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El Chuxter
03-24-2010, 12:01 AM
I know I've complained before about how toy manufacturers seem determined to reinforce gender stereotypes. I discovered something today when shopping for Easter presents that floored me, though.

Y'know how we keep asking for various female figures, even Leia and Padme, and the answer is always "boys don't want girl figures"? Try looking for a male companion for Barbie. At TRU, Target, and Wal-Mart, I only could find one male Barbie figure, from some DVD movie. It didn't look like Ken, nor did it use that name anywhere. Honestly, it looked like this particular doll wouldn't even be interested in Barbie. (Not saying there's anything wrong with that, but, really, the guy was not manly in the least. If not for his bare chest, I would've thought he was a girl.) Okay, I'm not counting the few dudes in the $30 collector dolls, but for a toddler? No.

You can buy every single Disney princess (aside from Kida, of course, whom they don't like to admit exists, because she could singlehandedly whoop every other Disney character all by herself). You can even buy a few supporting characters, as long as they're girls (I found her a Charlotte LeBouf doll, since she loves the character). But start looking for the dudes--no Prince Charming, no other Prince Charming, heck, not even the stinkin' Beast.

Then again, you simply can't get a female character in any current Batman line, despite the importance of characters like Catwoman, Poison Ivy, Harley Quinn, or Batgirl. (And wouldn't Black Canary be perfect packed with Music Meister?)

How, really, how, can every major toy manufacturer be so blind to the fact that kids up to a certain age play with whatever they darn well please, stereotypes be damned, and it's simply not fun to have, say, a bunch of Barbies without any dudes to hang out with them? I have to admit, Hasbro is better than Mattel on this; at least we get Padmes and Baronesses and even Arcees. The only cross-gender toys I could find from Mattel were the few women in the DC lines geared toward grownups.

If you care, I wound up getting her two Rise of Cobra Joes on clearance, since most women I know tell me they always thought Ken was a douchebag or a wuss and had their Barbies go out on dates with their brother's Joes anyway. Too bad there's no way to give her a Catwoman (her favorite Batman character) to go along with her new Gorilla Grodd (her second favorite).

JediTricks
03-24-2010, 12:10 AM
Ken was retired a few years ago from the Barbie line, he just never sold that well. I honestly think the problem is that men's clothes are fashionable in the same way. Barbie represents female fashions and there are tons of variations to the theme, shapes that accent busts, shoulders, waists, legs, pretty much everything; meanwhile, Ken represents male fashion which is "square, boring" in different fruity colors and shapes. Hell, Ken doesn't even wear a hat or accessorize. If I were a little girl into Barbies, Ken wouldn't fit in that play pattern for crap. And GI Joe only accessorizes in war or adventure gear, which isn't really the same.

I've put a lot of thought into this, my niece was into them for a while, and before that my mom collected them when I was a kid.

El Chuxter
03-24-2010, 12:16 AM
Yeah, but if Barbie is going to complain that math is hard and primp for her big date, who is she going out with? ;)

Luckily for me, Chux Jr likes GIJoes, so she won't mind having two Joes to play with her Barbies (which are mostly Disney princesses, anyway). Her favorite three Joes she named "Guy" (Shockblastwave), "Girl" (Helix), and "Roastie" (Tunnel Rat). I never figured out why a short Asian dude with a bandana got such a weird name. She never bothered naming her Snake Eyes and Storm Shadow for some reason.

figrin bran
03-24-2010, 12:57 AM
There is a Batgirl/Nightwing/Penguin pack coming very soon in the JLU line. They're really just BTAS figure repacks but Chux Jr. might enjoy having them.

Interestingly enough, Mattel has attempted female heavy packouts with the JLU multipacks - Fire, Ice, John Stewart and Huntress, Galatea, Superman. Unfortunately, they're both serious pegwarmers.

Bel-Cam Jos
03-24-2010, 01:18 PM
Think of the question at McDonald's regarding Happy Meal toys: boy or girl toy? So, if I say "boy" but don't get the toy the child wants, what do you do then?

Or the segregated aisles of toy departments? And the color schemes there?

Then there's the simple questions on the Census form (name, age, race, gender).

Star Wars didn't have a single different female toy (only Leias) until the 1995+ POTF2 line (and it wasn't until, Mon Mothma in '97/'98 or Oola in '96/'97 I think). And don't try to tell me that EV-9D9 was a "girl," either.

Tycho
03-24-2010, 01:38 PM
When I was a little kid, I liked having friends to play with, including several of the girls on my street.

I handled that well.

When they wanted to play with Barbies, I had no problem with that.

I used my weapons from my 12" Star Wars figures to "accessorize" all their Barbie figures and then we played with "action figures" the right way! :D

Bloody Massacre at Barbie's Dream Mansion was originally my idea.

I also got those scale sharks and alligators to help bring up the excitement level for Barbie's Dream Pool.

Inspired by M.A.S.K., I added fighter wings from a model kit to my lady friends' Barbie Corvettes.

And Barbie's camper van became her "pink Ops" mobile command center!

It just took some creativity and patience, and I taught the girls the correct way to play with their toys.

If Barbie depicted domestic life for young ladies, how was it ever going to be realistic without domestic violence?

El Chuxter
03-24-2010, 02:18 PM
My daughter always wants the boy toy at McDonald's. Sometimes, it gets astonished reactions from the cashier. "But, but, but... she's a girl!" Yeah, and the girl toys always suck. So be it.

mtriv73
03-24-2010, 02:53 PM
My daughter always wants the boy toy at McDonald's. Sometimes, it gets astonished reactions from the cashier. "But, but, but... she's a girl!" Yeah, and the girl toys always suck. So be it.

It's none of the cashiers business what toy your kid wants, they're there to get your order, take your money, and try to get you to upsize your order. Having said that, don't you think that's the exception rather than the rule? Obviously, there will be a significant number of exceptions. My wife never played with dolls and apparently had as many tonka trucks as I did. But, if you took 100 boys and 100 girls and asked each of them if they would rather have a toy from pile A (which would be toys generally labeled as girl toys) or pile B (toys generally labeled as boy toys) that a majority of the girls would pick one from pile A and a majority of boys from pile B? Toy companys are marketing to that majority, not to every child. To get the most bang for their marketing and development dollar they've stuck to the gender stereotypes. As much as they spend on marketing and research there has to be something to the fact that Prince Charming and Beast figures aren't as popular and thus profitable as Princess whoever, otherwise they'd be making them to get all the money from us they can get.

JediTricks
03-24-2010, 03:06 PM
Yeah, but if Barbie is going to complain that math is hard and primp for her big date, who is she going out with? ;)

Luckily for me, Chux Jr likes GIJoes, so she won't mind having two Joes to play with her Barbies (which are mostly Disney princesses, anyway). Her favorite three Joes she named "Guy" (Shockblastwave), "Girl" (Helix), and "Roastie" (Tunnel Rat). I never figured out why a short Asian dude with a bandana got such a weird name. She never bothered naming her Snake Eyes and Storm Shadow for some reason.I suspect not every girl gives a crap about the end-result of all the styling they give their Barbies. I wonder if the majority of pre-teen girls don't think much about recreating a dating environment as much as society has placed that stigma upon them in the '60s and '70s.

I honestly don't think Ken matters to the line, girls will use their imaginations to cover those bases if that's the route they want. There's not a lot of copies of the board game Dream Date selling these days. From what I've seen, pre-teen girls' play seems to be focused on: fashion, princesses (which is often just an offshoot of fashion), nurturing (doll babies, huggable creatures, brushing ponies' manes), crafts, homemaking, and on the outskirts there's collectible friendly adventure (Strawberry Shortcake, Smurfs).

And honestly, I think a lot of girls' toys are too dead-ended, too much of a brief encounter because they promote too little opportunity to use imagination and to go outside the boundaries of the play pattern. A lot of girls I've known were into boys toys because they're more exciting, more dynamic, and promote more open-ended and empowering play - and that's not just a modern thing, even my grandma talks about reading her superman comics and playing with toy guns.

At Botcon, I walked into the panel with the writers from the original Transformers cartoon, they were talking about a meeting some of them had with Hasbro about writing the upcoming My Little Pony cartoon as well. Hasbro had looked at their submitted idea and asked why there had to be an antagonist in the story, why couldn't they just prance and play every episode. One of the writers explained that there was this guy named Aristotle who postulated that all interesting stories must have this thing called conflict to drive the protagonist. And therein lies the disconnect, toymakers think girls just want to brush their ponies manes all day, that there's nothing more to the play pattern than simple nurturing. But an engrossing experience means struggling against something and overcoming it, maybe the ponies have to put out a fire in the stable, whatever, but toymakers still are having a hard time seeing girls toys as a gateway to exploring the player's imagination.

It probably doesn't help that tween girls' brains change rapidly to focus on socializing, thus dropping interest in toys and picking up interest in cellphones and such.

Darth Metalmute
03-24-2010, 03:19 PM
My daughter always wants the boy toy at McDonald's. Sometimes, it gets astonished reactions from the cashier. "But, but, but... she's a girl!" Yeah, and the girl toys always suck. So be it.

If your fast food employees are anything like ones in my city, it doesn't matter what you ask for. They grab the nearest bag and fill it with food. Last night I picked up Bk for my kids, one girl, one boy. Got home and found out I had 2 boy toys. Luckily one of them was pink. Half the time, I'm lucky to get the food I ordered.

My daughters new kick is Nerf guns. If they ever made a pink one, I'd be in trouble.

Tycho
03-24-2010, 06:45 PM
I think Parkerbrothers (a division of Hasbro) should make a new board game that targets women's stereotypes.

It will be called "ALIMONY AND CHILD SUPPORT" and the object of the game is to rape the man the girl will profit the most by interacting with.

She rolls the dice and moves her avatar around the board, landing on the positions on the board that represent the men she will sell her body to.

In the chance cards, she will get "fat cards" and other set-backs which will prevent her from scoring certain men her avatar piece lands on.

The board positions will include descriptions of men such as "real estate developer," "bum," and "con-artist." And she will win or lose accordingly as she tries to "use the best man."

This is so much more realistic than playing with Barbie dolls and doing their hair because if it mirrored real life, there'd be a Ken doll that could pay for it.

El Chuxter
03-24-2010, 06:56 PM
I honestly don't think Ken matters to the line, girls will use their imaginations to cover those bases if that's the route they want. There's not a lot of copies of the board game Dream Date selling these days. From what I've seen, pre-teen girls' play seems to be focused on: fashion, princesses (which is often just an offshoot of fashion), nurturing (doll babies, huggable creatures, brushing ponies' manes), crafts, homemaking, and on the outskirts there's collectible friendly adventure (Strawberry Shortcake, Smurfs).

And honestly, I think a lot of girls' toys are too dead-ended, too much of a brief encounter because they promote too little opportunity to use imagination and to go outside the boundaries of the play pattern. A lot of girls I've known were into boys toys because they're more exciting, more dynamic, and promote more open-ended and empowering play - and that's not just a modern thing, even my grandma talks about reading her superman comics and playing with toy guns.

Therein lies the problem. There's no reason girls' toys shouldn't allow for as much use of imagination as boys'. It's almost as if they're saying girls don't need to think as much, for whatever reason.

Utterly doing away with Ken is a bad idea. Sure, he's a tool, but why not allow girls to role play with male characters? If this were completely reversed, imagine how p***ed everyone here, and a lot of kids, would be if, suddenly, all Leias, Padmes, Scarletts, etc, were completely canceled because "female characters don't sell." Instead, they make fewer of them. So why not just make fewer Kens, or whatever they want to call them?

JediTricks
03-24-2010, 10:12 PM
Ken, IMO, is not fun basically because male fashions suck. Barbie is a fashion toy, Barbie doesn't need a man to work at McDonalds or have a Malibu Dream House and a Corvette, so the only way Ken really fits into that play pattern is to accessorize him, and his clothes always suck partly because men's clothes generally are dull shapes, and partly because Mattel has HORRIBLE taste in men's fashion and it's usually 20 years out of date. Bottom line, Ken sells terribly and nobody likes him.

I think the ancillary Barbie line that wants to be Bratz has a few boyfriends - a white guy, a black guy, and a latino guy - who aren't so drab and actually have modern clothes. And that line packages them with girls and by themselves.

figrin bran
03-24-2010, 10:34 PM
I guess Mattel's She-Ra Princess of Power line back in the 80's was rather progressive then as it interwove all the Barbie elements with action adventure elements.

Wow, did I actually give credit to Mattel for being progressive minded????

JediTricks
03-24-2010, 11:40 PM
Yes, but it was 20+ years ago, so don't feel too bad, it was probably an accident. And the figures were all insulting to women anyway. ;)

bigbarada
03-25-2010, 09:06 AM
I don't think that the toy manufacturers intentionally set out to segregate boys toys from girls toys. Why would they deliberately cut their profits in half that way? They are simply reacting to the purchasing habits of parents and kids.

If Hasbro could sell Star Wars toys to girls in the same numbers that they sell them to boys, they would jump at the chance because they would double their market and their sales.

However, I do seem to recall Hasbro trying to make girls Star Wars toys with the Queen Amidala dolls from Ep1. Look how well those did.

Darth Metalmute
03-25-2010, 09:28 AM
Ken, IMO, is not fun basically because male fashions suck. Barbie is a fashion toy, Barbie doesn't need a man to work at McDonalds or have a Malibu Dream House and a Corvette, so the only way Ken really fits into that play pattern is to accessorize him, and his clothes always suck partly because men's clothes generally are dull shapes, and partly because Mattel has HORRIBLE taste in men's fashion and it's usually 20 years out of date. Bottom line, Ken sells terribly and nobody likes him.

I think the ancillary Barbie line that wants to be Bratz has a few boyfriends - a white guy, a black guy, and a latino guy - who aren't so drab and actually have modern clothes. And that line packages them with girls and by themselves.

I don't know....
If Barbie is working at McDonalds, I'm pretty sure she needs a man to buy her that Malibu Dream House and corvette.:shocked:

Neuroleptic
03-25-2010, 10:03 AM
I think the reason you don't see girls buying star wars toys primarily, for example, is simply because of society. Girls are wrapped in pink while boys are wrapped in blue blankets in maternity wards. Girls wear pink frilly dresses while boys have there parents put on little sweaters and pants when they go to church. Girls tend to play with Barbi dolls/princesses/my little pony while boys tend to play with Transformers/Star Wars/G.I.Joe toys. It's just how things are and part of people building there identity so they conform to societies standards.

Regardless of how individuals may feel about that, every society dose this.

That being said, my daughter absolutly loves R2 and 3PO. I have given her the clone wars R2, and my 1997 or so 12 inch 3PO and R2 to play with. and she ALWAYS gets the boy toy at Mcdonalds unless the cashier sees a little girl and gives her what she thinks she wants instead of what she's screaming for when she sees the sighn when we come in.

She also likes Sailor Moon, which makes me wish there was merchandise out to get for it because she'd absolutly LOVE it and it is one of the more emaginative girl targited franchises out there.

ncbarrett
03-25-2010, 10:20 AM
I think the gender gap has more to do with parents, than toy companies.

My, almost 2 year old, daughter likes purses and baby dolls, but also likes cars and boy figures. One of the first action figures i let her play with was my "tapestry" Picard(she tore his arm off, poor guy, but it snapped back on), and concept stormtrooper. She even has a Darth tater, and loves to carry around his lightsaber arm.

When my son is born, i want force him to play with "boy" things, although I hope he wants too. :ninja:
Mainly for his own benefit, since society can accept a tomboy(my daughter), but not a girlie boy.

Neuroleptic
03-25-2010, 11:12 AM
I think the gender gap has more to do with parents, than toy companies.

My, almost 2 year old, daughter likes purses and baby dolls, but also likes cars and boy figures. One of the first action figures i let her play with was my "tapestry" Picard(she tore his arm off, poor guy, but it snapped back on), and concept stormtrooper. She even has a Darth tater, and loves to carry around his lightsaber arm.

When my son is born, i want force him to play with "boy" things, although I hope he wants too. :ninja:
Mainly for his own benefit, since society can accept a tomboy(my daughter), but not a girlie boy.


That's my point. Parents choose to have there kids largely do the things I mentioned above because they want there kids to fit in to society. If something is accepted, it's allowed (Tomgirls for example are accepted by the majority of society) and if it's not, parents will actively work to try to make there child conform to society (such is the case of girly boys).

Thus, due to societie's demands for what people should be like in a particular society, parents react certain ways. Such as buying Barbi for girls and Megatron for boys.

This is probably also why girl/woman action figures rarely sell well.

Tycho
03-25-2010, 11:42 AM
One of my best Star Wars buddies has a daughter who's absolutely enamored with Ahsoka Tano.

She also likes all the other girl Jedi featured more prominently in the Clone Wars: Aayla and Luminara. Padme interests her, too - as does Princess Leia in the OT.

There were two girls living in my building (college age: 20 yrs) who also loved Star Wars. They pretty much kept to themselves. One was an exchange student from Sweden. They frequently message about Star Wars. They were great-looking but guarded, so I've never gotten to know them very well, though they are going to see Star Wars In Concert when it returns here. So they're interested in some things SW. I don't know if that's because of Clone Wars or otherwise.

The fact that one girl is European (Swedish) is why I bring it up. I had a Swiss girlfriend in my past that absolutely loved Star TREK. SW and ST are American icons overseas and looked upon with much more respect than they are by women here. In the US, if you have a huge collection as an adult, you're a nerd or a little boy who can't grow up. It relates to this topic, because girls are discouraged by their mothers to play with Star Wars toys and the likes.

As I said, the B$@*&!es ought to teach their daughters to play with DIVORCE ATTORNEY ACTION FIGURES to prepare them for life in American society. (Did you get the latest exclusive that comes with the special garnished wages settlement, dear?)

And consequently, because of all this gender-gapping that begins with child-rearing, men who want to play with vaginas later PRETEND they are no longer interested in things like Star Wars toys, so they can be happy for 15 or fewer years, until they're bored and all their patience has been expended with their wives, and they inevitably cheat, claim they've suddenly discovered they're gay (see the former New Jersey governor for one example), or one way or another, meet with their ex's DIVORCE ATTORNEY ACTION FIGURE.

(I speak the truth and want to being teaching a Men's Self-Defense Course. However, it's usually too late by the time somebody believes me.)

Well, in any case, don't believe me because I don't believe anybody else and I not only think you'll lie to me, but that you're already lying to yourself.

Neuroleptic
03-25-2010, 02:38 PM
Tycho, you've lost me.

The first part of your comment sounded like you where going somewhere with it, and I was interested to hear what it was.

But then you seem to have switched thoughts or something half way through to try to say that all women are evil and . . . we should kill them before they go to an attorney?

The first part of your comment may have something to do with the topic and if you have more to say on it, I'm genuinly interested since I'm taking an anthropology course at the moment (that same course is what I'm basing a lot of my comments so far in this thread off of).

The second part . . . well, I like you Tycho, I really do, but the best thing I can say about the second part of your comment is that the way you've chosen to word it . . . well . . . all it does is make it sound like you have had some kind of issues with women lately or something, man.

I mean, yeah, I'm sure every one of us has met a woman who's like the type you're describing. But all of em?

For example, my wife thought it was realy cool that I am giving my daughter some of my collection to play with, as well as the fact that my daughter likes star wars and occasonaly asks for Star Wars toys because it allows me and my daughter to have an interest we both like. Also, my wife has never had a problem with my collection and even lets me display what I want in the living room where people can actualy see it.

:crazed: And if my wife married me for money she's probably been living a huge dissapointment for the last 6 years since she's always made a lot more than me and I'm currently going to school and not working :crazed:

Mr. JabbaJohnL
03-25-2010, 05:11 PM
In the past few weeks, I've noticed that one of the heaviest pegwarmers is Clone Wars Padmé. Then again, Ahsoka always sells like gangbusters. Take from that what you will.

When I was younger, I was more interested in getting the male SW figures. I didn't get slave Leia for quite a while, though I did have most of the other Leias (but passed on the Leia Collection two-packs until after they were out of stores). Before that, I bought and played with Aladdin figures, and I remember having at least two Jasmines. But I guess I've always been something of a collector, always wanting everything from a line. So who knows.

InsaneJediGirl
03-27-2010, 09:45 AM
My daughter always wants the boy toy at McDonald's. Sometimes, it gets astonished reactions from the cashier. "But, but, but... she's a girl!" Yeah, and the girl toys always suck. So be it.

I remember going into McDonald's around the age of 9 or so with my Mom and two younger brothers. The boy toy was a Hot Wheels car and the girl toy was something stupid, Beauty and the Beast I think(I so wasn't into Beauty and the Beast), so I asked my Mom to get me the car.

The cashier said "Oh, you must have three little boys" My Mom said "No, I have a daughter, she just doesn't want the ugly girls toy". Wow, did the cashier shut up, and Mom was mad.

I was lucky enough to be brought up to play with whatever toy I wanted, boy or girl. I remember my Barbies going on dates with the Red and Blue Power Rangers, while Ken stayed at home in the Barbie Mansion. I grew tired of Barbie pretty quick though, probably when I realized she was one dimensional;).

However, when I collected Star Wars starting around age 11, I always bought the male action figures first. They were just so much better designed than monkey-face Leia. They had cooler accessories too, i.e. lightsabers and bigger guns.

So is Hasbro steering girls away from traditional boy toys by giving the female figures cruddy accessories and ugly features?

JediTricks
03-27-2010, 04:18 PM
I don't think that the toy manufacturers intentionally set out to segregate boys toys from girls toys. Why would they deliberately cut their profits in half that way? They are simply reacting to the purchasing habits of parents and kids.

If Hasbro could sell Star Wars toys to girls in the same numbers that they sell them to boys, they would jump at the chance because they would double their market and their sales.

However, I do seem to recall Hasbro trying to make girls Star Wars toys with the Queen Amidala dolls from Ep1. Look how well those did.That's the thing, toy manufacturers aren't really trying to get into girls' toy buying habits the same way they do with boys' toys, so they're not actively trying to segregate purchasing, but they're passively doing that by focusing on what they already know.



I don't know....
If Barbie is working at McDonalds, I'm pretty sure she needs a man to buy her that Malibu Dream House and corvette.:shocked:She's the "Undercover Boss" there, she actually is CEO of the company. And she only took the job when she was a teenager because she needed money to pay for modeling lessons, fashion design school, 6 teaching degrees, dental school, medical school, nursing accreditation, veterinary training, lifeguard training, firefighter training, police AND Canadian Mountie academy, flight training, astronaut training, and degrees in computer engineering, paleontology, communications, business, and photography.

Granted, her 6 tours of duty with the Army, Navy, Air Force, and Marines probably helped pay for a lot of that, but the GI bill only goes so far.



I think the reason you don't see girls buying star wars toys primarily, for example, is simply because of society. Girls are wrapped in pink while boys are wrapped in blue blankets in maternity wards. Girls wear pink frilly dresses while boys have there parents put on little sweaters and pants when they go to church. Girls tend to play with Barbi dolls/princesses/my little pony while boys tend to play with Transformers/Star Wars/G.I.Joe toys. It's just how things are and part of people building there identity so they conform to societies standards.

Regardless of how individuals may feel about that, every society dose this.I disagree somewhat with that being the issue. At Celebration IV and every Comic-Con since, I've seen maybe 40% of the audiences there being gals, and a lot of the SW fangirls are quite interested in the toys and collectibles. The difference, however, is that girls largely don't seem to have the drive to buy figures of all their favorites and display them. They go towards a few key items at best, and are just glad to look at the items rather than own mountains of them. Girls don't have buying habits the same way boys do, and that's true of Barbie and My Little Pony too, they bond with the few they have over just getting everything.


She also likes Sailor Moon, which makes me wish there was merchandise out to get for it because she'd absolutly LOVE it and it is one of the more emaginative girl targited franchises out there.There was a line about 10 years ago, perhaps you could pick up those items on ebay.



I think the gender gap has more to do with parents, than toy companies.

My, almost 2 year old, daughter likes purses and baby dolls, but also likes cars and boy figures. One of the first action figures i let her play with was my "tapestry" Picard(she tore his arm off, poor guy, but it snapped back on), and concept stormtrooper. She even has a Darth tater, and loves to carry around his lightsaber arm.

When my son is born, i want force him to play with "boy" things, although I hope he wants too. :ninja:
Mainly for his own benefit, since society can accept a tomboy(my daughter), but not a girlie boy.Aww. Poor Picard though, and that's a rare figure!

When my niece was 4, I gave her a VHS set of the trilogy, and she dug it for a while. But of all my collection of figures, all she wanted was "the bad piggy", she wanted just 1 Gamorrean Guard. As they weren't on shelves at the time, I gave her one of my POTF2 figures on the shelf.

Once she hit about 9 years old, she became entirely disinterested with toys and it was a focus on socializing and decor.



I remember going into McDonald's around the age of 9 or so with my Mom and two younger brothers. The boy toy was a Hot Wheels car and the girl toy was something stupid, Beauty and the Beast I think(I so wasn't into Beauty and the Beast), so I asked my Mom to get me the car.

The cashier said "Oh, you must have three little boys" My Mom said "No, I have a daughter, she just doesn't want the ugly girls toy". Wow, did the cashier shut up, and Mom was mad.Haw! Awesome!


However, when I collected Star Wars starting around age 11, I always bought the male action figures first. They were just so much better designed than monkey-face Leia. They had cooler accessories too, i.e. lightsabers and bigger guns.TOTALLY! That's a good point, Leia figures back in the day always sucked, had limited articulation, and looked really bad.


So is Hasbro steering girls away from traditional boy toys by giving the female figures cruddy accessories and ugly features?I think even Padme's guns in Ep 1 are kind of feminine and boring, they make a weird "bwah bwah" noise. So, the problem is clearly Lucas creating 1 great female character but only letting her live it in her words, not costume or weapon. :D

LTBasker
03-27-2010, 04:55 PM
She's the "Undercover Boss" there, she actually is CEO of the company. And she only took the job when she was a teenager because she needed money to pay for modeling lessons, fashion design school, 6 teaching degrees, dental school, medical school, nursing accreditation, veterinary training, lifeguard training, firefighter training, police AND Canadian Mountie academy, flight training, astronaut training, and degrees in computer engineering, paleontology, communications, business, and photography.

Granted, her 6 tours of duty with the Army, Navy, Air Force, and Marines probably helped pay for a lot of that, but the GI bill only goes so far.


Man, that had me laughing pretty hard for a good several minutes!

I'm rather curious as to how you're aware of all her professions, though... :Ponder:

Tycho
03-27-2010, 06:01 PM
Tycho, you've lost me.

... then you seem to have switched thoughts or something half way through to try to say that all women are evil and . . . we should kill them before they go to an attorney?

Well, I'm not suggesting a course of action. I can just help arranging some introductions - for a modest fee of course. ;)


The second part [of Tycho's comment]. . . well, I like you Tycho, I really do, but the best thing I can say about the second part of your comment is that the way you've chosen to word it . . . well . . . all it does is make it sound like you have had some kind of issues with women lately or something, man.

I've never been married, but it should be understandable that I went through some period of rejection while I suffered my illness and being out-of-shape and not a stellar performer athletically, or financially, or even emotionally, while I suffered through my illness. It opened my eyes to what ladies values are.

It's funny to me that you know your best friends most of your life, but you become enamored with some girl who you only know for sometimes a very short while (sometimes only weeks with those making extremely poor decisions) and you sign a legal contract with her that might very well garnish your wages and cost you child support money for the rest of your lives - all with in a short course of time when you've known your best friends for so much longer.

It's anthopologically topical because if the girl actually was similarly cultured and really shared your interests with you, a guy might actually have that sort of friendship develop with his wife. However, a house might only have room for one collection as it is.

So why not stay single and have a close relationship, but no legal commitment, to whatever young lady interests you at the time? She should be able to take care of herself. She's supposedly an adult.

Girls don't like this because then they can't sue for alimony. But what the heck did they have in common with the guy anyway?

It's all sexual of course. It's just socially incorrect to admit that.

Well, I'm a socially incorrect kind of guy.

And I'd enjoy a girlfriend, but not a live-in and certainly not a wife.

Meanwhile, one of my buddies I've been friends with for over half my life is now going through a divorce. He was one I'd actually hoped would make married life work as I went to Seattle to be in his wedding, but his wife cheated on him - with another married man, who's a cop no less, and who already has 2 children with his own wife.


I mean, yeah, I'm sure every one of us has met a woman who's like the type you're describing. But all of em?

No, not all of them - yet I'll only have to guess on that. I've seen some bad things happen to many of my married friends - and my own parents - and friends' parents of course.

WHAT DOES ALL OF THIS HAVE TO DO WITH A GENDER GAP WITH TOYS?

If the culuralization of our children is so separate between the sexes, the chances that the sexes would disassociate from their marriages must be somewhat predictable, too.


For example, my wife thought it was realy cool that I am giving my daughter some of my collection to play with, as well as the fact that my daughter likes star wars and occasonaly asks for Star Wars toys because it allows me and my daughter to have an interest we both like. Also, my wife has never had a problem with my collection and even lets me display what I want in the living room where people can actualy see it.

All this is very cool and I wish you the best of luck that it will continue.

As for me continuing to say what is impolite or socially incorrect to say, I'd ask, "Does your wife compromise for you because she doesn't have [a police officer, etc.] to run off and have an affair with, or does she worry that if she doesn't keep you happy, she'll lose you to another woman?"

Sorry man, but that is the impolite question I have to ask. Not to personally harm you (so you don't have to answer or lie with your response either). The question was asked to make the point: are people desperate (like for your wife to make sure your children have a father and a good income in the household to raise them up with) so they put up with "the expansion of your Man-Cave?" Or you may be very fortunate, and she does these things (of no small importance to you, as I'm sure you appreciate her friendliness towards your hobby very much) because she loves you?

I hope the latter is true. I really do. I think you're a good guy, too. I certainly don't want my best friend going through what he has to deal with at this time. (And he's an ex-football player who's now a highly skilled engineer that designs airplanes by the way - it's not like he's the type of guy a girl should want to dump).

However, I've never really experienced this sort of situation in my personal life and my anger and hatred helped me get through the medical crisis that I had to get through. When I say I turned to the Dark Side a long time ago, I actually really mean it. The Dark Side saved me Buddy, and it might indeed be more powerful than the Light Side for some people.

Finally, that you're going to school and improving yourself, for presumably a career that you'll enjoy what you're doing in, is a very good thing to be proud of yourself for - and well-liked by others for. That's very admirable. What are you going to school for? [And is JT's friend "Barbie" in your class? ;) ]

Darth Metalmute
03-29-2010, 08:22 AM
She's the "Undercover Boss" there, she actually is CEO of the company. And she only took the job when she was a teenager because she needed money to pay for modeling lessons, fashion design school, 6 teaching degrees, dental school, medical school, nursing accreditation, veterinary training, lifeguard training, firefighter training, police AND Canadian Mountie academy, flight training, astronaut training, and degrees in computer engineering, paleontology, communications, business, and photography.

Granted, her 6 tours of duty with the Army, Navy, Air Force, and Marines probably helped pay for a lot of that, but the GI bill only goes so far.

I can't wait for that episode! You know it is CBS's most watched new show!


Once she hit about 9 years old, she became entirely disinterested with toys and it was a focus on socializing and decor.

I think this answers the entire thread. Girls don't play with toys long enough to make a real market for them. Even though half the toy store is for girls, they are aimed at the 5-9 age range. When they get in 3rd to 4th grade they mature and start focusing more on clothes, boys, etc.

Boys, on the other hand, play with or buy toys until they die. Especially from the current 30 something generation. I try to focus on one area, Star Wars, and then Transformers released a vintage line, and then a universe line with G1 figures, and then a flash drive that transforms into an authentic Ravage.......