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View Full Version : Where were you on Sept. 11, 2001?



Qui-Long Gone
09-03-2009, 02:33 PM
I am directing Anne Nelson's 9/11 drama The Guys....a play about a fire captain who has to write eulogies for his comrades lost in the Two Towers on 9/11.

We open our show this week and will be donating a portion of proceedes to a memorial being built for fallen emergency responders in our town. On the 11th we are honoring 2 fallen firefighers before the show by having a drill tower (used by SWAT and firefighters) named after them.

So, all that to say...where were you when 9/11 went down?

I was in a meeting and didn't find out until noon what had happened. My wife was at home watching it all on TV and couldn't reach me until lunch because we didn't have cell phones yet...we had only been married a few months....I basically missed the entire event and spent the rest of the week watching everything on TV, just like most people. I was in Tower 2 on the one year anniversary of the first bombing and spent a few years in that part of the country, so I really felt for the people of NYC....

JEDIpartner
09-03-2009, 02:37 PM
I was sitting at my desk and saw the picture of the first "hole" in the WTC. I looked at it and got a few co-workers to come into my office. I said, "That's no accident. If someone were trying to avoid a collision, it wouldn't have been such a centered impact." Then I said, "For some reason I think this is just going to get worse..."

pbarnard
09-03-2009, 02:39 PM
Just coming out of the shower about to go to work when living in Texas.

TeeEye7
09-03-2009, 02:53 PM
I was about to get off work.

I stayed and was glued to the TV as the day shift filed in. We couldn't believe what was happening.

sith_killer_99
09-03-2009, 03:56 PM
I was stationed at Fort Knox, working at Ireland Army Community Hospital, I would end stationed there for almost 5 years before PCSing to Fort Hood and deploying to Afghanistan for 15 months.

Ji'dai
09-03-2009, 04:00 PM
I was at home. Slept in that morning and woke up to the news showing that a plane had crashed into the first tower. Watched the rest of the events of that morning practically live as it happened - the second tower crash, the Pentagon attack, and then the towers collapsing.

mtriv73
09-03-2009, 04:17 PM
In a plane.

We were coming back from our honeymoon in Maui and were on the final leg of the trip from St.Louis to what we were hoping would be Dulles. It turned out we got put down in Cincinnatti, OH. when the FAA ordered all the planes out of the air.

We didn't find out what happened until we got on the concourse. My brother lived across the street from the Pentagon so we were both quite relieved when we found out the other was okay.

Ando
09-03-2009, 06:02 PM
I was on my way to work and I can remember EXACTLY where I was on the freeway.

I was listening to Mark and Brian (or had the radio tuned to that station) which is a syndicated show based out of LA and their station is/was owned by Disney, and in turn ABC news broke in with Peter Jennings reporting and I remember thinking that I was listening to a repeat of a broadcast from 1993 and then I heard about the planes...

I went home and cried myself to sleep that night thinking about all of the awful things that happened that day.

I am actually tearing up right now thinking about it.

Has it really been 8 years? OMG.

Darth Metalmute
09-03-2009, 06:25 PM
I was watching Blues Clues with my son. I flipped over to ESPN at 10:00 to watch highlights of the Broncos game that was on Monday Night Football the night before and it was all over ESPN. I flipped over to the regular news channel and watched it basically all day. We had to go to my Aunts funeral at noon that day. It's odd that I can recall everything that I did on that day, yet can't remember what I did last weekend.

Rocketboy
09-03-2009, 07:16 PM
My wife (then girlfriend) called and woke me up at home shortly after the news broke. At that time it there was still speculation it was just a tragic accident.
When the second plane hit it took me a few seconds to realize what was happening because initially I thought it was footage of the first plane. Then I realized there was smoke already pouring out of the first tower. When I put two and two together I thought/said: Oh sh*t!
Instantly it was clear that this was no accident. On tv there was mass confusion and conflicting reports of other planes down and other buildings hit; everything from Camp David to The White House to the Pentagon and more.
As the first tower fell the news anchor (I forget what channel I had on) went silent mid-sentence. I don't think he said a single word for over a minute.
Like most of other people I sat there in a daze staring at the screen until it was time to go to work. It was easily the slowest day ever and when they finally decided to close an hour or two later I couldn't get home fast enough.
Again, like everyone else, I spent every possible moment for the nest few days watching as much as I could, trying to understand and figure it all out.
I still haven't.

Mr. JabbaJohnL
09-03-2009, 07:19 PM
I was in sixth grade. My mom was driving me to school; we had just dropped my sister off at the high school. There was a report on the radio that a plane had crashed into the World Trade Center, but I didn't even know what that was. I mentioned it at school and remember another kid thinking I said "train center." I'm pretty sure they sent a letter home with us that day, but I don't remember just what it said - we got it in art class at the end of the day, and I remember my teacher saying the US needed to go after bin Laden. I still didn't know what was going on. I'm pretty sure my sister watched coverage of it in high school, but at middle school, we were more or less kept in the dark. We had McDonald's that night since nobody felt like cooking.

In the weeks and months afterward, I remember being scared whenever I heard a plane. One came really close to our house at one point, and my sister and I ran to the basement, sure we were going to be hit. I still drew a lot then, and most of my pictures were focused on killing bin Laden in various ways. I didn't cry until we attacked Afghanistan in October, but I remember thinking we were now going to be in an all-out war.

Mad Slanted Powers
09-03-2009, 07:32 PM
I was getting ready for work. I ate breakfast and took a shower. By that time, my dad was up and reading the paper and had the radio on. I finally noticed part of what they were saying, so turned on the little TV in my room and saw what was happening. So, I went out and turned on the TV in the living room. I don't think my dad was paying attention to the radio, so he didn't realize what I was talking about at first. I can't recall if both planes had hit already when I started watching, but I did see one of the buildings fall before I left.


I was in sixth grade. My mom was driving me to school; we had just dropped my sister off at the high school. There was a report on the radio that a plane had crashed into the World Trade Center, but I didn't even know what that was.You were in sixth grade and didn't know what the World Trade Center was?

Darth Jax
09-03-2009, 07:34 PM
i had just pulled into the office for monthly staff meeting when the first report came over the radio. once in the building flipped on cnn and we sat and watched, never had our meeting. spent most of the day watching the news, few patients showed for their appointments that day.

Mr. JabbaJohnL
09-03-2009, 07:37 PM
You were in sixth grade and didn't know what the World Trade Center was?
I only ever knew them as the Twin Towers. Please excuse the eleven year old for not being more worldly.

sith_killer_99
09-03-2009, 07:58 PM
You were in sixth grade and didn't know what the World Trade Center was?

Welcome to the current state of education in America. He'd probably never heard of the USS Cole either. The Beirut Barracks bombing took place in '83 and I knew about it in grade school.

I remembered the bombing of the WTC in 1993, I was senior in High School at the time.

I'm not banging on you JJL, you were pretty young back then (9/11). But a lot of people in this country got comfortable and failed to take these threats seriously (WTC '93, USS Cole, etc). All the warning signs were there and we failed to act with urgency. America was caught napping and we all paid the price. I'm just stating the facts as I see them.

September 11th was a sad day in the history of our country, but like Pearl Harbor, history will always be left to wonder if we could have done more, if it could have been prevented, and why we didn't see the warning signs.

Mad Slanted Powers
09-03-2009, 08:04 PM
Well, I guess I had an advantage, since that King Kong remake came out in 1976 when I was 6. So, even though I didn't see the movie until later, I knew that Kong climbed the World Trade Center in that movie.

Mr. JabbaJohnL
09-03-2009, 08:13 PM
Welcome to the current state of education in America. He'd probably never heard of the USS Cole either. The Beirut Barracks bombing took place in '83 and I knew about it in grade school.

I remembered the bombing of the WTC in 1993, I was senior in High School at the time.

I'm not banging on you JJL, you were pretty young back then (9/11).
Um, yeah, you kind of are. Why in the absolute hell would I need to know what the WTC was? I was three when the first attempt happened. How is my not being intimately familiar with every large American building or every attack attempt a sign of poor education in America? I knew about the Oklahoma city bombings when they happened, but we didn't review them in school. We heard about Columbine when it happened, but again, we weren't tested on it the next day.

"Hey kids, a few years ago, before you were even in school, some people tried to blow up these buildings. Just for your knowledge, since you aren't learning about anything else at all right now. So, be scared, 'cause they're gonna try again soon."


:rolleyes:

Lowly Bantha Cleaner
09-03-2009, 08:17 PM
The original 9/11 thread, on this forum, is worth investigating, since the (then new) forums were launched a month before. I remember typing my initial reactions at my college library.

I was a senior at college during the time of the attacks. The attack happened on one of my last free Tuesday mornings, just a week before I had to begin observations at a school. My mother woke me from bed and said that we were under attack. I had no clue what she meant until she told me two planes had flown into the World Trade Center Towers.

Rocketboy detailed the confusion that followed the attacks. Car bomb reports, more planes unaccounted for, etc. I remember Ted Kennedy & Laura Bush, shortly after, held a press conference to try and reassure the public about how Washington was functioning, despite the attack, and in the middle of the conference, secret service agents interrupted to whisk the First Lady away.

I remember watching the footage before I had to attend an afternoon class and there was an intense feeling of malaise of which I never felt before.

sith_killer_99
09-03-2009, 09:40 PM
Um, yeah, you kind of are. Why in the absolute hell would I need to know what the WTC was? I was three when the first attempt happened. How is my not being intimately familiar with every large American building or every attack attempt a sign of poor education in America? I knew about the Oklahoma city bombings when they happened, but we didn't review them in school. We heard about Columbine when it happened, but again, we weren't tested on it the next day.

"Hey kids, a few years ago, before you were even in school, some people tried to blow up these buildings. Just for your knowledge, since you aren't learning about anything else at all right now. So, be scared, 'cause they're gonna try again soon."


:rolleyes:

Umm, no, I wasn't criticizing you. I understand that you were like 3. The fact remains that in 2000 the USS Cole was hit. We knew then that it was the same group of terrorists (Al-Qaeda). The fact that nobody bothered to tie all that together for you is the point of my post. Everyone knew it, but nobody wanted to really talk about it.

"Hey kids, there is a lot going on in the news about the USS Cole, the same people who bombed the Navy also bombed the WTC a few years back. These attacks are part of something called Islamic Jihad. What's the WTC, oh that's just the biggest set of buildings in NYC."

Obviously no one had that conversation with you.

I knew about Islamic Jihad because of the '83 Barracks bombing in Beirut, that happened when I was like 9. It was also when I first learned about the Iranian hostage crisis that happened when I was like 4. Granted my comprehension amounted to "A bunch of religious nuts over in the Middle East want to kill people" but I knew about it and we talked about it in school.

Current events are also a big part of the education system. Way back in 1991 we had something is school called channel 1, we watched recaps of the war (Gulf War), the displacement of refugees, the WTC bombings, etc. Not only did we talk about it in school, and watch news reports of critical issues facing our nation, we even wrote reports about them.:twisted:

Mad Slanted Powers
09-03-2009, 09:49 PM
Channel 1 was after my time, but I recall hearing about it. I believe some people had a problem with it because it had advertising in it.

JetsAndHeels
09-03-2009, 10:11 PM
I was working at Duke University Medical Center at the time. I was on the phone with a patient and they told me what was happening. I then followed it online and watched it on tv during my lunch break.

It seems like just yesterday...hard to believe 8 years has gone by so quickly.

LusiferSam
09-04-2009, 12:00 AM
When first plane hit I was sleeping. I heard it about on the way to work. Sadly some of the first words out of my mouth once I got to work were, "I guess they figured a car bomb didn't work so well the first time."

Lowly Bantha Cleaner
09-04-2009, 12:24 AM
Umm, no, I wasn't criticizing you. I understand that you were like 3. The fact remains that in 2000 the USS Cole was hit. We knew then that it was the same group of terrorists (Al-Qaeda). The fact that nobody bothered to tie all that together for you is the point of my post. Everyone knew it, but nobody wanted to really talk about it.

"Hey kids, there is a lot going on in the news about the USS Cole, the same people who bombed the Navy also bombed the WTC a few years back. These attacks are part of something called Islamic Jihad. What's the WTC, oh that's just the biggest set of buildings in NYC."

Obviously no one had that conversation with you.

I knew about Islamic Jihad because of the '83 Barracks bombing in Beirut, that happened when I was like 9. It was also when I first learned about the Iranian hostage crisis that happened when I was like 4. Granted my comprehension amounted to "A bunch of religious nuts over in the Middle East want to kill people" but I knew about it and we talked about it in school.

Current events are also a big part of the education system. Way back in 1991 we had something is school called channel 1, we watched recaps of the war (Gulf War), the displacement of refugees, the WTC bombings, etc. Not only did we talk about it in school, and watch news reports of critical issues facing our nation, we even wrote reports about them.:twisted:


I remember having a conversation in the afternoon class I alluded to in my post of the attacks. The initial reports listed Bin Laden as the prime suspect, and out of a class of 25 or so, there were only 4 students that had heard of his name. I knew about him from listening to the reports about the Eastern African Embassy bombings in 1998.

Current events is something that is indeed fallen by the wayside in our education system. Unfortunately, due to incredible increased pressure on testing, educators have divided things into two categories: "nice to know" and "need to know." Anything that is not tested is divided into the "nice to know" category. Teachers don't always commit to teaching those items that aren't tested. Cursive, certain math concepts (like long division in my grade), and current events are sometimes lopped off the planning book because teaching those would take away time from material that is to be tested.

Blue2th
09-04-2009, 01:26 AM
Was driving on my way to work, listening to a tape I made. It had Ordinary World on it, so that was in my head as I walked into work.
Then a co-worker told me about the first plane had hit the WTC. Thinking it was an accident, soon to find out it wasn't for sure when the second one hit.

That song was still in my head from time to time that day when all the radios are tuned to the news, when I got some quite after being barraged with information. I worked all that day but was very distracted with all kinds of emotions.

I kept remembering that verse.

Papers in the roadside tell of suffering and greed
Here today, forgot tomorrow
Here besides the news of holy war and holy need
Ours is just a little sorrowed talk

(just blown away...)

..ordinary world yada yada. Burned in my head now on every Sept. 11.

Later when I went home, me and the Girlfriend watching the news all night. :ninja:
Then wondering if we should cancel our 2 week vacation trip out to Boston we had already booked our flight, rental car, hotels, itinerary to see New England in the last week of September into early October.

We decided to go. Talk about pinching the cushion seat with my cheeks all the way on the flight there.

When we landed at the lay over in St. Loius, as we were exiting the plane the pilot who was of Arabic decent was standing at the exit nodding goodbye to everyone in a reassuring way as we passed him. He could have just as well stayed in the cockpit and avoided people, but he chose to stand there like he was defiant to the stereotype. I must admit I was a little startled (I was already nervous flying) but smiled and nodded back, in an afterthought it was cool.

Very high airport security in Boston (of course)

No one in New England, we practically had it all to ourselves. The mountains and hills looked all covered in candy corn. Cape Cod was deserted.

Qui-Long Gone
09-04-2009, 02:01 PM
I'm not banging on you JJL, you were pretty young back then (9/11). But a lot of people in this country got comfortable and failed to take these threats seriously (WTC '93, USS Cole, etc). All the warning signs were there and we failed to act with urgency. America was caught napping and we all paid the price. I'm just stating the facts as I see them.


The Cole and WTC '93 weren't signs, they were part of a LONG list of messages that go clear back to US involvement in the Middle East since the 18th Century!

El Chuxter
09-04-2009, 02:21 PM
I love my country, and know that there's a good chance this could be taken out of context, but we're really quite lucky that it's only a minority population in one region of the world that is actively trying to destroy us. Given the history of western colonization, it's amazing that it's not the US, Canada, and western Europe, against the rest of the world.

sith_killer_99
09-04-2009, 03:30 PM
^ Conversations like these REALLY should stay in the Pit, so I'm not going to get into the issue of American self-loathing here.

Let us never forget the more than 3,000 people (American and Non-American) who lost their lives that sad day, in New York City, The Pentagon, and in a field in PA. They are gone but not forgotten.:cry:

Darth Cruel
09-04-2009, 03:53 PM
I was in a hotel room in Denver. I woke up at about 2:00 PM to get ready for my shift (night) and turned on the TV. After watching the news for about 1 mi nute, I was certain that I was watching a movie. But then I tried to change the channel.

El Chuxter
09-04-2009, 04:00 PM
Self-loathing?

Loath⋅ing /ˈloʊɪŋ/ –noun: strong dislike or disgust; intense aversion.
Origin: 1300–50; ME lathynge. See loathe, -ing 1
Related forms: loath⋅ing⋅ly, adverb
Synonyms: abhorrence; hatred. See aversion.

I don't see anything in that (or any other) definition about acknowledging that an awful lot of things in the past have dire consequences in the present, and in the future if we don't learn from them. Failure to recognize that our country, and "western" society in general did things in the rest of the world over the past thousand years or so, and these are why some people hate us, is dangerous. The attacks on America were not our fault, but the acts of crazed and brainwashed fanatics; however, the roots of their hatred for us goes back as far as the Crusades and the Muslim expulsion from Spain.

If we aren't willing, as a nation, to take a hard look at why Muslim fundamentalists don't like us, then that will never change, we will be at war with them for generations, or even centuries, to come, and more tha 3,000 people will have died in vain. This is one of the greatest tragedies, if not the greatest, of our lifetimes; we have to do whatever is necessary to keep it from happening again, even if that involves looking back on the history of relations between Europe and the US and Middle Eastern nations and applying the lessons of the past to the future.

"...<I>n a larger sense, we can not dedicate -- we can not consecrate -- we can not hallow -- this ground. The brave men, living and dead, who struggled here, have consecrated it, far above our poor power to add or detract. The world will little note, nor long remember what we say here, but it can never forget what they did here."

sith_killer_99
09-04-2009, 04:22 PM
I'm not going to get into the issue of American self-loathing here.

..........

El Chuxter
09-04-2009, 04:50 PM
Then why are you the only person who brought it up, and twice? I responded to you and thought it was buried, since the only possible case of "American self-loathing" I've observed here was you lamenting the lack of education when JabbaJohnL said he didn't know, at the world-weary age of 11, that the World Trade Center was the same as the Twin Towers. (And I'm not arguing that is American self-loathing, either.)

I prefaced my first comment with "I love my country, and know that there's a good chance this could be taken out of context" since I knew someone could misinterpret it. To be honest, I didn't expect you to be one to do that, as I know you're smarter than that.

When I explicitly say I love my country, am accused in an offhand manner of "American self-loathing," explain what I said further, and you come back by quoting your original accusation, it's not a discussion, it's not a debate, it's not even an argument. It's the equivalent of you sticking your tongue out, putting your fingers in your ears, and shouting, "Not listening! Not listening! Nyah nyah nyah!"

I'm not taking this thread any further from Qui-Long Gone's intent in starting it. If it makes you feel better to think you know me better than I think I know myself, then, by all means, believe I'm some hippie drug addict communist pinko who secretly plots how to destroy the American way of life.

Darth Cruel
09-04-2009, 05:47 PM
Oh, man! I just wrote a big long post on the idea of the politics of this discussion only to remember after I was done that this is not the Pit.

Damn, it was a good one as well. I will have to try to re-write it after I get home.

Blue2th
09-04-2009, 07:09 PM
I have loathing for those who feed off us like vampires sucking the life out of it's own people.
After stealing us blind a month after Sept. 11th, they turn around and do it again last year. Now after their scorched earth policy of operation chaos, they blame the problem on someone else currently in power.
They are not willing to give an inch to return their ill gotten gains back to the people they stole it from.

That part I "loathe"
These cold blooded reptilians are worse than someone who fights for a misguided cause, because their cause is money and power, and they do it to their own. Even deflect the blame to someone else, because there is more to gain in resources and power by selecting a profitable enemy. Meanwhile keeping their subjects in color coded fear to control them.

These are the most loathsome creatures inhabiting the earth, and they will not go quietly back into their holes.

Qui-Long Gone
09-05-2009, 01:48 AM
I'm not taking this thread any further from Qui-Long Gone's intent in starting it. If it makes you feel better to think you know me better than I think I know myself, then, by all means, believe I'm some hippie drug addict communist pinko who secretly plots how to destroy the American way of life.

I don't take your comments to be American self-loathing...I think in a much broader sense, 9-11 was an attack on the world, not the USA...America, after all, is more than just a nation of 50 states, it's an imperfect ideal and there are people who really really hate that ideal...for a variety of reasons.

I think the good that has come out of the event has been that our country realized that two oceans, the Rio Grande River, and our "hat"...I mean Canada, doesn't isolate us from religious/political/cultural/ethnic/damned stupid violence.

It's hard to speak of this event and not mix anguish with anger.

Although this thread is not political, as El has aptly noted, national grieving cannot be entirely separated from politics...because a people who cry together have to decide how to respond together....

Sith, I think it's easy to confuse self-loathing with self-reflection...and America indeed has demons in our past that continually haunt our future and threaten our present security. The irony, I'm sure you agree, is that America is so diverse in our religious and political landscape, that attacks from anyone--be they religious extreemists or whatever--is just plain misguided....

bobafrett
09-05-2009, 08:23 AM
Well, I was working overnights therefore sleeping during the days. I believe I was off that next night, so I only slept half the day. I woke up and their were two calls on my answering machine. The first was from my brother telling me about the incident, telling me to turn on the Television. The second was from my girlfriend offering me her house to come stay in since my apartment was close enough to O'Hare airport, and nobody knew what was going on.

I remember getting up and turning on the tube, and there it was, this tragedy unfolding, and it was about that time that they had someone who had happened to film the first plane hitting the twin tower from the street. I called my brother up and I was openly sobbing to him, and having him tell me he knows how I was feeling because he had also cried earlier after seeing the news.

The other thing I remember is being close to an airport, you take for granted all the air traffic overhead, you adjust to the sounds of the planes engines as they make their ascent and descent, but when they grounded all air flights, it was eerily silent.

Ando
09-08-2009, 10:47 AM
The other thing I remember is being close to an airport, you take for granted all the air traffic overhead, you adjust to the sounds of the planes engines as they make their ascent and descent, but when they grounded all air flights, it was eerily silent.

I remember that!

When they started letting planes fly again, it was the LOUDEST sound in the world!

My brother and I were both working for my dad at the time and we both rushed into the parking lot from different doors in the building and looked over at each other in amazement. We were the only two people to leave the offices and we did it at the same time.