PDA

View Full Version : 1975 Comic Book Ads



Engineernerd
02-16-2009, 06:43 PM
Through a series of events I ended up re-visting my comic book collection. In 1975 Avengers I found a variety of ads that were both amusing and strange. Check out my journey to the days of disco here:

http://www.tvandfilmtoys.com/Articles/retrocomic.asp

Enjoy!
Engineernerd

Bel-Cam Jos
02-16-2009, 09:00 PM
Sell Grit! X-Ray specs! Sea Monkeys! Charles Atlas and the 98-pound weakling! Ads for the NBC Saturday morning cartoon lineup (Kid Video? Smurfs! Snorks? Mr. T's Gymnastic Kids Group Thingie With a Bulldog With a Mowhawk! Disney's Adventures of the Gummi Bears?). Mile High Comics books for prices I still kick myself for not buying back then! :mad:

Engineernerd
02-17-2009, 06:00 AM
The NBC stuff and Mile High was more of '80's thing. But, yes I always wanted a pair of X-ray specs

Bel-Cam Jos
02-17-2009, 07:39 PM
Call it a cross-over then. :lipsrsealed:

I may do scan or digital pic of some other ads, if I get around to it.

JediTricks
02-17-2009, 09:21 PM
Those are rad! The fake beard one is a good starter.

$2 for a program in '75 seems REALLY expensive though. I mean, it's not going to be archival quality paper, it's not going to have a ton of art, it's not going to be especially exciting at all. $2 back then could get you a decent dinner, not to mention 4 crappy bumper stickers. ;) And all that included shipping and handling, so the program must have been where they thought they could recoup a ton of cash.

One funny note, you can really tell it's the '70s by the fact that a COMIC BOOK CONVENTION ADULT T-SHIRT ISN'T BEING OFFERED IN EXTRA-LARGE!!! :p

Mr. JabbaJohnL
02-18-2009, 12:29 AM
On something of a side note . . . JT, were you at a trivia contest at CIV? I remember a contestant saying how Star Wars fans needed bigger t-shirts, and now I've read you expressing a similar sentiment several times.

JediTricks
02-19-2009, 11:16 PM
Nope, definitely wasn't me, I haven't successfully made it to any trivia panels/contests at any of the conventions I've been in the past 2 years, they always get counter-programmed, I have a Wookieepedia BTS trivia contest slated as "interested" for Monday, but I didn't make it to that one. (Yes, I still have my files for the schedule I created for CIV, I throw away nothing, not unlike Engineernerd and these comic ads :p).

Mr. JabbaJohnL
02-20-2009, 07:44 PM
Ah, okay. I thought perhaps I'd caught a glimpse of the elusive JT, but just as well, since that guy was kind of a d*ck. :D

bigbarada
02-20-2009, 09:18 PM
Not exactly from 1975, but I've always liked this ad. I'm sure anyone who collected comics in the 80s will recognize this one:

El Chuxter
02-20-2009, 09:25 PM
Oh yeah! I remember that one well.

bigbarada
02-21-2009, 05:27 AM
Oh yeah! I remember that one well.

Yep, the "Fall of the Mutants" crossover storyline. IIRC, I think it was the first big crossover of all the X-books, which was a big deal back then; but then it seemed that they started having more and more of these "crossover events" every few months. That got a little tiresome.

Bel-Cam Jos
02-21-2009, 09:22 AM
Yep, the "Fall of the Mutants" crossover storyline. IIRC, I think it was the first big crossover of all the X-books, which was a big deal back then; but then it seemed that they started having more and more of these "crossover events" every few months. That got a little tiresome.I think that the Mutant Massacre (remember the Marvel 25th Anniversary covers? even the Ewoks series had one! ) actually was the first such mutant crossover. I kind of liked the "FotM" myself.

p.s. Should this thread be re-directed to the Comics/Books section? My powers work over there, but here, it's like I'm on a red sun world, not a yellow one. :S:

El Chuxter
02-21-2009, 11:32 AM
And now it's just one crossover after another, with maybe an issue in between.

Engineernerd
02-21-2009, 11:47 AM
(Yes, I still have my files for the schedule I created for CIV, I throw away nothing, not unlike Engineernerd and these comic ads :p).
Did Mrs. Nerd put you up to that?


Not exactly from 1975, but I've always liked this ad. I'm sure anyone who collected comics in the 80s will recognize this one:
Oh yeah...I remember that one. Wasn't into X books, but read a lot of Marvel in the eighties.



p.s. Should this thread be re-directed to the Comics/Books section? My powers work over there, but here, it's like I'm on a red sun world, not a yellow one. :S: I thought about putting it in there, but thought it was just for Star Wars Books & Comics

bigbarada
02-21-2009, 02:53 PM
I think that the Mutant Massacre (remember the Marvel 25th Anniversary covers? even the Ewoks series had one! ) actually was the first such mutant crossover. I kind of liked the "FotM" myself.

p.s. Should this thread be re-directed to the Comics/Books section? My powers work over there, but here, it's like I'm on a red sun world, not a yellow one. :S:

I only read the X-Factor half of Mutant Massacre, so I didn't realize that it involved the X-Men as well. I also remember the 25th Anniversary covers, but those didn't affect the storyline at all did they?


And now it's just one crossover after another, with maybe an issue in between.

That's one of the reasons I lost interest in the X-books back in the mid-90s. There was never any time for the individual titles to develop their characters, it was just one crisis after another. I got tired of the chaos.

Of course, in 1995 there was another little hobby of mine that got revived which made the decision to abandon comic books that much easier.

JediTricks
02-21-2009, 10:17 PM
Did Mrs. Nerd put you up to that?No, you did when you quoted her complaints in the original post. ;) :p


Ah, okay. I thought perhaps I'd caught a glimpse of the elusive JT, but just as well, since that guy was kind of a d*ck. :D
I save that for the internet. Wouldn't want to waste it on a broader audience. ;)


Not exactly from 1975, but I've always liked this ad. I'm sure anyone who collected comics in the 80s will recognize this one:I love that they felt they had to copyright it. :p

Bel-Cam Jos
02-22-2009, 09:48 AM
I only read the X-Factor half of Mutant Massacre, so I didn't realize that it involved the X-Men as well. I also remember the 25th Anniversary covers, but those didn't affect the storyline at all did they?
...

Of course, in 1995 there was another little hobby of mine that got revived which made the decision to abandon comic books that much easier.Well, IIRC, here are the issues that were in the MM crossover:

X-Men #209-212 (#211 was the 25th Anniv. cover?)
X-Factor #9-11? (#10 = 25th Ann.)
Thor #373-374? (#374 = 25th? and while an odd title, it fit in fairly well)
Power Pack #27 (no 25th?)
New Mutants #46? (maybe was the 25th?)
and maybe a couple others (a Web of SM? I'm pretty sure F4 wasn't in it, because they were dealing with Ben Grimm/Thing leaving [which was cleared up in the double size #296 with 25th cover])

bigbarada
02-23-2009, 07:59 PM
Well, IIRC, here are the issues that were in the MM crossover:

X-Men #209-212 (#211 was the 25th Anniv. cover?)
X-Factor #9-11? (#10 = 25th Ann.)
Thor #373-374? (#374 = 25th? and while an odd title, it fit in fairly well)
Power Pack #27 (no 25th?)
New Mutants #46? (maybe was the 25th?)
and maybe a couple others (a Web of SM? I'm pretty sure F4 wasn't in it, because they were dealing with Ben Grimm/Thing leaving [which was cleared up in the double size #296 with 25th cover])

I didn't actually get into superhero comics until just before Fall of the Mutants, so I didn't read the early issues until after the fact. That might have given the FotM crossover an exaggerated importance in my mind.

IIRC, X-Factor 28 was the very first superhero comic that I bought with my own money. I knew who Iceman was from the Spider-Man cartoon, but knowledge of that cartoon also lead me to believe that Jean Grey was actually Firestar (the red and yellow uniform didn't help dispel that notion). That issue was my first introduction to Beast as well, so I never knew that his diminished intelligence, a result of Pestilence's touch, was not normal. I also thought that the blue, furry Beast was a completely different character. Cyclops was boring then and is still boring now; but I wouldn't have it any other way.

Thanks for the breakdown of the MM crossover, it will give me some more comics to look for once I get my X-Factor collection rebuilt.:thumbsup:

Bel-Cam Jos
02-23-2009, 08:09 PM
No prob. This was around the time I was heavily addicted to comics, so my memory's pretty strong (a quick search engine showed that uber-reliable wikipedia says...)


Uncanny X-Men #210 (Prologue)
Uncanny X-Men #211
New Mutants #46
Uncanny X-Men #212
Uncanny X-Men #213
X-Factor #9 (Prologue)
X-Factor #10
Thor #373
Power Pack #27
Thor #374
X-Factor #11
Daredevil #238... this was the order, with DD #238 as a later tie-in. I was close to exact on the issue #s. Not not perfect. :cry: I think I still own all these, too.

Bel-Cam Jos
06-25-2009, 10:45 PM
In my quest to get all the Marvel 100s, I was reading Conan #100 today (from '78). There was a shoe ad featuring OJ Simpson (:eek: ), a baseball hitting equipment ad with Pete Rose (:eek: ), a Star Wars Kenner action figure and toy ad (featuring all 19 of the pre-Fett SW figures... yes, for some reason the Stormtrooper was left out, while "Hans Solo" took Han's place :confused: ), a Grit ad (:thumbsup: ), and a Hostess Pies ad with The Thing and some lame villain and hench-robot (:tired: ). Quite a find.

JediTricks
06-26-2009, 01:32 AM
Dude, that's awesome enough to be an authentic haul!

plasticfetish
06-26-2009, 04:34 AM
I'd started putting comic book ads up on my Flickr account a while ago. Here's a link to the gallery. (http://www.flickr.com/photos/plasticfetish/sets/72157613273808813/)

Honestly, I think those kinds of ads are what I miss the most when it comes to modern comics.

Ji'dai
07-03-2009, 04:16 PM
While scanning the covers in my comic collection I'll scan the occasional ad and upload it for this thread. I'm doing various DC titles now from the late 80s. These scans are from the back covers:

Put the Power of Karate at Your Fingertips with this advertisement (http://i44.tinypic.com/20fet1d.jpg) for The Karate Kid "tri-action figures and playsets," featuring the "Attack Alley and Training Center." Figures sold separately. To this day I've never seen this film! From Demon #1, January 1987 (DC Comics)

Did you ever play that great game for NES called Elevator Action? Well, you missed out on some tubular 2D, two-level fun, lemme tellya. This ad (http://i42.tinypic.com/29n6jiv.jpg) features Taito America's exciting new offerings for the Nintendo Entertainment System. From Green Arrow #2, March 1988 (DC Comics)

Remember Mad Balls? Sure, everyone probably had at least one or knew someone who did. But this ad is not for them! It's for free knock-off balls from Bonkers! Chewy Candy called, wait for it... yes... Ugly Balls! This ad (http://i39.tinypic.com/wa1t1h.jpg) was on just about every comic back cover for an entire year and I really grew tired of seeing it.
From Suicide Squad #1, May 1987 (DC Comics)

JediTricks
07-03-2009, 04:45 PM
Wow, I had no idea they made Mr Miyagi action figures!!! Great find, I wonder if these actually made it to market.

I owned Elevator Action, Arkanoid too, both were a ton of fun but Elevator Action looked pretty poor because it was porting the look of a 1983 arcade game (one of the more under-appreciated games of the early '80s IMO). Arkanoid kicked *** because it looked good and added weapons and upgrades to the Breakout concept, as well as bricks that act differently than normal. And that ad is great, perfect comic book stuff, does a HORRIBLE job selling the products they're talking about. :p

Heh heh, Ugly Balls, how clever. I do remember that ad, I don't remember differentiating the product from Madballs though, so I guess that ad sorta worked in that it was successfully misleading, but failed in that I didn't bother getting one.

sith_killer_99
07-04-2009, 04:04 AM
Heh heh, Ugly Balls, how clever. I do remember that ad, I don't remember differentiating the product from Madballs though, so I guess that ad sorta worked in that it was successfully misleading, but failed in that I didn't bother getting one.

Madballs are back BTW....

http://www.madballs.com/shop.action

Bel-Cam Jos
07-04-2009, 08:44 AM
The puns in the Madballs comics (I think I collected the first 8 issues or so) were really bad... now you know where I got my early material. :p To this day, one of those puns is how I remember which end of a boat is which (stern).

Ji'dai
07-04-2009, 10:17 AM
The puns in the Madballs comics (I think I collected the first 8 issues or so) were really bad... now you know where I got my early material. :p To this day, one of those puns is how I remember which end of a boat is which (stern). So what was the pun? I always get get my nautical terminology mixed up.

Speaking of Madballs, here is a spot (http://i41.tinypic.com/2ntle7p.jpg) for the real deal. From Madballs #1 (http://i41.tinypic.com/be6h77.jpg), September 1986 (Star Comics). Yes, Marvel gave them their own 3-issue limited series, though I’m not sure if the book did well enough to merit its own monthly title. According to Bel-Cam Jos, apparently it did.

Popples (http://i41.tinypic.com/118owh2.jpg) weren’t the delicious chicken-nugget-looking alien offspring of Omicron Persei 8, but were actually cuddly teddy bears that could fold up into their own pouch for transport. Popples were quite popular with girls and like many other toys of the 1980s, were adapted into a comic and cartoon. From Inhumanoids #2 (another toy), March 1987 (Star Comics).

My brother had nearly all of Kenner’s Super Powers (http://i42.tinypic.com/2hoibtk.jpg) action figures, based on the popular superheroes and villains of the DC Comics universe. I saved and still have his collection because I thought they were some decent figs. From V (The Visitors Are Our Friends) #6, July 1985 (DC Comics).

A full-page spread (http://i43.tinypic.com/9kczdc.jpg) for Kenner’s MASK collection of figures, vehicles, and the Boulder Hill Playset. ‘Nuff said, true believers. From V (The Visitors Are Our Friends) #11, December 1985 (DC Comics).

This is a cute one for Post Fruity and Cocoa Pebbles. I’m not sure if the cereals are still around or whether Barney Rubble is still trying to get his hands on Fred Flintstone’s Fruity Pebbles in those ubiquitous TV commercials that used to air on Saturday mornings. I think this ad was adapted from one of the TV spots; I remember seeing this Indiana Jones spoof regularly on TV and in print. From Chuck Norris (and the Karate Commandos) #1 (yes, another toy line), January 1987 (Star Comics), here is “Raiders of the Fruity Pebbles (http://i40.tinypic.com/qrxkly.jpg).”

sith_killer_99
07-04-2009, 01:55 PM
M.A.S.K. was awesome, to this day I still want a car with gull wing doors that can fly, a motorcycle that can transform into a helicopter and a side car that becomes a submarine! I had Condor and Piranha when I was younger.

They still make Fruity Pebbles and Cocoa Pebbles, and I still buy them every now and then, thought I haven't seen a commercial in a long time they still use the Fred/Barney "stolen pebbles" theme on the package.

JediTricks
07-04-2009, 04:28 PM
"Madballs, they don't bounce right" should have been their catchphrase.

Popples, I remember them vaguely, and now there's a new version on the market no less. Old ideas are new again.

I don't get that Super Powers ad, there's a Lex Luthor figure in the line, why not have Supes punch that?

Cripes, now Fred Flintstone is fooled by a HAT as a disguise?!? Maybe they shouldn't have hit him over the head so many times, I think he's gone goofy.

MASK may be my favorite toyline of all time, even over SW. That ad is a little odd, with the Thunderhawk's wings not fully deployed and no shot of the Switchblade in helicopter mode, but still awesome to see those. I had everything in that ad except the Gator, and currently have from ebay a beat up Rhino, Switchblade, and 2 Piranhas, as well as some other year 2 stuff. My dad still has my old Boulder Hill playset in storage, I think.

Bel-Cam Jos
07-05-2009, 09:05 AM
So what was the pun? I always get get my nautical terminology mixed up.

Speaking of Madballs, here is a spot (http://i41.tinypic.com/2ntle7p.jpg) for the real deal. From Madballs #1 (http://i41.tinypic.com/be6h77.jpg), September 1986 (Star Comics). Yes, Marvel gave them their own 3-issue limited series, though I’m not sure if the book did well enough to merit its own monthly title. According to Bel-Cam Jos, apparently it did.It was something like "Why are you so serious in the back of the boat?" Where some other Madball says "That's why he's/she's in the stern." (or close to it)

I checked my records: I own the 3-issue limited series, and issue #4. So my guess of 8 was wrong, they at least published one more after the first 3.

STAR Comics were virtually all toy-related.

Ji'dai
07-06-2009, 02:12 PM
In honor of the official release of the new GI Joe movie toys (maybe.. unless it's been changed by Hasbro again) here are a few advertisements for some vintage (as in 1980s) stuff:

Action Force was the UK version of GI JOE: A Real American Hero. The figures and vehicles were the same but the names were sometimes different. This spot (http://i39.tinypic.com/1247klt.jpg) features the AWE Striker and Cobra Stinger. From Action Force #14, June 1987.

I never understood the appeal of professional wrestling, but I did get the Sgt. Slaughter mail-away figure. This ad (http://i40.tinypic.com/24kzdw7.jpg) is not for the GI JOE fig, but the 8” wrestling one. From GI JOE Magazine, Fall 1987 issue.

I never understood the appeal of professional football either, yet I did get the “Fridge (http://i42.tinypic.com/2i8knmh.jpg)” mail-away figure. I didn’t call him to find out his “combat specialty” though. From GI JOE Magazine, Winter 1987 issue.

Get six GI JOE vehicle drivers Thunder, Frostbite, Crankcase, HISS driver, Stinger driver, and Copperhead for $16 a set plus $1.50 shipping and handling in this Hasbro mail-away offer (http://i41.tinypic.com/345mtkp.jpg). Hurry, offer expires August 31, 1988, or while supplies last. From GI JOE Magazine, Winter 1988 issue.

Remember those transforming robots that could turn into planes, cars, trucks, or guns and boom-boxes? Here is an ad (http://i40.tinypic.com/2llgb9u.jpg) for two of the good guys, called “Autobots.” I still have Rodimus Prime. From Action Force #10, May 1987.

Ji'dai
07-08-2009, 08:38 AM
I had a Super NES. I loved the Star Wars games and Donkey Kong Country was really fun. This ad (http://i26.tinypic.com/nq29w.jpg) is for two new controllers for that system. For some reason, “asciiPad” sounds really wrong. From the newsletter Ultra Monthly #1, June 1993.

My favorite store-bought brand of cookies was Devil’s Food. My mom didn’t like buying them because they were expensive, there wasn’t many cookies in the package, and they tended to disappear relatively quickly. Chip’s Ahoy chocolate chip cookies was a more common staple. Later I learned that you could put them in the microwave and heat them slightly, which makes them even better. This page (http://i25.tinypic.com/2z9ll00.jpg), for a new striped variety, is one of several advertisements for Chip’s Ahoy that were pretty common in the late ‘80s. From Strikeforce: Morituri #11, October 1987 (Marvel Comics).

I wasn’t very familiar with Gumby so this page (http://i29.tinypic.com/2dkhnhd.jpg) for Brachs’ bubble-gum lollipops didn’t resonate with me. I was sold on the candy though, putting gum in a sucker was a no-brainer. I much preferred Gum Dingers to the Tootsie Roll pop. From Mark Hazzard: MERC #5, March 1987 (Marvel Comics).

Remember “Sniglets?” If you don’t, then your username is probably Mr.JabbaJohnL or LtBasker. They were created by comedian Rich Hall for the HBO series “Not Necessarily the News” that ran in the late ’80s. This ad (http://i29.tinypic.com/18eskz.jpg) is one of several for OXY 10 that uses sniglets. I used Stridex a lot but probably had this stuff too. From D.P. 7 Annual #1, 1987 (Marvel Comics).

Great fake ad (http://i27.tinypic.com/acv3x0.jpg) from Marvel for the Mutant Registration Act. The mutant superhero titles were some of the hottest books in the 1980s. This ad predates The Fall of the Mutants cross-over storyline. From D.P. 7 #13, November 1987 (Marvel Comics).

I vaguely remember Hasbro’s Battle Beasts (http://i41.tinypic.com/2yltt2c.jpg). I think they even had a cartoon of their own. I never collected them though. From Action Force #19, July 1987 (Marvel Comics).

El Chuxter
07-08-2009, 08:44 AM
Did the Battle Beasts have a cartoon? I just remember them being really cool-looking armored animals with no storyline.

Ji'dai
07-08-2009, 08:54 AM
You're right, Battle Beasts didn't have a cartoon. According to the Wikipedia entry (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_Beasts), in Japan Battle Beasts were a spin-off of Transformers and appeared in an episode of that cartoon. Hasbro marketed them as a separate toy line in the US.

Ji'dai
07-09-2009, 08:42 AM
Today I’ll return the thread back to its roots with these ads from 1975. All three come from the same issue: Superman #293, November 1975 (DC Comics).

Mattel’s Heroes In Action (http://i26.tinypic.com/dwtlya.jpg) figures are a bit unique from the little army men most of us had. Put the figure on its display stand and push the lever to make gunfire sounds and watch the soldier move. The toy looks kind of cool, so the ad works. I’d be interested to see what these figures actually looked like in person.


The CBS Saturday Morning cartoon line-up for Fall 1975 - page one (http://i32.tinypic.com/103iv0l.jpg) and page two (http://i28.tinypic.com/dw26gn.jpg). The Bugs Bunny and Road Runner Hour was long-running so I remember watching that on Saturdays. I also remember the live-action Shazam and Isis half-hour shows. We’d go outside afterwards and act out the Shazam episode. I watched Fat Albert, but only if I was really bored. I didn’t live in the city so I didn’t identify with the problems they had. The others I don’t recall at all: Far Out Space Nuts… Ghost Busters… Valley of the Dinosaurs…


Monogram’s “Pop” art (http://i25.tinypic.com/35akumx.jpg) - build a model car in a soda bottle. 7-UP and Pepsi are shown. I wonder if they offered Coke bottles too. I remember the days of returning cartons of empty glass bottles to the grocery store for a deposit. Man, that part of the store was always a mess, especially on weekends. Stores usually had a long conveyer with rollers that you slid your carton of bottles down behind the counter. Then you got your deposit back from the pay window. On weekends there’d be so many returns the conveyer would be full and people would just start stacking their empties in carts all over the place. I don’t miss that at all.

Ji'dai
07-14-2009, 08:43 AM
Pair of half page ads (http://i25.tinypic.com/99f62f.jpg) from Archie’s Christmas Stocking #6, 1959 edition (Archie Comics). Record your voice at home with this machine that cuts real records. Only $6.98 plus .45 cents shipping. Fun for the whole family! And check out that exact replica of an exploding army hand grenade. Only a $1.25 to see your friends scatter in utter terror. Ten-day free trial and money back if not completely satisfied!

As seen on your TV screen, it’s G.I. Joe (http://i27.tinypic.com/1sxzc6.jpg), the greatest soldier a boy ever owned. From Justice League of America #34, March 1965 (DC Comics).

A 23rd Century Odyssey now - coming this Christmas to a theater near you - it’s Star Trek: The Motion Picture (http://i31.tinypic.com/2rcx6hg.jpg). Rated “S” for sucks. I bet this ad got the Trekkies hot and bothered. From The Pink Panther #66, July 1979 (Whitman / Western Publishing).

LEGO Expert Builder Dune Buggy (http://i28.tinypic.com/9sgvab.jpg) - now you’re building for real. The Expert Builder series was the forerunner of Technic and was targeted at older kids interested in building miniature toy models with real working gears and parts. From The Daring New Adventures of Supergirl #3, January 1983 (DC Comics).

Ji'dai
07-15-2009, 09:30 AM
Silly rabbit, Trix (http://i28.tinypic.com/2jb733p.jpg) are for kids! I loved this cereal. It first appeared in 1954. From Walt Disney’s Uncle Scrooge #53, October 1964 (Gold Key Comics).

Great moments in sport: Johnny Unitas leads the Baltimore Colts to victory over the New York Giants to clinch the 1958 NFL championship. Recreate the excitement with these Aurora (http://i25.tinypic.com/34yzked.jpg) model kits. All your favorite sports stars are here: Jack Dempsey, Babe Ruth, Jimmy Brown, and Jerry West! From the Brave and the Bold #63, December 1965-January 1966 (DC Comics).

In the days before Hubba Bubba and Bubble Yum, Life Savers’ Fruit Stripe Gum (http://i31.tinypic.com/w20x35.jpg) was my chew of choice. I wonder if it’s still around. From Wonder Woman #260, October 1979 (DC Comics).

Bring the battle home in Parker Brothers Star Wars: The Empire Strikes Back video game cartridge (http://i26.tinypic.com/23k97xy.jpg). For your Atari Video Computer System and Sears Video Arcade. This was the first Star Wars home video game and was super hard. I had it for the Atari 2600 - still have it actually. I could never make it beyond the first level or two - which were all the same, just harder to beat. From Star Wars #64, October 1982 (Marvel Comics Group).

JediTricks
08-01-2009, 11:27 PM
I had a Super NES. I loved the Star Wars games and Donkey Kong Country was really fun. This ad (http://i26.tinypic.com/nq29w.jpg) is for two new controllers for that system. For some reason, “asciiPad” sounds really wrong. From the newsletter Ultra Monthly #1, June 1993. I had a magazine with that ad AND both those controllers. They were great controllers, I think I still have them in storage somewhere.


My favorite store-bought brand of cookies was Devil’s Food. My mom didn’t like buying them because they were expensive, there wasn’t many cookies in the package, and they tended to disappear relatively quickly. Chip’s Ahoy chocolate chip cookies was a more common staple. Later I learned that you could put them in the microwave and heat them slightly, which makes them even better. This page (http://i25.tinypic.com/2z9ll00.jpg), for a new striped variety, is one of several advertisements for Chip’s Ahoy that were pretty common in the late ‘80s. From Strikeforce: Morituri #11, October 1987 (Marvel Comics). I remember that ad too! I think I had it in an Archie comics. At the time, striped cookies seemed like genius.


I wasn’t very familiar with Gumby so this page (http://i29.tinypic.com/2dkhnhd.jpg) for Brachs’ bubble-gum lollipops didn’t resonate with me. I was sold on the candy though, putting gum in a sucker was a no-brainer. I much preferred Gum Dingers to the Tootsie Roll pop. From Mark Hazzard: MERC #5, March 1987 (Marvel Comics).Cartoon drawings of Gumby are boring, and Pokey shouldn't be used to pimp products, he's too good for that.


Remember “Sniglets?” If you don’t, then your username is probably Mr.JabbaJohnL or LtBasker. They were created by comedian Rich Hall for the HBO series “Not Necessarily the News” that ran in the late ’80s. This ad (http://i29.tinypic.com/18eskz.jpg) is one of several for OXY 10 that uses sniglets. I used Stridex a lot but probably had this stuff too. From D.P. 7 Annual #1, 1987 (Marvel Comics).I not only remember Sniglets, I owned several of the books, but man are those super lame!


Monogram’s “Pop” art (http://i25.tinypic.com/35akumx.jpg) - build a model car in a soda bottle. 7-UP and Pepsi are shown. I wonder if they offered Coke bottles too. I remember the days of returning cartons of empty glass bottles to the grocery store for a deposit. Man, that part of the store was always a mess, especially on weekends. Stores usually had a long conveyer with rollers that you slid your carton of bottles down behind the counter. Then you got your deposit back from the pay window. On weekends there’d be so many returns the conveyer would be full and people would just start stacking their empties in carts all over the place. I don’t miss that at all.Kids, this is why model building is as popular as it is today.


Pair of half page ads (http://i25.tinypic.com/99f62f.jpg) from Archie’s Christmas Stocking #6, 1959 edition (Archie Comics). Record your voice at home with this machine that cuts real records. Only $6.98 plus .45 cents shipping. Fun for the whole family! And check out that exact replica of an exploding army hand grenade. Only a $1.25 to see your friends scatter in utter terror. Ten-day free trial and money back if not completely satisfied!Dude, there was an ad in Archie for a hand grenade?!? KICK ***! I want an Archie-approved grenade replica damnit!


LEGO Expert Builder Dune Buggy (http://i28.tinypic.com/9sgvab.jpg) - now you’re building for real. The Expert Builder series was the forerunner of Technic and was targeted at older kids interested in building miniature toy models with real working gears and parts. From The Daring New Adventures of Supergirl #3, January 1983 (DC Comics).Man, that ad was in a lot of my comics as a kid, and I totally loved those original Technic designs. Now it's all "build from the center out" which sucks.


In the days before Hubba Bubba and Bubble Yum, Life Savers’ Fruit Stripe Gum (http://i31.tinypic.com/w20x35.jpg) was my chew of choice. I wonder if it’s still around. From Wonder Woman #260, October 1979 (DC Comics).Yeah buddy! Fruit Stripe is indeed still made, and still has the best fruit flavor... for the 20 seconds that it actually carries flavor.


Bring the battle home in Parker Brothers Star Wars: The Empire Strikes Back video game cartridge (http://i26.tinypic.com/23k97xy.jpg). For your Atari Video Computer System and Sears Video Arcade. This was the first Star Wars home video game and was super hard. I had it for the Atari 2600 - still have it actually. I could never make it beyond the first level or two - which were all the same, just harder to beat. From Star Wars #64, October 1982 (Marvel Comics Group).Dang, even the ad for that game looks like crap, and I hated that game too, way too hard, too repetitive as well. In my whole life, I probably downed less than 10 of those AT-ATs in that game.

Bel-Cam Jos
08-02-2009, 08:51 AM
Dang, even the ad for that game looks like crap, and I hated that game too, way too hard, too repetitive as well. In my whole life, I probably downed less than 10 of those AT-ATs in that game.Back and forth... wait, too fast, come back again, firefirefire, too far, come back, fire, back again... oh no, the sky in the background is changing colors.

JediTricks
08-02-2009, 02:20 PM
Back and forth... wait, too fast, come back again, firefirefire, too far, come back, fire, back again... oh no, the sky in the background is changing colors.
So sadly true.

Ji'dai
08-03-2009, 01:01 PM
I not only remember Sniglets, I owned several of the books, but man are those super lame! I never had any of the Sniglet books, I didn't think they were funny to begin with. I did own several editions of Truly Tasteless Jokes though, which was high comedy for junior high school age.


Dude, there was an ad in Archie for a hand grenade?!? KICK ***! I want an Archie-approved grenade replica damnit! If the issue wasn't from 1959 I would've been more surprised. Different time, different sensibilities I guess. Though I've seen toy grenades that explode caps in stores before.


Yeah buddy! Fruit Stripe is indeed still made, and still has the best fruit flavor... for the 20 seconds that it actually carries flavor. Whoa, I'll have to look for some then. I usually only chew spearmint or peppermint-flavored gums now.


Dang, even the ad for that game looks like crap, and I hated that game too, way too hard, too repetitive as well. In my whole life, I probably downed less than 10 of those AT-ATs in that game. That pretty much sums up my experience too. I usually got bored after downing the first two walkers and then shut it off.

JediTricks
08-03-2009, 02:59 PM
I never had any of the Sniglet books, I didn't think they were funny to begin with. I did own several editions of Truly Tasteless Jokes though, which was high comedy for junior high school age.I had the first dozen or so, they got really repetitive and juvenile after a while though, but they were great for Boy Scout trips.


If the issue wasn't from 1959 I would've been more surprised. Different time, different sensibilities I guess. Though I've seen toy grenades that explode caps in stores before.Yeah, I guess you're right. Archie was a creepier character in '59. I remember those toy grenades with caps, they were great fun, but by the time I was a kid parents and society frowned on the concept.


Whoa, I'll have to look for some then. I usually only chew spearmint or peppermint-flavored gums now.It's the best gum for the first minute too, so bright of flavor and color, then it turns all gray in both flavor and color. It's now made by Farleys, who makes all the lesser-known old timey candies.


That pretty much sums up my experience too. I usually got bored after downing the first two walkers and then shut it off.Star Wars' early ventures into Atari were all crap, remember Jedi Arena? Friggin' Pong with a colored stick?

Ji'dai
08-03-2009, 08:58 PM
Yeah, I guess you're right. Archie was a creepier character in '59. I remember those toy grenades with caps, they were great fun, but by the time I was a kid parents and society frowned on the concept. I remember all the backlash against realistic toy weapons and the accidental shootings of kids packing realistic toy guns, but I think I was done with that type of play by then. The only thing that really affected me was the tampering with Halloween candy. I missed out on Trick-or-Treating after that. But the toy guns came back in new outlandish colors - I admit I did reluctantly buy the day-glo orange Kenner Han Solo blaster when the gun was released again in the mid-90s. The pendulum seems to have swung back now - the SW role play weapons seem more realistic now than they were even 10-15 years ago.


Star Wars' early ventures into Atari were all crap, remember Jedi Arena? Friggin' Pong with a colored stick? Yep, I had Jedi Arena too and it was stupid. I think the only SW game I had for Atari that was any good was Death Star Battle, where you fly the Falcon against the Death Star in ROTJ. But even that one grew tiresome quickly. The Atari coin-op SW arcade game was really cool - flying through the Death Star trench avoiding polygons with the Ghost of Obi-Wan egging you on. ParkerBrothers made it into a cartrdge for the Atari home system but I didn't own it.

Bel-Cam Jos
08-04-2009, 09:29 AM
I think the only SW game I had for Atari that was any good was Death Star Battle, where you fly the Falcon against the Death Star in ROTJ. But even that one grew tiresome quickly. The Atari coin-op SW arcade game was really cool - flying through the Death Star trench avoiding polygons with the Ghost of Obi-Wan egging you on. ParkerBrothers made it into a cartrdge for the Atari home system but I didn't own it.I have three (maybe four?) SW Atari games, but alas, after about 30 years, my system recently died out (at least most of the games I've tried don't play, but many do show the opening parts)... ESB (as JT mentioned above), coin-op SW (bought off eBay cheaply... worked once, then out like R2's Leia holo message), ROJ (really liked this one), and perhaps one other I can't recall now (but not Jedi Arena).

Ji'dai
08-04-2009, 11:47 AM
I haven't tried my Atari in years, probably not since the early 90s. It worked fine at that time. The console and all my games are in a tote in a storage shed, but I'm sure the constant change in humidity hasn't done it any good over the years.

JediTricks
08-04-2009, 02:04 PM
I remember all the backlash against realistic toy weapons and the accidental shootings of kids packing realistic toy guns, but I think I was done with that type of play by then. The only thing that really affected me was the tampering with Halloween candy. I missed out on Trick-or-Treating after that. But the toy guns came back in new outlandish colors - I admit I did reluctantly buy the day-glo orange Kenner Han Solo blaster when the gun was released again in the mid-90s. The pendulum seems to have swung back now - the SW role play weapons seem more realistic now than they were even 10-15 years ago.When I was a kid, I had water guns that looked like Mac-10s and Uzis, and it was the coolest. It's all the faults of those stupid kids who took REAL guns into the streets that ruined it for the rest of us, then the cops got nervous of kids with anything that looked like a gun.


Yep, I had Jedi Arena too and it was stupid. I think the only SW game I had for Atari that was any good was Death Star Battle, where you fly the Falcon against the Death Star in ROTJ. But even that one grew tiresome quickly. The Atari coin-op SW arcade game was really cool - flying through the Death Star trench avoiding polygons with the Ghost of Obi-Wan egging you on. ParkerBrothers made it into a cartrdge for the Atari home system but I didn't own it.I don't remember Death Star Battle, but I sure do remember the coin-op Star Wars Arcade, that game was THE BEST. Tons of real movie voices, and piloting mostly done by R2, great trench-runner. Shooting asterisks in space that were supposed to be torpedoes or something, man did I love that game. "USE THE FORCE, LUKE!"