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View Full Version : What books should I read over the summer?



chaerulez
05-19-2002, 12:08 AM
It's been quite a while since I've read a Star Wars book, but I would like start reading them again. The problem is I don't know where to start. I've read every single book up to the Vision of the Future, with the exceptions being Books 5 through 9 in the X-Wing Series and the Bounty Hunter Wars series.

What books should I start with now? The NJO series or the old books I haven't read... or the ones based on Episode I characters?

Also, since its been a while and its bugging me because I don't remember... what did Luke and Mara discover the Hand of Thrawn to be? I know they found the Chiss there, but that is all I can remember form that. And what was the story behind the guy Talon was so afraid of?

Taichi
05-19-2002, 12:56 AM
I'd go with NJO, and the series of novels that occur between TPM and AOTC........

Vector Prime is a good place to start, Bob Salvatore is an excellent writer, I've followed him through his "Forgotten Realms" Series, and find him to be an excellent writer.......

I'd like Terry Brooks to tackle another SW Book as well.....

Sith Vicious
05-19-2002, 05:26 PM
Originally posted by chaerulez
It's been quite a while since I've read a Star Wars book, but I would like start reading them again. The problem is I don't know where to start. I've read every single book up to the Vision of the Future, with the exceptions being Books 5 through 9 in the X-Wing Series and the Bounty Hunter Wars series.

What books should I start with now? The NJO series or the old books I haven't read... or the ones based on Episode I characters?

If you enjoyed the first 4 X-Wing books, definitely read the rest of the series. The Bounty Hunter Wars is so-so. Bad characterizations, but the plot is okay. The prequel era novels are also average IMO. You might read Rogue Planet, since it ends up connecting to some of the stuff in NJO. Other than that I think all you might have missed is the Tales of the New Republic anthology which you can skip. After the rest of the X-Wing stuff and Rogue Planet, you might just go ahead and start NJO since you're pretty far behind.



Also, since its been a while and its bugging me because I don't remember... what did Luke and Mara discover the Hand of Thrawn to be? I know they found the Chiss there, but that is all I can remember form that. And what was the story behind the guy Talon was so afraid of?

It's been so long since I've read it, I've forgotten most of it myself. I remember they found some clones of Thrawn being grown and they were preparing for some threat from the unknown regions or outer rim. I can't remember if it was specifically revealed as the threat from the NJO series or not.

chaerulez
05-19-2002, 06:24 PM
Okay, thanks for all the suggestions, gonna go to Borders and start checking out the books.

Eternal Padawan
05-20-2002, 12:05 AM
The Hand of Thrawn was a giant fist shaped fortress where the Chiss were keeping a clone of Thrawn, that was going to be trained to become the next Emperor. However, the cloning cylinder was damaged and the clone wasn't viable (still born). It was hinted that they would try again at some point in the future, but it would take a long while to grow it to full stage again.

Talons story revolved around his apprehension at going to see his former boss, the man he had received his organization from. he felt like he had usurped the leadership from the old guy, but it turns out the old man had wanted to leave and had groomed Talon into taking over when the time was right. There was some back story about the dark side cave on Dagobah, but I forgot what that was exactly.

BoShek
06-15-2002, 08:35 PM
Is Rogue Planet and Spinter of the Mind's Eye any good? I was debating buying those two. Which is better?

Beast
06-15-2002, 08:42 PM
Go with Rogue Planet, it fits in great in between Episode I and Episode II. And it doesn't contradict anything in the movies, unlike Splinter of Mind's Eye. Splinter has never really fit at all into the continuity of the Saga, especially after the release of Empire Strikes Back. :)

MTFBWY and HH!!

Jar Jar Binks

KIDD
06-15-2002, 09:57 PM
hey jar jar did u get my pm

Darth Evil
06-16-2002, 08:08 AM
I thought Splinter was an interesting read, it was different to every other Star Wars EU.

Eternal Padawan
06-16-2002, 09:06 AM
I have yet to read Splinter. All these years....

Bel-Cam Jos
06-16-2002, 05:32 PM
Here's a potentially spoiler-heavy technique: get the New Essential Guide to Characters and read the bios. Then, choose a story you like and look up the book.

Bel-Cam Jos
08-16-2002, 11:18 AM
Bumping this to current status.

Still adding most NJO books to the "avoid" category. ;)

OC47150
08-16-2002, 03:31 PM
I enjoyed the Darth Maul novel. (Sorry, can't remember the title.) It was a fast, enjoyable read. I read it in two - three days on Christmas vacation.

The Zahn novels are always good. I finished the Hand of Thrawn one on vacation two weeks ago.

Darth Evil
08-17-2002, 06:43 AM
The Darth Maul novel is called Shadow Hunter. I liked it too, very fast paced.

Figureman2
08-25-2002, 07:18 PM
I read X-Wing 5-7 (I'm reading chronologically, and I'm not up to 8 and 9 yet), and I thought that while they weren't up to the quality of the first four, they were enjoyable reads, and Warlord Zsinj is a great antagonist whom Wolverton didn't give nearly enough screentime in The Courtship of Princess Leia. So I would definitely recommend X-Wing 5-7, but beyond that, I can only assume that they're as good as the previous seven that I've read.

Rogue II
06-04-2003, 12:53 PM
I need some suggestions on what to read next. I just finished the first 4 books of the X-Wing series and I really want to take a break from it.

-It's been a long time since I read the Zahn trilogy.
-I read Jedi Search, but didn't read the rest of the series.
-I'm trying to stay in the Post classic trilogy area of the timeline, but I'm sure I missed a book somewhere.

The Star Wars Timeline thread didn't seem to have all the books listed.

OC47150
06-04-2003, 01:10 PM
Zahn has the other two Thrawn books out. It takes place a few years after his first trilogy. I read them last year.

The Tales from... series of books are interesting. Good short stories from different characters' points of view.

Rogue II
06-04-2003, 01:24 PM
I've read all of the Tales From.. books. They were good, well, most of them at least. I've also read the Han Solo Trilogy.

Rogue II
06-05-2003, 04:27 PM
Well, I went to Borders. They have a special where you buy any 3 paperbacks, you get 1 free. So, I bought Heir to the Empire, the last 2 books in the Jedi Academy Trilogy, and Truce at Bakura. That should hold me for a few months.

Darth Jax
06-05-2003, 08:33 PM
i haven't read the x-wing books or njo, but think i've gotten through all the others. i'd say truce at bakura was the worst that i recall.

Figureman2
06-05-2003, 10:21 PM
Of all the Star Wars books I've read, Truce at Bakura was probably the weakest, but it was certainly not bad. I personally enjoyed the Ssi-ruuk very much, and I thought that the cast of characters was very interesting. The concept itself isn't bad either, although the action was a little truncated and contrived towards the end.

Bel-Cam Jos
06-25-2007, 06:40 PM
Bu-bump!

I need some help/advice. In my genre-reading list (not an actual list, but a more ethereal, whispy one), I need a horror author not named Stephen King or Richard Bauchman [sp?], nor Bram Stoker, Mary Shelley, or EA Poe. Any suggestions? Can be recent/old school/less familiar authors/books. Winner gets a coin tossed at them, after being shot in a cantina back booth. :eek: :shootfirst:

OC47150
06-26-2007, 07:21 AM
Have you tried Laurell K. Hamilton, Bel-Cam? She writes the Anita Blake: Vampire Hunter books.

Friends introduced me to this series several years ago. Her earlier books are more interesting than her later ones. The later ones took on a more kinky sexual tone than the earlier ones.

The books are set in modern-day St. Louis and the Missouri area. Blake is a re-animator during the day and moonlights with the police helping solve odd cases.

Ji'dai
06-26-2007, 11:53 AM
A Victorian governess discovers that her two wards are being possessed by the recently departed in Henry James' The Turn of the Screw. The 1961 film adaptation, The Innocents, is still a watchable horror flick.

Peter Straub's style is similar to Stephen King's, but perhaps more aloof. Straub's Ghost Story is populated with not only everything from werewolves to haunted houses, but also contains a rustic retelling of The Turn of the Screw. The supernatural thrillers Lost Boy, Lost Girl and it's sequel In the Night Room, have a kind of ethereal feel to them, mainly because the boundaries between realities have grown thin.

...walls continue upright, bricks meet neatly, floors are firm, and doors are sensibly shut; silence lay against the stone and wood and whatever walks here, walks alone... in Shirley Jackson's The Haunting of Hill House. Classic haunted house story.

A group of paranormal investigators discover more than they bargained for in Hell House, Richard Matheson's take on the ultimate haunted house.

Bel-Cam Jos
06-26-2007, 01:50 PM
A Victorian governess discovers that her two wards are being possessed by the recently departed in Henry James' The Turn of the Screw. The 1961 film adaptation, The Innocents, is still a watchable horror flick.

Peter Straub's style is similar to Stephen King's, but perhaps more aloof. Straub's Ghost Story is populated with not only everything from werewolves to haunted houses, but also contains a rustic retelling of The Turn of the Screw. The supernatural thrillers Lost Boy, Lost Girl and it's sequel In the Night Room, have a kind of ethereal feel to them, mainly because the boundaries between realities have grown thin.

...walls continue upright, bricks meet neatly, floors are firm, and doors are sensibly shut; silence lay against the stone and wood and whatever walks here, walks alone... in Shirley Jackson's The Haunting of Hill House. Classic haunted house story.

A group of paranormal investigators discover more than they bargained for in Hell House, Richard Matheson's take on the ultimate haunted house.You write those reviews, Ji'dai? Pretty good, well worded and creative; you might have a new career there. :thumbsup:

BTW, is that the same Shirley Jackson as in "The Lottery" by Shirley Jackson? If so, she might get the nod, despite the fact that there was a movie (I'm trying to ween myself away from adaptations now) of the same name.

Thanks all!

Rocketboy
06-26-2007, 03:23 PM
Try the Star Wars Expanded Universe. Most of that stuff is so bad its scary!


(Sorry, couldn't resist)

Ji'dai
06-26-2007, 04:52 PM
You write those reviews, Ji'dai? Pretty good, well worded and creative; you might have a new career there. :thumbsup:

BTW, is that the same Shirley Jackson as in "The Lottery" by Shirley Jackson? If so, she might get the nod, despite the fact that there was a movie (I'm trying to ween myself away from adaptations now) of the same name. Thanks! Yep, Shirley Jackson wrote both stories. Hill House has been adapted for the big screen several times. The movie version of Ghost Story merely scratches the surface of Straub's book.

stillakid
06-26-2007, 11:44 PM
Save time and read the dictionary. All the other books are in there.

Bel-Cam Jos
06-27-2007, 10:23 AM
Save time and read the dictionary. All the other books are in there.Don't dis the dictionary! I actually do read it, not for the books :rolleyes: but to learn the etymology of words (even some phrases).


Try the Star Wars Expanded Universe. Most of that stuff is so bad its scary!


(Sorry, couldn't resist)I have read all of them. Only some, not most, are "so bad its scary."

Surprised to hear no one say to read Hearts of Darkness by Joseph Conrad, due to its famous line: "huge buzzing flies." Wait, wrong one: "the horror." :crazed:

Vi Cit Tecum
06-27-2007, 05:17 PM
Bel

Try Richard Layman his book the "cellar"(1st book in the beast house trilogy) about a small town Urban Legend that turns out to be real (Winchester House type) or "In the Dark" a librarian gets a set of instruction with a money reward, the rewards and dares start small and increase through novel

Robert R McCammon is another good Horro writer My 2 favorites would be "Swan Song" similar in structure to The Stand and "Bethany's Sin" about Amazons taking over a small town