Page 22 of 23 FirstFirst ... 12181920212223 LastLast
Results 211 to 220 of 225

Thread: The Hobbit

  1. #211
    Even though I was 10 when ROTJ came out, I didn't see it (or ESB) until I was 13 years old, which would have been 1986. I grew up in a pretty strict Baptist household and my parents didn't allow us to go to movie theaters until the mid-80s. I didn't see ANH until its television premiere in February 1984.

    So I knew the entire story behind the Star Wars trilogy before seeing any of the films and that might have changed my perceptions a bit. I remember still being totally blown away by ANH when I first saw it. When we finally saw ESB and ROTJ, it was at my cousin's fiance's house and we watched both films on VHS back to back. I might have been a little let down by ESB as well, but I think my overall reaction was more positive than my initial impression of ROTJ. However, after 6 years of anticipation for ESB and 3 years of anticipation for ROTJ, I'm not sure if any movie could have lived up to that... except for ANH which still impressed me after 7 years of anticipation.

    That's probably why ANH is the measuring stick by which I grade every movie even today.

  2. #212
    Quote Originally Posted by JediTricks View Post
    SW was nominated for best picture but lost to Annie Hall (which is utterly ludicrous).
    Not saying I disagree, but, if Star Wars is going to be robbed, I'd prefer the Oscar to go to Woody Allen's masterpiece than to just about anything else.
    Tommy, close your eyes.

  3. #213
    I finally got around to watching ROTK EE over the past couple of nights. You were right JT, it makes a huge difference having the cut scenes put back in. I enjoyed it a whole lot more than when I saw it in the theater. Since I hadn't seen it in awhile, I couldn't tell you 100% what was in the theatrical release or in the EE, but things happening outside of Frodo and Samwise seemed more significant. I also agree with you that the mouth of Sauron should never have been cut. That was damn creepy. I still did find the ending a bit long, but not near as bad as I remembered it in the theatre.

    We had a few rainy days here, so I was able to watch it over two nights, which was about right.

    Now that I've seen the ROTK EE, I'm curious about the EE versions of FOTR and TTT. Do the extra scenes improve those as well?

  4. #214
    Quote Originally Posted by El Chuxter View Post
    Not saying I disagree, but, if Star Wars is going to be robbed, I'd prefer the Oscar to go to Woody Allen's masterpiece than to just about anything else.
    Annie Hall is an amazing film. I hated it as a kid because it beat out Star Wars, but when I finally saw it completely as a 17-year old, I fell in love with it. I watch that and Manhattan at least once a year. Woody is a film god.

    Quote Originally Posted by Snowtrooper View Post
    I finally got around to watching ROTK EE over the past couple of nights. You were right JT, it makes a huge difference having the cut scenes put back in. I enjoyed it a whole lot more than when I saw it in the theater. Since I hadn't seen it in awhile, I couldn't tell you 100% what was in the theatrical release or in the EE, but things happening outside of Frodo and Samwise seemed more significant. I also agree with you that the mouth of Sauron should never have been cut. That was damn creepy. I still did find the ending a bit long, but not near as bad as I remembered it in the theatre.

    We had a few rainy days here, so I was able to watch it over two nights, which was about right.

    Now that I've seen the ROTK EE, I'm curious about the EE versions of FOTR and TTT. Do the extra scenes improve those as well?
    I prefer all of the EE versions. I can't watch the FOTR in non-extended form. The films make great marathon viewing in the winter. I watched all three blu-ray EE versions during winter break while opening a bunch of figures (my holiday tradition).

  5. #215
    Quote Originally Posted by bigbarada View Post
    Even though I was 10 when ROTJ came out, I didn't see it (or ESB) until I was 13 years old, which would have been 1986. I grew up in a pretty strict Baptist household and my parents didn't allow us to go to movie theaters until the mid-80s. I didn't see ANH until its television premiere in February 1984.

    So I knew the entire story behind the Star Wars trilogy before seeing any of the films and that might have changed my perceptions a bit. I remember still being totally blown away by ANH when I first saw it. When we finally saw ESB and ROTJ, it was at my cousin's fiance's house and we watched both films on VHS back to back. I might have been a little let down by ESB as well, but I think my overall reaction was more positive than my initial impression of ROTJ. However, after 6 years of anticipation for ESB and 3 years of anticipation for ROTJ, I'm not sure if any movie could have lived up to that... except for ANH which still impressed me after 7 years of anticipation.

    That's probably why ANH is the measuring stick by which I grade every movie even today.
    I wonder what changed your parents' minds about movies at that time. Ghostbusters maybe? Thrawn and I used to talk about 1985 being the pinnacle of western civilization, going from 1984's Ghostbusters, Indiana Jones 2, Beverly Hills Cop, Gremlins, Karate Kid, Police Academy, Star Trek 3, Romancing the Stone, Purple Rain, Amadeus, The Natural, Revenge of the Nerds, Buckaroo Banzai, Dune, Last Starfighter, Killing Fields, Splash, Muppets Take Manhattan, Neverending Story, Once Upon a Time in America, Repo Man, Sixteen Candles, The Terminator into '85's Back to the Future, Rambo First Blood pt 2, Rocky 4, Goonies, Fletch, European Vacation, The Breakfast Club, Pee Wee's Big Adventure, Better Off Dead, Brazil, Clue, Enemy Mine, the Ewoks movie... ok, you get the idea.

    That must have been rough waiting to see the SW movies after everybody had been talking about them. That's rough about ESB feeling like a letdown, maybe that wasn't the best way to see them, VHS wasn't a great format and back to back can be challenging. ANH as the measuring stick makes sense to me, it works in spite of its shortcomings thanks to thoughtful editing and a clean, understated cinematography that stayed out of the way of the story. ESB has it easier, more money, more time, more resources, a more seasoned director, more writing talent, and Lucas not getting in the way of himself.


    Quote Originally Posted by El Chuxter View Post
    Not saying I disagree, but, if Star Wars is going to be robbed, I'd prefer the Oscar to go to Woody Allen's masterpiece than to just about anything else.
    I liked Manhattan and Zelig more, I'd put Annie Hall above Sleeper though.

    Quote Originally Posted by Snowtrooper View Post
    I finally got around to watching ROTK EE over the past couple of nights. You were right JT, it makes a huge difference having the cut scenes put back in. I enjoyed it a whole lot more than when I saw it in the theater. Since I hadn't seen it in awhile, I couldn't tell you 100% what was in the theatrical release or in the EE, but things happening outside of Frodo and Samwise seemed more significant. I also agree with you that the mouth of Sauron should never have been cut. That was damn creepy. I still did find the ending a bit long, but not near as bad as I remembered it in the theatre.

    We had a few rainy days here, so I was able to watch it over two nights, which was about right.

    Now that I've seen the ROTK EE, I'm curious about the EE versions of FOTR and TTT. Do the extra scenes improve those as well?
    Glad to hear you saw it and enjoyed it. I was the same way after I saw the ROTK EE, couldn't tell you what exactly was in the theatrical but I could feel such a massive difference in my enjoyment of the rest of the movie beyond Frodo's tale. The ending is long, not surprised there. 2 nights seems right, was it at the natural disk break?

    Both the other EEs are terrific if you love spending time in those universes, I'd say TTT gains the least from its EE simply by being such a good theatrical experience, FOTR I may never have seen the theatrical cut, we went to the theater when the EE got a limited release, ROTK really gains the most from its EE though.

    Quote Originally Posted by Maradona View Post
    Annie Hall is an amazing film. I hated it as a kid because it beat out Star Wars, but when I finally saw it completely as a 17-year old, I fell in love with it. I watch that and Manhattan at least once a year. Woody is a film god.

    I prefer all of the EE versions. I can't watch the FOTR in non-extended form. The films make great marathon viewing in the winter. I watched all three blu-ray EE versions during winter break while opening a bunch of figures (my holiday tradition).
    I bristle at the idea that Woody Allen is to be put on a pedestal, his work is talented but should be enjoyed on the levels it was created, he acts and he writes and he does silly cartoon stuff and heavy drama, and to me it seems like Annie Hall was the point where he got pigeonholed into being the American cinematic auteur, the critical darling who could do no wrong so long as he kept doing exactly the same thing again and again. I didn't watch Annie Hall for decades because of the SW snub, I watched most of his other films but actively avoided Annie Hall until it came on TCM a few years ago in HD, and when I finally saw it it was fine but by avoiding the "gravitas" that the critics had bestowed upon it, it was more enjoyable as a movie.

    Just like my idea for the SW OT, they should re-release the LOTR EEs as a roadshow during the summer, FOTR a week in one town then move onto the next town and the first town gets TTT, then a week after it moves on that first town gets ROTK for a week. That'd be fun, as good as it is on the HDTV it's so much better on the big screen and seeing it with a group.
    Darth Vader is becoming the Mickey Mouse of Star Wars.

    "We named the dog 'Chewbacca'!"
    The use of a lightsaber does not make one a Jedi, it is the ability to not use it.

  6. #216
    I don't pay attention to the critics. I just enjoy Woody Allen as a funny, cynical b*****d.

    Truth be told, I like his books better than his movies, even though there are only a few of them.
    Tommy, close your eyes.

  7. #217
    Quote Originally Posted by Maradona View Post
    I prefer all of the EE versions. I can't watch the FOTR in non-extended form. The films make great marathon viewing in the winter. I watched all three blu-ray EE versions during winter break while opening a bunch of figures (my holiday tradition).
    Sounds like a good tradition to me. I liked the theatrical release of FOTR. Is the EE a huge improvement on that one as well?

    Quote Originally Posted by JediTricks View Post
    Glad to hear you saw it and enjoyed it. I was the same way after I saw the ROTK EE, couldn't tell you what exactly was in the theatrical but I could feel such a massive difference in my enjoyment of the rest of the movie beyond Frodo's tale. The ending is long, not surprised there. 2 nights seems right, was it at the natural disk break?

    Both the other EEs are terrific if you love spending time in those universes, I'd say TTT gains the least from its EE simply by being such a good theatrical experience, FOTR I may never have seen the theatrical cut, we went to the theater when the EE got a limited release, ROTK really gains the most from its EE though.
    The difference is really amazing. I couldn't believe how much better it was. Yeah, the breaks came at the end of the discs(it was on DVD). At some point I think I'm going to watch all of the EEs.

  8. #218
    Quote Originally Posted by JediTricks View Post
    I wonder what changed your parents' minds about movies at that time. Ghostbusters maybe? Thrawn and I used to talk about 1985 being the pinnacle of western civilization, going from 1984's Ghostbusters, Indiana Jones 2, Beverly Hills Cop, Gremlins, Karate Kid, Police Academy, Star Trek 3, Romancing the Stone, Purple Rain, Amadeus, The Natural, Revenge of the Nerds, Buckaroo Banzai, Dune, Last Starfighter, Killing Fields, Splash, Muppets Take Manhattan, Neverending Story, Once Upon a Time in America, Repo Man, Sixteen Candles, The Terminator into '85's Back to the Future, Rambo First Blood pt 2, Rocky 4, Goonies, Fletch, European Vacation, The Breakfast Club, Pee Wee's Big Adventure, Better Off Dead, Brazil, Clue, Enemy Mine, the Ewoks movie... ok, you get the idea.

    That must have been rough waiting to see the SW movies after everybody had been talking about them. That's rough about ESB feeling like a letdown, maybe that wasn't the best way to see them, VHS wasn't a great format and back to back can be challenging. ANH as the measuring stick makes sense to me, it works in spite of its shortcomings thanks to thoughtful editing and a clean, understated cinematography that stayed out of the way of the story. ESB has it easier, more money, more time, more resources, a more seasoned director, more writing talent, and Lucas not getting in the way of himself.
    Star Trek 3 was actually the first movie that my brother and I were allowed to see in a theater. I always thought it was because one of our friend's parents offered to pay for our movie tickets and my parents didn't want to offend them by saying no. The very next movie I saw in a theater was Karate Kid 2, in 1986, then Top Gun, Labyrinth and Aliens all in that same summer. But that was the summer that we spent at our aunt's ranch in California, so my parents weren't around to object. After the summer of 1986 my parents weren't as strict on the no-theater rule. We still didn't go to very many movies though. I remember going to see Dragnet in 1987, but that's about it.

    I do agree with your point, though, I think movies as a whole have been going downhill since the mid-80s. There are still a few high points (like LOTR), but it's almost unheard of for so many big, iconic films to be released in one year these days.

    We watched ESB and ROTJ when we spent the summer in California as well. They were VHS recordings of the HBO broadcasts of the film. So the quality really wasn't there at all; but I knew the story for the movies almost backwards and forwards by then. I had read the storybooks and the novelizations and whatever else I could find about the films, so they kind of got built up in my mind into more than what they were. I think my biggest disappointment with ESB was the battle of Hoth being so short and no Wampa attack on the Rebel base. ROTJ just felt like it dragged on way too long between blowing up Jabba's Sail Barge and blowing up the second Death Star.

    Quote Originally Posted by JediTricks View Post
    Glad to hear you saw it and enjoyed it. I was the same way after I saw the ROTK EE, couldn't tell you what exactly was in the theatrical but I could feel such a massive difference in my enjoyment of the rest of the movie beyond Frodo's tale. The ending is long, not surprised there. 2 nights seems right, was it at the natural disk break?

    Both the other EEs are terrific if you love spending time in those universes, I'd say TTT gains the least from its EE simply by being such a good theatrical experience, FOTR I may never have seen the theatrical cut, we went to the theater when the EE got a limited release, ROTK really gains the most from its EE though.

    Just like my idea for the SW OT, they should re-release the LOTR EEs as a roadshow during the summer, FOTR a week in one town then move onto the next town and the first town gets TTT, then a week after it moves on that first town gets ROTK for a week. That'd be fun, as good as it is on the HDTV it's so much better on the big screen and seeing it with a group.
    I try to watch all 3 extended editions at least once a year. I break them up over six nights and just watch one disc a night. In my mind they feel like the true release of each film. The theatrical releases are just what they put out there for the unwashed masses.

  9. #219
    Quote Originally Posted by Snowtrooper View Post
    The difference is really amazing. I couldn't believe how much better it was. Yeah, the breaks came at the end of the discs(it was on DVD). At some point I think I'm going to watch all of the EEs.
    The disc break makes the most sense, at least, I'd hate to have that momentum be broken up more artificially.

    Wise choice on the EEs, they're a lot of fun, and had I more time I'd be rewatching them now just because this conversation is riling me up on the idea. I'll be curious to hear your thoughts on them.


    Quote Originally Posted by bigbarada View Post
    Star Trek 3 was actually the first movie that my brother and I were allowed to see in a theater. I always thought it was because one of our friend's parents offered to pay for our movie tickets and my parents didn't want to offend them by saying no. The very next movie I saw in a theater was Karate Kid 2, in 1986, then Top Gun, Labyrinth and Aliens all in that same summer. But that was the summer that we spent at our aunt's ranch in California, so my parents weren't around to object. After the summer of 1986 my parents weren't as strict on the no-theater rule. We still didn't go to very many movies though. I remember going to see Dragnet in 1987, but that's about it.
    Had you and your brother seen Star Trek 2 at that point? It seems like ST3 would be a tough film for a young person to jump in on, a very dark turn for the series and a challenging film to stand on its own (although I think it does pretty well, and catches too much "odd-numbered Trek film" flak). The rest is a good assortment of films to see without parental permission at least. Dragnet, I remember that one in theaters too, I can see that being the end of theatrical entertainment. I wonder what your parents thought as you grew into this new experience, did you talk with them much about that change or was it left quiet?

    I do agree with your point, though, I think movies as a whole have been going downhill since the mid-80s. There are still a few high points (like LOTR), but it's almost unheard of for so many big, iconic films to be released in one year these days.
    Yeah, and if you look at '84 and '85, very few of those are sequels or remakes, a lot of great entertainment ideas were allowed to be fostered and turned into entertainment, and I think it spurred the few remakes and sequels to be themselves better. That was before the studios got overrun with the corporations who had just bought them though.

    We watched ESB and ROTJ when we spent the summer in California as well. They were VHS recordings of the HBO broadcasts of the film. So the quality really wasn't there at all; but I knew the story for the movies almost backwards and forwards by then. I had read the storybooks and the novelizations and whatever else I could find about the films, so they kind of got built up in my mind into more than what they were. I think my biggest disappointment with ESB was the battle of Hoth being so short and no Wampa attack on the Rebel base. ROTJ just felt like it dragged on way too long between blowing up Jabba's Sail Barge and blowing up the second Death Star.
    Do you think knowing the stories ahead of time affected your opinions of the films? I remember feeling very frustrated and disappointed with The Princess Bride, of all movies, for not living up to the book even as everybody else was praising the film. But the LOTR movies and The Hobbit I definitely didn't have that with.

    I try to watch all 3 extended editions at least once a year. I break them up over six nights and just watch one disc a night. In my mind they feel like the true release of each film. The theatrical releases are just what they put out there for the unwashed masses.
    My problem is I can't control myself, if I watch the first half of these movies, I want to watch the second half right away, but I rarely have 4 solid hours to do that, and when I have 4 hours free I end up spreading my time around various interests instead. I should do it though while I can. Brutal assessment of the theatricals, but I guess not false gauging by the reactions in this thread to the EEs.
    Darth Vader is becoming the Mickey Mouse of Star Wars.

    "We named the dog 'Chewbacca'!"
    The use of a lightsaber does not make one a Jedi, it is the ability to not use it.

  10. #220
    Quote Originally Posted by JediTricks View Post
    Had you and your brother seen Star Trek 2 at that point? It seems like ST3 would be a tough film for a young person to jump in on, a very dark turn for the series and a challenging film to stand on its own (although I think it does pretty well, and catches too much "odd-numbered Trek film" flak). The rest is a good assortment of films to see without parental permission at least. Dragnet, I remember that one in theaters too, I can see that being the end of theatrical entertainment. I wonder what your parents thought as you grew into this new experience, did you talk with them much about that change or was it left quiet?
    We knew the basic storyline for Wrath of Kahn, but we had never seen it prior. But they did a flashback of Spock's death scene at the beginning of Search for Spock, so it wasn't really that hard to follow. I seem to recall watching Karate Kid 2 before seeing the first movie as well, so jumping into the middle of a story was not that uncommon for us as kids.

    Quote Originally Posted by JediTricks View Post
    Yeah, and if you look at '84 and '85, very few of those are sequels or remakes, a lot of great entertainment ideas were allowed to be fostered and turned into entertainment, and I think it spurred the few remakes and sequels to be themselves better. That was before the studios got overrun with the corporations who had just bought them though.
    I think the problem is that studios have boiled the formula for making profitable, blockbuster movies down to a science and it seems like they are making movies according to a well-established checklist of what's been successful in the past. As a result, most movies today are very big on budget and spectacle and they make a lot of money, but very low on originality or heart and they fail to make a lasting impact on the audience.

    Quote Originally Posted by JediTricks View Post
    Do you think knowing the stories ahead of time affected your opinions of the films? I remember feeling very frustrated and disappointed with The Princess Bride, of all movies, for not living up to the book even as everybody else was praising the film. But the LOTR movies and The Hobbit I definitely didn't have that with.
    Well, keep in mind that I not only knew that Darth Vader was Luke's father before my first viewing of ESB, but I also knew that Leia was Luke's sister and that Darth Vader would eventually sacrifice his own life to save Luke at the end. So that completely changed the dynamic of ESB and, for me, the ending of the movie felt a little flat (keeping in mind that this was just my initial impression of the film and in no way represents how I feel about it now). What didn't help was the bland interior sets that they used for Bespin which looked like something from a low budget TV show. That's why I think the digital alterations they made to the interiors of Bespin in the Special Edition significantly improved the movie. In fact, those are the only Special Edition changes that I think were absolutely necessary.

    I think the simple fact that I was such a big fan of Star Wars for so many years before even seeing all of the movies is one of the main reasons that I'm still a fan today. Throughout most of my childhood, Star Wars was a toy line first and a series of movies second. Which probably also explains why I can still be a fan of specific elements from the Prequels without even liking the Prequels as films.

    Quote Originally Posted by JediTricks View Post
    My problem is I can't control myself, if I watch the first half of these movies, I want to watch the second half right away, but I rarely have 4 solid hours to do that, and when I have 4 hours free I end up spreading my time around various interests instead. I should do it though while I can. Brutal assessment of the theatricals, but I guess not false gauging by the reactions in this thread to the EEs.
    It does take a bit of self control to not just pop the next disc in and watch the rest of each film, but after almost 9 years of watching these, I've learned that taking them in little bites keeps them fresh and exciting. I also think it's better to leave a movie still feeling fresh and wanting to see more, rather than leave a movie totally exhausted and mentally drained because the film went on too long and just wore you down.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Single Sign On provided by vBSSO