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View Full Version : Who Wants To Buy A House? Do You Own One Already? What Are Your Plans?



Tycho
12-14-2008, 04:02 PM
I want to buy a house to live in myself (I have some real estate I inherited but it was necessary to utilize it to bring me income).

I want the house to have room to set up all my Star Wars collection in displayed-dioramas. (I desperately need the space in which to organize it all, too).

I don't want to live with anybody. I really like things being absolutely silent (except when I turn on movies or music, news or something).

I have to get my health back - maybe I'll have that by next summer - and I should be able to seek new sources of additional income with which to handle a mortgage (I can already put my full apartment rent into a new house in the second or third month I own it - as I wouldn't move in to the house immediately, but I wouldn't need the apartment any more).

I think I could finally be mature enough to take on a 9-5 job that I might not even like, to afford the income for what I want to buy. I didn't like the idea of being away from my free time when I was younger - but now I've had nearly 3 years of experience with all the free time I could ever imagine, but none of the physical health to go and enjoy it that much. It made me realize that I needed to use the precious times when I felt good to the maximum, so if it were my time that was limited, rather than the moments when I felt good, I'd be able to make the most of it.

Anyway, I have somewhat of a headstart from what my parents left for me, but I am also first relying on it to help me get through my kidney transplant. The kidney failure is my inheritence too, you know.

Anyway, I have my college degrees and some good work experience behind me with which I can apply towards a new direction moving forward when (if) I get that chance.

Do you want to buy a house?

Do you already own a house? Is it the one you want to remain living in?

Do you want to have the place and peace you need to do what you want with your own personal space? Does it involve your toy collection? How? Which toys?

What will you do to gain whatever in your life is lacking with regards to this?

What is your plan? How long do you think it will take?

Will it work?

sith_killer_99
12-14-2008, 05:16 PM
The plan right now is to buy the dream house after I retire from the Army 2013-2015.

Likely a 3 bedroom, garage, full basement, high ceilings, big kitchen, laundry room, etc.

The basement will be mine for the Star Wars collection and the movie theater. The wife and kids can do whatever they want with the rest of the house. I will require a large garage to work on the car.:D

My retirement alone will pay the mortgage, so I'm not really worried about the payments.

I plan to get a job teaching right after I retire, we just need to make enough to pay basic bills, food, electric, etc.

Then I will work on my political career, the teaching job is just to help with the transition between military life and civilian life.

Anyway, back on topic.

The basement will be split into three sections.

The Star Wars room will be the largest area. I want to display my carded figure collection inside museum style display cases. The center will be my higher dollar stuff, Gentle Giants, Koto, Master Replicas, etc.

Then the "war room" which will basically be my computer room. This will contain the heart of my home network along with a screaming desktop system, mega HD monitor, etc.

Last, and most importantly will be my home movie theater. My brother-in-law does this stuff for a living, I can have the full theater, custom stadium seating, mega screen, sound proofing, etc.

The theater will take the most time to get set up, because unfortunately it will be low on the priority for the house over all.

The living room, bed rooms, etc. will all have flat screen HD televisions, computers, full network access. Most of this stuff I already have, it's just a matter of getting everything configured.

The hard part may be getting FiOS internet access, it's so limited right now, and it's hard to tell when and where access will be in 5-10 years.

Yes, I want a house and I will get it!!!

Basically, it's my retirement present to the family (and myself).:thumbsup:

bobafrett
12-14-2008, 09:58 PM
I would like to buy a house eventually, but it will have to be after our kids finish high school.

It won't be in our town we live in now, homes are way out of our price range, at least at our current incomes for me and my wife.

I would like to get a place where I have enough space to have much of my collection properly displayed, maybe a finished basement or something.

FLORIDA COLLECTOR X
12-14-2008, 11:41 PM
Owning a house is :

property tax
insurance
repairs
security monitoring bill
electricity bill
phone bill
gas bill
homeowners association payments
mortgage bill
water / trash bill
maintenance costs
landscaping costs

I would give anything to sell my house and get out of this money pit that everyone thinks is some kind of american dream. The dream is dead and was killed by the greed of bankers and brokers. I dont mean to burst your bubble but it is no longer worth it.

jjreason
12-15-2008, 12:10 AM
It is expensive. but I'm very glad to be a home owner (well, the owner of approx 33% of a house, anyhow).

I can't help but think that renting is just giving someone else money... but I fully understand the plight/choice of those that can't afford (or don't want) to get tied to a house, especially in your economy as it stands.

Mad Slanted Powers
12-15-2008, 12:30 AM
Owning a house is :

property tax
insurance
repairs
security monitoring bill
electricity bill
phone bill
gas bill
homeowners association payments
mortgage bill
water / trash bill
maintenance costs
landscaping costs

I would give anything to sell my house and get out of this money pit that everyone thinks is some kind of american dream. The dream is dead and was killed by the greed of bankers and brokers. I dont mean to burst your bubble but it is no longer worth it.Those things have always come with owning a home, though I don't have some of those costs. If you are buying, at least you are getting equity in something. Renting has many of the same costs. Your rent may not be as much as your mortgage, and you don't have the maintenance and landscaping, but you still have a lot of the utilities. When you move out, all you might get back is your deposit. With a house, you can at least get back some of the money you paid for it. If you are lucky, the house might have appreciated in value.

I bought my house five years ago. Living with my parents until age 33 allowed me to save up a decent down payment. At the time, my paycheck was less than my house payment, but I got paid every other week, so I still had something left from that each month, and the two months in which there were three paychecks were at about the time my property taxes were due. So I didn't save as much back then. Now I that I make more, I'm saving more except for when I have to have work done on my car.

I got a good rate of 4.25% on my loan, but it was a 5/1 ARM, and it just adjusted. I was expecting it to go up, so I was looking at refinancing. At the end of September was when the stock market dropped big. The gal I was working with called me said the rates had dipped, and given how things were going with the market, figured I should lock in, so I did at 5.875%. I had two months to see if it would drop more though. My mom wasn't happy with it, and figured the rates would go down. Eventually, I found out that my ARM was going to adjust to 4.00%, so I decided to stick with it, though I lost the appraisal fee I had to pay.

The last week before my lock in ran out, I got another call saying that the rate had gone down to 5.375%, and I was considering accepting that. It would be an increase over what I'm paying now, but would be a good rate to lock in for the long run. My mom still didn't think I should, so if sticking with the ARM ends up being a bad idea, I guess I can get a bail out from her. It can only adjust 2% points a year, and the rate will never be more than 9.25% Given how things are now, it probably will stay pretty low for quite a while. By the time that it could become an issue, there could be inheritance or insurance money from my parents.

My house is a decent sized house, but the space is all in the wrong places for displaying my collection. So, it is beginning to overwhelm my spare bedroom. Ideally I would have a large rec room or basement to set this stuff up. However, I don't really want to go through the hassle of moving unless I have to. I have payments I know I can afford, I am close to work, and I like how and where the house is located.

So, for now I am staying where I am. I've bought some storage bins to put my figures in. This has helped save some space because the figures took up more room when they were carded, so I can open figures and store them. It also means I can put away displayed figures and make room to display current figures. I'm always trying to figure out better ways to store and display them so that they will take up less room. If I hadn't collected Lord of the Rings figures, I'd have a good portion of the spare bedroom closet still available. It would have helped if the early LOTR figures had been in the same sort of packaging as the later figures.

plasticfetish
12-15-2008, 01:32 AM
Owning a house is :
property tax
insurance
repairs
security monitoring bill
electricity bill
phone bill
gas bill
homeowners association payments
mortgage bill
water / trash bill
maintenance costs
landscaping costs

Well... renting is pretty much the same also. ;) Unless you find some magical place where all utilities are paid and elves pay half the rent, you're always going to be writing someone a check every month. Besides, not everyone pays for things like "homeowners association payments" or a "security monitoring bill." No one forced you to move into a country club. ;)

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

We bought a house about a year ago here in Portland with a good chunk for a down, so our monthly (even with tax and insurance) is around what we'd been paying to rent an apartment while we looked for this house.

The house is 98 years old, and needs to be upgraded in about 1000 ways, but I'd probably do that for any house, so it's no big deal. (Well, it is a big deal, but WTF... I own a 98 year old house that I'm dragging into the 21st century, and that's pretty cool.)

The plan at this point, is that I'll have the basement for both a family tv/game area, and a studio/office; which is where I'll finally be able to put out some of this stuff that's been living in plastic totes for the last few years.

Funny too... we're supposed to go in on Tuesday and see about reworking our mortgage a little. As much as I know that the whole financial nightmare that most people are going through sucks, I'm honestly pretty happy that things may end up working to our advantage. And that's also why I'd recommend grabbing a bargain if you can afford it. Chances are good that things will bounce back in a few years, and opportunities will start to dry up.

pbarnard
12-15-2008, 09:37 AM
My wife and I are putting together all the pieces for the finaning of a house right now. We're sort of hesitant because while we both have stable jobs, I still want to finish the PhD (course that means I have to stop picking fights with short sighted program directors first).

Also where we live is relatively unaffected by the whole real estate bubble in terms of foreclosures. It's just a matter of do we buy one here or the next town/place.

Blue2th
12-15-2008, 11:18 AM
Yes, I do have a house. Been in it for over ten years. Small (1300 sq. ft.) but it has possibilities to expand. I have a huge two car garage that I want to at least make half of it into living quarters, and a huge corner lot to expand if I want, or if I can get more money.
I paid 115K for it, and even in the downward economy it's worth at least 175K, and I owe 72K on it.
I didn't fall for all the home equity offers on it. You know the ones they used to send you every week to borrow up to 125% on it.
I'd be upside down in it, like a good majority of Americans are from all the unregulated predatory lending that's been going on.
I guess I'm kinda smart to have not done that in hindsight.

I'm getting kinda restless though, so I might sell when things have stabilized a bit. I'm single and I want to travel so I could cash in and have a great time at least for a while.
Everyone should have a home to go to to rest their bones, so I would eventually have to buy another house. I just don't know where I want to live yet. Maybe move to Australia, or the Pacific Northwest.

Exhaust Port
12-15-2008, 12:04 PM
I bought my house 3 years after living in my previous apartment for 9+ years. I had to get out. I started shopping near the peak of the housing bubble so there were a lot of mortgage options when I started looking. I really didn't want to put any money down so I could keep any cash I had in reserve which wasn't a problem. It sounds like now the 0% down options aren't available.

My biggest requirement in a house was having enough land so I could build an outbuilding at some point. That proved to be tricky to find, at least in my price range. It didn't help that my agent had never shopped looking for a land requirement. She was kind of dead weight and I did all of the searching with the online MLS and ended up finding the house I eventually bought. I lucked out and found my house through the online "For Sale By Owner" websites. I bought the house from the man who lived next door as he owned this house where his parents lived until they passed away. I couldn't have asked for a nicer person to buy a house from or live next to. The house is a ranch and despite being visually stuck in the 70's with blue shag carpeting it was a great house, everything was very well taken care of.

I think the house is about 1800 sq ft with an unfinished basement. The plan is to finish the basement with a few rooms (a bedroom, office, tv room/entertainment area). Right now my 12" SW figures are in boxes but once the basement is finished they'll go back on display. In the meantime I've been working on the main floor for the last 3 years. There is probably another 2 years worth of work left at the pace I'm working on it (ie can afford it).

I have a friend who is still living in an apartment with his wife after all these years and all he sees with a house is "more bills". I've done what I can to explain to him the real cost of owning a house vs. all those years of renting but he doesn't see it. Living in Ohio there are a lot of cheap houses so finding something in your price range isn't really an issue. The one thing that buying a house does end up costing you with is with all the startup purchases needed to run a house. Coming from an apartment I didn't own a lawnmower, rake, shovel, ladder, etc. or any tool for that matter beyond my electric drill. I also didn't own hardly any furniture but I lucked out and bought most of what I needed for the house from my neighbor for a few hundred $$.

I have no plans on moving ever. I love where I live and I think the house with a few more years of work can be a house that I can live in forever. Sure it isn't as big as one of these new McMansions but that isn't really my style. I look back at the 800 sq ft house that my folks raised my brother and I and I remember never once thinking that a bigger house would be better. How can I complain now when I have so much more that that?

JON9000
12-15-2008, 07:38 PM
I kinda like renting. I HATE commuting more than anything in the world, and I just want always to be close to work. I also detest yard work and maintenance, and I have no little ones. I just started my own business, so if it all works out and I can remain self-employed, I'll settle into a house soon enough and get a leaf blower.

But for those still in the changing-jobs phase of life, renting allows for much greater efficiencies.

Old Fossil
12-15-2008, 09:36 PM
Owning a home is a pain. Something always needs repairing. Just this year we replaced our laundry room light, kitchen light, bathroom outlet, kitchen garbage disposal, and the floor in our master bathroom. Also, our yard is 1.3 wooded acres, so I'm always raking, mowing, mulching. The riding mower also requires annual maintenance. I love being outside but sometimes I grow weary of the whole affair, and yearn for a rock garden.

That being said, I'll never willingly rent a house again. Before we bought our own house, the landlord of our rental home put the place up for sale, without notifying us. I simply came home from work one day, and hello! A "For Sale" sign in my front yard. I hope I'm never put in that position again.

Interestingly, said former landlord lived in Gulfport, Mississippi, and I understand that the homes on the street where he lived were washed off their foundations by Hurricane Katrina. (The jerk survived, somehow. Rats are cunning.) Karma?... :sleeping:

Mad Slanted Powers
12-15-2008, 09:52 PM
That's why I wanted a new home. There should be several years before I get any major problems. However, I'm not too handy and kind of lazy, so there are probably a lot of things that I probably should be doing that I either don't know I should be doing, or haven't made the time to do them. The lawn work can be a bit of a pain. Mowing isn't that big of a deal, but dealing with the weeds and the moss and such that seems to get worse each year can be a problem.

My lawn is one of the bigger ones in the subdivision, but I'm back away from the trees, so I don't get a lot of leaves or needles. I have a bit of a hill to go up to get to my house, but not too bad (at least from one direction, the other direction has a steeper hill). The lot itself is pretty flat. The people across the street have a bit of an uphill driveway. These are all things I considered when looking for a house.

One problem is that with such a wide lot compared to the others, I probably have the most curb space in the cul-de-sac. So, people visiting the neighbors across the street often park in front of my place. For some reason, the neighborhood kids would spend more time on the sidewalk on my side than on their own side of the street. Perhaps because they have cars parked in their driveways or on their side of the street because they have multiple cars and/or they don't have room in their garage to park a car.

bigbarada
12-15-2008, 10:16 PM
That being said, I'll never willingly rent a house again. Before we bought our own house, the landlord of our rental home put the place up for sale, without notifying us. I simply came home from work one day, and hello! A "For Sale" sign in my front yard. I hope I'm never put in that position again.


I'm in that situation now. I live in an old mansion that was turned into apartments and the owner is trying to sell the place because he's just barely been able to keep his head above water as far as maintaining the place.

It's a great deal right now because I have a large living area, kitchen, bathroom and a good sized bedroom for $375 a month. That also include free water, gas, cable TV and wireless internet. The only other expense I pay is electricity, which I'm able to keep under $30 a month by buying those compact-flourescent energy saving bulbs and not running my heater during the winter. The only real downside is I can't have a dog.

However, if he sells the building, I don't expect this to last. My rent will likely go up and I'll almost surely lose the free cable and internet.

mtriv73
12-16-2008, 01:24 PM
I've actually got 2 right now.

We thought the market had about bottomed out in July and bought a single family home while at the same time putting our townhouse on the market. Unfortunately, we haven't sold the townhouse yet. Still, I don't regret the decision. We can afford the 2 mortgages for a while and we have a really nice new place with a huge yard.

Tycho
12-16-2008, 06:46 PM
Can't you rent out the townhouse to help cover your expenses? It's many a person's financial strategy to purchase an income property later on anyway.

Exhaust Port
12-16-2008, 07:22 PM
Mortgage rates are getting darn low now too which will be nice for folks buying a home. Of course with all the changes added after the housing bubble popped and folks are foreclosing left and right I'm not sure how easy it is for new home buyers to get approved.

Mad Slanted Powers
12-16-2008, 07:44 PM
Can't you rent out the townhouse to help cover your expenses? It's many a person's financial strategy to purchase an income property later on anyway.
That's what my brother always suggested, but I wouldn't have to deal with renters, and I wouldn't be handy enough to take care of problems. For those that wouldn't have a problem with that, it is a good strategy for someone starting out. Buy a duplex and rent out one half. The rent you receive can help to cover your mortgage payment, and you could probably either save more or pay it off quicker. Then you would be in a better position to buy the house you really want. Then you could rent out both sides of the duplex when you move into the new house. If you hold onto the duplex for a long time, then that could be a starter place for your kids when they grow up. They get a bit of freedom, but they also have the responsibility of taking care of the place and paying the bills.

DarthQuack
12-16-2008, 09:02 PM
I would love to buy a house....but odds are I'll have to wait to have my bride...whenever I find her that is :P. I'm 28 now, and turn 30 in August 2010. I hope to have the 8k in school loans and CC debt paid off. The CC debt is only 600 so I haven't gone overboard with that. When it does happen though I'll be 100% debt free and then I want to concentrate fully on purchasing a home.

pbarnard
12-17-2008, 10:23 AM
Can't you rent out the townhouse to help cover your expenses? It's many a person's financial strategy to purchase an income property later on anyway.

That is sort of what got us into the real estate bubble/mess to begin with. It wasn't the primary residences or even underqualified borrowers, it was people using easy credit to buy a second home for either vacation or rental purposes using ARMs.

mtriv73
12-17-2008, 11:53 AM
Can't you rent out the townhouse to help cover your expenses? It's many a person's financial strategy to purchase an income property later on anyway.

We were giving it a few months to see if we could just sell it outright first. We didn't want to be stuck with it for another year if we could sell it in a few months. We are starting to consider renting it out though. Since we bought it in 2001, before most of the insane price increases, put down more than 30% on it, and have been paying it down as fast as possible, we owe relatively little on it and it wouldn't be hard to find a renter to cover the mortgage/taxes/insurance. But, I just don't have the time to be a landlord as well as all the other stuff I have going on.

Jargo
12-17-2008, 01:24 PM
I'd be more inclined to buy land than a house. I'm quite happy living in rented accommodation. I'd buy a plot of land and plant it with trees. have my own private woodland. Maybe build a shed on it with a stoop. sit out there in the summer evenings. of course i'd have a fifteen feet high electrified fence all the way round. don't want any uncouth youths roaming round my own private haven.

Houses don't interest me. it's just bricks and wood and plaster. square boxes stacked on top of each other you put stuff in and use to keep dry and warm. any property will do for that. I just want a space i can get away from everyone in and be at peace and commune with nature. maybe my shed would be a little love nest. maybe more of a log cabin. I know one thing, if i did buy a piece of land I'd be sure not to install a phone or TV and definitely wouldn't tell anyone the location..

Tycho
12-17-2008, 02:28 PM
What I don't want is anyone having control over me in my own private residence. My apartment complex is slated to be sold as condo-conversions in 2 years. I hope to be long out of here, and I don't think I'd buy to own the place I'm in right now. It's nice and has a lot of ammenities on site, but I'd just rather have a house.


Houses don't interest me. it's just bricks and wood and plaster. square boxes stacked on top of each other you put stuff in and use to keep dry and warm. any property will do for that

Not so for me: I want the space to display my Star Wars collection in battle dioramas and not crowd it out. I need a large home for that.

When you walk into my living room, the sofas will be brown, as so the coffee tables and lamps. Maybe there will be a simulated tree "cat house" for my pets, and there will be display cases against the walls with Naboo, Kashyyyk, and Endor battle scenes (if they're mostly brown and green). Some N-1s will hang from the ceiling, battling Vulcher Droid Fighters.

Then when you walk into my movie-theater A/V room, it will be furnished in black. Display cases there will have Coruscant and the Death Star displays in glass cases against the walls. Tri-Droid Fighters, Jedi Starfighters, and in another corner, X-wings, Y-wings, a B-wing and A-wings will be fighting all kinds of TIEs hung from the ceiling. Larger cases for the appropriate 12" figures will be in the corners.

I just don't want to put all that effort into setting it up (all the different rooms like Tatooine in several bedrooms) and then be told that someone else (who owns the property) is going to sell it out from under me unless I pay their price - or the rent the new buyer requires.

I think in a large place like this - with no roommates or wife - I'll have my private sanctuary and get to be away from all other people. Then I don't need to live in the countryside or somewhere more isolated with less conveniences. I DO understand the beauty and appeal of a mostly all-natural area. I thought that one day I might retire and live in one of California's mountain communities. (No where on the ocean is really undeveloped, save for military-owned land or nature preserves).

But every one of us has their own tastes.

Old Fossil
12-17-2008, 02:46 PM
Not so for me: I want the space to display my Star Wars collection in battle dioramas and not crowd it out. I need a large home for that.

When you walk into my living room, the sofas will be brown, as so the coffee tables and lamps. Maybe there will be a simulated tree "cat house" for my pets, and there will be display cases against the walls with Naboo, Kashyyyk, and Endor battle scenes (if they're mostly brown and green). Some N-1s will hang from the ceiling, battling Vulcher Droid Fighters.

Then when you walk into my movie-theater A/V room, it will be furnished in black. Display cases there will have Coruscant and the Death Star displays in glass cases against the walls. Tri-Droid Fighters, Jedi Starfighters, and in another corner, X-wings, Y-wings, a B-wing and A-wings will be fighting all kinds of TIEs hung from the ceiling. Larger cases for the appropriate 12" figures will be in the corners.

I just don't want to put all that effort into setting it up (all the different rooms like Tatooine in several bedrooms) and then be told that someone else (who owns the property) is going to sell it out from under me unless I pay their price - or the rent the new buyer requires.


I used to think I'd do something similar before we got our house. In our rental home, I had around 13 glass shelves set up in my "office" room of the house. That allowed me to display the bulk of my collection (that was in 2002-2003).

After a few months the issue of dusting all the figures and ships became very real. When multiples of my lightsaber-wielding figures had cobwebs stretched from one saber-tip to another, I realized I was making too much work for myself. Now, despite having a much larger living area, I limit my displayed collection to 5 shelves. Much less work to maintain.

You are wise to include display cases in your plans, which will negate the issue of dusting for the most part, excepting your ships hanging from the ceiling.

El Chuxter
12-17-2008, 02:49 PM
I would like to buy a horse, but I don't have anywhere to let it run around.

Tycho
12-17-2008, 02:55 PM
Old Fossil: the completely enclosed scenes in glass cases (not open shelves) should keep dust either out, or away from me breathing it. In my old apartment, dust did not really collect or it would have been visible on the vintage Ewok Village Playset treetops. It was all encased.

As to hanging starships, while I wasn't too good at doing this before, going over them once a week with a computer-dusting-spray-blower should probably suffice. TIE Fighters don't have that much surface area to collect dust on by comparison with the Falcon.

Chuxter: a horse is an extremely expensive undertaking from veterinary care to feed, etc. I'd like to have a horse as well - but the daily commitment (unless you hire a stable to do this for you and have a less close relationship with your animal) is probably much more of an investment of your time than you'd get from riding it. If I lived on a farm or ranch....

Mad Slanted Powers
12-17-2008, 08:22 PM
Dust hasn't been too bad in my place. Recently I took my titaniums off the fireplace mantle and I noticed a web stringing from one to another for a few of them. Getting a can of air might be the easiest way to dust off the figures.

pbarnard
12-18-2008, 11:08 AM
Dust hasn't been too bad in my place. Recently I took my titaniums off the fireplace mantle and I noticed a web stringing from one to another for a few of them. Getting a can of air might be the easiest way to dust off the figures.

It really is, for weekly quicky cleaning. Eventually, once every 6 months or so though, I have to take down an entire display, wipe everything off, scrubbing and cleaning.

Tycho
12-18-2008, 11:23 AM
That's why it's really worth it to completely enclose and seal off most of your Star Wars displays. (Dust)

The Unleashed 7" can be handled with an air can, but when you set up a bunch of 3 3/4", they blow over too easily. On top of that, you position those figures so they are shooting each other, lightsaber dueling, etc., or they are posed holding the controls in the Royal Starship or BMF or something and you have to undo your previous effort to get in there and clean it all out.

If all you have to do is wipe off counter-tops to display cases, it's much easier.

I don't like re-making displays. If you set up the Mos Eisley Cantina, it's cool to look at it and imagine another time and place, so different. But if you have to continuously re-set it up, you tire of it. I'd think most of us would rather be building something new (Jabba's Palace, whatever) and not constantly going back to what already should be done. I mean it's fine if you want to pick up and marvel over Djas Phur because you haven't played with him since 2002, but at least nothing FORCED you to.

For the moment, I can't think of anything I like this much in the world (as much as my Star Wars collection) that doesn't have its drawbacks, too. Dust and cleaning has to be where Star Wars tests one's tolerance.

Does anyone really like setting and re-setting their scenes (like the cantina) over and over again? I really bore of this and want to always have something new to try - like the Galactic Senate.

pbarnard
12-18-2008, 03:47 PM
Does anyone really like setting and re-setting their scenes (like the cantina) over and over again? I really bore of this and want to always have something new to try - like the Galactic Senate.

While glass enclosures would be nice, that is one thing waiting for the permamence of a house right now. I honestly don't mind resetting my displays. I do it anyway once a new figure is brought in either as a purchase or a custom. Plus where my Cantina (the actual building is) now is up on the 6' tall mdf case that holds a death star level, Republic cruiser level, Endor/Tatooine, Jedi Council/Everything else, I don't get to play with it that much. Also putting the central throne room in Jabba's palace on top of that didn't hurt either.

Old Fossil
12-18-2008, 09:47 PM
I'd be more inclined to buy land than a house. I'm quite happy living in rented accommodation. I'd buy a plot of land and plant it with trees. have my own private woodland. Maybe build a shed on it with a stoop. sit out there in the summer evenings. of course i'd have a fifteen feet high electrified fence all the way round. don't want any uncouth youths roaming round my own private haven.

Houses don't interest me. it's just bricks and wood and plaster. square boxes stacked on top of each other you put stuff in and use to keep dry and warm. any property will do for that. I just want a space i can get away from everyone in and be at peace and commune with nature. maybe my shed would be a little love nest. maybe more of a log cabin. I know one thing, if i did buy a piece of land I'd be sure not to install a phone or TV and definitely wouldn't tell anyone the location..

That's very much the approach I've taken to our lot. I planted several new trees for the past two years, in part to replace the old ones pushed over by the hurricane, and in part to thicken the woods a bit.

It can be a bit deceiving, when it is very quiet on Sunday mornings and late at night, but we are only about 300 yards from a very busy section of interstate highway. I can never really forget that fact; the whine and hum of wheels and engines on the road is constant. It is a bit like the whole Gondor/Mordor thing in Middle-earth; however fair Gondor became -- whether the woods of Ithilien, or the walls of Minas Tirith -- the dark of Mordor was always there on the horizon. I like to think that gave some impetus to the Gondorians to beautify their land. It certainly does to me.

Exhaust Port
12-19-2008, 10:24 AM
I read a quote from Oprah of all people a few years ago that stuck with me and that was to "buy land because no one is making anymore".

I agree with the above posts which is one reason why when I was shopping for a place to live the land was the biggest concern. For some people the house is much more important than the lot but that isn't for me. Some of these new McMansions are sitting on lots barely any bigger than the house themselves. Sure the house's are big but I feel as if I'm sitting in a boarding area at an airport rather than a house because they are so big. Who needs that much space to sit on a couch and watch TV or read a book?

I couldn't afford much land and actually was very lucky to find the deal I did because little if anything was in my price range. What I have discovered is the next best thing to owning land is to live next to someone who does. There's an abandoned 200 acre farm across the street from us and 45 acres of woods behind us. We don't own a foot of it but it's a nice view and we take short hikes behind our house.

We live on the edge of civilization so land still costs some money with it being between $2000-$5000 per acre if you are buying just land. Go east or an hour or so south and land starts approaching $1000 per acre. Awesome! But I'm not interested in driving that far to get away. I came across 1 deal that was 100 acres sitting on Lake Erie with a 100 year old farm house for $100,000. It would make my commute to work a bit too far though. :)

Tycho
12-20-2008, 03:39 AM
Well you already know why I want a big house, but if I were to permanently settle, a large bit of land would be good for a large 1-story house. I've usually lived in 2-story homes, but some day I will be disabled and find it difficult to go up stairs. Maybe seeking a 4-5 bedroom 1-story is a bright idea. But as you guys pointed out, having land for that is expensive - especially since I'm more inclined to city or suburb living.

I really can hide away from everyone and find my silence I like so much even in city living. I'm in an apartment in central San Diego right now and all I hear is my air conditioner running. When I shut it off - there's nothing.

I'm sure I couldn't stand living downtown for any period of time - but that's what the hotels are for if I want to experience that for some fun. I'll probably want to do that around the time of Comic Con anyway.