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View Full Version : How Long Did It Take You To Get In To Vote?



Tycho
11-04-2008, 10:43 AM
This is not a political thread, so go into the Rancor Pit for discussion about the candidates. (Type R-A-N-C-O-R like the instructions say, and you're in)

This specific thread is about our historic election with probably the highest voter turn-out in our nation's history.

At my apartment complex, one of the club rooms is always set up as a polling place.

I went down at 6:58am (polls in California open at 7am) and I had to wait in line for almost exactly 1 hour. There were probably 100 people ahead of me who were already waiting to vote.

It even started to rain on us - but it was more like a few light sprinkles here and there - but enough to get the pavement wet.

There were hot college girls next to me in line. One had a little poodle dog with its own drivers' license attached to its collar. (However, the election officials did not allow the dog to vote).

There were a lot of issues on California's ballot to vote on, including 11 statewide initiatives, and at least 5 or 6 city ordinances affecting San Diego (like we had to vote on whether to permanently outlaw drinking on the beach here).

Also, the election saw people in my hometown voting for their representatives in Congress and our California State government.

I think it helped tremendously, if people had read their voter information early and knew exactly how they were going to vote before they showed up at the polls.

We allowed early voting at the Registrar of Voters, too - but there were hours-long lines for people voting early even a week or more back.

There are a lot of election-returns parties going on tonight, where you can go hang out and find out who won. The House of Blues here in San Diego is throwing a big one, with giant screens tuned in to the election results.

My apartment complex is setting up one of the Rec Rooms with caterered food and drinks, so all the neighbors can get together. (This is the event I'm planning to attend).

Want to make a LOT of friends really fast? A couple of hours before your state's polls close, say you're an UNDECIDED VOTER (even if you've already voted) - and watch people try and talk to you, buy you meals, and drive you to polling places. This is a great way to meet college girls who are volunteering on campaigns. Just say something like "I'm leaning towards ______ but I think _______ also has some good ideas I can agree with." Then let your new friend do all the talking! This really works. (But don't actually vote more than once!)

Anyway, what was your voting experience like?

Old Fossil
11-04-2008, 10:48 AM
I voted at the county courthouse at 7:30 this morning, and only had to wait about ten minutes. However, by the time I got done a few minutes later, the line was to the front door, with more cars pulling in.

mtriv73
11-04-2008, 10:56 AM
I waited no time whatsoever. I walked in, walked right up to the check in, and then straight over to the voting machine. Of course I went at 8:30 AM when the early morning rush was apparently over.

JetsAndHeels
11-04-2008, 11:11 AM
I voted last Thursday, and the voting part itself only took me about a total of 10 minutes.

After voting, I spent 25 minutes begging the election officials to give me stuff to use at our school's mock election.

LusiferSam
11-04-2008, 12:24 PM
Well I spent about 40 minutes in line. Which wasn't too bad. I've waited longer in line, for less relevant things. It took me under 10 minutes to actually vote. Other than a couple of local things I had pretty much made my mind up.

On a totally off topic subject the person in line behind me was a friend from high school I've not talked to in years. So it was great caching up with her. So good things happen when you vote.

Tycho
11-04-2008, 12:57 PM
I've waited longer in line, for less relevant things.

Like Star Wars movies and Midnite Madness toy releases? :D

Nah. Who here does that? ;)


On a totally off topic subject the person in line behind me was a friend from high school I've not talked to in years. So it was great caching up with her. So good things happen when you vote.

Cool. Yeah, there are a lot of young people turning out to vote!

I just got done waiting in the line again. I just told the people I was talking to that I couldn't stay and had to come back and vote later. Hehe.

It's still raining here and I can make friends fast by buying a few folks in line a cup of warm coffee. There's a coffee shop right on the other side of the driveway from our polling location.

Right now, there was about 25 people in line - only about 1/8 as many as this morning.

I came in for a little bit to watch some of the news pundits and make this post. Later, I will get back in the line again to enjoy the company of the next group of voters.

UKWildcat
11-04-2008, 02:07 PM
It took me all of 3 minutes to vote. :thumbsup:

El Chuxter
11-04-2008, 03:32 PM
About two years.

sith_killer_99
11-04-2008, 04:59 PM
Absentee, so it depends on your point of view. A couple of weeks...or a few minutes. lol

bigbarada
11-04-2008, 05:12 PM
I did early voting last week and there was no waiting at all.

Just curious, what kind of system did everyone use to vote? When I was in New Mexico, our voting was completely electronic, kind of like using an ATM. However, here in Montgomery County, IL we voted on large sheets of paper with bubbles that we filled in using an ink pen, then fed them into a machine to be counted.

One of the weird things is that many of the local offices I was voting for were unopposed Democrats. So you basically either voted for the guy or didn't vote at all. I would have thought there would at least be an option for a write-in. That was a little strange.

bobafrett
11-04-2008, 05:36 PM
I did early voting last week and there was no waiting at all.

I went in around 4 p.m. after I got off of work, and picked up my wife. No line what so ever. I was a little disappointed, I had expected to be in a long line, like I had heard about on the news.


Just curious, what kind of system did everyone use to vote? When I was in New Mexico, our voting was completely electronic, kind of like using an ATM. However, here in Montgomery County, IL we voted on large sheets of paper with bubbles that we filled in using an ink pen, then fed them into a machine to be counted.

Here in Dupage county it was the same with the black ink pen, fill in the circle completely, stick into the machine when done.


One of the weird things is that many of the local offices I was voting for were unopposed Democrats. So you basically either voted for the guy or didn't vote at all. I would have thought there would at least be an option for a write-in. That was a little strange.

I thought that strange too. We had many positions with no opposition running, but no place to put a write in canidate. I forgot to ask if we could leave the spot blank if we didn't want to vote for that canidate. I had planned on entering the names of dark side Star Wars characters.

LTBasker
11-04-2008, 06:26 PM
It was pretty quick to vote here, of course it's a small town so I didn't really expect it to be too bad in the morning. We got there at exactly 7am, and I was back home by 7:30.

It was a little church that hosted the voting, and they had a long table set up with 4 different spots to line up at in order to sign the book. After signing a book they handed you a ballot sheet and you went to a table - which had partitions for privacy - to fill it out. Then, you just line up in one last line to slide the tip of your ballot sheet into this machine and it pulls it in the rest of the way. I was a little disappointed that it there wasn't a better layout for it, several of the tables where you would fill out your form were nearly in the middle of the lines. Due to that, people were preferring to use the furthest back ones which required the most waiting for.

Of course, it wasn't all bad... I got to stand behind a really hot girl with an amazing back-side.

bigbarada
11-04-2008, 06:33 PM
Here in Dupage county it was the same with the black ink pen, fill in the circle completely, stick into the machine when done.


I've been watching the news, so I can keep up with the results and apparently the ballots we used are referred to as "optical scan" ballots and they are one of the new, more controversial methods.

Personally, I don't know why they are controversial, I like the idea of physically marking my choice on a piece of paper rather than just pressing a button on a computer.

Kidhuman
11-04-2008, 07:04 PM
Took me over an hour to vote this morning. Ended up being late for work.

Blue2th
11-04-2008, 07:11 PM
I did early voting last week and there was no waiting at all.

Just curious, what kind of system did everyone use to vote? When I was in New Mexico, our voting was completely electronic, kind of like using an ATM. However, here in Montgomery County, IL we voted on large sheets of paper with bubbles that we filled in using an ink pen, then fed them into a machine to be counted.


New Mexico has the large sheets of paper now also. I voted absentee a little over a week ago.

Bel-Cam Jos
11-04-2008, 07:30 PM
I went after work, since I was at work before the polls opened. My polling place is down the street from where I live, so I always walk there, if the weather permits (it was cool, cloudy, and breezy, but the morning's rain was gone). Brought my SW: Order 66 book to stand in line. Overall, from standing in line to walking out, it was about 20 maximum.

p.s. They ran out of "I Voted" stickers. :( :noproofivoted:

Daryl VayDar
11-04-2008, 07:45 PM
I went to the polls about 8 am and the line was really long so I thought I'd let the early folks finish before I went. I did some shopping and went back around 10, the line was a bit shorter so I hopped in...took about 50 minutes to get through the 70 or 80 people ahead of me. We used the fill-in-the-oval style ballot here in Michigan.

bobafrett
11-04-2008, 08:00 PM
Took me over an hour to vote this morning. Ended up being late for work.

Wal-Mart gave us two hours to vote. Our manager said that if we were gone on a 2 hour 45 minute lunch, it wouldn't be held against us. Most of the department management associates chose to leave work 2 hours early. I left work at 3:30 to beat the folks who were getting out at 5 pm.

2-1B
11-04-2008, 08:06 PM
5 minutes in and out.

bigB, I had to complete an arrow next to the person's name to mark them as my choice. Kinda odd but that's how we did it in '06, too. Each name had an incomplete arrow and you just had to draw a line connecting them.

Then we have to run the big piece of paper into a machine that held it.

JetsAndHeels
11-04-2008, 08:08 PM
Our ballots basically just have the names with an oval beside the candidates. You fill it in, or write a name in where applicable. Once you finish, you take the paper and run it into the machine.

Snowtrooper
11-04-2008, 08:35 PM
It took me longer to drive in then to actually vote. There wasn't a whole lot of issues on the ballot, but two were really important. The presidential race was one, of course. The other was to elect school board members to the local public school system. They've been trying to jam a new gymnasium for the high school down our throats. We do kinda need a new gym, but they want to spare no expense in building it. It was voted down once before, but they keep trying push it. There has also been alot of corruption and misappropriation of funds. Hopefully we can vote the bastards out!!!

Mad Slanted Powers
11-04-2008, 08:46 PM
I mailed my ballot yesterday morning. Most of Washington is vote-by-mail now. Except for one time, I've always voted absentee anyway. That way I can take my take and look stuff up while I am completing my ballot.


I think it helped tremendously, if people had read their voter information early and knew exactly how they were going to vote before they showed up at the polls.That's exactly why I like the vote-by-mail. Since the newspaper covers all the local races, I may not always know which ones I'll actually be voting on. It's easy to remember which legislative district I'm in, but when it comes to fire district or water district or something like that, I don't always know, and those races don't get the attention.


I did early voting last week and there was no waiting at all.

Just curious, what kind of system did everyone use to vote? When I was in New Mexico, our voting was completely electronic, kind of like using an ATM. However, here in Montgomery County, IL we voted on large sheets of paper with bubbles that we filled in using an ink pen, then fed them into a machine to be counted.

One of the weird things is that many of the local offices I was voting for were unopposed Democrats. So you basically either voted for the guy or didn't vote at all. I would have thought there would at least be an option for a write-in. That was a little strange.The only time I ever voted at an actual polling place, I think the ballots were much like the absentee ballots of the time - a punch card where you poked out the chads. I think at the voting booth, the card probably lined up under something with the names on it. With the absentee ballot, you had numbers next to the candidates and you then had to find that number on the punch card and poke out the chad.

The past few elections, the vote-by-mail ballot has an arrow-head and an arrow-tail next to each item. You have to draw a single line connecting the head and the tail. I wonder if my ballots got thrown out before because I would fill in the whole space between the two.

TeeEye7
11-04-2008, 08:52 PM
Just returned home from voting with Mrs. TI7.

Took about 30 minutes at the site. Would have been faster, but there's always some dill weed who just doesn't understand directions from the poll workers. We were lucky enough to be behind that person. :rolleyes: Things went lickety-split after we received our ballots.

Mr. JabbaJohnL
11-04-2008, 09:23 PM
We had ten days' worth of early voting here in Colorado and I went right in and voted. I really don't see why they haven't always done it that way, or why everywhere else doesn't also do it like that.

My ballot was the large two-sided sheet with fill-in bubbles, and you had to walk it over to a big machine that sucked it in.

While campaigning today for the final time, it never seemed like the lines were all that long. Hopefully most of the people already early voted, and it seemed like they had (from the calls we made).

JediTricks
11-04-2008, 10:06 PM
It was at the local elementary school's auditorium, over half the voting I've done in my adult life has been there (the rest at a local church and a masonic temple... weird). I waited in line less than a minute, then used inka-vote (fill in the bubbles with the fat pen). The pen didn't do a very good job so it took me like 10 minutes to get the bubbles done right. Then I fed it into the machine, made the standard "paper shredder" joke and got my sticker.

Phantom-like Menace
11-05-2008, 12:15 AM
I voted this morning at about nine or so Central time. My precinct doesn't have a lot of registered voters. I understand it was fairly crowded before I got there, but by the time I voted, the whole thing only took about twenty minutes total, and that included my very thoroughly checking my selections.

jediguy
11-05-2008, 06:43 AM
15 minutes from check in to submitting my ballot

9:30 am to 9:45 am

the voting place is in the hallway in the mall right next to Target, but no toy run yesterday

Bel-Cam Jos
11-05-2008, 07:05 AM
I was given a choice: I could wait for the "convenience" of electronic voting, or take the huge cards with even huger card protector and start right away. Duh.

We also had to "draw the line" between the arrow, and were strictly informed to make a SINGLE line with our pen. Saw on the news later how some ballots would be spoiled if people a) circled the arrow parts, b) put an X or checkmark in between, c) colored in the space between, d) other wrong ways. Then, the reporter said people were "confused" about the directions. :confused: About drawing a line? There's your poll tax: can't draw a line, can't vote at all then. :mad:

Someone who voted later let me have their "I Voted" sticker. Hooray.

DarthQuack
11-05-2008, 07:20 AM
Well once I got to my correct polling place it took all of a few minutes to fill out a paper ballot.

Mad Slanted Powers
11-05-2008, 08:34 AM
Well, I seem to have trouble drawing a straight line. I'd start in the middle on the tail end and it would end up kind of crooked. That's why I used to fill in the whole thing so there was no doubt what I was picking. But, I resisted my urge to do that the last couple elections. I'd much prefer to fill in a bubble.

Slicker
11-05-2008, 11:01 AM
Absentee ballots are the way to go. :thumbsup:

Daryl VayDar
11-05-2008, 04:25 PM
(the rest at a local church and a masonic temple... weird).

Yeah- this year the polls were moved from the poolhouse of the local city park to a church around the corner... isn't there something about separation yadda yadda? It was a Korean church so maybe that makes it ok...

JediTricks
11-05-2008, 04:32 PM
At first I was kinda weirded out by that separation thing, but it is run by volunteers and not held in the areas that are all extra churchy (the Masonic temple seems to mainly be 3 rather generic rooms connected by a main chamber). I drove by a polling place that was in someone's garage, it's not much weirder than that.

Daryl VayDar
11-05-2008, 04:34 PM
In a garage? SWEET- I bet they had a dirty styrafoam cooler filled with Bud Light, cast yer vote and grab a brew!

Bel-Cam Jos
11-05-2008, 07:02 PM
Before my polling place was where it is now, it was in the school I went to for kindergarten (that was weird), and before that was in someone's house. But they didn't use their garage; it was their living room. That was really odd. Just one time there, though, and I wonder if they decided that wasn't a wise decision in those days of theft.

How many of you "did your homework," and came with your choices already made (like in the mailer ballot)? Or did you just wing it and figure it out at the place itself? Try to sell someone your vote in the polling stall next to you? :D

TeeEye7
11-05-2008, 08:28 PM
How many of you "did your homework," and came with your choices already made (like in the mailer ballot)? Or did you just wing it and figure it out at the place itself?

I did my "homework" and usually do. What I'm especially proud of, though, was that this was our son's first presidential election. He did his homework, not only with the candidates, but on all of California's propositions and went to the polls armed with his list. (Yes, BCJ, he uses The Way of the List!) ;).

Mr. JabbaJohnL
11-05-2008, 09:06 PM
It was also my first election, and I had a list made up beforehand. Colorado's ballot was way too long, with a ton of stupid amendments, including one that would make it harder to get stuff on the ballot. Guess how I voted on that one? :D

Mad Slanted Powers
11-05-2008, 09:08 PM
I did my "homework" and usually do. What I'm especially proud of, though, was that this was our son's first presidential election. He did his homework, not only with the candidates, but on all of California's propositions and went to the polls armed with his list. (Yes, BCJ, he uses The Way of the List!) ;).But does he listen to The Way of the Fist (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Way_of_the_Fist)?

Tycho
11-06-2008, 05:23 AM
How many of you "did your homework," and came with your choices already made (like in the mailer ballot)? Or did you just wing it and figure it out at the place itself? Try to sell someone your vote in the polling stall next to you? :D

I did my homework. California had enough stuff, along with the City of San Diego, that it was far easier to just know what you were doing before you went in to vote.

I'd actually welcome MORE things be put to the voters though - as I'd like my say in a lot of matters and sometimes wonder what in the heck my state legislature and City Council are thinking when they make some of their decisions.

JimJamBonds
11-06-2008, 10:21 AM
I was in and out in less then 5 minutes. When I walked out there was a line of about 10 people.

JediTricks
11-06-2008, 09:42 PM
In a garage? SWEET- I bet they had a dirty styrafoam cooler filled with Bud Light, cast yer vote and grab a brew!I think there's a law against that, but it'd certainly increase turnout. The question is, get drunk after or before voting? :p


How many of you "did your homework," and came with your choices already made (like in the mailer ballot)? Or did you just wing it and figure it out at the place itself? Try to sell someone your vote in the polling stall next to you? :DI marked my ballot for all the measures and representation, but I just didn't know where to look for info on the judicial so I didn't vote there at all. However, there were 2 or 3 propositions where I marked them with question marks because I couldn't decide, and at the last minute for them I went with my gut after reading all the arguments.


It was also my first election, and I had a list made up beforehand. Colorado's ballot was way too long, with a ton of stupid amendments, including one that would make it harder to get stuff on the ballot. Guess how I voted on that one? :DCongrats on voting for the first time, good choice to start, I guess that's your parents' choice though. ;)

I would guess you voted "no confidence" on that one, and then made Jar Jar a senator. :p



I was in and out in less then 5 minutes. When I walked out there was a line of about 10 people.Just like Slicker's mom.

figrin bran
11-06-2008, 10:10 PM
It was at the local elementary school's auditorium, over half the voting I've done in my adult life has been there (the rest at a local church and a masonic temple... weird). I waited in line less than a minute, then used inka-vote (fill in the bubbles with the fat pen). The pen didn't do a very good job so it took me like 10 minutes to get the bubbles done right. Then I fed it into the machine, made the standard "paper shredder" joke and got my sticker.

JT, they've never given me that local elementary school nor the Masonic Temple as a polling place. Nowadays I get a not that local elementary school (down on Sunset heading towards Silver Lake)

Rocketboy
11-06-2008, 10:54 PM
Absentee ballots are the way to go. :thumbsup:Word B*tch. Zero minutes and you can fill it out on the toilet.

JediTricks
11-06-2008, 11:36 PM
JT, they've never given me that local elementary school nor the Masonic Temple as a polling place. Nowadays I get a not that local elementary school (down on Sunset heading towards Silver Lake)
You can thank redistricting for that, we're the same zip code I believe but not the same district.

Phantom-like Menace
11-06-2008, 11:58 PM
Since we're all chiming in with word of where we voted, I voted at a local elementary school, in fact the elementary school I attended third, fourth, and fifth grade. It's kind of ghetto, since my neighborhood went to pot in the late eighties, early nineties. When I lived in Tallahassee, I voted first at the Florida Department of Agriculture building and then at a Church after I moved to another apartment.

Bel-Cam Jos
11-07-2008, 08:01 PM
Word B*tch. Zero minutes and you can fill it out on the toilet.As other things go down the drain...

I know it sounds lame and old fogey-esque, but I like the stand-in-line aspect. Makes me feel more like a part of the whole process being around the other voters, instead of literally mailin' it in.

Ji'dai
11-08-2008, 09:40 PM
I hit the polls around four p.m. and walked right in. There were other people ahead of me but I was able to get my own booth without waiting. I was probably in and out in less than fifteen minutes.

DarthNihilus
11-10-2008, 02:51 PM
I was ready to go home if I saw a long line. I went after work and didn't have to wait in any lines.

Tycho
11-10-2008, 02:59 PM
Did you guys think that voting was FUN?

I liked being there with so many people wanting to stand up and be counted as Americans and participate in our democratic process.

I did not get into discussing politics with the others in line, but did discuss the huge turnout, the convenience of our polling place - that sort of thing.

In that sense, it was fun.

I also had read my ballot and made my decisions on the election items before hand, so marking my ballot and turning it in was like the completion of a model I had been building - a model for my idea about good government I guess. But it felt like I'd finished my homework and turned my test in. Or I bought an miniature airplane kit and finally finished putting it all together.

Then I got to watch "my test being graded" as the election results came in on television that evening.

In a great sense - it was all sort of fun for me.

Politics is like sports might be to others. But with politics, you can have absolutely no gifts of physical talent, but if you have the gift of intelligence, you can use your brain to figure things out. Then EVERYONE gets to play, too. And at the end of "the game," you check the final score. To me, all of these factors combine to make it much more appealing than sports will ever be.

Election Day is a lot of fun for me. It is for certain the Superbowl of Politics.

TeeEye7
11-10-2008, 04:16 PM
Did you guys think that voting was FUN?

I think that's an appropriate word. For better or worse, I thinks there's "fun" in the anticipation of seeing how your candidates or propositions you support fare at the close of the polls.

Bel-Cam Jos
11-10-2008, 05:10 PM
For better or worse, I thinks there's "fun" in the anticipation of seeing how your candidates or propositions you support fare at the close of the polls.Especially if you're wagering on the results: straight-up winners, over-under on yes/no percentages, total percent earned, parlays, exactas on multiple propositions, etc.

did I just admit that in print? :eek:

OC47150
11-10-2008, 08:20 PM
It took me about 10 minutes to vote. It would've gone quicker but an older lady voted straight ticket by accident and requested a new ballot.

Voting is fun, but it's also a service or duty. I don't mind making time to vote in every election. Remember: you don't vote, you can't complain. :lipsrsealed: