Page 8 of 58 FirstFirst ... 45678910111218 ... LastLast
Results 71 to 80 of 577

Thread: Teachers

  1. #71
    Health? So far, so good. But I may just have jinxed myself by typing that. Might be due to the warmer weather not allowing colds/viruses/etc. to grow easily.

    Unions? Here it's pretty good, both from my own perspective and the community's, I think.
    'It is always nice to see you, says the Besalisk at the counter... And instead I pour blue milk...' From "Dex's Diner" by Su-San Vega

  2. #72
    Quote Originally Posted by 2-1B View Post
    Serious question here, no intent to flame or incite argument of Rancor Pit proportions, but what is the general attitude in everyone's communities toward teachers and specifically teacher's unions?
    I just asked Mrs. TI7 and she reminded me that over the summer, teachers in her school district were considering job actions as the muckity-mucks weren't taking salary negotiations seriously. The teachers sent out a lot of info to parents as to what was happening and in return, were supported by them. Thankfully, her school district has always enjoyed a high volume of parent participation at the school site and the PTA. Parents in our area are well versed in the amount of resources (money/materials) teachers put back into their classrooms and are appreciative. I would have to give the attitude towards teachers a in my area. As for the teacher's union, I would say the average parent is ambivalent and that the average union member is rather lukewarm about their union. It hasn't been very effective over the years for the membership and too chicken to address the fact that No Child Left Behind is a failure and should be abolished. Teachers should be left alone to teach and not jump through Federal hoops or face threats in order to receive funding.
    ¡Que la fuerza te acompañe!

  3. #73
    It always bothered me when I would hear of school teachers on strike. As one who competed in sports, I wondered how that would have affected me had I been attending a striking school. I'm not sure if those schools were able to have practice for their sports during the strike time, or if they were able to compete. It might have been easier for my sport, because I could have run on my own, but football teams need to practice together to be able to execute their plays and be prepared for their opponents. These are once in a lifetime opportunities for these kids as they look forward to having a successful senior year and a chance to go out on a positive note. Some may be trying to make it to the next level and get a college scholarship.

    I remember seeing a thing in the local paper about the average starting salary of teachers at the various local schools around the time I was in college. I think it ranged from around $19,000 to $23,000 depending on the school district. Several years later when I started working, it took me three years of work before I reached that level. At that point, the average teacher salary was probably more. I had two years of grad school, so I had as much school as most beginning teachers. To become a teacher, you have to go into a program specifically designed to train teachers, so I would think that they must have a passion to do it, and would have time enough to realize what they were getting into.

  4. #74
    I'm currently in a charter school right now (non-union) and can definitely see why people prefer union schools. My host teacher is in her fourth year and has a master's plus 15 credits towards her second and barely clears $30,000 a year. In her 4 years there she has seen a 2% pay increase. Needless to say, her second master's is in administration and she is on her way out ASAP.

    What's funny is that the company that runs the school can't seem to figure out why there is such a high turnover rate.
    It's a blacked-out blur but I'm pretty sure it ruled.

  5. #75
    I worked 8 years before I made that much. If she has only seen a 2% increase, then she was almost making that to start with ($29,400 x 1.02 = $29,998). At the point I reached that level, I had saved up enough for a down payment on a house and moved out of my parents house. I was able to get by on that amount. My situation would have been even better if I didn't collect Star Wars

    I guess it comes down to what it is you really want to do and what is acceptable compensation for the work you do. I'm just glad to have a job, and one in which I seem to have found a niche.

  6. #76
    Quote Originally Posted by Mad Slanted Powers View Post
    I worked 8 years before I made that much. If she has only seen a 2% increase, then she was almost making that to start with ($29,400 x 1.02 = $29,998). At the point I reached that level, I had saved up enough for a down payment on a house and moved out of my parents house. I was able to get by on that amount. My situation would have been even better if I didn't collect Star Wars

    I guess it comes down to what it is you really want to do and what is acceptable compensation for the work you do. I'm just glad to have a job, and one in which I seem to have found a niche.
    Totally with you there. Granted, I don't pay much as my apartment is roughly 450, including garage and utilities and cable is 110 with another 25 for gas and 10 or so for electric. I don't buy as many figures as I used to as there isn't that much out there and i've REALLY REALLY cut back on game/DVD purchases. I finally start paying back my loans here soon at $650 a month. I've been doing really well to save for it, but my nerves won't let me rest that i'll be alright. I'll be working another job over christmas break hopefully while still getting my university paycheck and I have tax return in feb or so. I just need to chillax, keep watching my $$ and i'll be good to go.

    On my teaching end, I had a student lift the first paragraph of their last paper from Wiki; it was really REALLY obvious, a complete change in tone that was so blatant. I smelled something was up, headed to google, typed in the first two lines and BAM, a wikipedia entry came up. I told the student that i'm not an idiot and that I can figure this stuff out. They sort of stumbled on their words and reasoning; I told them I was only going to fail them on this paper and if I saw it again, I would not hesitate to end their academic career by getting them kicked out of school. Do kids today think we're all idiots?!?!?!!

    Right now, i've assigned final research papers and portfolios that are due in Mid December. We only have a few more actual classes, then conferences, turkey day break, and then student presentations. Thus, my actual work days should be over in two weeks and I concentrate on making the syllabi for my four classes in the spring. And I totally planned it this way!

    My dept. chair sent out this GREAT e-mail. I think she got it elsewhere, but it's great.

    "Did I miss anything?"- Frequently asked by students after they miss class.

    Here are some replies you can use:

    - Nothing. When we realized you weren't here, we sat with our hands folded on our desks in silence, for the full two hours.

    - Everything. I gave an exam worth 40 per cent of the grade for this term and assigned some reading due today on which I'm about to hand out a quiz worth 50 per cent.

    - Nothing. None of the content of this course has value or meaning. Take as many days off as you like: any activities we undertake as a class I assure you will not matter, either to you or me and are without purpose.

    - Everything. A few minutes after we began last time a shaft of light descended and an angel or other heavenly being appeared and revealed to us what each woman or man must do to attain divine wisdom in this life and the hereafter. This is the last time the class will meet before we disperse to bring this good news to all people on earth.

    - Nothing. When you are not present how could something significant occur?

    - Everything. Contained in this classroom is a microcosm of human existence assembled for you to query and examine and ponder. This is not the only place such an opportunity has been gathered but it was one place. And you weren't here.
    I loved this e-mail. I get irritated when I get that question, but it doesn't irk me nearly as much as "What are we doing today?" ("Hey, if you read the syllabus, you'd know!") or "how long do you plan on keeping us today?" ("as long as I feel like you need to be taught......maybe all night?")

    "Woke up at 9.55am. Soon as I woke up, I looked at Suzanne and she looked at me. I said, 'Did I tell you about the immune system?' Suzanne starting laughing, I said, 'it's amazing.' She said, 'Not now.'"

  7. #77
    That is a great e-mail!

    That "one-ups" all those "my grandmother died" excuses you must hear incessantly when assignments aren't turned in on time by your students!
    ¡Que la fuerza te acompañe!

  8. #78
    I have developed a skill in recognizing the "excuse posture." After they straighten their shoulders, lower their voice, and sort of make eye contact, I let them tell me their story (facinating details... if only their writing was so precise and descriptive), then remind them of my rules and the time given and my reminders. 99.9% of the time, they're not all that effective in swaying me.
    'It is always nice to see you, says the Besalisk at the counter... And instead I pour blue milk...' From "Dex's Diner" by Su-San Vega

  9. #79
    Quote Originally Posted by Bel-Cam Jos View Post
    I have developed a skill in recognizing the "excuse posture." After they straighten their shoulders, lower their voice, and sort of make eye contact, I let them tell me their story (facinating details... if only their writing was so precise and descriptive), then remind them of my rules and the time given and my reminders. 99.9% of the time, they're not all that effective in swaying me.
    Do you ever use the "Do you feel you're being treated unfairly" line in a deep foreboding voice?

  10. #80
    Quote Originally Posted by Bel-Cam Jos View Post
    I have developed a skill in recognizing the "excuse posture." After they straighten their shoulders, lower their voice, and sort of make eye contact, I let them tell me their story (facinating details... if only their writing was so precise and descriptive), then remind them of my rules and the time given and my reminders. 99.9% of the time, they're not all that effective in swaying me.
    Yeah, I get that some of the time too. But I remind them at the beginning of the semester that I only allow five unexcused absences and then they don't get any credit for the class (the university likes us to say "no credit" instead of "fail") and it's not my problem. I had a student who had missed around 15 classes and then e-mailed me out of the blue to know what was on the agenda for the following days class. I almost laughed to the point of tears.

    But very rarely do students try to argue with me regarding their unexcused absences. I've been told i'm pretty intimidating due to my size, stature, and that I go wide eyed when I need to. Plus, I have a beard now, so kids don't give me too much guff. I've made one girl cry (after she left class, mind you).

    I just don't get them sometimes. I gave one of my classes a night off as Elie Wiesel came to the area to speak and since I called off their class, I gave them an optional extra credit assignment: go listen to Wiesel speak, write up a 3-4 page blurb about what he said, what topics he touched on, etc. etc. NOT ONE DAMN STUDENT did it. I was.....flabbergasted. Elie gave a tremendous speech about morals, politics, humanity, and how to improve our world and they just blew it off. I was shocked.

    But alas, a few more weeks left in the semester.
    "Woke up at 9.55am. Soon as I woke up, I looked at Suzanne and she looked at me. I said, 'Did I tell you about the immune system?' Suzanne starting laughing, I said, 'it's amazing.' She said, 'Not now.'"

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Single Sign On provided by vBSSO