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  1. #1

    Vintage question, date stamps?

    This may seem like a simple question, but I'm still kind of a rookie when it comes to vintage.

    The vintage figs were stamped with a date (usually on the leg). Was this the date that the mold was cast or the actual date the figure was manufactured?

    For example Darth Vader was produced and stamped 1977. Obviously the original 12 backs would be stamped 1977. But what about the Darth Vader released on the ROTJ card? Would it still be stamped 1977 or 1983?

    I am assuming that it serves as a type of "copy right" so all vintage Darth Vaders would be stamped 1977. Hence it would be impossible to determine the actual "age" of a loose vintage figure.

    Also, I am aware that Kenner had a habit of taking back unsold figures and re-packing them on newer cards.
    May the force be with you.

  2. #2
    All reissued figures kept their original date stamp. Thus all Darth Vaders say 1977, as with all Chewbaccas so on, so forth. The only time a date stamp was changed was when enough changes were done to consider it a new figure. For example the Pull-Apart version of Threepio, the sensorscope and pop-up saber versions of Artoo.

    Of course, this makes it completely impossible to tell if your loose Darth Vader was originally issued on a SW, ESB, ROTJ or POTF card. Which is probably why the gap between loose and carded values for the original twelve is so large when compared to all other figures of the line. The twelve backs were released 4 to 5 times, while ROTJ were released only 2 to 3 times and the POTF figures were released only twice. (SW, ESB, ROTJ, POTF, Tri-Logo carded releases) Thus there are more loose 'original twelve' than most other figures.

    FYI, the date stamp on each figure is usually one year earlier than the actual release of the figure.
    "To be concerned about being grown up, to admire the grown up because it is grown up, to blush at the suspicion of being childish; these things are the marks of childhood and adolescence… When I became a man I put away childish things, including the fear of childishness and the desire to be very grown up." - C.S. Lewis

  3. #3

    Lightbulb

    You can tell if your figure is older by cutting it open and counting the rings in the plastic. What? What?
    I think the four TRU Classic set figures (Vader, Luke, Han, and uh, what was the 4th one?) had 1995 dates stamped, but I could be wrong.
    CU Later. Contracted Universe? Later. :(

  4. #4
    Yes, the TRU four pack (Vader, Luke, Han and Chewie) had 1995 stamped on the bottom of their foot not the back of their leg like the vintage ones. How do I know? I accidentally bought a "vintage" Chewie from a comic book store and it wasn't until after I got home that I saw the different date stamp.

    stupid!stupid!stupid!
    Last edited by bigbarada; 10-15-2001 at 06:19 PM.
    "To be concerned about being grown up, to admire the grown up because it is grown up, to blush at the suspicion of being childish; these things are the marks of childhood and adolescence… When I became a man I put away childish things, including the fear of childishness and the desire to be very grown up." - C.S. Lewis

  5. #5
    I checked out a few losse vintage figures that a co-worker just got in the mail. She got them for her kid and they are pretty shabby, but allowed me to take a look at the legs. It appears that the date, as BigBarada mentioned, is a year earlier than the release year. I guess this would be the date of registering the design rather than the production year?
    OK... I BLOG. YOU READ. at http://jedipartner1967.livejournal.com
    **Steven Sterlekar (1969-2001)**

  6. #6
    Originally posted by bigbarada
    Yes, the TRU four pack (Vader, Luke, Han and Chewie) had 1995 stamped on the bottom of their foot not the back of their leg like the vintage ones. How do I know? I accidentally bought a "vintage" Chewie from a comic book store and it wasn't until after I got home that I saw the different date stamp.

    stupid!stupid!stupid!
    Yes you are are stupid Howmuch did you pay for it?

    I checked out a few losse vintage figures that a co-worker just got in the mail. She got them for her kid and they are pretty shabby, but allowed me to take a look at the legs. It appears that the date, as BigBarada mentioned, is a year earlier than the release year. I guess this would be the date of registering the design rather than the production year?
    It takes around 8-12 months to make a figure from the sketches to the the figure on the pegs at TRU so they would have started designing and making the prototypes in 1977 and about 12 months or so later Kenner started to release them.
    GNT
    ''
    You fool, my reach is far greater than the Jedi.Only a Sith can wield the force over such a great distance.'' - Darth Sidious

  7. #7
    Originally posted by GNT
    Yes you are are stupid Howmuch did you pay for it?
    $15
    "To be concerned about being grown up, to admire the grown up because it is grown up, to blush at the suspicion of being childish; these things are the marks of childhood and adolescence… When I became a man I put away childish things, including the fear of childishness and the desire to be very grown up." - C.S. Lewis

  8. #8
    Hmmmmmm, I've noticed something very odd about the POTF date stamps. For one, Lumat and Paploo have no date stamps!! Next is the actual dates on some of the figures, of the ten I have, here are the dates for each one:

    Lumat-none
    Paploo-none
    Warok- 1985
    Romba- 1985
    Barada- 1985
    Imperial Dignitary- 1984
    Anakin Skywalker- 1985
    Luke Stormtrooper- 1984
    A-Wing Pilot- 1984
    Amanaman- 1985

    My main question is why some POTF figures' dates match the dates on the last wave of ROTJ figures and why Anakin, who was a mail-away on a 65-back, has 1985 as his date? Did it really take a full year for kids to get their Anakin figures?

    (Before you say it, I know Lumat and Paploo were released on 79-back ROTJ cards. But they are usually included with the POTF line so I figured, why break tradition?)
    "To be concerned about being grown up, to admire the grown up because it is grown up, to blush at the suspicion of being childish; these things are the marks of childhood and adolescence… When I became a man I put away childish things, including the fear of childishness and the desire to be very grown up." - C.S. Lewis

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