Page 16 of 18 FirstFirst ... 612131415161718 LastLast
Results 151 to 160 of 172
  1. #151
    I totally forgot to go out and check these out....of course they don't have me on the 5am shift anymore so I could have enjoyed it then....
    You'll be sorry, Pee-Wee Herman!

  2. #152
    So, it's well known that many NASA scientists and whatnot are major Trek fans, most of which claim they were inspired by the show and it's ideals to seek out their scientific careers. Obviously, most if not all of these people would have been inspired during the reign of Kirk's people from '66 and onward. As the years tick by, no doubt many held wonder as to when the Star Wars generation would get ahold of the internal workings of NASA. Well, today is that day. Or rather, tomorrow is that day. NASA will be attacking the moon, or "space station" as they most likely believed in order to go ahead with this.

    http://gizmodo.com/5376774/how-to-wa...g-in-real-time

    I kid, of course, but seriously... We're gonna attack the moon. I really want to meet the first person that managed to say that with a straight face.

    I do have a question burning in my head about this, though. Is it possible that this detonation on the moon will be able to give them info on the effectiveness of missiles for incoming asteroids?
    "Hokey packaging and ancient gimmicks are no match for good detail on your figure, kid."
    "I am a Klingot from Oklahoma in human boy form."
    "We came, we saw, we conquered... We, woke up!"

  3. #153
    Quote Originally Posted by LTBasker View Post
    I do have a question burning in my head about this, though. Is it possible that this detonation on the moon will be able to give them info on the effectiveness of missiles for incoming asteroids?
    Off hand I would say no. If you're going to blow up an asteroid you're going to first have to know how it's made. Asteroids (and comets) are thought to be anything from loose material weakly held together be gravity to more solid chucks of rock. The rubble pile will react very different from the large solid rock. The large asteroids like Vesta or Pallas are more likely tightly bound together. The Earth killer sized ones the thought be the rubble pile type. The type the leave meteorites are going to be more large rocks in space.

    The Moon is solid body held together tightly itself own gravity. While the raw material might similar, it's a about the same using Earth based explosion to judge the effective on asteroids. NASA's Deep Impact mission would be (and was) much more useful in terms of how to deal with Earth-killer asteroids.
    "I'm sick and tried of these motherfrakkking Sith on this motherfrakkker plane!"
    Mace Windu - Episode 2.5: Sith on a Plane

  4. #154

    Look! Up in the sky! (No...It's not Jets&Heels....)

    Time for the Leonid Meteor Showers tonight, kiddies!

    For the US: best viewing will be for the East Coasters from 1AM 'til dawn. Viewing best pretty much 90º straight up for you. Left Coasters will have to look to the lower Eastern horizon for their (my) views; again beginning about 1AM our time. The Moon won't be a factor as it will be in its new phase. This will be an average year for us....only about 20-30 displays per hour. If you want the best show, you'll have to get yourself to Asia post-haste! Domo arigato Mr. Roboto...

    Bundle up and have fun!
    ¡Que la fuerza te acompañe!

  5. #155
    :happy dance:
    OK... I BLOG. YOU READ. at http://jedipartner1967.livejournal.com
    **Steven Sterlekar (1969-2001)**

  6. #156
    Interesting bookends: today is the 42th anniversary of The Eagle leaving the moon after its monumental first landing in 1969, while the space shuttle lands after its inexcuseably LAST mission. But on a positive note, reportedly, the shuttle will be on display at the CA ScienCenter here in SoCal eventually.
    'It is always nice to see you, says the Besalisk at the counter... And instead I pour blue milk...' From "Dex's Diner" by Su-San Vega

  7. #157
    I'm super crabby that they killed the shuttle without any sort of replacement programme in place. They keep talking about how the next incarnation of space travel will be left to private corporations and, while I get that, they will be the ones making deliveries to the ISS and such.

    Did you know that, at present, it costs $10,000 to deliver 1 pound of coffee to the ISS?
    OK... I BLOG. YOU READ. at http://jedipartner1967.livejournal.com
    **Steven Sterlekar (1969-2001)**

  8. #158
    Quote Originally Posted by JEDIpartner View Post
    Did you know that, at present, it costs $10,000 to deliver 1 pound of coffee to the ISS?
    What, there's no STARbucks up there yet? :untappedmarket:
    'It is always nice to see you, says the Besalisk at the counter... And instead I pour blue milk...' From "Dex's Diner" by Su-San Vega

  9. #159
    Quote Originally Posted by Bel-Cam Jos View Post
    What, there's no STARbucks up there yet? :untappedmarket:
    Considering how much it costs to ship coffee, the average cost for a cup of STARbucks would be around eleventy billion dollars.
    May the force be with you.

  10. #160
    I woke up this morning (sounds like a blues song intro) and noticed the moon looked different from its almost-full size the last couple days. Then I remembered... eclipse! Threepio says, "they're mad men, because "luna" (moon) gave us "lunatic! If you hurry you might catch it!" Check it out if you can, west coasters!
    'It is always nice to see you, says the Besalisk at the counter... And instead I pour blue milk...' From "Dex's Diner" by Su-San Vega

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Single Sign On provided by vBSSO