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  1. #1

    Exclamation Guitar Help.......

    OK, kiddies.....after a couple of decades of not playing (mainly because I gave them away) I'm contemplating getting another guitar. Good therapy as you know.

    I need your help on what's good and what to avoid these days. Here are the parameters: I'm an acoustic fan, so electrics are out (electric/acoustic may be OK, but I'll have to give that some thought). Six string (although I miss my 12 string), dreadnought (cutaways may be OK), and no more that $750. Used is fine and probably preferable because of price.

    A buddy at work brought in his Taylor 310 CE (electric/acoustic) and really liked it. I've found some straight acoustic Taylors on line for the price I'm willing to spend. However, I still need to bum around the music stores and check things out. I'd like to hear from you as to what you play and why you like it

    Thanks in advance for your time and consideration!

    No Esteban references, please!
    ¡Que la fuerza te acompañe!

  2. #2
    Hmmm...

    Yamaha has made some awesome guitars... it's a weird question simply due to the fact that most "serious" guitar players swear by one type or another. I personally play a 12-string "SeaGull" which was made in Quebec, it is a SWEET sounding guitar, and was not too expensive (tho I bought it over 10 years ago)

    I would say tho that if you're paying north of 350-400$ for an acoustic guitar from an actual guitar-type shop, it's probably a fine instrument no matter who made it, it just depends on exactly what's right for you.

    I know when I got mine, I just checked out a ton of guitars but this particular one jumped out, 12 string with ridiculous low action, gorgeous tone AND a neck that's thinner than many 6-strings, plus really nice machine heads

    Can't wait til you pick oine up, we'll have to jam when we inevitably meet up

    Iso&Baws

    Oyes, guitars
    Something about him reminds me of my older brother, Rex.

  3. #3
    I gave my Takamine F-400 12-string along with a $19.95 Kawai classical (which I began on) to a nephew when he was learning to play years ago (he now teaches music) as an incentive since I hardly touched my guitars then.

    I'll have to check out Yamaha again, and that's something I've planned to do. Back in the college days, Yamaha and Ovation had a pretty big following.

    I guess what I'm looking to have answered more than anything else is that a lot of manufacturers have gone overseas from their traditional locations. Some quality has suffered and some has surprisingly improved. I'm wondering what, in our legions of guitar players here, is a good product these days and what to avoid. I plan to haunt the music stores and find out first hand what I like; but I'd like to have some product guidance so that I don't waste my time. Mabs is right, my choice I think will ultimately pick me.

    Thanks for the input, mabs!
    ¡Que la fuerza te acompañe!

  4. #4
    Anywhere close to Indiana?

    I pass this place coming and going to work every day.

    http://www.sweetwater.com/

    From what I've heard they have a pretty incredible try out area.

  5. #5
    Taylor is the top of the line, and very nice, but expensive. Made in USA. Lots of artists use those when they aren't using Gibson's and Martin's.

    I have a Guild which is owned by Fender, but they wouldn't cover the split top it had which started in the music store when I bought it, but went out of business. So any time I can badmouth Guild, I'm going to.
    If I ever make it big or get my 15 minutes of fame on stage I'm going to play it with big letters written on it saying "Guild Sucks!" then smash it like Pete would.

    I've been looking for a nylon string cut-away, but don't know what to buy either.
    Harmony Central.com has reviews from the musicians who actually play the equipment, and I have used them to determine the quality.
    Musicians Friend.com has some good deals and also reviews of equipment, though I can't really tell if they are biased.

    It's best though to walk in and try one to see how it plays and sounds though.
    You can also sometimes get the retailers to match online prices.
    "Ohh, maxi big da fish! Well dat smells stinkowiff"


    "No time to discuss this as a supercommittee.... I am not a supercommittee!"

  6. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by Engineernerd View Post
    Anywhere close to Indiana?
    No, I'm a left coaster. Great site, though, thanks! When/if I make a decision, no reason I couldn't place an order. I appreciate the help!

    Quote Originally Posted by Blue2th View Post
    It's best though to walk in and try one to see how it plays and sounds though.
    You can also sometimes get the retailers to match online prices.
    Thanks for your input, Blue2th. This is the type of info I was hoping for. Interesting about Guild. I've not heard of problems from them before. A friend of mine had problems with Washburn (he never specified, just advised to stay away). You're right about haunting the music stores, and I plan to do that. I won't buy without actually hearing or trying the instrument. (What is it about guitar necks, anyway? Why does it seem some are better than others?).
    ¡Que la fuerza te acompañe!

  7. #7
    Quote Originally Posted by TeeEye7 View Post
    (What is it about guitar necks, anyway? Why does it seem some are better than others?).
    I learned one thing, is that a 3-piece neck is stronger than a one piece. The laminations of the wood help make it stronger, which is especially important if there is a lot of tension on the neck, like a 12 string.
    Most guitars these days have truss rods to straighten it, but the pull of different tensions from open E to open E strings and in between can warp a weak piece of wood.

    The most important thing in any guitar besides sound is whether the neck is straight from fret to fret.
    "Ohh, maxi big da fish! Well dat smells stinkowiff"


    "No time to discuss this as a supercommittee.... I am not a supercommittee!"

  8. #8
    The only times I remember playing Washburns I remember HATING the action on them and it didn't seem there was any fix avaible, just a personal prejudice against them things that I had totally blanked on.

    About necks- who knows really, tho what blu2th said is right, 3 piece kick butt over single piece. Preferences seem SO varied on overall neck dimensions tho- one of the greatest guitarists I have ever seen (R.I.P. Mark) had custom necks made (he also wound his own damn strings, he was pretty hands-on) that were literally like either baseball bats with a flat side or 2 x 4s depending on the type. I couldn't play a damn thng on that stuff, but he could make them do crazy things, never made sense to me
    Iso&Baws

    Some fine advice above, and that Guild story was funny, I hope that happens
    Something about him reminds me of my older brother, Rex.

  9. #9
    My mom's into Carvin, they're local to SoCal yet do international direct sales. They stand by their products, and I believe they make them in San Diego: http://www.carvinguitars.com/
    Darth Vader is becoming the Mickey Mouse of Star Wars.

    "We named the dog 'Chewbacca'!"
    The use of a lightsaber does not make one a Jedi, it is the ability to not use it.

  10. #10
    Thanks for the Carvin link, JT. I've seen just a few them before, but never picked one up. More to look into!

    Another topic: fret boards. Some swear ebony is far superior to rosewood. Opinions? Any difference in actions? I would imagine ebony is much more durable, given its hardness.

    To my knowledge, I've always played git-tars with rosewood fret boards. My friend's Taylor had an ebony fret board. I didn't have the instrument long enough to see any appreciable difference. I'm aware of the price difference, though!
    ¡Que la fuerza te acompañe!

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