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  1. #11
    Quote Originally Posted by El Chuxter
    Synthesizers should die.
    Synthesizers (when used correctly) ROCK!!! And they need to be brought back!!!
    Wanted; loose or sealed
    Blue Clone Wars Jedi Starfighter (Not Anakin's), TRU Y-Wing, TRU Gold Leader X-Wing

  2. #12
    A'ight, I'll concede that used properly and in moderation, synthesizers can be useful. You get Queen's The Game album. When overused, you get Queen's Hot Space, which not even a fan can love (outside of the two singles).
    Tommy, close your eyes.

  3. #13
    It's funny now that in alot of modern music a synthesizer is considered "old School" All they need now is a record scatcher and a rubber ducky squeek toy. I remember when the worlds greatest shredder Eddie Van Halen took up the synth, people right away knocked him for it. He was actually very good at it. Really though, I miss even a short instumental section in todays music. Most songs don't even have a lead anymore! Probably because all the good guitarists are too old to look good in front of a camera. Even lead guitar with a few exceptions (Metal) is becoming a lost art.

  4. #14
    OKAY, time to be the bad guy

    Seriously though, basically, something of what blu2th said is pretty much at the core, but he didn't get into the "how and why" as much, so here goes....

    The "rise of the virtuoso" in pop music started in the late 60's and I'm not talking about extremely competent musicians, I'm talking about folks who were nearly MADE of musical talent... the jazz scene had seen it's share of these since somewhere in the 20's, but it took a while fo it to truly catch on, and technological advances aided in this.. by the early 80's you had the NWOBHM and a LOT of them guys were AMAZING.. even on mainstream radio, there was a lot of virtusity in the solos (van halen being a good example) or what otherwise could still pass as "hard pop" music (especially looking back on it from today)

    BUT the music industry basically decided that it was going to present that as "hair metal" and "silly show off-manship" so you ended up with a LOT of really weird music which did feature less actual musical skill, like say the Spin Doctors etc, who were pretty darn good, musically, but not mindblowing (and I play guitar and have for a long time plus worked in a recording studio, I know what is "poor", "decent" "good" "amazing" and "superhuman" VERY well)

    THEN once everyone was good and ready, the industry DUMBED it DOON severely.... then you got bands like Nirvana, and the Hip and Pearl Jam, who ere musically pretty lam, but marketeed SO brilliantly (both in the actual advertising and creative control departments) and whattya know, solso becam almost non-existent... see, you can easily replace a "really scompetent" player, but imagine trying to take Jimi out of the Experience, or Eddie Van outta Van Halen, you COULDN't do it

    todays "acts" are much more modular, since as some above posts mentioned, the "acts" are just faces for a product, and just like factory worked, they know that if someone don't like the deal they're handed they can be replaced...
    There's still some AMAZING instrumental music coming out, but most of the "music buying public" has been convinced that it is silly in so many ways, so it is mostly available in Germany wher ethe REAL METAL still exiosts...

    On a side note, I'm no fan of audioslave, but I swear I nearly passed out when I heard a what, 8 BAR solo (a DAMN good one, and BTW if it is actually a velvet revolver song, sorry for the mistake, it kinda sounds like Slash's sensibility only a bit less sloppy) in that current "big" single, something like "it doesn't remind me of anything"

    But yeah, I would say that most rock music no longer rocks NOR rolls
    Something about him reminds me of my older brother, Rex.

  5. #15
    Yeah, that's Audioslave. The guitarist is Tom Morello, and he's pretty amazing.
    Tommy, close your eyes.

  6. #16
    Yeah, that Tom Morello guy is amazing. I remember when the song "Like a Stone" came out, everyone went out and bought a Wammy pedal to recreate that amazing lead. I found the sound already existed on my Boss GT-5, so my band ended up doing that one. Nice to hear an almost anti-soloist like him. He keeps it fresh by changing the sound. I think that the "Hair Bands" while alot of them were very good at virtuosity, it seemed it was getting a little silly after a while. Like athletes competing to see who could play the best and fastest, and look the best on MTV. I do like some of the wierd chord changes and moods you get with new music, but like you say there is not much virtuosity. That's why I'm still a big fan of the "Art Rock" bands of the late 70's like Floyd, Genesis, Yes, Rush, even Zeppelin and some obscure stuff, etc. It's a real treat to listen once again to LONG instumentals with plenty of virtuosity, yet not overplaying one instument but all get their share of the big picture.

  7. #17
    Speaking of instrumentals, check out "Peaches en Regalia" and "Sexual Harassment in the Workplace" by Frank Zappa. Two totally different styles, two incredible instrumentals.
    Tommy, close your eyes.

  8. #18
    when you are all saying 'oh, rock music all sounds the same' what you really mean is mainstream rock music all sounds the same. there are plenty of bands out there doing different things - you are just not being spoonfed them. try looking. anyone who would like to try some different sounding 'rock' music could do worse than check out the band Opeth - they don't sound like anything or anyone else.

    as for instrumentals, for christams i was given 'the fire in our throats will beckon the thaw' by pelican. all seven songs are completely instrumental. also much of the music by isis is instrumental and when there are lyrics being sung they are so far down the mix they too sound like another instrument. its pretty heavy stuff (isis sounds like tectonic plates shifting) but again, its different to what the mainstream offers.

    also for christmas i got the R30 dvd/cd package. thirty years in the music business and they still sound unique too.
    come one, come all/chalk your eyes/blood for gall/this isnít the same world/your children are offerings/bow down/give thanks for their scant sufferings/chalk your eyes/the bigger the god so small the man/just this wooden horse remains

    is this what you fought for?/green order/green order

  9. #19
    Quote Originally Posted by El Chuxter
    Speaking of instrumentals, check out "Peaches en Regalia" and "Sexual Harassment in the Workplace" by Frank Zappa. Two totally different styles, two incredible instrumentals.
    Good call with suggesting Zappa!

  10. #20
    Just about every Fugazi album has an instrumental song on it. They are one of my favorite bands.

    Last year, I happened to hear Kinski's latest album streamed from Sub-Pop's website. An entirely instrumental album if I recall. Maybe a little like Sonic Youth but without the vocals. I've been meaning to buy it sometime.

    I agree with arctangent's assessment. There is plenty of good music out there, it's just a little hard to find if you are only listening to mainstream radio.

    I actually like a lot of synthesizer/keyboard stuff. It kind of defines some of my favorite music from the new wave era - The first two Cars albums (consider the song "Night Spots"), The Fine Art of Surfacing by The Boomtown Rats, "(I Don't Want To Go To) Chelsea" by Elvis Costello. I also like the keyboards in some newer songs like "Bandages" by Hot Hot Heat. The last few years, I've gotten into the ambient/electronic/new age/space music that I heard on an internet station called Astreaux World. Also, I've been fans of Devo and Kraftwerk for a long time.

    Oh, and I just remembered another great instrumental song from years ago - "Coast to Coast" by the Scorpions.

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