Results 1 to 5 of 5
  1. #1

    BBFC change DVD policy

    The BBFC have changed their policy about Director's Cut DVDs in Britain. From The R2 Project:

    The BBFC has decided to change the classification policy which prevents different versions of videos and DVDs being distributed if they are not rated for the same age group.

    With the advent of the DVD there has been a growing trend towards the release of alternative versions, or 'Director's Cuts', of successful film titles. These may contain new material not present in the version originally submitted to the BBFC, or simply the uncut versions of films previously cut to obtain a lower certificate (at the cinema and/or on video). In a number of instances these have required a higher age rating than the original, which the BBFC has not permitted. The key concern has been that two versions of the same title would lead to customer and retailer confusion.

    The BBFC has now decided to relax this policy. To ensure that there is no confusion between the different versions the BBFC has obtained the agreement of the industry to make the packaging for the new version significantly different from the original and to include clear references to the uncut, or 'Director's cut' versions. The industry has also agreed to ensure that packaging for the higher rated versions is not attractive to under-age viewers. All packaging will be approved by the BBFC to ensure that there should be no confusion between the different versions.

    Robin Duval, Director of the BBFC said:
    "We know that this change of policy will be very popular with film fans who want to own the uncut versions of their favourite films, or who want to see a film as the director intended it. The industry's agreement to submit all packaging to the BBFC for approval will mean that the different versions will be easily identifiable so that retailers and rental shops can continue to prevent under age viewing, but adult film fans will be able to enjoy their favourite film in full."
    Don't take me wrong, this will probably be better for the DVD industry in Britain, but how confusing was it to begin with? Not at all! I'd rather have the same film with different certificates than the "Director's Cut" being made bigger on the artwork, and having covers that would not appeal to younger audiences! Covers will probably become ugly and tacky!

    However, this new policy may have meant that the UK got the uncut version of Temple of Doom if this policy was introduced before the Indiana Jones Box Set arrived.

    PENDO!
    "You were my brother, Anakin. I loved you!" - Obi-Wan Kenobi
    "There's a gentleness about a total Star Wars geek that is sublime."- Rick McCallum
    My DVD Collection

  2. #2
    The key concern has been that two versions of the same title would lead to customer and retailer confusion.
    Well, if we stupid Americans can figure it out, you would think...nevermind.

    LOL

    This has to be the dumbest policy I have ever heard of regarding videos.

    Let me take a moment to, once again, thank God that I live in a place where this kind of censorship isn't blatantly running rampant.

    How hard is it to slap the words "Director's Cut Unrated Version" or just "Unrated" on the front of a video?
    May the force be with you.

  3. #3
    that would be using good sense and logic. the people that comprise the bbfc are generally aging men and women who are so out of touch with real life in general and cinema in particular that they have no idea what the bulk of cinema goers or video/dvd purchasers wish to see.

    obviously by cutting 1/4 second of visible penetration from a sex scene they are safeguarding the uk's moral standards!

    they can see their (once considerable) power slipping away and so they have to come up with hairbrained schemes like this to justify their continued existance. because they have no common sense they assume that no one else has any either.

  4. #4
    Aren't these people just UK's counterpart to the US's Motion Picture Association of America (MPAA).

    I don't get how they can stop movie producers from putting out unrated material. Is there some kind of law prohibiting these films?

    I just bought the unrated version of "American Wedding" at Target, if I had been underage they would not have allowed me to buy it, simple. Or last night, when I bought "Underworld" at the self check out counter at Wal-Mart (Widescreen of course) the computer locked up and asked for a Wal-Mart employee to verify age, etc.

    It seems to me all they would have to do is give the higher rated or unrated films a different code that would prompt the sales people to ask for ID.
    May the force be with you.

  5. #5
    Quote Originally Posted by sith_killer_99
    Aren't these people just UK's counterpart to the US's Motion Picture Association of America (MPAA).

    I don't get how they can stop movie producers from putting out unrated material. Is there some kind of law prohibiting these films?
    in the uk to get a film released for general distribution by law it must be passed (ie censored) by the bbfc. without a bbfc certificate, which fixes what age can go and watch the film, it can't be shown on general release and the major cinema chains wouldn't touch an uncertified film because they would be breaking the law.

    i believe you can show a private screening of a film without it being certified by the bbfc but that has to be in a cinema not used by the general public, which are few and far between, obviously. and i think this happened a few years ago with clockwork orange, which was banned in the uk at stanley kubrik's own request, which i think was shown to a private audience in a small cinema in london.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Single Sign On provided by vBSSO