising.

Thoughts?

bobafrett
09-26-2008, 09:28 AM
I thought this thread was about the rock band Tesla, of which I am a fan. *sigh*

I like the car, wouldn't make for a good pizza delivery vehicle though.

Blue2th
09-26-2008, 12:01 PM
Great, but just give me a Mercedes Station Wagon (to hold all my toy hauls) converted to bio-diesel, and I'll go from coast to coast on french fry grease. Let's see, there's a McDonalds in every town.

Or for that mater let me buy one of the new European Ford Fiestas that gets 65 miles per gallon on diesel, that Ford refuses to sell in the U.S.

JediTricks
10-03-2008, 03:57 PM
In late 2006, my mother learned about the Tesla Roadster and saw that it was on display at the LA Auto Show right then, so I said "let's go" and we all headed down there. It was tucked away in a little spot with some tire company, and it was tres cool. Having recently fallen in love with the Lotus Elise, which the Tesla body is partly based on, it was the first electric car easy on the eyes and exciting to match. And its charge-up time and distance were greater than previous electric cars. At first nobody was paying attention to it, but the second we tried to photograph it, all of a sudden it was a hit with a crowd.

In late 2007 we went back to the auto show and saw it again, they had a near-production model there, this time in blue instead of red, and it was a LITTLE easier to photograph but still had plenty of attention on it. I only got 3 usable pics, but one shot is of the plug-in port and another is of the 2-speed gearshift (the transmission is hand-crafted and a big part of why it was delayed):
http://blog.myspace.com/index.cfm?fuseaction=blog.view&friendID=68319007&blogID=333255244

To be honest though, if I had $100k, I'd buy the Nissan GT-R for $70k and $30k on gas. ;) If I had $1mil though, I'd buy 'em both.

pbarnard
10-03-2008, 04:40 PM
The only thing about electric cars is the increased demand they put on a problemed electric grid. Basically while they cut green house gasses on the road, they increase the power plants. It's a start, and I'd really like to see if this one company that can turn algae into gasoline is going to take off as well.

Blue2th
10-03-2008, 05:32 PM
The only thing about electric cars is the increased demand they put on a problemed electric grid. Basically while they cut green house gasses on the road, they increase the power plants. It's a start, and I'd really like to see if this one company that can turn algae into gasoline is going to take off as well.

My thoughts as well. Unless they start supplying power from wind and solar energy which is limitless. People drive around in electric cars, but they don't seem to realize they are still making an environmental footprint bigger than they think.

I think alternative fuels is the best answer. Make stuff that burns without much hydro-carbon emissions. We wouldn't have to scrap all of our cars.
The original diesel engine ran on peanut oil.

cookiemonster
10-07-2008, 08:29 PM
Hell just go back to horse and carriage, it works and its proven, lol.

Blue2th
10-08-2008, 12:21 AM
Hell just go back to horse and carriage, it works and its proven, lol.
I want to do that so bad.
My band played at a bar in the mountains on the outskirts of town, and a cook there on his night off, rode his horse to the bar. First time I had ever seen something like that.

JediTricks
10-09-2008, 04:14 AM
My thoughts as well. Unless they start supplying power from wind and solar energy which is limitless.Except for personal solar and wind systems, those would not change the issue of increased draw on the ill-prepared electrical infrastructure.


People drive around in electric cars, but they don't seem to realize they are still making an environmental footprint bigger than they think.

I think alternative fuels is the best answer. Make stuff that burns without much hydro-carbon emissions. We wouldn't have to scrap all of our cars.
The original diesel engine ran on peanut oil.Growing plants to fuel this creates a footprint as well. Also, the peanut oil solution wouldn't even be legal in California, where there's a freeze on selling new diesels because of the amount of sulfur emissions they produce (my dad has an old Mercedes 240d diesel that he runs mostly on biodiesel), and peanut oil produced quite a lot of sulfur.

By the way, we need to consider that the internal combustion engine running on gasoline is one of the most energy-efficient powerplants of all time, for everyday driving you're not going to get better performance out of a diesel or strength or speed out of a horse or distance out of an electric car. And this engine is the most common powerplant on the planet with a whopping level of support infrastructure, so it is going to be a lot more difficult to find a truly suitable replacement than simple quick fixes like electric cars and biodiesel for that. Personally, I like the idea of the algae that a small biotech firm is using to create a non-petroleum-based gasoline which wouldn't require reinventing the car and its existing infrastructure.

Blue2th
10-09-2008, 11:53 AM
I did not know that about peanut oil. When I did work for Ford the 2008 diesel models were a lot less stinky with the new sulfur reduction. Made a difference when you pulled them into the shop. Less gagging.

New forms of gasoline is the best answer. I mean most of us can't buy any new cars, and have to make do with what we have.

Brazil runs most of it's cars on gas made from sugar cane mixed with petrol.

Though it's petroleum, I know that natural gas when put through some sort of condensator on site where they drilled it turns into liquid fuel. (we used to steal it in high school with a bucket and a monkey wrench) Though low octane and lots of pinging, it burned fine, and from what I hear is less emissions.
I can see why T Bone Pickins wants to develop this. (other thread)

pbarnard
10-09-2008, 01:39 PM
I think alternative fuels is the best answer. Make stuff that burns without much hydro-carbon emissions. We wouldn't have to scrap all of our cars.
The original diesel engine ran on peanut oil.


That's sort of impossible. By its very definition, combustion gives off water and C02 as byproducts. Now you can make low emitters, but you trade off power because energy capture by combustion is reduced, but you still emit C02 and whatever else. Living in Iowa, we have ethanol blended fuel (different from E85). We get slightly less gas milage because we don't have as many hydrocarbons being combusted, however, the footprint to make it is debateable on how much we're actually reducing (corn stalk vs corn meal ethanol). Either way, Cedar Rapids smells of it, and there are giant stills popping up all over the state.

El Chuxter
10-09-2008, 01:46 PM
Tesla for everyone (http://www.amazon.com/Forever-More-Tesla/dp/B001EKUI34/ref=pd_bbs_sr_1?ie=UTF8&s=music&qid=1223574256&sr=8-1), released just Tuesday!

Qui-Long Gone
10-09-2008, 05:37 PM
Not too bad....their music is less painful than, say, getting pistol whipped in the crotch after ridding a horse for two weeks.....but on the whole I thought their music was terrific.....




for me......





to poop on! :bandit:

JediTricks
10-09-2008, 07:20 PM
I did not know that about peanut oil. When I did work for Ford the 2008 diesel models were a lot less stinky with the new sulfur reduction. Made a difference when you pulled them into the shop. Less gagging.Yeah, i think the sulfur-reduction actually is enough to satisfy Cali's needs so the govt is lifting the ban, but I'm not sure. But peanut oil puts out a lot of sulfur from what I've read, it's the oil you don't want to use if you can avoid it.


Brazil runs most of it's cars on gas made from sugar cane mixed with petrol.I think it's a lower octane though, like 83 or 85, that's what some of these E85 flexfuel concepts we're starting to see badged on cars is. Some of our cars can run on it ok, others cannot. We run our gas mixed with ethanol too though, just not based on sugar (ours is corn) and not at such high concentrations because ethanol burns differently, is less stable, and increases wear.



Anyway, one of the biggest problems with electric cars is that battery technology has sorta stalled out, there's no way to pack more energy into batteries than we already do, so the only thing to do is either to make them more efficient at using the power they have, or wait for a new technology to carry more power in a lighter format - and neither have proved to be all that realistic.

pbarnard
10-10-2008, 12:48 PM
I think it's a lower octane though, like 83 or 85, that's what some of these E85 flexfuel concepts we're starting to see badged on cars is. Some of our cars can run on it ok, others cannot. We run our gas mixed with ethanol too though, just not based on sugar (ours is corn) and not at such high concentrations because ethanol burns differently, is less stable, and increases wear.

Not octane, but percentage in the mix. It is 85% ethanol 15% petroleum (usually around 89 octane). Ethanol is actually more stable than gasoline chemically and has a lower flash point. It does increase wear but it is because the amount of energy released when burned in having on 1 carbon carbon bonds as opposed to the 7 of reined gasoline does requires slightly more work. The average ethanol blend one buys in the midwest is reversed. Octane is a whole different animal that refers to what structural isomer and how much of it is in a certain refined gasoline. While octane of fuel is quantifieable, it really is arcane how it was determined originally (the sound of an engine running it).