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  1. #1

    William Shakespeare's Star Wars

    I just noticed this in an e-mail from Barnes & Noble:

    William Shakespeare's Star Wars by Ian Doescher.

    Sounds interesting. I think that experiencing the Star Wars story in a different style might make it seem fresh again, even if it is in the style of something written 500 years ago. Then again, that seems appropriate for a story set a long time ago.

  2. #2
    I saw something about that a few weeks ago. Reading an excerpt, it seemed pretty forced, which is a bit sad because I love SW and Shakespeare.
    Tommy, close your eyes.

  3. #3
    I am waiting for the usual holiday weekend B&N coupon (fingers crossed) to get it this... well, holiday weekend. Can't wait to see how Yoda-speak fits into the Bard's iambic pentameter.

    [Edit] Just checked my in-box... there's a coupon email!
    Last edited by Bel-Cam Jos; 07-03-2013 at 09:09 AM. Reason: The savings, dear Brutus, is in the in-box.
    "May the 4th be with you?" "Why yes, thank you for asking."

  4. #4
    I saw this online recently, read the excerpt and then shook my head. These mashup books are really labored and too self-amused, this one especially feels like it thinks it's too cute presented as a play of the Bard, complete with ornate woodcarving plates.
    Darth Vader is becoming the Mickey Mouse of Star Wars.

    "We named the dog 'Chewbacca'!"
    The use of a lightsaber does not make one a Jedi, it is the ability to not use it.

  5. #5

  6. #6
    As a high school teacher of Shakespeare's work, I can't wait to see what this looks like. I can already see this concept as a future assignment for students. "Ok, kids. FOr the next few weeks, in groups of five, you're going to turn your favorite film, video game, comic book, or novel into an Elizabethan play correctly using iambic pentameter. Each student will write one act. All plays MUST feature iambic pentameter at key points, include soliloquies, and each play must begin with sonnet. Bonus credit for those that put on their plays on film. Double bonus credit for those who do them live in class from memory." That's just off the top of my head. In reality, we have very little time for something like this during the school year now that the principal focus is test preparation - which is often a valid expense of school time.

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