View Poll Results: What percentage of SW figures do you think are bought by kids?

Voters
459. You may not vote on this poll
  • Less than 30%

    269 58.61%
  • 30-40%

    129 28.10%
  • 41-50%

    36 7.84%
  • 51-60%

    10 2.18%
  • Over 60%

    15 3.27%
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Results 41 to 50 of 59
  1. #41
    I never lost any of mine either, maybe after a few years I did. I was 3 or 4 when I got a Shogun Warrior. It had about thirty missles in it. When I got rid of it, ten years later I had lost 2 of em. I kept my stuff in great shape. All my vintage stuff has play wear on it. I lost alot of my vintage collection in moving but thats about it. I never lost a sliding saber on my vintage either. Kids (to me) seem alot more spoiled today then we did. They seem to have an "I dont care" attitude. That combined with the way toys are made, dont mix. Plus combined with the prices of them really dont mix. I would rather loose my wallet than pay 40-60 dollars for a toy that is gonna be broken in the matter of a week.

    I played rough with my toys. I would slam them against walls and everything. They were made like football players. Nowadays it is like roughing the kicker.
    thanks Chux Turbo LBC Bobafrett Mtriv73 Rjarvis JF96 JT JMG FB Rogue2 Tycho Slicker Deoxy Caesar JontheJedi JJReason Brandon Solo JMS UK for great deals.
    SSG Pro Football Pick em and Bowl Pick em Champ 2006. 2007 NCAA Bracket Champ
    #24 - Gone but not forgotten

  2. #42
    Quote Originally Posted by kidhuman
    What? Me and stillakid agree? Heaven help us..........LOL
    Open your mind and I'll take you to a world of enlightenment.

    Have some of this KoolAid first.

    Quote Originally Posted by kidhuman
    And Tycho, Kids can not aford to have allthe coolships and what not. They are too expensive for kids nowadays. I remember when I was young and such that I treasured my Millenium Falcon and Tie Fighters. Kids nowadays get these big toys ans destroy themwith in days of having them. I refuse to buy my stepson anything big and expensive for that reason. We bought himthe Spider Man playset for Christmas last year. It took me more time to put it together for himthan it did for himto destroy it. It has been sitting in his toy box since Dec. 26. If they didnt have all these little parts(missles, etc) than maybe it wouldnt be so bad. But they lose the missles and everything else 20 minutes intoplaying with them and then they do not want it because it doesnt work anymore. Plus they are so cheaply made, they cant handle the abuse kids put it through.
    My first ship was the Landspeeder which I got for Christmas or a birthday. Then I got the Falcon for Christmas 1978, I think. Both got parked in their boxes after I was done playing with them (and I'm proud to still have the original packaging in pretty decent shape after all these years.) The next ship I recall getting was the Slave I. I had saved up about $20 and begged my mom to allow me to buy it. That too, remains well kept even today in it's grade A original box even with moderate to heavy play use.

    As Tycho says, teach a kid to take care of his stuff and he probably will. However, accidents happen. Some of my friends did things like "fly" their ships around on strings until they broke and went crashing into the ground. Kids are kids. And toys should be built to take heavy abuse even if kids are expected to be gentle.

    My son got the new Slave I for his birthday. Within seconds, his friends took off around the house shooting the missiles every which way. To this day, we're missing at least half of them. That's how kids play with stuff. That's just the way it is. The toy companies can't be held responsible for that, but by the same token, they should take care in crafting their products in a way that can stand up to rough play...if they're making them for kids that is. We "adults" treat this stuff with kit-gloves as if it was frickin' Tiffany glass or something. But kids? Well, they have different ideas about what to do with toys.

  3. #43
    Quote Originally Posted by Tycho
    The speeders had nice crash features for low end of the price range.
    Except most Saga figures can't really interact with those 2 ships.
    Quote Originally Posted by Tycho
    Anyway, it's not lack of vehicles. It might be lack of funds and an alternative to "day care."
    They have to be good ships that hold figures inside IMO, the AAT is pretty pathetic in that department really, the Hailfire Droid is a complete bust there, the aforementioned Coruscant Speeders fail pretty badly, the Ep 2 speederbikes are nowhere to be found and really only accomodate a specialty figure, Jedi Starfighter only holds 1 figure, TIE Fighter isn't that great and is in the same boat with only 1 figure, Green A-Wing is nowhere to be found and in the same boat, and so is the Naboo Fighter. So that really only leaves Jango's Slave 1 (cool toy, sucky interior and small exterior though) and the Rep Gunship (bland interior) for available figures to play with. And notice how most of the 1-figure vehicles don't hold many Saga figs and have to come with their own pack-in figure.

    BTW, my point wasn't just about SW, look at GI Joe for example. And the few vehicles and playsets there are barely interact with the figures, there's no cool interiors anymore, they're usually taken up by gimmicks and batteries and whatnot.
    Darth Vader is becoming the Mickey Mouse of Star Wars.

    "We named the dog 'Chewbacca'!"
    The use of a lightsaber does not make one a Jedi, it is the ability to not use it.

  4. #44
    Quote Originally Posted by stillakid
    Open your mind and I'll take you to a world of enlightenment.

    Have some of this KoolAid first.



    My first ship was the Landspeeder which I got for Christmas or a birthday. Then I got the Falcon for Christmas 1978, I think. Both got parked in their boxes after I was done playing with them (and I'm proud to still have the original packaging in pretty decent shape after all these years.) The next ship I recall getting was the Slave I. I had saved up about $20 and begged my mom to allow me to buy it. That too, remains well kept even today in it's grade A original box even with moderate to heavy play use.

    As Tycho says, teach a kid to take care of his stuff and he probably will. However, accidents happen. Some of my friends did things like "fly" their ships around on strings until they broke and went crashing into the ground. Kids are kids. And toys should be built to take heavy abuse even if kids are expected to be gentle.

    My son got the new Slave I for his birthday. Within seconds, his friends took off around the house shooting the missiles every which way. To this day, we're missing at least half of them. That's how kids play with stuff. That's just the way it is. The toy companies can't be held responsible for that, but by the same token, they should take care in crafting their products in a way that can stand up to rough play...if they're making them for kids that is. We "adults" treat this stuff with kit-gloves as if it was frickin' Tiffany glass or something. But kids? Well, they have different ideas about what to do with toys.
    Which is why I allow NO kids near my collection without me around. Kids are innocently destructive. And let's face it, we're into Star Wars cause we grew up with it. Same thing with He-Man, Thunder Cats and all the other toys that we enjoyed as kids. Ironically, the much reviled Power Rangers and anime's like Yugi-oh, Pokemon and other anime wannabees are what kids are mostly interested in. Why? Because these are the toys kids nowadays are growing up with and are very fond of them. Maybe todays kids are just different from us. Just as we are different from our parents when they were kids like us. Gotta change with the times.

  5. #45
    Quote Originally Posted by icatch9
    I'd like to have this same poll conducted in a 3rd or 4th grade classroom. Just to see what the results are.

    This is not a fair poll as we are not a fair cross section of the community. We are collectors that's it, by no means are we diverse.

    By the way I voted that 60% of the product is bought by kids. Why? Simple. Go to your job ask every co-worker you can find if they themselves have a Star Wars figure at home that they bought for themselves. Unless you work at a comic shop chances are you'll find no one else who collects these things.

    Now go to any grade school in the land ask the same question to as many kids as you can. I bet you 95% of the boys say yes they have Star Wars figures at home, and I bet a surprising number of girls would say yes too.
    Actually, we are a bit diverse. There are teens, 20 somethings, 30 and older here at SSG. We buy toys at different times of the day. Some early morning buyers, some like myself (right after work) and so on. Many of us have collected the modern line from the begining. So I personally have 8 years of experience to speak from (Of course I collected the vintage line when it first came out) when I can say there are virtually no kids buying SW. Also in that time you can get a good read on people if they are buying the toys for themselves or their kids. Again based on 8 years of collecting this percentage of kids is low, from my observations.

    Also the poll question eluded to the TOTAL percentage of SW toys being bought, not whether a kid has one, two or a few figures. Shoot I alone have more figures than probably 2 average grade schools worth of children or more.

    And Steve, that's unfair to say movie year or not. Even during the movie years the purchasing of SW toys buy kids or their parents still wasn't great. Sure it's more than non-movie years but nowhere near the purchasing habits of collectors. I know my purchasing habots increase during the movie years, but that's just because more product is available. As I've mentioned before, on 4/23 I bought nearly $700 worth of SW toys alone. I can honestly say that there were no kids there and the closest any other collector came to me in amount purchased was $200, but the average collector seemed to be buying somewhere in the range of $100-150. NO kid or even parent for that mater with only the rarest of exceptions bought like that on 4/23. And they still don't to this day. In the last 1 1/2 months alone, I again have sunk another $400 into the collection. (this due to the rather sudden appearance of new product from a drought of almost 6 months) What kid I ask can do this. Again, you'd have to look to the RARE exception. That's why it is clearly apparent that this toy line is and forever will be about collectors. Shoot even during the dark times of early 2003, I still bought SW toys. I army built a little. I broke down and bought some things off the net. I started collecting non toy SW paraphernalia (sp?)

    Movie year or no, action gimmicks or not, we will be the ones to sustain the line. PERIOD.

    Sorry for going on the rant. I'm just tired of this debate. Where are the "kids" who collect. You'll find even here, the best SW collecting site in the world, that that percentage is disproportionate to that of adult collectors.

    The average kid does not go on the net looking for lead to new SW toys. Like has been mentioned SO many times before, they've got Video games, Yu-Gi-Oh (and stuff like that), other toy lines and so on.

    When Kenner got the right to produce the modern line, do you honestly believe they thought, "WOW, we are going to make a killing on these toys in the 4-12 demographic". NO, I tell you. They were probably thinging more like, "YES! WE are going to score a bundle on those people who used to collect this stuff years ago. Shoot, now they're all grown up and have the money to buy a ton of this".

    See we have the nostalgia factor we as kids back in 1995 didn't have that. Sure they had the movie on VHS but that's just not the same. Now sure some of those kids have grown a bit since then and of course with the release of the Special Editions, then EPI and EPII they started to buy more.

    Let look at that example though. Let's say "Billy" was 10 back in 1995. He wasn't even born yet when ROTJ came out. He wouldn't even be able to understand the movies at least until he was roughly 5 (in 1990). How many times do you think he saw the Original Trilogy during that time. IF his parents were fans, amybe a little but if not, then virtually not at all. So here comes this new toy line in 1995 with characters from movies almost 20 years prior. He has no interest. Now here comes the Special Editions. His interest is piqued a little. So now he wants some of the figures after seeing the movies in the theaters (which BTW is still the best way to see them). So now in 1997 during the SE "Billy" is now 12. So he understands the movies a bit more. Slowly rumors arise that George Lucas is going to make a new "Prequel" trilogy. He again show interest. So in 1999 (he's now 14) he sees the movie and get more toys. This kid still isn't old enough to have a job that pays decent for his age, so he can only get a sparse amount of stuff. Besides his parents who are not fans are trying to steer him away from toys (in general not just SW) and want him to grow up a little. Well, luckily for us "Billy" keeps up as best as he can and in 2002 AOTC comes out, now "Billy" is 16 and working at his local McDonalds. He has the money to buy the toys but is torn if he should get them or that cool ride or some designer clothes to impress his girlfriend. So he decides a little of each. Well, here we are in 2003. "Billy" has a modest collection but still isn't old enough to have a good paying job. He's thinking about college now, so interest while high in the movies, isn't so much on the toys.

    Now this can be rearranged a little to say, what of kids today? Again, unless their parents are fans themselves, I just can't see them buying $100's of dollars at a time for toys, especially for a kid 4-8 years old.

    Now if you turn this example around and plug in a collector's age, the dynamic become quite different.

    I'll use me as an example.

    I was 7 when SW came out. I through the help of my mom figures and ships and such. Again there was no internet or video games and collectible card games where unheard of then. So all we had were toys for the most part back then. I was 10 when ESB came out and my mom knew I was a big fan so again she bought me more stuff. (I was easy to buy for though since I only like SW, Lego's then later G.I. Joe and Ninja Turtles) Then in 83 ROTJ came out. I again was able to get toys and did so. Then came the dark times for collecting. The line started to die off and I started growing up. I got a girlfriend, nice clothes had a job and so on. So my focus wasn't SW. Yes, I've always been a fan, but like most, the passion subsided, only to be in part replaced by natural things that occur while growing up. Well, speed up to 1995. I'm now 25-26. I've been in the military, have a decent job and am starting college (many my age have already completed college and have good jobs themselves). So at this point I here that SW toys are making a come back. I'm ecstatic, because I remember how much joy they brought me when I was a kid. I didn't think back then that the to line would ever grow into what it has become. I thought that there would only be a couple dozen figures and that would be the end f it, so I bought all of the first wave. Funny thing though, the figures didn't stop coming and I found that while I was a bit disgruntled by the "buff" figures, I still wanted them. Then the news of the re-release of SW and with EXTRA footage! This really got me going and I found that I wanted to get my hands on any SW toys I could. (I guess that's when I can say I honestly knew I became a collector, though in truth I was before that.) Now by the time of 1998 I had been happily collecting for 3 years and had amassed a nice collection. Then the news of TPM. Well by now I had finished college and was going back for a second degree and had a great job and could afford the toys, so I got them. During midnight madness for Menace, I spent nearly $300. (BTW, I don't say this to brag, it's just the point that we adults can and do buy MUCH more than kids and/or their parnets when it comes to SW) Well, the rest is pretty much history because when he EPI toy release happened I got one of my first tastes of scalping and saw that this was going to be a bigger undertaking than I had anticipated 4 years ago (from 1999). Still I stuck through it because I had been a fan of the Saga at that point for 22 years! I bought heavily as mentioned for the EPII toy release and continue til this day. If all goes as planned and Hasbro has a lot to offer, I'm planning on a $1000 EPIII toy release. Little "Billy" is now a collector like me (he's 20 now BTW). While he can't buy in the amounts that I do, he still can afford more than the average kid.

    So, in conclusion, SW is not a kids toy line it is a collectors line. Does it make collectors out of kids? In a lot of cases yes, but they are near adults or are adults by the time that happens. Will it have staying power in the future? Who knows. Without another trilogy, the line will eventually die. The books can only carry it so far. We (us old timers) will go into a small depression, because we have to yet again face a world without SW and the toys and those new fans will be facing the same thing.

    Unless Hasbro changes it's thinking (and they seem to during the non-movie years), the line will fall into oblivion by the end of 2007.

    Okay I'm done now. Can we be done with this endless debate? I wanna go home and play with my figures now......
    Move along, move along

  6. #46
    Well said Jedi Master Sal!

    Everyone go back and re-read what he wrote immediately above!

    It couldn't be explained better, and it would be very hard to argue against!


    The way he tells the story is great, too - and you'll find it surely describes a LOT of us!
    BAD Pts Need: R5-C7 lf leg (x2), , R4-P44 right leg BAD Pts Offered For Trade: PM me - I have lots of parts now including BG-J38!. New Kyle Katarn is also available.

  7. #47
    No, I don't think you can argue or dispute how jedi master sal has presented the situation for the most part. My only question is, with what he's said ...
    Quote Originally Posted by jedi master sal
    Movie year or no, action gimmicks or not, we will be the ones to sustain the line. PERIOD.
    Sorry for going on the rant. I'm just tired of this debate. Where are the "kids" who collect. You'll find even here, the best SW collecting site in the world, that that percentage is disproportionate to that of adult collectors.
    ... what really is the point of the "debate?" Are we trying to say that ... the Star wars line is supported nearly exclusively by collectors, who are primarily adults and as such the line should be designed and marketed to them alone? If so, what does this mean exactly to anyone who agrees?
    Quote Originally Posted by jedi master sal
    When Kenner got the right to produce the modern line, do you honestly believe they thought, "WOW, we are going to make a killing on these toys in the 4-12 demographic". NO, I tell you. They were probably thinking more like, "YES! WE are going to score a bundle on those people who used to collect this stuff years ago. Shoot, now they're all grown up and have the money to buy a ton of this".
    I'm not about to entirely dispute that point ... I would only hope to amend it. I genuinely think (and I'm only speculating, so make of it what you will) that Kenner came into this thinking two things. First and yes foremost, that past fans of the line (now adults) will be interested because of nostalgia. Yet secondly, I think Kenner may have been counting on another and similar effect ... and that has to do with nostalgic parents buying toys for their own children. There must have been a great amount of faith put into the idea that a parent, who had been a fan of Star Wars ... to just about any degree, would spot these toys and think, "Hey, that's something I know ... that's something good." I think the initial design of the figures supports a lean toward the Star Wars line as being, at least in spirit, intended primarily for children. The big brawny figures were probably designed to catch a kids eye and offer that kind of GI Joe fighting fun that Kenner assumed all kids wanted. I frankly hated the way they looked ... and initially resisted the POTF2 line because it was such a weird departure from the vintage line. But, I did think that my own child might like them once he had gotten to know the story just a little.

    Only point I'd try to make, is that there's never been anything wrong with trying to appeal to both kids and collectors. In many cases Hasbro's done a pretty good job ... in others they've done poorly. I think this kind of "debate" has lead to Hasbro's seeming schizophrenic approach to the Star Wars line. It's also what's gotten us into this distribution mess that we're in. The kids have dropped what fragile interest they've had in the line because there's nothing significant there for them to be interested in. So Hasbro thinks ... <begin Hasbro voice> if collectors are the only ones buying and they represent a smaller audience, then we can reduce the amount of merchandise that we produce and distribute. After all, those "collectors" will track it down and find it if they really want it. Maybe we can even play around with the quality of the product to see if they'll keep buying it no matter what ... after all, most of them don't open their stuff anyway. (Look at that Todd McFarlane, he's making a killing and he could probably get away with only gluing half of his figure together. Who'd know the difference?) <end Hasbro voice>

    I'm pretty much convinced that if the line becomes geared entirely toward collectors in some fashion, that I'll probably lose interest also. I collect toys ... which are and should be designed with children's interests in mind. If Hasbro can't create a toy or produce a toy line that excites and effectively sparks a child's imagination, then I suppose the line deserves to die. At the very least, hand the license over to someone else that might approach it with more focus.

    It's probably just a little early to be writing Hasbro off though. We should probably wait and see how things go over the next few years and wait to see what the "kids" think about this next movie.
    plasticfetish.net

  8. #48
    I totally agree with what jedi master sal said. I pretty much was that kid he described, grew up loving star wars but couldnt find any money to sustain my addiction. Then i got a paper route and all of my money basically went into buying figures. I admit now that i do have a decent paying job that not all my money goes into buying figures (college) but when they do have stuff that i dont have a spend about 20 bucks a week which isnt much, but over the years my collection is up to 151 figures and 10 vehicles, mostly bought by my own money which makes me even more proud of it. I only wish Idaho got some new figures, wal mart and TRU and target have nothing the only store that has anything decent is KB. I just wish now that I would have boughten that Death Star trooper when i saw him years ago or the Ree-Yees etc. I will prolly end up having to buy them off of ebay now, that is my only regret in my star wars collecting days. But suffice to say well done jedi master sal couldnt agree more and good points plasticfetish.

  9. #49
    I think these ideas will appeal to both- they always appealed in the past:

    • neutral poses, with basic articulation, and even more poseability when possible
    • perhaps use that articulation to pose them in the package, to make them look more exciting
    • accessories that are appropriate and authentic to the character, and might interact w. other stuff
    • clear stands
    • scene specific base stands that connect, when appropriate (Padme Wedding)
    • cool packaging (especially like the vintage figure days)
    • a wide range of background characters that collectors want for dioramas, or just detail
    • Core characters re-released so that they're available for new collectors or kids just old enough
    • Distribution with army builders in cases with only other army builders
    • Color coding the cases so that Collection 1 is always stocked by stores to compliment Collection 2


    In the 1970's-'80's, these figures appealed to kids - those kids were most of us!

    This is what kids AND Collectors want to buy.

    Obviously, cartoons, video games, rpg's, and ccg's will help sell the line to kids. Some of that is out of Hasbro's control, but it won't work unless they do the above as well.
    BAD Pts Need: R5-C7 lf leg (x2), , R4-P44 right leg BAD Pts Offered For Trade: PM me - I have lots of parts now including BG-J38!. New Kyle Katarn is also available.

  10. #50
    Quote Originally Posted by Tycho
    I think these ideas will appeal to both- they always appealed in the past:

    • neutral poses, with basic articulation, and even more poseability when possible
    • perhaps use that articulation to pose them in the package, to make them look more exciting
    • accessories that are appropriate and authentic to the character, and might interact w. other stuff
    • clear stands
    • scene specific base stands that connect, when appropriate (Padme Wedding)
    • cool packaging (especially like the vintage figure days)
    • a wide range of background characters that collectors want for dioramas, or just detail
    • Core characters re-released so that they're available for new collectors or kids just old enough
    • Distribution with army builders in cases with only other army builders
    • Color coding the cases so that Collection 1 is always stocked by stores to compliment Collection 2


    In the 1970's-'80's, these figures appealed to kids - those kids were most of us!

    This is what kids AND Collectors want to buy.

    Obviously, cartoons, video games, rpg's, and ccg's will help sell the line to kids. Some of that is out of Hasbro's control, but it won't work unless they do the above as well.

    I really believe that "Playsets and Vehicles" should be added to your list. I vividly recall from my youth enjoying my action figures the most when I had them in a playset and/or vehicle. The Falcon, of course, was the best because it was both. I also played a ton with Dagobah and with the Cantina. Sure, I used the couch and the laundry basket and other stuff to "make" the environments that I didn't have from Kenner, but rarely did I just "play" with the action figures out on the carpet or a table. It was always more fun to put them in a ship and fly them around or "recreate" a scene from a movie with a playset. And certainly, I NEVER just displayed them. I don't even think that was in the vernacular at the time for kids. They had that action figure stand, but I didn't know anyone who had it.

    Anyhow, figures are cool to have, but they need a place to go and some way to get there.

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