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  1. #181
    The spin-offs could be awesome though:

    Han Solo
    Boba Fett
    Darth Vader
    Yoda

    It's got to be these.

    Pre-TPM might not be as popular.

    There remains the possibility that spin-off movies will be inspired by sequel trilogy characters:

    Jaina and Jacen Solo
    Corran Horn
    Kyle Katarn
    new charaters dealing with the Yuuzhan Vong invasion
    Grand Admiral Thrawn
    Mara Jade
    Gavin Darklighter (if they don't choose Wedge and Tycho during or after OT)
    BAD Pts Need: R5-C7 lf leg (x2), , R4-P44 right leg BAD Pts Offered For Trade: PM me - I have lots of parts now including BG-J38!. New Kyle Katarn is also available.

  2. #182
    The Celebration Europe site updated to day to mention that concept artists Doug Chiang and Iain McCaig will be coming to the convention - and are also "reunited at the start of this year as part of the team Lucasfilm President Kathleen Kennedy has assembled to create an exciting new future for Star Wars." The Facebook page has a photo that says they are "shaping the look of the new movies."

    I'm very excited that they're returning for the new films, as I loved their work on the prequels. It really sounds like Kennedy is bringing back some of the best talent from previous SW projects, and I'm glad that the prequels aren't being neglected here.
    My Photos and Reviews: SSG Toy Guide
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  3. #183
    I didn't like Doug Chiang's work too much on the prequels, he's got a very specific vision and it doesn't feel Star Warsy to me, it's a pretense of practicality that comes after the idea of a shape and a curve has already entered the fray. I can't put my finger on it, but seeing his non-SW design work from the '90s makes it really obvious that he's got something else in mind.

    Iain McCaig's SW character design work didn't remind me of SW at all most of the time, he made some things work but he's so worried about being ornate and layered and shapey without a lot of logic or sense.
    Darth Vader is becoming the Mickey Mouse of Star Wars.

    "In Brooklyn, a castle, is where dwell I"
    The use of a lightsaber does not make one a Jedi, it is the ability to not use it.

  4. #184
    Not to change the subject too much off of the movie / vehicle designs, but a lot more (new) rumors are surfacing about casting Jaina (Solo) Fel.

    Also that the movie will open with the slaying of Darth Caedus by his tough, but damaged twin sister.

    I really hope the casting and feature of Jaina Fel will be true.
    BAD Pts Need: R5-C7 lf leg (x2), , R4-P44 right leg BAD Pts Offered For Trade: PM me - I have lots of parts now including BG-J38!. New Kyle Katarn is also available.

  5. #185
    Quote Originally Posted by JediTricks View Post
    I didn't like Doug Chiang's work too much on the prequels, he's got a very specific vision and it doesn't feel Star Warsy to me, it's a pretense of practicality that comes after the idea of a shape and a curve has already entered the fray. I can't put my finger on it, but seeing his non-SW design work from the '90s makes it really obvious that he's got something else in mind.

    Iain McCaig's SW character design work didn't remind me of SW at all most of the time, he made some things work but he's so worried about being ornate and layered and shapey without a lot of logic or sense.
    I agree about Chiang. He has a "design for design's" sake style that doesn't really fit when you want practical, believable vehicle designs. Sure the OT designs were pretty out there, but everything felt like it had a function. I could never figure out what practical function those long needlepoints served on the Naboo Fighters.

    I liked Iain McCaig's work, but I do see what you mean about being too ornate. Which again seemed to be more about design than practicality.
    "To be concerned about being grown up, to admire the grown up because it is grown up, to blush at the suspicion of being childish; these things are the marks of childhood and adolescence… When I became a man I put away childish things, including the fear of childishness and the desire to be very grown up." - C.S. Lewis

  6. #186
    Quote Originally Posted by bigbarada View Post
    I agree about Chiang. He has a "design for design's" sake style that doesn't really fit when you want practical, believable vehicle designs. Sure the OT designs were pretty out there, but everything felt like it had a function. I could never figure out what practical function those long needlepoints served on the Naboo Fighters.

    I liked Iain McCaig's work, but I do see what you mean about being too ornate. Which again seemed to be more about design than practicality.
    I never saw that as a flaw of Chiang's design, but a hallmark of Naboo's design, and the time period in which it took place. That was kind of the point - they were able to take the time and design things for form over function. As the war machine ramped up, the designs became more sparse and utilitarian. You could apply the same thinking to the costumes.

    As a side note, if everything had a function in the OT, can you tell me what exactly is the point of a twin-pod cloud car?
    My Photos and Reviews: SSG Toy Guide
    My Star Wars Fan Film: The Lazy Jedi
    Follow Me: Twitter | Instagram

  7. #187
    Quote Originally Posted by bigbarada View Post
    I agree about Chiang. He has a "design for design's" sake style that doesn't really fit when you want practical, believable vehicle designs. Sure the OT designs were pretty out there, but everything felt like it had a function. I could never figure out what practical function those long needlepoints served on the Naboo Fighters.
    It's weird, it's like Chiang is hiding his impracticalities, giving designs a single functional area and then here's a curve for no reason, there's a hanging bit, here's a rivet line where joining wouldn't make sense, have a strut too thin to work, etc., all built around a premise - walking droid, landing craft, what have you. Everything he does seems to have a dangling element and a curve, and not enough logic.

    I liked Iain McCaig's work, but I do see what you mean about being too ornate. Which again seemed to be more about design than practicality.
    The ornate thing gets into the characters too, it's really odd. His work has a presence on page, but seems too "look at me, look at all the stuff I and my costume are doing" for the screen, it's very... thick in a way, very full to the point where it distracts from the forest simply to show off the trees. How would Sio Bibble have looked on the screen if this is what he was meant to be? http://images1.wikia.nocookie.net/__...le_concept.jpg


    Quote Originally Posted by Mr. JabbaJohnL View Post
    I never saw that as a flaw of Chiang's design, but a hallmark of Naboo's design, and the time period in which it took place. That was kind of the point - they were able to take the time and design things for form over function. As the war machine ramped up, the designs became more sparse and utilitarian. You could apply the same thinking to the costumes.

    As a side note, if everything had a function in the OT, can you tell me what exactly is the point of a twin-pod cloud car?
    Sio Bibble there isn't merely ornate or opulent, he's got a cow-catcher on his neck. It's an idea without a reason, nobody would be able to talk or move around in that sort of thing. It's like a fetishwear design portfolio, it's not meant to exist, it's merely meant to titillate the artist and/or audience.

    The cloud car design is basically a pair of police motorcycle sidecars, the isolation of each cockpit requires far less weight than a larger, 2-man cabin vehicle.
    Darth Vader is becoming the Mickey Mouse of Star Wars.

    "In Brooklyn, a castle, is where dwell I"
    The use of a lightsaber does not make one a Jedi, it is the ability to not use it.

  8. #188
    I'm going to be the one defending the prequels? Oh, the irony!

    I recall reading somewhere back in 1999 or thereabouts that the prequel-era designs were supposed to reflect an air of decadence, where, for instance, people were designing starfighters to look fancy and sophisticated, but without taking into account what the ship was for (since, later EU notwithstanding, the movie was supposed to take place after centuries or even millennia of galactic peace). As the prequels progressed, the designs became more utilitarian (like JJL said).
    Tommy, close your eyes.

  9. #189
    Quote Originally Posted by El Chuxter View Post
    I'm going to be the one defending the prequels? Oh, the irony!

    I recall reading somewhere back in 1999 or thereabouts that the prequel-era designs were supposed to reflect an air of decadence, where, for instance, people were designing starfighters to look fancy and sophisticated, but without taking into account what the ship was for (since, later EU notwithstanding, the movie was supposed to take place after centuries or even millennia of galactic peace). As the prequels progressed, the designs became more utilitarian (like JJL said).
    I understand all that, but looking at the designs in the Art of Ep 1, it's not the opulence that's at issue, it's the expression and style, it's design for design's sake over practicality. That's the difference. For example: epaulets on a shoulder are not there for no reason, there's a history behind their development. Shiny buttons are still buttons. Sashes have meaning even if they seem fanciful. But the prequel designs don't have that sense of "this had meaning once and has been turned decadent", the tails on the Naboo Fighters overwhelm the shape of that fighter, it's not like it's a streamlined plane, it's a trio of tails with the ideas of a plane at the front, it's out of balance.
    Darth Vader is becoming the Mickey Mouse of Star Wars.

    "In Brooklyn, a castle, is where dwell I"
    The use of a lightsaber does not make one a Jedi, it is the ability to not use it.

  10. #190
    I took it as ceremonial ornateness taken to an absurd extreme where practicality started to suffer. Eh, to each his own.
    Tommy, close your eyes.

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