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sith_killer_99
10-17-2010, 12:44 PM
So a short time ago I downloaded "Atlas Shrugged" by Ayn Rand. It is a classic, one of the greatest books ever written IMO. It has been in publication for more than 50 years now.

So I was at work the other day, speaking to some of my more intelligent co-workers and I mentioned that I just got "Atlas Shrugged" on audiobook.

The response was blank stares, none of them had heard of "Atlas Shrugged" or Ayn Rand!!!

It bothered me that no one had heard of this book, let alone Ayn Rand who was one of the most significant authors of the 20th century. I could understand if they had said "Oh yeah, I've heard of it, but never read it." Let's face it, "Atlas Shrugged" is sort of like "Moby-Dick" famous, but seldom read, it is in fact a weighty tome.

Ray Bradbury once said "There are worse crimes than burning books. One of them is not reading them."

Is it just me? It seems people just don't read much anymore, aside from what I call "popcorn"....pop culture books, magazine articles, websites, blogs, etc.

JimJamBonds
10-17-2010, 02:07 PM
I only "got into" reading in college, since that time I've tried to be more or less constantly reading something. It tends to be military history although if I see/hear of something interesting I'll give it a try.
I'm a big fan of audio books. I used to have 1.5 - 2 hr round trip commute and I listened to many many audio books. Currently I do not have a commute per say although I do drive around for my job so it takes quite a bit longer to get through a book.

I think there is definitely something to be said about reading and continuing to learn and grow.

sith_killer_99
10-17-2010, 03:10 PM
My wife and I read to our kids, or have them read to us every night before they go to bed. We believe reading is important and it has helped our daughter greatly in school. We hope it will help our son when he starts school as well.

It just seems like in today's society no one reads the classics any more unless they are forced to in schools. Sure a lot of people own e-readers and buy e-books and read, but what are they reading. When was the last time someone told you they just read "Of Mice and Men" or "The Fountainhead" or "Fahrenheit 451"?

Today it seems like people are reading garbage like "The Twilight Saga", which is fine, but when that is all you read, then what's the point?

JimJamBonds
10-17-2010, 05:20 PM
I just did a search of my local library of Atlas Shrugged and believe it or not they are all out, with the one exception of cliff notes. I'm currently working on a book and there is another I want to read but I've just put Ms. Rand on my list to read.

Mad Slanted Powers
10-17-2010, 06:53 PM
I read too slow, so it takes a long time to read. If my mind wanders, then I also find I read a page or two and don't remember what I just read. I haven't even made time to read Star Wars novels the past few years.

There are a lot of classics I would like to read. I think the last book I read in its entirety was the last Harry Potter book. I started Sarah Palin's book and Glenn Beck's Arguing With Idiots (I wanted to learn to argue with myself), but haven't finished them. Beck mentions a lot of stuff that would be interesting to read, but I just haven't made the time. I grew up watching television, so that is my evening entertainment. If I start reading too late in the evening, then I tend to get tired.

A co-worker lent me The Universal Baseball Association, Inc., J. Henry Waugh, Prop., so that is the one I will need to finish first so I can get it back to him.

I had heard of Ayn Rand and Atlas Shrugged and The Fountainhead, but never read them or knew anything about the books until the last couple of years.

Rocketboy
10-17-2010, 06:54 PM
I like read and my selections vary quite a bit. I'll try whatever catches my attention. Biography, history, mystery, crime, historical fiction, sci-fi, short story collections, whatever. If it sounds good, I'll try it.
I'm not the type to read a book a week, but I try to read at least a little every day.
So far I'm on books 16 for the year, hoping to hit at least 20 by year's end.

I've tried a few audiobooks but they don't really hold my attention. I find myelf mentally tuning out quite often. And so many of them are abridged, which feels like I'm going to be cheated out of story, based solely on some stranger's opinion.

And I've tried a few of the "classics," most of which did nothing for me. "The Catcher In The Rye" has to be one of the most overrated anythings ever.

sith_killer_99
10-17-2010, 06:56 PM
I just did a search of my local library of Atlas Shrugged and believe it or not they are all out, with the one exception of cliff notes. I'm currently working on a book and there is another I want to read but I've just put Ms. Rand on my list to read.

You will not regret it, Atlas Shrugged is 1,200 pages, but worth the read. My audio book came in 8 parts at almost 8 hours each. :eek:

I also highly recommend reading "The Fountainhead" before embarking upon "Atlas Shrugged".

Bel-Cam Jos
10-17-2010, 07:14 PM
I am a high school English teacher. You don't want to know my answer about reading (what's being read and at what reading levels). :cry: And that's for adults AND youth.

sith_killer_99
10-17-2010, 08:02 PM
I am a high school English teacher. You don't want to know my answer about reading (what's being read and at what reading levels). :cry: And that's for adults AND youth.

I was reading Jack London, Edgar Allan Poe, John Steinbeck, Ralph Waldo Emerson, Henry David Thoreau, Herman Melville, Carl Stephenson, and many many more in Jr High School, as part of the curriculum. :yes:

Mad Slanted Powers
10-17-2010, 09:42 PM
I think my favorite book that we had to read in school was A Tale of Two Cities. The teacher did a good job of pointing out a lot of stuff. So, I was able to see how all of these things from early in the book came back to be important later on. So, I enjoyed how well it was written and how everything came together. The ending was also very moving.

dr_evazan22
10-17-2010, 11:32 PM
I had gotten some ebooks from Amazon for my iPad kindle app; they ended up sending me an email about one of their sites called Audible.com, which, I guess, is all audio (books). I got the SW and ESB radio plays to listen to. The first half of the SW play is so good, with 6 of 12 chapters covering up to when the Falcon blasts off from Mos Eisley.

I checked out the audio of Atlas Shrugged but didn't get it, I thought the price was too high. On a different note, I've never been great with names (there was a time when I couldn't spell my own last name)... So, is Ayn pronounced like Ann, or Ain (like rain)?

sith_killer_99
10-18-2010, 12:09 AM
It is pronounced more like ein as in Heinz Ketchup, or Albert Einstein. lol It's Russian.

I have a subscription to audible.com, so I pay a flat fee for 2 credits per month, Atlas Shrugged cost 1 credit. My membership is $22.95 per month with 2 credits per month and 30% off all additional purchases.

JimJamBonds
10-18-2010, 08:22 AM
I also highly recommend reading "The Fountainhead" ....

Wasn't that an inspiration for a Rush album?

sith_killer_99
10-18-2010, 08:32 AM
Wasn't that an inspiration for a Rush album?

Rush was indeed highly influenced by Ayn Rand and "Objectivism" though I don't know that "The Fountainhead" specifically influenced Rush. It is clear that the philosophy of Objectivism had a profound effect on Rush.

JimJamBonds
10-18-2010, 11:48 AM
I (fairly) recently saw a documentary on Rush and I know they mentioned Ayn Rand, in fact Sebastian Bach mentioned that he went out and read Ayn Rand 'to find out what it was about.'

In a similar vein I read "Johnny Get Your Gun" and "For Whom The Bell Tolls" because of Metallica.

dr_evazan22
10-18-2010, 06:51 PM
It is pronounced more like ein as in Heinz Ketchup, or Albert Einstein. lol It's Russian.

I have a subscription to audible.com, so I pay a flat fee for 2 credits per month, Atlas Shrugged cost 1 credit. My membership is $22.95 per month with 2 credits per month and 30% off all additional purchases.

The membership fee is about what the cost was for the one audiobook.

I think that if the prices were lower it would give me greater incentive to become a member and get more titles. Its just as well though, because if I had the time to listen to more audiobooks, then I'd have more time to read actual books (or e-books). Just not enough time.

Bel-Cam Jos
10-18-2010, 07:06 PM
Our core literature (what each student, regardless of course level, is supposed to read) is, IIRC:
9th (Romeo & Juliet, Shakespeare; To Kill a Mockingbird, Lee)
10th (Antigone, Sophocles; Lord of the Flies, Golding)
11th (Of Mice & Men, Steinbeck; The Crucible, Miller)
12th (Macbeth, Shakespeare; The Stranger, Camus)

But I read different books (only Macbeth and Antigone were the same) back in MY DAY in high school.

Mad Slanted Powers
10-18-2010, 07:32 PM
Our core literature (what each student, regardless of course level, is supposed to read) is, IIRC:
9th (Romeo & Juliet, Shakespeare; To Kill a Mockingbird, Lee)
10th (Antigone, Sophocles; Lord of the Flies, Golding)
11th (Of Mice & Men, Steinbeck; The Crucible, Miller)
12th (Macbeth, Shakespeare; The Stranger, Camus)

But I read different books (only Macbeth and Antigone were the same) back in MY DAY in high school.

Of those, we read Romeo & Juliet, Lord of the Flies, Of Mice & Men, and Macbeth.

Other ones we read: Great Expectations, The Odyssey, The Iliad, The Pearl, Grapes of Wrath, As I Lay Dying, A Separate Peace, Tale of Two Cities, Childhood's End, Julius Caesar, Huckleberry Finn, Death of a Salesman, The Scarlet Letter, and The Red Badge of Courage. There may have been a couple others.

We never read The Stranger, but we did read a short story that had a similar theme. I believe it was "The Guest."

Come to think of it, I believe we read Antigone as well. The Literature textbook we had that year had the whole Theban plays trilogy in it if I recall correctly, so we read all three.

Bel-Cam Jos
10-18-2010, 11:23 PM
But I read different books (only Macbeth and Antigone were the same) back in MY DAY in high school.IIRC, here were the books I read (I know I'm missing several, I believe):
9th: Macbeth (abridged), Julius Caesar
10th: Grapes of Wrath, Adv. of Huckleberry Finn, Red Badge of Courage, Invisible Man (Wright), King Lear
11th: Heart of Darkness, The Stranger, Under Milkwood
12th: Hamlet, Macbeth (full play), Portrait of Artist as Young Man, Canterbery [sp?] Tales, Hard Times, Oedipus Cycle

sith_killer_99
10-18-2010, 11:53 PM
I have a love/hate relationship with William Shakespeare.

I do not like reading his plays. I do enjoy his work in smaller doses, poems, sonnets, and I enjoy watching his plays, but I loath trudging through a reading of Romeo and Juliet. :eek:

El Chuxter
10-19-2010, 12:09 AM
Macbeth is one of the greatest works in human history. Almost as good as Huckleberry Finn or Gulliver's Travels. Or Hamlet, for that matter.

But A Midsummer Night's Dream is Shakespeare's masterpiece. Unless we count the sonnets and the "missing" plays. But we can't count the missing plays, since no one alive has any knowledge of them, aside from a few scattered references to their titles.

sith_killer_99
10-19-2010, 12:41 AM
Macbeth is one of the greatest works in human history. Almost as good as Huckleberry Finn or Gulliver's Travels. Or Hamlet, for that matter.

Wow, see that, this is exactly what I am talking about, yet another person who has never read "Atlas Shrugged".;)

Oh you said Macbeth was one of the greatest works...my mistake. :D

Mad Slanted Powers
10-19-2010, 01:06 AM
I have a love/hate relationship with William Shakespeare.

I do not like reading his plays. I do enjoy his work in smaller doses, poems, sonnets, and I enjoy watching his plays, but I loath trudging through a reading of Romeo and Juliet. :eek:

In high school, we had versions of Romeo & Juliet and Julius Caesar that had notes in them explaining some of the language. Also, the teacher was able to point a lot of stuff out. Macbeth was a huge deal my senior year. We spent a fair amount of time on it, and had a major test about it.

When I was in college, I bought a complete works of Shakespeare book at the college bookstore. It seemed a good price to get everything. However, trying to read through it all without any Cliff's Notes or something might get a bit tedious. I'd still like to get back to it some day. I think the first play in it was The Tempest, and I think I started in on it once years ago, but didn't stick with it.

Bel-Cam Jos
10-19-2010, 06:39 PM
Wow, see that, this is exactly what I am talking about, yet another person who has never read "Atlas Shrugged".;)

Oh you said Macbeth was one of the greatest works...my mistake. :DThere's a ton (yes, I am sure that literally 2000 lbs. of books exist :p ) of greatest works out there. I guess I'm another Atlas Shrugged non-reader; not because I am avoiding it, just haven't gotten around to it. Sometimes, when I think about all the books I want to read that I have yet to do so, with all the other responsibilities I have, it feels like the weight of the world is on my shoulders. But then, I say "meh," with a bodily motion that relates to "meh" and move on. :rolleyes: (but I don't look in a book of maps)

El Chuxter
10-19-2010, 08:35 PM
I got a cheap used copy of either Atlas Shrugged or The Fountainhead ages ago, but I haven't gotten around to reading it. I'm pretty bad about getting books that I know I want to read but have no time to read at the moment whenever I find cheap used copies.

sith_killer_99
10-19-2010, 09:39 PM
feels like the weight of the world is on my shoulders. But then, I say "meh," with a bodily motion that relates to "meh" and move on. :rolleyes: (but I don't look in a book of maps)

Okay, I see what you did there.:laugh:

JimJamBonds
10-20-2010, 05:44 AM
When I was in college, I bought a complete works of Shakespeare book at the college bookstore. It seemed a good price to get everything. However, trying to read through it all without any Cliff's Notes or something might get a bit tedious. I'd still like to get back to it some day. I think the first play in it was The Tempest, and I think I started in on it once years ago, but didn't stick with it.

I hear you MSP, a handful of years ago I bought a copy of The Illiad and The Odyssey with the intention of reading it. Its however its in 'poem' form so its a tough tough read. I'd like to get through it but I doubt I ever will.

Bel-Cam Jos
10-20-2010, 07:25 AM
Hey, the Trojan War and Odysseus' subsequent journey home took 20 years. If you read them by that time, you're on pace with the masters!

nohagent
10-20-2010, 07:27 AM
Pediatric advanced life support, lets hope it retains

JimJamBonds
10-20-2010, 02:16 PM
Hey, the Trojan War and Odysseus' subsequent journey home took 20 years. If you read them by that time, you're on pace with the masters!

That is true...with that thinking then I'm behind on the Journals of Lewis and Clark. :D