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  1. #11
    Quote Originally Posted by OC47150 View Post
    One person I had the chance to interview was a survivor from the USS Indianapolis. He was a Marine assigned to the ship and was on the fateful voyage that delivered the atomic bomb to Titian. He survived the initial sinking by sleeping on deck because it was too hot below. It was very difficult for him to talk about the experience.
    I can only imagine how hard it is to re-hash his experience. This is a story that really makes me squirm! What a horrible ordeal! It's bad enough being torpedoed, but then, your own people don't bother looking for you for days on end when you expect rescue. And then there's the sharks........

    What a truly horrific chapter of WWII.
    ¡Que la fuerza te acompañe!

  2. #12
    I was reading up on the 671st of the 416th. Their missions were sometimes more harrowing than the high flying 8th Airforce in the B-17's and B-24's.

    Most times they were flying a lot lower, were easier to pick off by flak, and had to fly more than twice the 25 missions the guys in the 8th had to before they got to go home.
    Not trying to take away from the high altitude 4 engine bomber crews, but the exploits of these other guys are less known.

    So apparently your Uncle went down before D-Day trying to soften up the Germans in France before the great invasion.

    They had a heck of a time with those Buzz-bombs, and very few planes that could catch them once they were in the air. So the importance of taking them out was paramount.
    The British Hawker Typhoon (though it was slower) and Tempest were used the most. If they couldn't shoot it down they would pull up along side it and use their wings to flip them over. Interesting stuff.

    Forget about the V2, that was a rocket.
    "Ohh, maxi big da fish! Well dat smells stinkowiff"


    "No time to discuss this as a supercommittee.... I am not a supercommittee!"

  3. #13
    Ralph Conte's book, Attack Bombers We Need You! is a great resource for the 416th, as he was a bombadier/navagator with the group. And at the risk of sounding arrogant, Wayne Sayles' book is also a good source on the history of the 416th.

    The A20 Havocs and the A26 Invaders flown by the 416th, indeed, flew lower-level missions. According to Conte's book, which chronicled almost every mission, the planes normally flew between 11,500 and 12,000 feet and often lower in order to see the targets below the cloud cover. The flights were subject not only to flak, but small arms ground fire. I agree about your statement about the 9th Air Force being less known. The boys in the 8th have, indeed, been the glamor boys. The A20s and A26s were also used in a ground attack mode occasionally, further exposing themselves to danger.

    What surprised me in Conte's book was that the bomber formations enjoyed fighter escort and were rarely affected by enemy aircraft. I was surprised how often he would cite that the accompanying P-47s or P-38s (the P-51s came later) would successfully chase off the German's efforts to harass the flights. Far and away, anti-aircraft fire was far more effective.

    My uncle was killed on April 10, 1944, less than two months before D-Day. In Sayles' book, he editorialized about the buzz-bomb targets. It seems the Americans preferred to go after rail yards, marshaling yards, bridges, etc. pre-D-Day to benefit the impending invasion of Europe, but the British insisted that the buzz bombs raining down on London be the priority. After a protracted p!ssing match, the Americans deferred to the Brits.

    Ah, war and politics!
    ¡Que la fuerza te acompañe!

  4. #14
    Indeed. The Americans had to defer many times to the Brits, after all we were on their island, the only place in Europe that the Germans hadn't taken over (thank God for the Spitfire)

    We all know what happened in Montgomery's ill fated Operation Market Garden after D-Day.

    It's interesting to find out how these generals managed to get things done dispite their huge egos. Eisenhower had his hands full.
    "Ohh, maxi big da fish! Well dat smells stinkowiff"


    "No time to discuss this as a supercommittee.... I am not a supercommittee!"

  5. #15
    Quote Originally Posted by Blue2th View Post
    (thank God for the Spitfire)
    and more so the Hawker Hurricane.

    The Spitfire gets the credit usually but the Hurricane was more numerous and accounted for more German loses in the Battle of Britain than the Spitfire. Not the prettiest of beasts but it got the job done.
    "No one helped me so why should I help you?" - College professor circa 1999

    By choosing not to decide you still have made a choice.

    I'm in love with the women of Univision.

  6. #16
    Quote Originally Posted by Exhaust Port View Post
    and more so the Hawker Hurricane.

    The Spitfire gets the credit usually but the Hurricane was more numerous and accounted for more German loses in the Battle of Britain than the Spitfire. Not the prettiest of beasts but it got the job done.
    Much like the B-17 gets all of the glory when the B-24 was more numerous and performed in more theaters.
    Up, up, and OKAAAAY!!!

  7. #17
    Quote Originally Posted by Slicker View Post
    Much like the B-17 gets all of the glory when the B-24 was more numerous and performed in more theaters.
    But the B-52s have sold more records that both.
    [FONT=Book Antiqua]He passes to Moses - He shoots, he scores![/FONT]
    Mummy of the raincoat is a gigantic trollop.
    DOMINATE!


  8. #18
    Doh! Spitfires, gettin' all the credit. I watched too much of "The Battle of Britain."

    Much like the F4F Wildcat, and the F6F Hellcat gettin' all the credit.
    Which it did shoot down more enemy aircraft than any other fighter in WWII, but if we didn't have the Wildcat, we could have lost to the Japanese, and there wouldn't even be a Hellcat.
    "Ohh, maxi big da fish! Well dat smells stinkowiff"


    "No time to discuss this as a supercommittee.... I am not a supercommittee!"

  9. #19
    The F4F suffered pretty heavily in Coral Sea and Midway which were more of a naval battle than aerial battle like the Battle of Britain. The Wildcat had a positive kill ratio against Japanese aircraft but it was probably more of a stop-gap until better aircraft were introduced (F6F and F4U). More aces were formed with later aircraft than with the Wildcat too.

    I've wondered what created the popularity of the B-17 in the decades to follow the war. Was it due to the PR campaign with the Memphis Belle crew that launched the B-17 into popular culture? There definately is a lack of love for the B-24.
    "No one helped me so why should I help you?" - College professor circa 1999

    By choosing not to decide you still have made a choice.

    I'm in love with the women of Univision.

  10. #20
    In the hands of the Marines they could be formidable, but as you say stop gap. That's the best they had, which dispite the odds prevailed till they could get something better. http://www.historynet.com/world-war-...uadalcanal.htm

    I love those harrowing stories of obsolete US aircraft in the beginning two years of the war. Where it was more dependent on tactics rather than air superiority till our technology caught up.

    After that it was a turkey shoot.
    "Ohh, maxi big da fish! Well dat smells stinkowiff"


    "No time to discuss this as a supercommittee.... I am not a supercommittee!"

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