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Thread: Reading!

  1. #961
    Uncovering the Truth About Meriwether Lewis by Thomas C. Danisi. This book isn't a typical book, rather each chapter covers some aspect about Lewis's life that new research by the author has uncovered. I found some of the chapters interesting but Mr Danisi puts himself a bit too into the book imho and he ignores information that is already out there. That said I'm all for another book about the late explorer.

  2. #962
    I need to read me some L&C stuff. I've read some books before that includes them and their accomplishments, but never a focus on the two (or just one) explorers themselves.

    Here I thought with play rehearsals I'd have had little chance to read this month, but it's amazing how waiting for a call makes you uninterested in student papers to grade. A third read for October for me, America Again by Stephen Colbert, was so funny at times, I left the library quiet room out of respect for the other readers. I found it better than his first, I Am America.
    "That's what Sheev said."

  3. #963
    L&C is some good reading, I went through a 'phase' a few years ago where I read a ton about the expedition, while its not quite the same interest if I see something interesting I'll read it.

    I knocked out another one: Anatomy for Runners by Jay Dicharry. Jay is a pt and in short the book is more about fixing the issues that cause problems in runners, not getting the runner back to running (if that makes sense).

  4. #964
    For the 50th anniversary of James Bond films, I borrowed a Kindle book of Casino Royale. I didn't realize A) the book is pretty short; and B) it's not all that well-written. That said, it's pretty compelling, and Bond is quite a different sort of fellow here, it's a shame that Goldfinger started the movies onto such a drastically different path from the written material. I had been planning to see Skyfall before starting Casino Royale, but some real life stuff has kept me from making it so far.


    The price on the Kindle edition of Darth Plagueis dropped from $13 to $8.
    Darth Vader is becoming the Mickey Mouse of Star Wars.

    "In Brooklyn, a castle, is where dwell I"
    The use of a lightsaber does not make one a Jedi, it is the ability to not use it.

  5. #965
    Quote Originally Posted by JediTricks View Post
    For the 50th anniversary of James Bond films, I borrowed a Kindle book of Casino Royale. I didn't realize A) the book is pretty short; and B) it's not all that well-written. That said, it's pretty compelling, and Bond is quite a different sort of fellow here, it's a shame that Goldfinger started the movies onto such a drastically different path from the written material. I had been planning to see Skyfall before starting Casino Royale, but some real life stuff has kept me from making it so far.


    The price on the Kindle edition of Darth Plagueis dropped from $13 to $8.
    I liked the JB books; and yes, they are short and quick reads.

    I wonder if, once paperback editions are released, that e-books' prices will drop to the cheaper cover price.
    "That's what Sheev said."

  6. #966
    Stayed up waaaay to late last night to finish:

    Unbroken: A World War II Story of Survival, Resilience, and Redemption
    by Laura Hillenbrand (author of Seabiscuit).

    One of the best books I've ever read and at times the most difficult due to the subject matter. This is the biography of Louis Zamperini, long distance runner who competed in the 1936 Munich Olympics. With the advent of WWII, Zamparini becomes a navigator in a B-24 crew who crashes in the Pacific and ultimately is captured and interned by the Japanese. The book is very direct about Zamparini's captivity without being overly graphic. Zamparini was held for almost three years and endured unbelievable abuse (Japan did not recognize the Geneva Convention during the War). Reading of his constant abuse proved difficult for me at times and I would have to put the book down. Also, when Hillenbrand describes the Zamparini family's attempts to come to grips with the reports of Louis being declared missing, then ultimately killed in action was another difficult read, as my family, too, is a Gold Star family.

    I highly recommend this book, especially if you are a fan of distance running and a WWII buff. Hillenbrand has done a magnificent job of research in presenting Zamparini's running career from its earliest stages as well as documenting many, many aspects of the World War II experience.

    JimJamBonds: a must read for you if you haven't already done so, sir!
    ¡Que la fuerza te acompañe!

  7. #967
    Quote Originally Posted by TeeEye7 View Post
    Stayed up waaaay to late last night to finish:

    Unbroken: A World War II Story of Survival, Resilience, and Redemption
    by Laura Hillenbrand (author of Seabiscuit).

    One of the best books I've ever read and at times the most difficult due to the subject matter. This is the biography of Louis Zamperini, long distance runner who competed in the 1936 Munich Olympics. With the advent of WWII, Zamparini becomes a navigator in a B-24 crew who crashes in the Pacific and ultimately is captured and interned by the Japanese. The book is very direct about Zamparini's captivity without being overly graphic. Zamparini was held for almost three years and endured unbelievable abuse (Japan did not recognize the Geneva Convention during the War). Reading of his constant abuse proved difficult for me at times and I would have to put the book down. Also, when Hillenbrand describes the Zamparini family's attempts to come to grips with the reports of Louis being declared missing, then ultimately killed in action was another difficult read, as my family, too, is a Gold Star family.

    I highly recommend this book, especially if you are a fan of distance running and a WWII buff. Hillenbrand has done a magnificent job of research in presenting Zamparini's running career from its earliest stages as well as documenting many, many aspects of the World War II experience.

    JimJamBonds: a must read for you if you haven't already done so, sir!
    CBS Sunday morning did a feature on Zamparini a few months back. Very interesting. What's just as interesting is, the writer has a phobia where she doesn't like to come out in public. She's not a recluse or anything, but has a fear of the public. Zamparini helped her overcome part of that fear.

  8. #968
    Quote Originally Posted by TeeEye7 View Post
    JimJamBonds: a must read for you if you haven't already done so, sir!
    I'm familiar with Zamparini's story having heard him on a local radio station a few years ago, I also read a book about him, that said I've read several books about Dick Winters so I'll give this book a shot as well.

    Thanks TeeEye7 for the suggestion!

  9. #969
    Quote Originally Posted by OC47150 View Post
    She's not a recluse or anything, but has a fear of the public. Zamparini helped her overcome part of that fear.
    What I read about Laura Hillenbrand was that she suffered from CFS, Chronic Fatigue Syndrome which hobbles her. She's just unable to get out and about.

    Quote Originally Posted by JimJamBonds View Post
    Thanks TeeEye7 for the suggestion!
    You are quite welcome, sir!

    BTW: At 95 years young, Zamparini is still with us!
    ¡Que la fuerza te acompañe!

  10. #970
    Quote Originally Posted by TeeEye7 View Post
    BTW: At 95 years young, Zamparini is still with us!
    AND full of p*** and vinegar!!! He was on Leno during the summer iirc.

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